Docstoc

Collected Cabin Wisdom

Document Sample
Collected Cabin Wisdom Powered By Docstoc
					Collected Cabin Wisdom

      A Users Guide to
     # 7 Crescent Bay

         Version 1.8
           2005/06/30
    This page left blank




2
Preamble

This document is a collection of learning‟s from the cabin. They are recorded here in the
hopes that future users will not have to „relearn‟ them and thus take greater enjoyment
from their stay.

Beginning in 1991, a cabin “checklist and notes” form was completed by every visitor to
the cabin. Each visit was recorded and comments noted by the user. In many cases these
forms contained recommendations by users as to how things should work at the cabin.
The initial version of this document attempts to summarize the learning‟s from 1991-
2003.

This document references the “WUG” (Warranty and User Guides binder). This binder
contains all the manuals and warranty descriptions for most appliances used at the cabin.
At the time of writing, it is stored in the NW bedroom cupboard.


Document History

Release        Date                                     Major Changes

.1          2002/08/19     Initial Draft
.2          2002/08/29     Fridge and stove
.3          2003/02/09     Winter use
.4          2003/06/22     Speedo sensor pictures, corrected error re chlorination of dish water, expanded dock
                           chain adjustment information, added basic cabin inventory section
1.0         2003/06/23     Added short cabin history section and declared document ready as release 1.0
1.1         2003/07/12     Minor typographical and layout changes. Section numbers added
1.2         2003/08/08     Added Serial & Part number section, some new photos
1.3         2003/12/22     Moved 12 v power system to under cabin, added a section and photos on tool kits.
1.4         2004/06/11     Added electrical loads to serial # section; new generator updates, opening & closing
                           the cabin section; boat switches; boat rear light; expanded water heater section.
                           Fixed some typos
1.5         2004/06/27     Added paint section, chain saw instructions, water pipe instructions
1.6         2004/07/29     Radio station directory; water filtering changed, water heater changed, washing
                           machine added
1.7         2004/08/30     Added power inverter section; new page 1 photo; bilge pump now automatic; key
                           centre, removed tap filter; battery centre changed; paint formulations; new kitchen
                           photo; kitchen light bulb info;
1.8         2005/06/30     Changed section on turning on 12volt system (switch instead of cable moves)


Suggestions for next release:




                                                                                                           3
Figure 1 View from cabin deck - early morning




4
                                                Table of Contents




1.      Cabin History 1962 - 2004 ...................................................................................... 8
2.      Front Room ............................................................................................................. 9
3.      Getting in .............................................................................................................. 10
     3.1.    Hidden keys .................................................................................................. 10
     3.2.    Basement ....................................................................................................... 11
     3.3.    Key Center .................................................................................................... 12
4.      Opening (starting) and Closing the Cabin ............................................................ 13
     4.1.   First Opening of the Year ............................................................................. 13
     4.2.   Standard Opening.......................................................................................... 13
     4.3.   Closing for the Year ...................................................................................... 14
     4.4.   Standard Closing ........................................................................................... 14
5.      Power - generator .................................................................................................. 15
     5.1.   Oil Change .................................................................................................... 15
     5.2.   Starting .......................................................................................................... 16
     5.3.   Stopping ........................................................................................................ 17
     5.4.   Eco-Throttle .................................................................................................. 17
     5.5.   Generator Battery Removal .......................................................................... 18
6.      Power – cabin electricity....................................................................................... 20
     6.1.   Power Systems .............................................................................................. 20
     6.2.   12 Volt power system ................................................................................... 20
     6.3.   110 Volt Cabin power system ....................................................................... 22
     6.4.   110 Volt inverted power ............................................................................... 25
7.      Boat ....................................................................................................................... 28
     7.1.    Switches ........................................................................................................ 28
     7.2.    Instrumentation ............................................................................................. 29
     7.3.    Bilge Pump.................................................................................................... 29
     7.4.    Speedometer .................................................................................................. 29
     7.5.    Emergency Kit .............................................................................................. 31
     7.6.    Lighting – Rear (Stern) ................................................................................. 32
     7.7.    Gas Tanks...................................................................................................... 35
8.      Buoy ...................................................................................................................... 36
     8.1.   How to pronounce Buoy ............................................................................... 36
     8.2.   Connecting the boat ...................................................................................... 37
     8.3.   Tales to Tell .................................................................................................. 37
9.      Dock ...................................................................................................................... 38
     9.1.   Adjusting chains............................................................................................ 38
     9.2. Tying the boat up at the dock ........................................................................ 39
     9.3. Preparing the dock for departure................................................................... 40


                                                                                                                                     5
    10. Bathroom............................................................................................................... 41
      10.1.    Chlorine Tablet ......................................................................................... 41
      10.2.    Toiletries ................................................................................................... 41
    11. Water System ........................................................................................................ 42
      11.1.    Winterizing ............................................................................................... 42
      11.2.    Filtration .................................................................................................... 42
      11.3.    Tap Water.................................................................................................. 43
      11.4.    Creek-to-Cabin water system .................................................................... 44
      11.5.    Steps to turn the water on.......................................................................... 45
      11.6.    Washing Dishes ........................................................................................ 46
    12. Propane Tank ........................................................................................................ 47
      12.1.   General Notes on Propane Usage ............................................................. 47
      12.2.   CO Detector .............................................................................................. 47
      12.3.   Locking ..................................................................................................... 47
      12.4.   Turning On / Off ....................................................................................... 48
      12.5.   Refilling .................................................................................................... 50
    13. Furnace .................................................................................................................. 51
      13.1.    Lighting ..................................................................................................... 52
      13.2.    Thermostat ................................................................................................ 54
      13.3.    Furnace is not giving off heat ................................................................... 55
      13.4.    Exhaust Venting ........................................................................................ 55
    14. Fridge .................................................................................................................... 57
      14.1.     Lighting ..................................................................................................... 57
      14.2.     Thermostat ................................................................................................ 58
      14.3.     Routine Maintenance ................................................................................ 58
      14.4.     Shutting Down .......................................................................................... 66
    15. Stove / Oven .......................................................................................................... 68
      15.1.     Lighting the Stove ..................................................................................... 68
      15.2.     Lighting the Oven ..................................................................................... 70
      15.3.     Oven temperature control ......................................................................... 72
      15.4.     Shutting Down .......................................................................................... 72
    16. Water Heater ......................................................................................................... 73
      16.1.   Lighting ..................................................................................................... 73
      16.2.   Winterizing ............................................................................................... 75
      16.3.   Where does the water go? ......................................................................... 77
    17. Washing Machine ................................................................................................. 78
      17.1.   Indoor drying ............................................................................................ 79
    18. Chain Saw ............................................................................................................. 80
    19. Radio / CD / Tape player ...................................................................................... 81
      19.1.    Orientation ................................................................................................ 81
      19.2.    Turning the power off ............................................................................... 81


6
   19.3.          Local Radio Stations ................................................................................. 82
20. Coal Oil Lamps ..................................................................................................... 83
  20.1.    Wick trimming .......................................................................................... 83
  20.2.    Globe cleaning .......................................................................................... 83
21. Miscellaneous items .............................................................................................. 84
  21.1.    First Aid Kit .............................................................................................. 84
  21.2.    Picnic Table .............................................................................................. 84
  21.3.    Contacts..................................................................................................... 84
  21.4.    Fireplace .................................................................................................... 84
  21.5.    Bathtub ...................................................................................................... 84
  21.6.    Air Pump ................................................................................................... 84
22. Tool Kits ............................................................................................................... 85
  22.1.    Wrench‟s etc ............................................................................................. 85
  22.2.    Drill Bit Tool Set ...................................................................................... 86
  22.3.    Electric Metering Tool Kit ........................................................................ 86
23. Winter Use of the Cabin ....................................................................................... 87
24. Cabin Inventory .................................................................................................... 92
25. Sample Cabin Closing Checklist .......................................................................... 94
26. Serial and Part Numbers ....................................................................................... 95
27. Cabin Paint ............................................................................................................ 97
28. List of Pictures ...................................................................................................... 98
29. Index ................................................................................................................... 100




                                                                                                                               7
1.     Cabin History 1962 - 2004

George & Thelma Wiens bought the lake property in 1962 from Archie Young. Archie
owned all of Crescent Bay and gave one lot to each of his three daughters (note: two of
whom each married a Wood‟s boy and the third who took the property on the northern
point and vacationed there in her trailer). George was offered his choice of the remaining
lots. He walked the bay until he finally settled on the spot that provided the best view up
the lake to the mountain peaks in the distance. He chose this lot, which is where the
cabin sits today.

The cabin was built in 1968. A contractor was hired to build the frame and cover the
exterior with plywood. The family completed the construction over the next several
years as a vacation activity. Legal title for the cabin and property was held in Thelma‟s
name.

For many years, taking pictures of the mountain peaks at the end of the lake was a regular
activity when using the cabin. In 1980, a visiting amateur artist spent some time
sketching the scene. In the early 1980‟s Ken (accompanied by Bill Macdonald) identified
the peaks and their location and climbed the highest mountain in the group. This peak
can be seen from the cabin and is the one that is snow-capped year round – just right of
centre.

By the late 1990‟s, George & Thelma were no longer actively using the cabin and put it
on the market for sale. When it had not sold two years later, Bob and Ken, who both had
continued to use the cabin regularly, proposed a purchase arrangement whereby they
would jointly own the cabin in a 50:50 purchase and cost sharing arrangement. In
1999(?) contracts were drawn up and this arrangement was finalized.

Since Bob & Ken took ownership, minor cabin enhancements have been made including
the storage facilities under the cabin, additional lighting and the furnace.

The furnace was added in 2002; the Honda generator in 2004. During the period from
2001 – 2004, the storage & utility rooms and the new basement front wall (replacing the
yellow plastic wall) were added.

