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					http://www.who.int/tobacco/mpower/mpower_report_forward_summary_2008.pdf
                                                   Que Es?
Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants
in the genus Nicotiana.




                                                                                                      ***

   ***This image was first published in a November 1986 issue of the journal Science in a paper titled "Transient and stable expression of the
   firefly luciferase gene in plant cells and transgenic plants" by David W. Ow, Keith V. Wood, Marlene DeLuca, Jeffrey R. de Wet, Donald R.
   Helinski and Stephen H. Howell.
           Tobacco has long been in use as an
                  entheogen in the Americas.

  An entheogen, in the strictest sense, is a psychoactive substance used in a
                              religious context.

Entheogens generally come from plant sources which contain molecules closely
                  related to endogenous neurochemicals.

 They occur in a wide variety of psychedelics of various religious rites and have
  been shown to directly provoke what users perceive as spiritual or mystical
                                   experiences
                    Intentions &
                   Consumptions
Why would someone consume an entheogen?


       Seal a bargain
       Trade
       Rites of passage
       Purification




 It was believed that tobacco was a gift from the Creator and that the
     exhaled tobacco smoke was capable of carrying one's thoughts
                         and prayers to heaven.
            Ceremony to Commerce


   Europeans used tobacco to trade

   Fostered southern economy

After the civil war James Bonsack automated cigarette
   production because of increased demand

This increase in production allowed tremendous growth in the
  tobacco industry until the scientific revelations of the mid-
  1900s.



        http://tobaccodocuments.org/ness/28918.html?zoom=750&ocr_position=above_foramatted&start
        _page=1&end_page=143
White Buffalo Calf Woman




                           The woman's name was Ptesan-Wi which translated White Buffalo


 \                        Calf Woman. She taught the Lakotas many sacred rituals and gave



                              them the chununpa or sacred pipe which is the holiest of all



                            worship symbols. After teaching the people and giving them her



                             gifts, PtesanWi left them promising to return. Later, the story



                           became attributed to the goddess Wohpe, also know as Whope, or



                                                         Wope.
        What’s going on with
          tobacco now?
                   Condemned as a health hazard

 As the industry's downward tumble continued, in the 1990s Brown &
  Williamsons cross-bred a strain a tobacco to produce Y1. This strain of tobacco
  contained an unusually high amount of nicotine, nearly doubling its content
  from 3.2-3.5% to 6.5%.



    This prompted Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to use this strain as
   evidence that tobacco companies were intentionally manipulating the nicotine
                             content of cigarettes.




                    Inside the Tobacco Deal- interview with David Kessler”.PBS.2008.
           http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/settlement/intervies/kessler/html
World Health Organization
          2004
 (WHO)[11] successfully rallied 168 countries to sign the Framework
  Convention on Tobacco Control. The Convention is designed to push
  for effective legislation and its enforcement in all countries to reduce
   the harmful effects of tobacco.




      This led to the development of tobacco
                  cessation products



                   http://www.who.int/tobacco/research/legislation/Tobacco%20Control%2
                   0Legislation.pdf
                             The main health risks
      cardiovascular system, myocardial infarction (heart attack)
        Cigarette smokers are 2-4 times more likely to develop coronary heart
          disease than non-smokers.

      diseases of the respiratory tract such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
       (COPD)
           attributable to cigarette smoking. About 90% of all deaths from chronic
             obstructive lung diseases are
      Emphysema
      cancer, particularly lung cancer and cancers of the larynx and mouth.


          Smoking doubles the risk of stroke


               U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and
                     Hispanics: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 1998
                     [accessed 2006 Dec 5].

Ockene IS, Miller NH. Cigarette Smoking, Cardiovascular Disease, and Stroke: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American
    Heart Association. Journal of American Health Association. 1997;96(9):3243–3247 [accessed 2006 Dec 5].
                  Cigarettes and Health
 Cigarette smoking approximately doubles a person’s risk
  for stroke.
 Cigarette smoking is associate with a tenfold increase in
  the risk of dying from chronic obstructive lung disease.
  About 90% of all deaths from chronic obstructive lung
  diseases are attributable to cigarette smoking.
 Cigarette smoking has many adverse reproductive & early
  childhood effects, including an increased risk for
  infertility, preterm delivery, stillbirth, low birth weight,
  and SIDS.
         U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department
         of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health
         Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004 [accessed 2006 Dec 5].