The cabin is located at:

Datum (NAD 27)
N 50° 52‟ 26.5”
W 119° 04‟ 58.8”

Elevation 372m




8
2.     Front Room




Figure 2 Living Room




Figure 3 Kitchen




                       9
3.      Getting in
     3.1.       Hidden keys


There are two keys for the cabin that are hidden on the outside of the cabin. One is
located in a compartment behind the thermometer by the south door. There is a
combination lock on the compartment of “208” that must be entered to open this up.




Figure 4 Key holder in thermometer




10
The second key is located hanging on a nail underneath the laundry platform by the north
door. Many people report difficulty finding this key – but it is there – and hard to spot.
In the attached picture the key is located just to the left of the joins in the boards, which is
just slightly right, and below the centre of the picture. The propane line shown is leading
to the BBQ.




Figure 5 Key under laundry platform



    3.2.        Basement
The basement sliding doors each have their own lock. Both use the same key which is
stored in the key centre in the vacuum cleaner closet. Once inside these doors, the room
on the left is also locked and uses the same key as the main doors into the cabin.




                                                                                             11
     3.3.      Key Center


Extra keys for every lock are kept in the key center in the vacuum cleaner closet.




Figure 6 Key Centre




12
4.      Opening (starting) and Closing the Cabin


     4.1.       First Opening of the Year



     4.2.       Standard Opening
The following is a list of the usual steps to be taken when you arrive at the cabin. It
assumes this is not the first (initial) opening of the year.

     1. Arrive with loaded boat at the dock.
     2. Adjust the dock so that the ladder can comfortably reach the shore. See page 38.
         Extend ladder to shore.
     3. Using rope, tie ladder to dock (preventing it from washing away in a storm)
     4. Unlock cabin (either of two hidden keys) See “Getting In” pg 10. While the key
         is out, unlock the room below the cabin.
     5. Connect 12-volt battery cables to battery (beside washing machine). Check that
         12 volt lights work. See page 20
     6. Connect 12 volt battery charger to 12 volt battery (allows battery to be charged if
         you run the generator). This charger is usually stored in the locked room below
         the cabin
     7. Turn on Propane. See page 48. The same key that unlocks the propane tank also
         unlocks the tool shed.
     8. Turn on water (at creek). See page 44
     9. Turn on water at back of cabin (if water filter is not at back of cabin then it is
         probably sitting in the sink)
     10. Start stove pilot (Stove is lit first as it is the easiest to start and gets the gas
         through the lines fast). See Lighting the Stove page 68
     11. Start Oven Pilot (This pilot must be lit immediately as it has no shut off – gas will
         begin flowing as soon as the propane has been turned on to the cabin). See page
         70
     12. Start water heater. As this is not the initial opening, the water heater should
         already have water from the previous visitor. See page 73
     13. Start fridge. See page 57. Close fridge door (left open from pervious visitors)
     14. If room temperature (or night time temperature) is cool, you may want to light the
         furnace. Nothing is required if you do not want the furnace. To light the furnace,
         see page 52
     15. Check that water is flowing by turning on a faucet. Open all faucets and flush
         toilet to flush air from system.
     16. Recheck all propane-powered items to ensure that pilot lights remained on.
     17. When the boat is unpacked – take it to the buoy.




                                                                                           13
     4.3.      Closing for the Year
Follow the closing checklist for items marked “W” (winter)

All pipes need to have plumbing antifreeze put in them. See the section on winterizing
the water system.

The water heater needs to be drained before leaving for the winter. See the section on the
water heater in this manual


     4.4.      Standard Closing


A standard closing is accomplished if everything on the closing checklist is completed.
Fill in the checklist and add appropriate comments. Leave in binder for next visitor to
review. The checklist has a column marked “S” and on marked “W”. The “S” column
(Summer) is used for standard closings and the “W” (Winter) column is used for closing
for the year. The “S” column assumes that other visitors will be out before the first
freeze.




14
5.      Power - generator

The generator runs on premium grade gasoline. Do not mix oil into the generator gas.
This is a 4-stroke motor – so the oil is added separately (as in a car motor). The generator
is either started by key (electric start) or by using the pull cord. See notes on the
“starting” below.




Figure 7 Generator showing control panel




     5.1.       Oil Change


The generator was new as of June 2004 (oil consumption should be minimal). The
owner‟s manual suggests changing the oil every 6 months or 100 hours of operation.
Given our light usage, an annual oil change is probably appropriate. The oil filler nut is
shown in the picture below. The oil should be filled to the very top of the oil filler tube.
Minimum oil level is the bottom of the oil level dipstick. A full oil change requires .55l.
The best oil for our climate is a premium synthetic 10W-40 (operating range of -20C to
above 40C). Other routine maintenance is explained in the generator user manual
(WUG). Maintenance is generally minimal.


                                                                                          15
Figure 8 Generator oil fill & drain




     5.2.        Starting


         1. Turn the fuel valve to on (If the engine has not been run for a long while, or it
            was previously run dry – wait 10-20 seconds before proceeding to the next
            step)
         2. Pull the choke knob out (unless the engine is already warm)
         3. Turn the engine switch (key) to start and hold it there until the engine starts
            (Do not hold in start position for more than 5 seconds. If the engine fails to
            start, release the key, wait 10 seconds and try again)
         4. When running , let the engine switch return to on
         5. Push the choke knob in




16
    5.3.         Stopping


        1. Turn off the engine switch (key)
        2. Turn the fuel valve lever to the OFF position


    5.4.         Eco-Throttle
The generator is equipped with an eco-throttle. This switch makes the generator run at
low RPM when there is low electrical load and faster as the load increases. It is generally
left “on” (giving quieter operation and better fuel efficiency). Electrical appliances
requiring immediate power when they come on may not operate properly with this switch
setting (microwave?). If so, this switch may be set to off and the generator will run at full
power.




Figure 9 Generator – control panel detail (engine off)


Other maintenance is handled through the maintenance panel (air cleaner). The
maintenance panel is open in the next picture:




                                                                                          17
Figure 10 Generator maintenance panel



     5.5.      Generator Battery Removal


The battery is used for the electric start. It can be removed for external charging or
winter storage. The removal instructions are (see following pictures):

        1. Remove the four 6 mm cap nuts (requires 10mm socket wrench) and the front
           cover
        2. Remove the battery holder band
        3. Disconnect the battery cable (negative (right most), then positive (left most))
        4. Remove battery from battery tray




18
Figure 11 Generator with front cover removed




Figure 12 Generator battery detail




                                               19
6.      Power – cabin electricity
     6.1.      Power Systems
The cabin has 3 sources / types of electricity. These are:
   1. 12 Volt power from a 12 volt battery
   2. 110 volt power from a gas powered generator
   3. 110 volt power inverted from a 12 volt battery

Each of these are described in more detail in the following sections.

     6.2.      12 Volt power system


The cabin has a 12-volt lighting system. The battery is located under the cabin and
connected via battery clips to the household 12-volt wiring system. There is also a
battery charger attached so that the battery is charged each time the generator is running.

The battery should be disconnected from the systems (charging and the cabin) when
leaving.

There are also some 12-volt outlets (cigarette lighter style) available. There are three
behind the front curtain just to the left of the fireplace (usually used for charging cell
phones and PDA‟s) and three in the water heater room beside the battery station (usually
used for running air pumps)

All lights are 12 volt. Some bulbs (such as the one above the kitchen table) are the same
size as 110-volt bulbs – but must be replaced with 12-volt bulbs.




20
Figure 13 Battery under cabin (connected to charger & cabin)




                                                               21
When disconnecting the 12-volt system, turn the switch in the basement off (see picture
below)




Figure 14 Battery power master switch (on right)




     6.3.       110 Volt Cabin power system


The generator supplies 110 volts to the cabin through several outlets. These include:

The washing machine (under the cabin)




22
Figure 15 Power outlet by washing machine


Kitchen (above the microwave)




Figure 16 Power outlet by microwave




                                            23
South bedroom closet




Figure 17 Power outlet in South bedroom closet
Kitchen – beside front window




Figure 18 Power outlet - by front window




24
   6.4.        110 Volt inverted power


This power is generated from the 12-volt battery used for the 12-volt power system. The
inverter converts the 12 volts to 110 volts (117 to be precise) and theoretically can supply
up to 200 watts of power. The actual amount of power (watts) provided is based on the
age of the battery, the condition of the battery (state of charge) and how long the power is
used. For example, with a good battery, fully charged, you could (theoretically) run a 60-
watt item for about 4 hours. This power is should not used if the generator is running
(Far more power is available through the regular house outlets when the generator is
running)

Only 1 outlet in the cabin is supplied with inverted power. This is the white outlet
under the front window. There are several things to consider when using the inverted
power.

   a. Low load items work best. For example, this power is good for charging laptops,
      razors, cameras, CD players etc. We have also run laptops and portable DVD
      players off of this power source.
   b. The purpose of this power is to supply electricity to low load items without
      needing to run the generator. For example, running a generator for 2 hours to
      recharge a laptop is inefficient. The inverted power is excellent for this (and can
      be done at night when the generator isn‟t normally running)
   c. Extension cords really reduce the available power. Try and plug items directly
      into the outlet. Because of the line drop, even this outlet is wired from the
      inverter with 12 gauge wire (The rest of the cabin 110v system uses standard
      thinner 14 gauge wire)
   d. When the voltage in the battery drops to a certain point, the inverter will shut
      down. Before it does this, it will start beeping to warn you that the power is
      dropping too low. This seems to happen when the battery voltage drops to around
      11 volts.
   e. The inverter must be turned on before this power is available to be used. The
      inverter is found in the water heater room, mounted near the battery area. Press
      the button on the inverter and a 3-digit display will on (“000”). Continue holding
      the button down until the display turn to “888”. Release the button (if you
      continue to hold it down the inverter will turn off). The display will now change
      to show the voltage coming from the 12-volt battery (usually between 11 and 13).
      Pres the button again and the display will show the current draw (total draw in
      watts from items plugged in). Press the button again and the display will show
      the output voltage (usually 117).
   f. Once the inverter is on, there is typically no need to turn it off. It will turn off
      when the battery is disconnected or if the voltage from the battery drops too low.
      The inverter though can sometimes add static to the radio. If the statis is too
      annoying you may want to turn it off. (Plugging a power brick into the inverter
      outlet will also usually remove the static – for example plugging a laptop power


                                                                                         25
        cable / power brick – even without the laptop – will usually filter out the static) If
        necessary, the inverter can be turned off by pressing and holding the button.
     g. If the battery is low (or old), you may be unable to run the inverter and lights at
        the same time (for example, a laptop uses about 40 watts to charge; if you have
        lights on as well, and haven‟t charged the battery lately, you may hear the inverter
        alarm start to sound). In this case you will want to turn the inverter off as the
        alarm is loud.




Figure 19 Inverter outlet (white outlet on right)




26
Figure 20 Inverter - switching on




                                    27
7.      Boat


     7.1.        Switches


Not all of the switches on the dashboard are functional. Those that are include:

Horn
Bilge pump
12V Power source
Front and rear lighting
Dashboard lighting




Figure 21 Boat switches - right of wheel


Upper right – bilge pump
Lower right – nothing
Lower 2nd from right – bow and stern lights
Lower 2nd from left – cigarette lighter power source (used for a spotlight - usually stored
under the bow of boat)
Lower left – instrument lights




28
Figure 22 Boat switches - left of wheel


Lower right - horn


    7.2.         Instrumentation


Most instrumentation does not work. The instruments are remnants of an earlier boat
motor. They are still mounted because they look better than the holes that would
otherwise exist in the dashboard. The only instrument that works is the speedometer.
The trim gauge pretends to work but isn‟t accurate at low trim levels.


    7.3.         Bilge Pump
The bilge pump is automatic – that is, once the switch is turned on, the pump will only
operate if there is water in the bottom of the boat. The switch should always be left on
except if the boat is out of the water (in storage). This way the pump will keep the water
out of the boat as necessary.

    7.4.         Speedometer


A sensor that hangs off the back of the boat drives the speedometer. The sensor is a
white plastic probe that descends below the level of the bottom of the boat. It is mounted
on the back of the boat to the right of the motor (when standing behind the boat) well
below the water line. When the boat is put into storage (at the Marina) the probe is bent
up (on its hinge) to prevent it from hitting items and breaking off. This hinge also allows


                                                                                         29
the probe to swing up if the boat goes over a log. In either case, one must manually
(carefully) push the probe back down before the speedometer will register. If the
speedometer isn‟t registering, this is the first item to check.




Figure 23 Speedo sensor - ready for storage




Figure 24 Speedo sensor - operational position




30
    7.5.        Emergency Kit


As part of the new boating regulations introduced around 1999, every boat must carry
certain emergency items. An emergency kit exists for both the fishing boat and the large
boat. For the large boat this kit is in a black plastic box under the front of the boat. This
box is too large to easily remove from under the boat front and must be opened first
before it can be pulled out. It contains:

Rope
Horn
Flashlight
Bailing can




Figure 25 Large boat emergency kit




                                                                                           31
Figure 26 Small (fishing) boat emergency kit



     7.6.       Lighting – Rear (Stern)
The rear light is on a short pole (approx 60cm) stored in the drivers side storage
compartment. To install:

        Locate the mounting point
        Slide open the mount and align the screw in the pole with the notch in the mount
        Insert the pole until solidly mounted
        Rotate cover until it locks pole in place
        When removing pole – rotate cover to prevent water from entering mount




32
Figure 27 Stern Light - mounting point




Figure 28 Stern light - alignment for mounting




                                                 33
Figure 29 Stern light - pole mounted




Figure 30 Stern light - pole locked in place




34
   7.7.        Gas Tanks


There are three gas tanks in the boat. Two tanks are for regular use and the third is in a
plastic can. The plastic can is used for refilling one of the main tanks in the event that
one runs out of fuel (or for long trips). The gas in the plastic jug is emptied into a main
tank and refilled at least once each year to ensure it doesn‟t become stale. This plastic
tank is set up with oil mixed in.

At the end of a trip, at least one main tank must be completely filled up. This ensures
that the next visitor will not have to get gas before coming across the lake (It‟s hard to fill
up the tanks after the boat is loaded with luggage or if one arrives after the marina has
closed)

The gas to oil mixture is 50:1. For example, a metal gas tank holds approximately 21
litres of gas and 420 ml of oil




                                                                                              35
8.      Buoy
     8.1.       How to pronounce Buoy
The common dictionaries seem to agree that “Buoy” is pronounced “boi” by Canadians
(as our English reflects our British heritage), and either “boi” or “booie” if you are from
the US.


                     The American Heritage® Book of English Usage.
            A Practical and Authoritative Guide to Contemporary English. 1996.

             7. Pronunciation Challenges: Confusions and Controversy

                                        § 36. buoy
 Traditionally and in Britain this word is pronounced like boy (boi). In the United States
 the more common pronunciation seems to be (b ´ ), except in the compound life buoy,
 where (boi) is entrenched. The pronunciation (bwoi), which is also traditional, is now
 rarely heard in either Britain or the U.S.


Miriam Webster concurs with:

We don't want to get in too deep with watery allusions, but boy, what a difference an
ocean can make. Our correspondent correctly observed that /boy/ is the more common
pronunciation in British English. In American English, both /boy/ and /boo-ee/ are
equally acceptable, but /boo-ee/ is predominant. Anglophiles can be buoyed, however,
by the fact that /boy/ was probably the earlier of the two pronunciations.

The Oxford English Dictionary, the final authority on Canadian English states:

“Medieval manuscripts, especially the accounts kept of the building of ships for the
Crown, are a rich source of material for the OED, often providing striking antedatings:
buoy (OED 1466), for instance, appears in 1295 as „boye‟”

buoy:

/b/ noun 1 anchored float as navigational mark etc. 2 lifebuoy. verb 1 (usually +
up) keep afloat. (usually + up) encourage. 3 (often + out) mark with buoy(s).

·noun 1beacon, float, marker, mooring buoy. verb 2(buoy up) see RAISE.




36
    8.2.        Connecting the boat
Connect the FRONT of the boat to the buoy. The boat should always be taken to the
buoy at night no matter how calm the water / weather appears. Violent storms come up
on this lake on even the clearest of days. A storm at night can easily sink the boat if it
isn‟t properly tied up to the buoy.




Figure 31 Connecting boat to buoy



    8.3.        Tales to Tell


There is an “urban legend” that someone once tied the boat to the buoy by clipping into
the back of the boat (instead of the front attachment point). According to the story, this
person spent the rest of their vacation restoring the boat after it sunk in a storm.




                                                                                             37
9.      Dock
     9.1.       Adjusting chains
The dock needs constant adjustment to reduce the chance of damaging the dock in a
storm. The chains need to be adjusted to keep the dock as far from shore as possible –
while still keeping the approach ladder firmly attached to both shore and dock. It is best
to tie the ladder to the dock to ensure it does not get swept away in a storm.




Figure 32 Dock fully extended



There are two dock chains. One runs from the dock to the anchor and the other runs from
a tree on shore to the dock. Both need to be adjusted to move the dock in and out. Each
has an adjustment point at each end of the dock. No tools are required and the adjustment
is easily done by hand.

In the spring – before the water has peaked, it is important to leave enough slack chain in
the system to allow the dock to rise. Examine the beach and estimate how high the dock
can still rise. Make sure that enough chain exists on the anchor end to allow the doc to
rise that far. Otherwise, the dock will be pulled under the water and can usually only be
freed by cutting the chain under the water (see hack saw in the inventory list if this
happens)




38
Figure 33 Dock – one of the chain adjustment points




    9.2.        Tying the boat up at the dock
When the boat is at the dock, it is placed as shown below. Although this is probably the
hardest possible position to get the boat into (the neighbours dock is close and turning the
boat around in such a tight circle tests your steering skills), there are significant
advantages. These are:

     This side of the dock has protective rubber stripping
     This side is more protected in a storm than the other side of the dock
     Pointing the boat out reduces the chance for damage should a sudden storm come
      up before you can get the boat moved to the buoy. (Boats need to point into a
      storm to help reduce the potential for damage)




                                                                                         39
Figure 34 Boat - parking at dock



     9.3.       Preparing the dock for departure
During the summer (after around the 1st week of July), the water level in the lake is
dropping. The dock should be left well out in the lake (with the ramp ladder pulled up on
top of the dock and tied down). A beached dock can require the assistance of the barge to
have it pulled back into the lake. This is costly and can damage the dock.

In the spring, the lake level is rising. You need to make sure that the chain on the lake
end of the dock is not so short that it might pull the dock down under water (or lift the
anchor off the bottom) as the lake level goes up. If the dock is pulled under water, it may
be almost impossible to free the chain without some manner of pushing the dock down
even further.




40
10.     Bathroom
    10.1.       Chlorine Tablet
Each year, a Chlorine tablet is placed in the toilet tank. This reduces the cleaning
requirements. The tablets are usually good for about 3-4 months and last throughout the
summer.

    10.2.       Toiletries

Toiletries are stored in separate boxes (per family) in a cupboard in the north bedroom.




Figure 35 Toiletries boxes




                                                                                           41
11.     Water System
     11.1.      Winterizing
It is important to remove all water from the water pipes. This is done by opening all taps,
removing the showerhead, removing the washing machine hoses etc. In the past, pipes
have burst inside the walls requiring extensive work to remove and replace (usually in the
middle of the night). In addition, items that could freeze or crack can be left in the
bathtub to prevent damage should they do so. Shampoos, liquor etc can be left in the tub
over the winter.


     11.2.      Filtration
Sediment Filter

There is a sediment filter located behind the cabin. It needs to be replaced when it
visually appears to be clogging up. Although it can be rinsed out, when it starts to hold
water back, rinsing is usually a temporary fix at best. This filter will not remove ecoli or
other bacteria from the water.