    Tobacco Use Among U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups—African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and
    Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 1998
    [accessed 2006 Dec 5].
    Ockene IS, Miller NH. Cigarette Smoking, Cardiovascular Disease, and Stroke: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American
    Heart Association. Journal of American Health Association. 1997;96(9):3243–3247 [accessed 2006 Dec 5].
           The American Legacy Foundation® is dedicated to building a

         world where young people reject tobacco and anyone can quit.

    Located in Washington, D.C., the foundation develops programs that address the health effects of
     tobacco use, especially among vulnerable populations disproportionately affected by the toll of
     tobacco, through grants, technical assistance and training, partnerships, youth activism, and
     counter-marketing and grassroots marketing campaigns.

    The Foundation’s programs include truth®, a national youth smoking prevention campaign that has
     been cited as contributing to significant declines in youth smoking; EX®, an innovative public health
     program designed to speak to smokers in their own language and change the way they approach
     quitting; research initiatives exploring the causes, consequences and approaches to reducing
     tobacco use; and a nationally-renowned program of outreach to priority populations.




    The American Legacy Foundation was created as a result of the November 1998 Master
      Settlement Agreement (MSA) reached between attorneys general from 46 states, five
                           U.S. territories and the tobacco industry.



                                        Visit http://www.americanlegacy.org/.
    Everyday in the US
• The tobacco industry spends more $36 million to
  market and promote its products
•     http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/cdcbestpractices/downloads/CDC_Mulligan_Phase_II_SLC_Jan_22_08.ppt



• Every day, about 3,900 youth ages 12 to 17 try a
  cigarette for the first time.

• Approximately 1,200 current and former smokers
  die prematurely from tobacco related diseases




                                        http://www.thetruth.com/facts/
           Adult Cigarette Smoking Prevalence Rates

                         by Education Level, 2006


      Graduate degree         6.60%

 Undergraduate degree            9.60%

         Some college                          22.70%

  High school diploma                             23.80%

                 GED                                                    46%

No high school diploma                                28.70%

                    0.00%     10.00%     20.00%    30.00%      40.00%   50.00%
                                       Prevalence by Percent



                     American Legacy Foundation
     Adult Cigarette Smoking Prevalence Rates

                         by Age, 2006



  Age 65 +                  10.20 %


Age 45 - 64                                           21.80 %


Age 25 - 44                                              23.50 %


Age 18 - 24                                               23.90 %


        0.00%   5.00%   10.00 %   15.00 %   20.00 %     25.00 %     30.00 %




                           American Legacy Foundation
      Adult Cigarette Smoking Prevalence Rates

                     by Medicaid Status, 2006


40%                     36%
35%
30%
                                                                25%
25%       23%

20%
15%                                                12%
10%
5%
0%
         General       Medicaid                  Pregnant /   Pregnant /
        Population    Recipients                General Pop    Medicaid


                              American Legacy Foundation
               Cigarette Smoking Prevalence

         by Middle & High School Students, 2004



                                     22.40% 22.10%
25.00%

20.00%

15.00%     8.60%                                         Fem ale
                    7.70%
                                                         Male
10.00%

 5.00%

 0.00%
         Middle School              High School




                            American Legacy Foundation
          Tobacco-related deaths versus
     other preventable causes of death,
                                                       2001

500,000      435,000
450,000
400,000
350,000
300,000
250,000
200,000
150,000                       85,000
100,000                                           43,000        29,000           20,000
 50,000                                                                                          17,000
      0




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    The Tobacco Industry and
           the media



     The television – tells your Vision what to see.
TOP SECRET OPERATION
     RAINMAKER
              Tuesday, 20 March, 90 RWM


 point one - what are we trying to accomplish?