Figure 36 Water sediment filter




42
The taps on the left side of the filter (blue) must be open for the water to run through the
filter. The tap on the pipe above the filter must be closed. This tap (above the filter) is
used to allow the water to bypass the filter if required. For example, if the filter canister
was to break, then turning off the tap on the left side of the filter, moving the hose to the
other pipe end (above the filter), and opening the tap above the filter will allow water to
still enter the cabin. This should be used only in an emergency as water with sediment
will enter the cabin and quickly clog taps etc.

When changing the filter element, the taps on the left of the filter, and the tap on the
water line (see next picture) should be turned off.




Figure 37 Water line valve (behind cabin)


The red tap on the filtration system is for outside watering. As shown in the picture
above, it is used for watering trees etc.


    11.3.       Tap Water




                                                                                            43
In a water test conducted in July 2002, the result was that ecoli (coliform bacteria) was
potentially present in the water. You may wish to boil water or drink bottled water. See
the section on washing dishes and make sure bleach is added to the rinse water.


     11.4.      Creek-to-Cabin water system
Water arrives at the cabin via a plastic hose. The water is gravity fed from a nearby
creek. We co-maintain this pipe with our neighbours to the South (Kevin & Ann Drover
as of this writing). When neither the Drovers nor we are at the cabins, the water is turned
off via a valve on the water pipe located shortly after the pipe leaves the creek. When the
valve handle is parallel to the pipe, the water is on. Other water pipes have valves in
close proximity to ours so care must be taken to only adjust our valve.




Figure 38 Water valve turned off



There is also a red plastic valve on a „T‟ junction on the pipe. This valve is located
further away from the creek than the previous valve, and is just on top of the hill as you
follow the pipe up out of the creek valley. This valve has no effect unless the metal plug
is also removed from the “T”. When the plug is removed and the valve is opened, water
can exit the pipe via the “T”. This may help in purging air from the pipe (often required



44
when putting the pipe into the stream for the first time in the year or if you have had to
remove the pipe from the creek for maintenance.




Figure 39 Water system T valve purging air


As the summer progresses, the stream gets lower and additional adjustments to the bucket
/ pipe that take water from the stream may be required.


    11.5.       Steps to turn the water on


Starting from the bucket in the creek:

    1. Ensure the bucket is free from debris and that the water line is well above the
       point where it enters the pipe (see picture page 46)
    2. Follow the pipe down the creek to where it leaves the creek (36 metres from the
       bucket) and starts climbing the hill. Follow the pipe for 5 meters (from where it
       left the creek). The first valve is located here. This blue valve needs to be open
       (parallel to the pipe) See picture on page 44
    3. Another 32 metres along the pipe brings you to the next valve. This red valve
       doesn‟t affect water flow but can help in purging air from the system by opening
       it up and removing the metal plug from the end (see picture on page 45.
    4. Water should now be flowing to the cabin. Often in the spring, the pipe needs to
       be opened though to help flush air from the system. Ensure that the pipe is solidly




                                                                                             45
         put back together when done (lots of fun under pressure to hook the pieces
         together with the water spraying in your face)




Figure 40 Water bucket in stream



     11.6.      Washing Dishes
Water tests have shown that the existence of ecoli is possible in the tap water. When
washing dishes, Parks Canada recommends the following precautions be taken with
“uncertain” water:

        Wash and rinse dishes in the hottest water possible (gloves are provided
         above stove).
        Wash dishes in one sink and rinse off thoroughly in the second sink
        Add approximately ½ teaspoon of bleach to the hot water in the rinse sink
         a few minutes prior to beginning to wash / rinse the dishes. Do not add
         chlorine to the soapy water as chlorine and soap neutralize each other
         (version .3 of this document had suggested adding it to both sinks but this
         was an error)
        Dishes should not be left to soak for long periods of time.
        Towel dry dishes within 10-15 minutes of removing from rinse water




46
12.    Propane Tank
   12.1.       General Notes on Propane Usage
Once the propane tank is turned on, all propane appliances should be lit (the furnace is
optional as it has its own gas line valve so it may be shut off separately with no danger of
allowing gas to leak into the cabin)


   12.2.       CO Detector
The cabin is equipped with a Carbon Monoxide (CO) detector. Due to the manner in
which these detectors work, any gas that displaces oxygen will trigger the alarm. As a
result, it can generally be relied upon to also detect a propane leak. Consequently, when
the alarm goes off – it is either propane or Carbon Monoxide (both of which are
poisonous). Both gasses are odourless in their pure forms, however you may still be able
to differentiate via smell. The gas company adds a distinctive smell to propane to help
detect a propane leak. Carbon Monoxide is typically found in the cabin if a burner
(usually the fridge) is not burning cleanly. It will have a sooty smell. Common causes of
a propane leak are pilot lights in the oven or stove or fridge going out. The most
common CO source is the burner for the fridge. Check the burner (remove the lower
front panel on the fridge) to ensure that it has a blue flame and that the flame is going up
the fridge chimney (and not burning in a wide flame around the outside edge of the
chimney – see the fridge section for more information)


   12.3.       Locking
The propane tank is locked. It must be unlocked to access the valves to turn propane on
and off (and for access to refill the tank).




                                                                                          47
     12.4.     Turning On / Off
The propane is turned on and off via one main valve on the tank. As of this writing
(2002) the main valve leaks and must be turned on and off VERY TIGHTLY to stop it
from leaking. It is safest to coat the valve in a mixture of dish detergent and water and
check for bubbles (which would indicate a leak)




48
When leaving the cabin, the propane level is recorded on the checklist. The gauge is
located next to the main valve and is shown in the picture below:




                                                                                       49
     12.5.    Refilling
The propane company brings a propane truck on the barge each spring. We need to book
this in advance if we want the propane tank refilled. We must also leave the tank
unlocked so that the propane company can get at the tank valves. Historically we use
approximately 15% of the tank each year.




50
13.    Furnace
The furnace extends the usable season of the cabin – and reduces the need for
fires for heat (but not aesthetics). Although it is not quite strong enough to
quickly raise the cabin to room temperature in the middle of the winter, with
the addition of a small fire, the cabin is debatably quite usable year round.
When used in the winter, the furnace is just capable of maintaining room
temperature (without the fire) - but only after the 3-4 days it takes to
thoroughly dry out and heat the cabin walls.

The furnace gives off considerable heat (10,000 btu’s). Do not set anything on
top of the furnace if there is any chance of the furnace coming on. The
furnace mounting system is really only strong enough to hold the furnace.
Placing any significant weight on the furnace could bend its frame or damage
the mounting system.




Figure 41 Furnace




                                                                            51
     13.1.      Lighting
Before lighting the furnace, make sure that the main propane tank is turned on, and that
the furnace gas valve is turned on (below the furnace / under the cabin). The furnace has
a pilot light, which must first be turned on. To open the furnace, lift up on the front cover
and pull it out and off.




Figure 42 Furnace - front cover removed


Open the inspection window




52
Figure 43 Furnace - inspection cover opened


Turn the gas valve to “Pilot”




Figure 44 Furnace - pilot light switch


                                              53
Depress the red button every few seconds until the pilot light burns. The red button
creates a spark in the pilot system – a lighter is not required. Lighting the pilot takes a
minute or so as the gas has to get through the gas lines to the pilot burner. You will see
the pilot light burning through the inspection window. Close and clamp the inspection
panel once the pilot is burning.

Turn the gas valve to “ON”




Figure 45 Furnace - valve turned to ON


Close the furnace and turn on the thermostat


     13.2.      Thermostat
Turn the Heat/Off/Cool slide switch to “Heat”. Use the temperature control to set the
desired temperature. A few seconds later, the display will show the current room
temperature. If it doesn‟t display the temperature, the battery in the thermostat may need
replacement. There is no fan in the furnace so the fan switch does nothing for this unit.

Additional instructions for the furnace and thermostat are found in the WUG.




54
Figure 46 Furnace thermostat



   13.3.       Furnace is not giving off heat
If the furnace is only giving off only very minor heat, it is possible that only the pilot
light is on. Check that the gas valve is turned to “ON” (from Pilot), that the thermostat is
set to “heat” and that the temperature is set to a value higher than the current room
temperature. If the furnace still isn‟t giving off heat re-open the front cover and open the
inspection plate. (Be careful – the inspection plate wing nuts will be very hot – even with
just the pilot light running). By looking inside you will be able to tell if only the pilot
light is running or the full burner.

If the pilot light is burning and the main burner isn‟t coming on, try turning the heat-off-
cool switch on the thermostat back and forth a few times. Once the main burner has
come on once, you should be able to leave the system under thermostatic control. Close
the inspection plate and remount the front of the furnace.

   13.4.       Exhaust Venting
The furnace obtains air for combustion and exhausts air from burning through a vent
located on the back of the furnace that runs through the wall of the cabin. This intake /



                                                                                            55
exhaust should not be blocked. Although, the exhaust is located outside the legal
minimum distance from the cabin door, it is probably safest not to run the furnace with
the door wide open (We‟re not sure why one would do this anyway)




Figure 47 Furnace intake / exhaust vent




56
14.    Fridge
   14.1.       Lighting
The fridge pilot light and burner assembly is located at the bottom of the fridge. You
must remove the front access panel (below the fridge door) to get at the burner. To light
the system, depress the red button while holding a flame (long handled lighter) over the
burner – in the thermister (probe that extends over the main burner)




Figure 48 Fridge burner assembly


When the main burner is functioning properly, it burns with a strong blue flame.




                                                                                        57
Figure 49 Fridge burner - proper flame




     14.2.      Thermostat
The thermostat for the fridge should not be adjusted. It has been set through a great deal
of trial and error to maintain a proper temperature, as it is currently set. To discourage
changing the fridge temperature, the thermostat has been taped over.


     14.3.      Routine Maintenance
Every 5 or so years, the fridge chimney may become clogged with excessive soot. This
needs to be cleaned out. The burner (the large pipe that the flame comes out of) can also
be removed and soot cleaned out from inside it. This apparently can be done by
ourselves although we have usually relied on an experienced gas / fridge repair person to
ensure that the work is done properly.




58
Fridge repair of older propane fridges is no longer a common occupation. In 2003, we
were unable to find anyone that would come out to the cabin to service the fridge. We
did find a business in Enderby (Hillcrest or Hill street Fridge repair) though that worked
on Propane fridges – but you must take the fridge to them for servicing. This business is
considered the primary repair centre for propane fridges in western Canada /
northwestern US. We took the burner assembly to him for inspection / repair

Signs that the fridge chimney is clogged include the CO detector going off constantly, a
gas (or sooty) smell in the cabin and the flame not burning properly. If the chimney is
clogged, the fridge flame will often be very wide and not be going „up‟ the chimney – but
rather around the chimney.

The steps to clean the chimney system (as described to Ken over the phone by a retired
fridge repair mechanic in Sicamous) are:

    1. Shut off the gas to the fridge (see shutting down for location of fridge gas valve)
    2. Put a small plastic bag over the burner so that soot doesn‟t fall into the burner (It‟s
       probably already had soot fall in anyway though and will require removal and
       cleaning as well)
    3. Pull the fridge away from the wall. Be extremely careful not to bend or kink the
       gas line coming up from the floor below the fridge




Figure 50 Fridge pulled away for maintenance




                                                                                           59
     4. Remove the top grill and back (lots of screws)




Figure 51 Fridge back plate and top grill




60
   5. Remove the cardboard chimney (unhook a wire clip- inside it first -accessible
      from the top – which may cause the “flame straightner to fall out at the bottom of
      the fridge)




Figure 52 Fridge cardboard chimney


   6. This provides access to the top of the steel chimney
   7. Looking down from the top of the cardboard chimney – you will see the pointed
      end of a screw that a wire hook is hanging on. This hook is the end of a long wire
      that is attached to the “Flame straightner” (I have no idea why it‟s called this).
      Unhook from the screw and remove the flame straightner from the bottom of the
      fridge (slide it past the burner – if it didn‟t fall out when unhooked from the
      cardboard chimney.) If this is difficult to remove, you may need to insert a coat
      hander from the bottom of the chimney to „hook‟ the straightner and pull it out




                                                                                      61
Figure 53 Fridge flame straightner (removed)




Figure 54 fridge chimney




62
8. Using a straightened coat hanger and a rag – push and pull a rag through the
   chimney until no soot remains. The entire steel chimney (top to bottom) must be
   cleaned.
9. If the burner has soot in it, it will need to be removed and cleaned. If the burner
   flame was not blue and going only up the chimney – it probably needs to be
   cleaned. Disconnect the burner assembly where the gas line leaves the thermostat
   assembly (to go to the burner) and by loosening the nut that holds the burner
   under the fridge.




                  Figure 55 Fridge thermostat with burner removed


10. The burner and its surrounding tube can then be removed from the assembly;
    separated and cleaned.




                                                                                    63
              Figure 56 Fridge burner with flame orifice and flame tubes disassembled


     11. Reassemble the burner assembly (but do not install in fridge). When reassembling
         the burner and surrounding tube, ensure that a small notch and grove align. If
         they are properly aligned, the tube will only rotate ¼ of the a turn around the inner
         burner. If it rotates completely, the tube and burner are not properly aligned.
         Close inspection of the inside of the tube and outside of the burner will show the
         notch and groove that need to align.




64
             Figure 57 burner tubes showing alignment notch on inner tube


12. Reassemble chimney system. The flame straightner must be inserted from the
    bottom (it will jam if inserted from the top). Make sure the hook on the top of the
    straightner wire is reattached to the same place in the cardboard chimney. The
    straightners position in the chimney is critical to proper functioning of the fridge.
13. Complete reassembly of fridge back. Make sure you use all the screws on the
    fridge back or else it will rattle every time you walk by.
14. Before reinstalling the burner assembly in the fridge, cover the burner tube
    assembly with a small plastic bag to ensure nothing falls into it (even the smallest
    specks of dirt, soot, bugs etc will cause the flame to burn poorly) When the fridge
    is completely reassembled and pushed back into position against the wall – then
    the bag can be removed.
15. Once the burner assembly is installed, careful flame adjustment is required to
    ensure that the burner flame is blue. A yellow flame is what causes this problem
    in the first place (the dirty chimney). Rotating the burner adjusts the air to gas
    mixture. The adjustment is very sensitive. To adjust this properly, you need to
    hold a mirror under the burner so that you can view the flame up inside the
    chimney. The flame must be blue right to the upper flame tip. It works best if
    you can use one hand to hold the mirror, one hand to turn the burner tube and one
    hand to hold yourself up off the floor. You also need to do it quickly before the
    burner gets to be too hot to touch.




                                                                                      65
     14.4.    Shutting Down
When leaving the cabin, the fridge is shut down with the other propane appliances. The
fridge can be shut off independently though via a gas valve under the cabin (installed
2002-08-24).




                                 Figure 58 Fridge gas line
When leaving the fridge off, the two primary items to remember are:

1. Leave a drip bowl under the drain spout (at the bottom of the freezer). The drain bowl
is cracked at one end, so remember to leave the “good” end under the spout.




                                Figure 59 Fridge drip bowl




66
2. Leave the fridge door open. If the door isn‟t open, mould will quickly grown in the
fridge and require extensive cleaning and disinfecting work on the next visit.




Figure 60 Fridge door open (shutdown)




                                                                                         67
15.     Stove / Oven
When leaving the cabin, the top of the stove should be covered with a green garbage bag.
The old stove pipe (in the ceiling above the stove) leaks in the rain and water drips onto
the stove. Without the bag to protect the stove, the water will cause rusting of the system.

     15.1.      Lighting the Stove
The pilot for the stove is always on. If the pilots (2) are not lit soon after turning the
propane tank on, propane will leak into the cabin.




Figure 61 Stove / Oven




68
Figure 62 Stove with pilot lights accessible




                                               69
     15.2.       Lighting the Oven
The pilot for the oven is always on. It this pilot is not lit soon after turning the propane
tank on, propane will leak into the cabin. To light the oven, the lower panel must be
removed by lifting it up and pulling it forward.




Figure 63 Oven with pilot light accessible




70
The pilot light has no switch. Simply hold the flame of a lighter under the angled burner
plate at the back of the oven. Although not quite visible, the pilot is located in the middle
of the following picture.




Figure 64 Oven with close-up of pilot light assembly




                                                                                          71
     15.3.     Oven temperature control
The oven switch has a build in thermostat. It is however, not entirely accurate. It is quite
common to set the control at 400F and have the actual oven at almost 500F. It is best to
rely on the thermometer inside the oven.


     15.4.     Shutting Down
All pilot lights to the stove will go off when the propane is turned off. Due to a minor
leak above the stove, the garbage can should be placed on the floor against the stove to
the left of the stove. This will catch water dripping from the old chimney in the ceiling.




Figure 65 Stove ready for shutdown




72
16.     Water Heater
    16.1.       Lighting
To light the water heater, two plates must be removed. First remove the blue front plate,
and then remove the tin inner plate. This gives access to the pilot light, which must be lit
first (Turn the red dial to pilot and hold down the red button while holding a lighter in the
pilot assembly). Once the pilot is lit, the knob may be turned to “ON” and the main
burner will light. Make sure that there is water in the tank before lighting the pilot.




Figure 66 Water heater - closed




                                                                                          73
Figure 67 Water heater - open for lighting




Figure 68 Water heater - switch set to light pilot (button depressed)




74
Figure 69 Water Heater - Pilot light assembly



    16.2.       Winterizing
Drain the hot water tank at the end of the season. The tank is drained into the black pipe
in the water heater room (via a garden hose). A cab on the top of the black drain pipe
“Y” opens to allow the hose to be inserted (see two pictures following). The cap needs to
be in place when using the washing machine or some water may spray out.




                                                                                       75
Figure 70 washing machine and drain pipe




Figure 71 Water heater draining




76
   16.3.       Where does the water go?
The water from the washing machine and water heater both drain into the black pipe.
This then goes below the floor, into an opening into the rocks and then seeps into the
rocks below the cabin. The picture below shows the hole (kept open by cement cinder
blocks) below the floor. The plywood sheet (flooring) covering this hole can be lifted up
if you need to check that this is functioning properly.




Figure 72 Water drain hole below water heater room




                                                                                       77
17.    Washing Machine

Washing machine is located below the cabin and runs on 110volt power. Medium size
loads work best. Follow the instructions in the lid carefully with regards to how clothes
are placed in the machine. If clothes are not carefully balanced, this machine rocks
horribly. Using the 4 quarters system described in the lid is very important (as opposed
to draping clothes around the spindle)




Figure 73 Washing Machine




Figure 74 Washing machine drainage




78
    17.1.        Indoor drying
When weather doesn‟t permit, it is sometimes necessary to dry clothes inside. If the
generator is running, this can be supplemented with the electric fan. The clothes rack is
(at the time of this writing) stored in the SE bedroom closet.




Figure 75 drying clothes - inside




                                                                                        79
18.       Chain Saw

The chain saw is a craftsman model C944.411370 - 16 inch bar

Important: The chain oiler must be refilled every time the gas is refilled or the unit will
burn out quickly. (use chain saw bar oil. SAE 30 can be used temporarily if bar oil is not
available)

Detailed instructions are found in the WUG

Fuel: Mix gas and oil at a ratio of 40:1. Unleaded gasoline must be used. The oil must
be a good quality 2 cycle air cooled engine oil. Do not use gasohol.

Starting from cold:

     1. Move on/off switch to on
     2. Pull choke/fast idle lever out to full extent
     3. Slowly press primer bulb 6 times
     4. Pull the starter rope with your right hand 5 times (unless it starts before the 5th
        time
     5. Push the choke / fast idle lever in completely
     6. Continue pulling the starter rope (assuming it hasn‟t started yet) until the engine
        starts
     7. Run for 5 seconds and then squeeze and release the throttle trigger to allow the
        engine to return to idle speed

Starting when warm:

     1. Move on/off switch to on
     2. Pull choke/fast idle lever out to full extent, then push the lever back in completely
        (to the off choke position)
     3. Slowly press primer bulb 6 times
     4. Pull the starter rope quickly until the engine starts
     5. Squeeze and release throttle trigger

Stopping:

     1. Turn on/off switch to stop




80
19.     Radio / CD / Tape player
    19.1.       Orientation

For best reception, the radio should be parallel to the wall where the furnace is mounted.