  Prevent further deterioration of overall social, legislative, and
     regulatory climate, and ultimately actually improve the climate
     for the marketing and use of tobacco products Social Climate -
     accommodation program has been proven and must be
     expanded Peace with Congress - peace not possible for long
     time, but it is possible to reach a grudging stalemate. Lower
     criticism of product - expand knowledge base of smokers; take
     more realistic positions; push accommodation as "The
     American Way.”




                      http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/elu76b00
ACQUISITION - If we are to truly
    influence the public policy
 agenda and the information…
flow to the populace we must be the media, we must be part of
                              it.

     The only way to do this is to own a major media outlet.



  If we are not willing to take this step, then we are not serious
          about really wanting to change the atmosphere.



Organizations that should be very seriously considered include: -
  Knight-Ridder - Zuckerman's group - the Copley News Service
    - United Press International - or a major city daily that has
        access to--and from--all of the major wire services

                       http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/elu76b00
                                ACTION
- Expand dramatically, not contract all of the elements of the
  education arm of the four point program of identify, educate,
  recruit and mobilize.



- Disband the Tobacco Institute and reconstitute it as two
  bodies: one for lobbying with no public profile; and another
  body that is high public profile, information-oriented and not
  the flat- earth society.




                    http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/elu76b00
                 NAME CHANGE
 We must immediately change the name of either
  Philip Morris USA or of PM Companies.
COMMENTARY - there is no silver bullet and we are kidding ourselves
  if we keep on searching for the mystical Holy Grail. Rather, we
  must help put tobacco into a better perspective ad it relates to
  today's society. This is not impossible, but it must be a major
  effort, on multiple fronts, and it must be sustained.




          http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/elu76b00/pdf?search=%22operation%20rainmaker%22
  GENERAL OPERATIONS
     LATIN AMERICA
∎IS PM MAKING A REASONABLE PROFIT IN BRAZIL AND
  OTHER LATIN AMERICA MARKETS?

∎LATIN AMERICA IS ONE OUR FASTEST-GROWING
  REGIONS AND IS AN IMPORTANT PART OF PMI. WE
  ARE MAKING IN EXCESS OF $400 MILLION (TOBACCO,
  FOOD AND BEER).

∎ STRONG #2 IN TOBACCO TO BAT ON A REGIONAL
  BASIS AND LEADING POSITIONS IN ARGENTINA,
  ECUADOR AND THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. HEALTHY
  AND GROWING FOOD BUSINESS FOCUSED ON
  POWDERED BEVERAGES AND CONFECTIONERY.


                  http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/dbx06c00
2. WHAT IS THE STATUS OF PMI'S
       BUSINESS IN MEXICO?


∎ PMI HAS A 28% INTEREST IN CIGATAM (SECOND LARGEST
  CIGARETTE CO. IN MEXICO). WE RECEIVE ROYALTIES ON
  OUR PRODUCTS BUT DO NOT CONTROL THE COMPANY.


∎ HAVE A STRONG AND GROWING FOOD BUSINESS
  (POWDERED SOFT DRINKS, CHEESE, MAYONNAISE) AND
  IMPORT PRODUCTS FROM THE U.S. TO TAKE ADVANTAGE
  OF NAFTA.
 CHINA? VIETNAM? SOUTHEAST ASIA?
                                              INDIA?
WHAT ARE PLANS . . .

CONTINUE TO LOOK AT OPPORTUNITIES TO GROW OUR
 BUSINESSES.

 CHINA: 4 JOINT VENTURES TO MANUFACTURE AND SELL
  MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE, TANG, HOLLYWOOD GUM AND
  KRAFT BRANDED DAIRY PRODUCTS.

 JOINT VENTURE WITH PEPSI TO SELL LIQUID COFFEE IN
  CHINA AND OTHER PARTS OF ASIA. OPTIMISTIC OF LONG-
  TERM GROWTH POTENTIAL IN THIS COUNTRY WITH A
  POPULATION OF 1.2 BILLION. INDONESIA: EXPANDING OUR
  CHEESE AND CONFECTIONERY BUSINESSES. INDIA AND
  VIETNAM: LOOKING AT BUSINESS POSSIBILITIES, BUT ARE
  APPROACHING THESE COUNTRIES MORE SLOWLY. HONG
  KONG
 http://tobaccodocuments.org/bliley_pm/26183.html?zoom=750&ocr_position=above_foramatted&start_page=1&end_page=147

				
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posted:9/4/2011
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