Figure 76 Radio situated for good reception




    19.2.       Turning the power off
The radio has no “OFF” switch. The main selector switch must be set to “tape” and the
tape unit be turned off. Any other setting (e.g. CD) will eventually drain the batteries –
even if the CD is turned off.




                                                                                         81
Figure 77 Radio - power OFF



     19.3.      Local Radio Stations


Band    Frequency     Name             Genre

AM      580           Easy Rock        Easy Rock (primary local radio station)
AM      1260          Weather          Weather recording

FM      105.7         ?
FM      104           Power 104        Kelowna Rock
FM      88            CBC
FM      97            CBC
FM      102           Easy Rock        FM version of AM 580 (when
                                       generator is on – the AM band has
                                       static but this band is OK)




82
20.    Coal Oil Lamps
   20.1.       Wick trimming
Lamp wick trimming is an art form. The wick must be trimmed with a curved top where
the curve matches the curve in the metal enclosure around the wick. Any corners on the
wick will cause a point in the flame. A point in the flame causes the globe to blacken
(see Globe cleaning below)


   20.2.       Globe cleaning
Gently pushing a crushed newspaper page into the globe and turning it around can
remove heavy soot. The best light comes out of thoroughly cleaned globes. As far as is
known, only Carol and Grandma Wiens know the secret to completely cleaning globes.
The rest of us have gradually learned that the globes break very easily and leave cleaning
to the experts!




                                                                                        83
21.     Miscellaneous items
     21.1.      First Aid Kit
There is a first aid kit located in a closet in the foyer. It is inside a metal green toolbox.
Once a year we check it to remove & replace any expired items. If any
Items are used, make sure there are adequate supplies left, or replace as necessary.


     21.2.      Picnic Table
The cedar picnic table was replaced in 2001. When departing the cabin, it should be
stood up and leaned against the cabin so that water cannot pool on the tabletop. The table
should be “painted” each year with water repellent.


     21.3.      Contacts
In the divider (brown cabinet beside the fridge), in one of the drawers, is a book of phone
numbers. It contains the numbers of important contacts regarding the cabin (repair
companies, marinas etc). Add any names / numbers that are appropriate.


     21.4.      Fireplace
When cleaning the fireplace, ashes are dumped into the outhouse. Large pieces of wood
are left and a new fire set for the next visitor.


     21.5.      Bathtub
At various times of the years, large bugs will appear in the bathtub during the night. It
“appears” that leaving the bathtub drain plug in will stop this from happening. We don‟t
even begin to think about what this means for the habitat of these bugs.


     21.6.      Air Pump
There is a 12 volt air pump located in the cabin basement. There is also a 12 volt
cigarette lighter adapter to connect this to the 12 volt battery system (also below the
cabin). The pump is designed for air mattresses etc.




84
22.    Tool Kits
   22.1.       Wrench’s etc


This tool kit is located under the cabin and includes socket wrenches; set wrenches,
pliers, rubber mallet.




                                    Figure 78 Tool Kit




                                                                                       85
     22.2.     Drill Bit Tool Set


Located under the cabin, this set includes basic drill bit and some screwdriver heads.
There is no drive unit included




                                    Figure 79 Drill Bit Set




     22.3.     Electric Metering Tool Kit


Located under the cabin, this tool, kit includes a multimetre, wire cutter and wire
connectors




                             Figure 80 Electric Metering Tool Kit



86
23.     Winter Use of the Cabin

Our (Ken‟s family) typical winter use scenario follows. These comments apply to any
cabin visit during the winter. The days are short and there are always last minute items to
pick up – so we plan on an overnight in Sicamous to avoid too much of a rush. The boat
is unavailable (no way of getting it into the water) so you need to rely on the Sicamous
Water Taxi (Fred Busch) to get you to and back from the cabin. As you won‟t have a
boat (for quick trips back to town), it is important to carefully plan out everything you
will need during your stay. These are “notes to ourselves” but are hopefully of use to
others using the cabin in the winter.

Even though water sports are sort of out of the question, we are never bored in the winter.
For the 2002/3 winter, we spent 6 nights here and could easily have stayed longer. The
winter is exceptionally quiet. In several years of winter use, we have never seen another
visitor (or even another boat on the lake) during the Christmas / new years period.

Day                                        Activity

-lots      During the last summer visit, take an inventory of items required during
            the winter.
           See the fluids list below and ensure that lots are on hand. It‟s easier to
            stock up now than to bring it across in the winter.
           Although it‟s too late to do anything about it now – is there enough
            Propane?
           Get lots of firewood cut and stacked below cabin (cutting in the winter
            works but the snowy frozen wood doesn‟t burn as well as dried wood
            does.
           Get extra propane cartridges. Winter nights are long and the two-mantle
            lantern will go through one cartridge each evening!
           Have extra lantern globes (coal oil and Coleman lanterns), mantels and
            wicks
           Have lots of matches, lighters
  -4       A few days before your expected arrival, contact the Sicamous water taxi
            and book a date and time for your ride to and back from the cabin. Some
            years he is busy, and other years we are the only winter ride he does.
            Best to book ahead and ensure he is available. He is very punctual and
            will arrive at the time you asked (or earlier). We book a time between 1
            and 2 PM (Gives us time for a leisurely morning to pick up forgotten
            items and any groceries). He is Al‟s (The Marina) ex-partner in the
            Marina and operates out of the Marina.
           Remember the quantities of fluids in the cabin. Take (or buy in Sicamous
            any that may be in short supply) Specifically include:
                1. Generator gas
                2. Coal oil (lamps)
                3. Dishwashing soap


                                                                                         87
             4. Generator oil
             5. Chain saw bar oil, engine oil, gas (unless lots of wood was left
                 from last summer)
             6. RV antifreeze (don‟t plan to use the plumbing – but if water
                 accidentally goes down a drain you need to put antifreeze down
                 before it freezes)
             7. Propane cartridges (lamp)
        For clothing, the area is not especially cold. Typical new years
         temperatures vary from +2 to –5C. It is often wetter than it is cold.
         Sweaters help take the chill off the cold in the cabin in the mornings.
        For sealing the windows (with a transparent plastic film) purchase the
         following shrink film. This film comes with two-sided tape to stick the
         film up on the inside of the windows. This is very transparent and adds
         tremendously to the insulation of the cabin. The amount listed below is
         enough to do all of the cabin windows (including bedrooms and
         bathroom) with some left over. In 2002 the total cost of the film was
         $20.00 for the roll and $10.00 for the box). If you plan to keep one of the
         bedrooms closed up, the box of wrap isn‟t necessary. (The roll is enough
         to do the entire cabin except for one of the bedroom windows)

            1. 1 roll Climaloc Bulk Shrink Film (2.13m x 7.62m)
            2. 1 box Climaloc shrink film (for 5 windows)

        Book a hotel in Sicamous for the night of arrival. Sicamous is a major
         snow mobiling centre in the winter and hotels are often booked just as
         much in the winter as they are in the summer. We use the Super 8 in
         Sicamous as it less frequented by the snow mobilers (who tend to party
         late and idle their diesel pickup trucks outside your window for several
         hours very early in the morning)
        You won‟t be able to wash clothes at the cabin so taking wash cloths and
         dish towels from home will make it easier to not leave dirty towels in the
         cabin
        Don‟t forget:
         1. Cell phone and charger
         2. Extra newspapers for starting fires
         3. Collapsible water jugs (several) for wash water (fill from lake)
         4. Bottled drinking water
         5. Snow pants
         6. Toilet paper (remember the outhouse?)
         7. Paper towels (easy to use lots of these in the winter)
         8. Plastic tub for washing dishes (we use one of the plastic boxes we
             packed with). This water is dumped in the forest after each use.
         9. Lots of snacking foods
         10. Extra batteries / chargers for any electronic toys
         11. Books



88
-2     Pack up everything you will need. Plan out your meals carefully.
       Freeze solidly any meat you are taking. The cabin freezer is small, but
        thoroughly frozen meats will stay frozen in an icebox outside for several
        days (no problem with 5 days over new years in 2002/3.). They can be
        thawed in the cabin or microwave)
      As much as possible, use plastic boxes that can take getting wet
        (cardboard boxes and bags will rip open at the worst possible time and
        dump your belongings in the lake!). Use backpacks as they are easier to
        carry up to the cabin and can handle being dropped in the snow.
      For clothes, pack your warm clothes in a separate bag, as you will want to
        wear them when crossing the lake.
      Fred has quite a large boat that has no problem with 4 people and lots of
        gear.
-1   Drive to Sicamous. (Remember and write down everything you forgot as
     you drive!)
+1    Breakfast in Sicamous. Grocery shopping. Last minute items.
      Get a block of ice. This will be added to the icebox to help keep the meat
        frozen. You may want a bag of ice cubes as well (drinks)
      Was the cabin 12v battery left at the cabin? If the Marina has it – get it
        from Al and take it with you (hopefully you called Al a day or two prior
        and made arrangements)
      Meet Fred and pack boat. Leave car at the Marina. Boat ride to Cabin.
        Confirm subsequent pickup date and time with Fred.
      Start carrying loads up to the cabin.
      Turn on furnace ASAP. Note that the thermostat has a problem and
        needs to have the switch marked “Heat-Off-Cool” moved back and forth
        between “heat” and “Off” several times before it works. By leaving the
        observation window on the furnace open, you can easily see when this
        switch starts to work (the furnace will go from pilot only to full burners
        on). Once it starts to work it seems to continue working fine. Close up
        the observation window and put the front back on the furnace. We set the
        temp at 27C to keep it running non-stop.
      After all loads are in the cabin, light the stove, oven and fridge pilots.
      Start the four stove burners. These will heat the cabin quickly.
      Start the fireplace. If it was left set by the last visitors this is easy.
        Otherwise it may take a little more effort.
      There are coat hooks in the front room. Two are behind the door (South)
        and one is behind the fireplace. The fireplace hook is good for drying
        damp clothes.
      Wet clothes are hung in the bathroom on the hooks above the bathtub.
        Don‟t forget to put RV antifreeze in the drain if any water enters the
        drain.
      Close the back bedrooms and bathroom doors to concentrate the heat in
        the front room.
      Set up a garbage system. Sort by burnables (for the fire pit on the beach),


                                                                                     89
          non-burnables (to take back into town) and compostables.
         By now its time for a drink and supper.
         Keep the fire burning. Making your supper one that requires the stove or
          oven helps to heat the cabin even more.
         Get kindling and other firewood for tomorrow. Use the wooden apple
          crate for the larger wood and the short & wide yellow bucket for kindling.
          Set this inside so that it can dry over night and be ready in the morning.
         You can get the cabin temperature up to 25-27. It will cool off tonight to
          around 18 (and feel even cooler)
         Wash dishes. Dump wash water in forest away from trees.
         Add RV antifreeze to drain in case any water got in.
         We sleep on the foam mattresses in the front room. We use the sleeping
          bags and blankets from the bedrooms. (We don‟t bring sleeping bags
          from home)
 +2      The fire went out over night and the cabin feels cool. Set the fire using
          the wood brought in last night. Before starting the fire, shovel the ashes
          into the (now empty) yellow bucket. Later in the day you can empty this
          bucket into the lake.
         It takes at least 24 hours to warm up the walls in the cabin (and several
          days to obtain maximum heat efficiency). The front room will warm
          faster and stay warm longer as each day goes by.
         Keep the fire burning and heat the cabin up. When the front room is nice
          and warm (23 or so), open the back rooms up and let them heat up.
         Apply the Climaloc Shrink film to the windows. Clean the windows and
          frames first. Note that the 2-sided tape will remove paint so use it on the
          sides of the frames not easily visible (e.g. – outside of frames for the big
          front room windows). Once this is up, you need top use a hair dryer to
          shrink the film. There is one stored in the foyer cupboards. Once shrunk,
          you can barely tell the film is up. We plan to leave the film up until the
          first summer visit – it probably helps seal out insects. With the film up it
          becomes easier to heat up the cabin.
         Keep the cabin warm. We often find that 25C isn‟t too warm (given that
          the doors are open frequently to make outside trips, it is easy for a cabin
          of warm air to get suddenly cold. As the walls of the cabin gradually heat
          up, this becomes less of a problem.
         Sit in the cabin; read lots; eat well; keep the fire burning; sled on the
          beach (minimize the number of lake entries)
 +3      Same as other days. We are sleeping in the back rooms by now.
         Each day we burn the burnable garbage, dump the fireplace ashes
 +4      Didn‟t even need the fire for most of the day. Furnace kept the cabin at
          22C (with all back doors open).
 +n      Day before pickup. Clean up cabin and pack as much as possible.
 N       Standard winter shutdown
         Check RV antifreeze in any drain that may have had water
         Pickup and boat back to Sicamous


90
Figure 81 Water Taxi (winter cabin access)




          Figure 82 Winter gear




                                             91
24.     Cabin Inventory

This table provides a list of the items stored at the cabin. It is NOT updated with any
frequency, so items may exist that are not in this list, and similarly be in this list, but no
longer at the cabin.

     Category       Description      Location                           Notes

                                                 This chart will be completed (maybe) / started
                                                 during 2003. A few sample entries are provided
                                                 below

Heavy Tools        Chain Saw        Tool shed    A new saw was purchased 2002/12. Oil & Gas
                                                 instructions must be followed closely (see WUG)
                                                 to keep this working.
Kitchen Tools      Microwave        Kitchen
Yard Tools         Trimmer          Tool Shed    Long handled / extendable trimmer gives about a
                                                 20‟ reach for trimming branches
Light Tools        Hand Saw         Tool shed
                   Humming bird     Foyer
                   feeder
                   Hair dryer       Foyer (ur)   Used to shrink plastic wrap on windows (used for
                                                 additional winter insulation)
                   Propane          Foyer (ul)   Used for propane lights
                   Canisters
                   Fire             Foyer
                   Extinguisher
                   First Aid kit    Foyer (ml)   Contains large bandages, antibiotics, syringes etc.
                                                 Attempted to keep up to date by Ken
                   Flash lights     Foyer (ml)   Two large MAG lights
                   Water filters    Foyer (ml)   Elements for filter behind cabin
                   Vacuum           Foyer (mr)   120 volt and manual
                   Hand tools       Foyer (mr)
                   Raid, Off etc    Foyer (ml)
                   Batteries        Foyer (ml)   Flashlight and radio batteries
                   Rags             Foyer (mr)
                   Laundry          Foyer (mr)
                   baskets
                   Battery tester   Divider
                   Playing cards    Divider
                   Kerosene         Shed         Quantity varies
                   Snow shovel      Shed
                   Trimmer          Shed         Long extendable trimmer with 20 foot reach
                   Hack saw         Shed
                   12 v battery     Shed
                   charger
                   RV antifreeze    Shed
                   Spade            Shed
                   Lawn rakes       Shed
                   Axe (2)          Shed
                   Hatchet          Shed
                   Fibreglass       Shed



92
                  repair kit
                  12 v batteries    Shed
                  (3)
                  Tent              Basement
                  Scuba tank, etc   Basement
                  Flippers          Basement
                  Water tubes       Basement   1 extra large, 2 medium
                  Hot dog sticks    Basement   50 – maybe more?
                  (50)
                  Games (board)     Basement
                  Dog bowls,        Basement
                  brush
                  Water toys        Basement   Floating basketball hoop etc
                  (misc)
                  Citronella        Basement
                  candles
                  Tool kits         Basement   Wrenches, pliers, wire cutters
                  Drill bit set     Basement
                  Hammock           Basement

Foyer (ur) = upper right cabinet when entering the foyer from the front room, “ul” is the
upper left, “ml” = main left and “mr” = main right




                                                                                       93
25.       Sample Cabin Closing Checklist

This checklist is routinely updated as cabin conditions and contents change.

                                                  S   W                                                     S   W
Dock - adjust all chains for expected change in           Outdoor chairs - store in outhouse or below
water levels                                              cabin
Dock - adjust for winter                                  Outdoor rugs - put in outhouse
Laundry - clean towels, sheets etc.                       Canoe - store beside cabin
Water - remove hose from creek                            Fishing boat - store in flat area above beach
                                                          near NE corner of property
Water - remove and clean media filter from                Wind-surfer - ensure sail is dry and store
rear of cabin                                             under cabin
Water - drain water pipe between creek and                Wind-surfer - store main board under or
cabin                                                     behind cabin
Water - shut off water entry into cabin                   Garbage - take into Sicamous
Water - open all taps in cabin (especially in             Propane Tank - shut off and lock
bathtub)
Water - disconnect and drain water from                   Tell Carol propane levels so that propane can
shower head and hose                                      be ordered for spring
Water - drain hot water tank                              Lock tool shed
Water - put RV antifreeze into all drains and             Lock outhouse
toilets (auto antifreeze eats plastic)
Water – turn off at creek if both Drover‟s and            Lock cabin doors
Wiens will be away
Generator - use up all gas in generator tank              Lock all cabin windows (use slats & nails as
                                                          required)
Generator - check that oil is clear and topped            Lock storage room under cabin, close window
up.                                                       drape
Generator - check that battery is charged.                Batteries - remove from flashlights, radio, etc
Take into Sicamous or home for winter
Washing machine - remove and drain water                  Batteries - use tester - dispose of dead
from hoses at rear of machine                             batteries
Refrigerator - clean                                      Keys - hang on nail beside fridge
Refrigerator - leave door ajar                            Keys - leave a key under clothes platform on
                                                          nail
Refrigerator - leave cup under freezer spout to           Fireplace - clean out all ashes
collect water
Shampoo bottles (and other liquids) – move to             Fireplace - set fire for next visitors
bathtub
Perishables - take home canned goods                      Move “expensive” items from storage room to
                                                          cabin
Perishables - take home pop, beer etc                     Vacuum Cabin, Clean floors
Perishables - take home paint                             Furnace Thermostat – set to off
                                                          Battery (12 V in tool shed) – unclip cables
                                                          leading to cabin




94
26.   Serial and Part Numbers

  Item            Number      Number              Notes
                  Type

  Servel Fridge   Model       2350                Tag on front of frame says:
                  S/N         01584               When ordering parts or referring
                  Part        4000-420            to refrigerator give this no.
                                                  “CBN600           01463” (long
                                                  space between numbers)

  Johnson         Spec        140 hp              Sparkplugs (4) – uses either
  Outboard        Model       J140TLCNB           Champion UL77V or NGK
  Motor           Year        1982                BUHXW-1 (both of which can
                                                  be difficult to find)

  Johnson         Year        1964
  Seahorse        Spec        9.5 hp
  Fishing boat
  motor

  Chainsaw        Mfg         Craftsman           Purchased at Sears (Calgary)
  (Craftsman)     Model       C944.411370         See instructions in this manual
                  Bar         16”                 before using – gas / oil mix and
                  engine      2.2 cu in / 36 cc   chain oil are critical to review
                  Engine      2 cycle             before each use.
                  Purchased   December 2002

  Chainsaw        Mfg         Pioneer             Unit will start, but quickly
  (Pioneer)       Model       P20 or P25          overheats and will not restart
                                                  until cooled. A new chain may
                                                  help, but the Craftsman unit
                                                  works fine

  Furnace         Mfg         Empire
                  Model       DV-210-7SG
                  BTU         10,000
                  S/N         V 20 938794

  Generator       Mfg         Honda               Rated at max 3000 Watts (rated
                  Model       EU3000is            2800 Watts). Purchased
                  Year        2004                2004/06/10 from Bowcycle
                  S/N         EZGF 1100667        (Calgary) 1-888-288-5421 with
                                                  2 year warranty



                                                                                 95
     Item              Number   Number             Notes
                       Type

     Washing           Mfg      Frigidaire
     Machine           Year     1962
                       Model    WCDAC-62
                       Model    Custom Deluxe
                       Load     8 Amps

     Stove             Mfg      Danby
                       Model    D4677 W
                       S/N      D 0 21 2621217

     Lantern (single   Mfg      Coleman            Globe is cracked (but still
     mantle)           Model    5419-700           working). Globe no longer
                       Mantle   #999               available for purchase
                       Globe    990

     Lantern (dual     Mfg      Coleman            Electronic Ignition
     mantle)           Model    5154B
                       Globe    L-19
                       Mantle   #21

     Vacuum            Mfg      Hoover             No longer used
                       Model    S1061CTC
                       S/N      00008587

     Vacuum            Mfg      Kenmore            Currently being used
                       Year     Aug 1999
                       Model    116.28085790C
                       Bag      20-50570
                       No.      99031
                       Load     8.5 Amps

     Microwave         Mfg      Simplicity
                       Model    SMW902W
                       Output   900 W
                       SN       1101070009000637
                       Load     1.35 KW

     Battery Charger Mfg        Canadian Tire      Load is based on standard
                     Load       2.4 Amps           charging settings (Charger has a
                                                   “car start / boost” setting which
                                                   is not used at the cabin – and
                                                   draws a much higher load).


96
27.     Cabin Paint

Item                               Paint                           Last painted

Deck railings                      7450 CIL select                 2004/06/20
                                   External Acrylic Semi Gloss
                                   7456 Accent

                                   BLK 3P20
                                   YOX 1P38
                                   OXR 2P50
                                   WHT None

                                   Purchased from Parkland
                                   Building supplies (Sicamous)
Exterior Walls (vertical grooved   Dulux Weather Guard Premium     2004/06/20
wood – beige colour)               exterior latex
                                   Acrylic Satin White 1540

                                   BLK 0P10
                                   YOX 0P29
                                   LFY 0P4
                                   WHT 6P08

                                   Purchased from “Colour you
                                   world” in Salmon Arm
Deck Floor                         Deckote                         2004/05/15
                                   Rustic Green
                                   17-0493
                                   Purchased from Parkland
                                   Building Supplies (Sicamous)
Cedar Siding                       CIL Select                      ??
                                   7406 Base Accent
                                   External Acrylic Satin FInish

                                   BLK 3P5
                                   OXR 5P1
                                   GRN 2P45
                                   WHT 0P24

                                   Purchased from Parkland
                                   Building supplies (Sicamous)




                                                                                  97
28.        List of Pictures


Figure 1 View from cabin deck - early morning................................................................. 4
Figure 2 Living Room ........................................................................................................ 9
Figure 3 Kitchen ................................................................................................................. 9
Figure 4 Key holder in thermometer ................................................................................. 10
Figure 5 Key under laundry platform ............................................................................... 11
Figure 6 Key Centre .......................................................................................................... 12
Figure 7 Generator showing control panel........................................................................ 15
Figure 8 Generator oil fill & drain .................................................................................... 16
Figure 9 Generator – control panel detail (engine off) ..................................................... 17
Figure 10 Generator maintenance panel ........................................................................... 18
Figure 11 Generator with front cover removed ................................................................ 19
Figure 12 Generator battery detail .................................................................................... 19
Figure 13 Battery under cabin (connected to charger & cabin) ........................................ 21
Figure 14 Battery power master switch (on right) ............................................................ 22
Figure 15 Power outlet by washing machine .................................................................... 23
Figure 16 Power outlet by microwave .............................................................................. 23
Figure 17 Power outlet in South bedroom closet .............................................................. 24
Figure 18 Power outlet - by front window ........................................................................ 24
Figure 19 Inverter outlet (white outlet on right) ............................................................... 26
Figure 20 Inverter - switching on...................................................................................... 27
Figure 21 Boat switches - right of wheel .......................................................................... 28
Figure 22 Boat switches - left of wheel ............................................................................ 29
Figure 23 Speedo sensor - ready for storage ..................................................................... 30
Figure 24 Speedo sensor - operational position ................................................................ 30
Figure 25 Large boat emergency kit ................................................................................. 31
Figure 26 Small (fishing) boat emergency kit .................................................................. 32
Figure 27 Stern Light - mounting point ............................................................................ 33
Figure 28 Stern light - alignment for mounting ................................................................ 33
Figure 29 Stern light - pole mounted ................................................................................ 34
Figure 30 Stern light - pole locked in place ...................................................................... 34
Figure 31 Connecting boat to buoy................................................................................... 37
Figure 32 Dock fully extended ......................................................................................... 38
Figure 33 Dock – one of the chain adjustment points ...................................................... 39
Figure 34 Boat - parking at dock ...................................................................................... 40
Figure 35 Toiletries boxes ................................................................................................ 41
Figure 36 Water sediment filter ........................................................................................ 42
Figure 37 Water line valve (behind cabin) ....................................................................... 43
Figure 38 Water valve turned off ...................................................................................... 44
Figure 39 Water system T valve purging air .................................................................... 45
Figure 40 Water bucket in stream ..................................................................................... 46
Figure 41 Furnace ............................................................................................................. 51
Figure 42 Furnace - front cover removed ......................................................................... 52


98
Figure 43 Furnace - inspection cover opened ................................................................... 53
Figure 44 Furnace - pilot light switch ............................................................................... 53
Figure 45 Furnace - valve turned to ON ........................................................................... 54
Figure 46 Furnace thermostat ........................................................................................... 55
Figure 47 Furnace intake / exhaust vent ........................................................................... 56
Figure 48 Fridge burner assembly .................................................................................... 57
Figure 49 Fridge burner - proper flame ............................................................................ 58
Figure 50 Fridge pulled away for maintenance ................................................................ 59
Figure 51 Fridge back plate and top grill .......................................................................... 60
Figure 52 Fridge cardboard chimney ................................................................................ 61
Figure 53 Fridge flame straightner (removed) .................................................................. 62
Figure 54 fridge chimney .................................................................................................. 62
Figure 55 Fridge thermostat with burner removed ........................................................... 63
Figure 56 Fridge burner with flame orifice and flame tubes disassembled ...................... 64
Figure 57 burner tubes showing alignment notch on inner tube ....................................... 65
Figure 58 Fridge gas line .................................................................................................. 66
Figure 59 Fridge drip bowl ............................................................................................... 66
Figure 60 Fridge door open (shutdown) ........................................................................... 67
Figure 61 Stove / Oven ..................................................................................................... 68
Figure 62 Stove with pilot lights accessible ..................................................................... 69
Figure 63 Oven with pilot light accessible ....................................................................... 70
Figure 64 Oven with close-up of pilot light assembly ...................................................... 71
Figure 65 Stove ready for shutdown ................................................................................. 72
Figure 66 Water heater - closed ........................................................................................ 73
Figure 67 Water heater - open for lighting ....................................................................... 74
Figure 68 Water heater - switch set to light pilot (button depressed) ............................... 74
Figure 69 Water Heater - Pilot light assembly.................................................................. 75
Figure 70 washing machine and drain pipe ...................................................................... 76
Figure 71 Water heater draining ....................................................................................... 76
Figure 72 Water drain hole below water heater room ...................................................... 77
Figure 73 Washing Machine ............................................................................................. 78
Figure 74 Washing machine drainage............................................................................... 78
Figure 75 drying clothes - inside ...................................................................................... 79
Figure 76 Radio situated for good reception..................................................................... 81
Figure 77 Radio - power OFF ........................................................................................... 82
Figure 78 Tool Kit ........................................................................................................... 85
Figure 79 Drill Bit Set....................................................................................................... 86
Figure 80 Electric Metering Tool Kit .............................................................................. 86
Figure 81 Water Taxi (winter cabin access) ..................................................................... 91
Figure 82 Winter gear ....................................................................................................... 91




                                                                                                                             99
29.    Index

12 volt, 20                               gas to oil mixture, 35
antifreeze, 87, 89, 90, 94                generator, 3, 13, 15, 17, 20, 22, 94
bacteria, 42, 44                          hair dryer, 90
Bilge pump, 28                            Horn, 28, 31
bleach, 46                                inverter, 3, 25, 26
boat, 29, 31, 35, 37, 39                  keys, 10
Boat, 28                                  leak, 47, 48, 68, 70
bugs, 84                                  leaks, 48, 68
buoy, 37, 39                              maintenance, 45
Carbon Monoxide, 47                       pilot, 47, 52, 53, 54, 55, 57, 68, 69, 70,
chain saw, 80                                71, 73
Chain saw, 87                             propane, 11, 47, 48, 49, 50, 52, 68, 70
Chain Saw, 92                             pump, 28, 29, 84
checklist, 3, 49                          radio, 81
choke, 15                                 Shutting Down, 66, 72
Climaloc, 87, 90                          speedometer, 29
Climaloc Shrink film, 90                  stream, 45
CO, 47, 59                                sunk, 37
coliform, 44                              Taxi, 87, 91
Contacts, 84                              temperature, 51, 54, 58, 72
dishes, 46                                thermostat, 54, 55, 58, 72, 89
dock, 38, 39, 40                          Thermostat, 54, 58
ecoli, 42, 44, 46                         Tools, 85, 86, 92, 93
exhaust, 56                               urban legend, 37
filter, 42, 43                            valve, 44, 47, 48, 49, 52, 53, 54
Fireplace, 84, 94                         Washing Machine, 78, 96
first aid, 84                             water, 29, 37, 40, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 48,
flame straightner, 61, 62, 65                68, 73, 75, 84
FRONT, 37                                 Water, 42, 44, 46
furnace, 47, 51, 52, 54, 55, 81, 89       winter, 42, 51, 87, 90, 91, 94
Furnace, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 90, 94   WUG, 3, 54
gas tanks, 35




100

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:27
posted:9/4/2011
language:English
pages:100