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Guide to Postgraduate Study Department of Biological Sciences

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									Guide to Postgraduate Study
  Department of Biological Sciences
       University of Warwick




              October 2007
                            Guide to Postgraduate study

                        Department of Biological Sciences
                              University of Warwick


                                                                         Page
Check list for the first week                                            3

Purpose of the Guide                                                     4
     A brief introduction to the Department                              5
     Post graduate life in the Department                                6
     How long do I need to spend on my PhD ?                             7
     Related training for post graduate students                         7
     Demonstrating to undergraduates                                     8



You, the student                                                          9
      Your supervisor/s                                                  10
      The Advisory Committee                                             10
      Unwritten rules of research                                        11
      Support                                                            12
      Communication in the Department                                    13
      Information we need from you                                       13
      Information you might need from the department                     14



Safety at work                                                           15
      Personal safety on campus                                          15



Working towards finishing your PhD                                       16
     Postgraduate review Process                                         16
     7-week Review                                                       18
     7-week Report                                                       20
     7-week Review Comment Form                                          21
     First Year Review                                                   22
     First Year Report                                                   24
     First Year Review Comment Form                                      25
     Second Year Review                                                  26
     Second Year Report                                                  28
     Second Year Review Comment Form                                     39
     Third Year Review                                                   30
     Thesis Plan                                                         32
     Third Year Review Comment Form                                      33



Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)              Page 1 of 78
Finishing your PhD                                                           34
      Submitting your Phd                                                    34
      General guidance                                                       34
      Completion of Laboratory Work                                          37
      Preparing a Thesis                                                     38
      Guidelines from the University of Warwick                              40
      Guidelines from the Department of Biological Sciences                  41
      Common errors found in thesis                                          45
      Binding the thesis                                                     46
      Submitting the thesis                                                  46
      What happens after submission?                                         47
      The oral examination (viva voce examination)                           48
      Requirements for each degree                                           51
      What do I need to do when I have finished                              53



Computing Facilities within the Department                                   55



Societies                                                                    59
      Overseas Societies                                                     62
      Welfare Services Available to Students                                 65
      University Shuttle Bus                                                 76

Appendix A                                                                   54
Appendix B                                                                   59
Appendix C                                                                   65
Appendix D                                                                   69
Appendix E                                                                   70
Appendix F                                                                   71
Appendix G                                                                   72
Appendix H                                                                   73
Appendix I                                                                   74
Appendix J                                                                   75
Appendix K                                                                   76-




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                  Page 2 of 78
Check list for the first week


      Make sure that you have enrolled on-line. You should have received a letter from the
       University stating how you do this but for more information on how to enrol, how to set up
       your new email address and collect your University card go to:
       http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/ourservices/enrolment/welcome/.

      Give your contact details to the postgraduate office in the department and make
       sure that your records with them are correct.

      Meet with your supervisor to let them know that you have arrived.

      Find out when the introductory courses are running and attend all of these.

      Generally have a wander around and find out how to use the departmental library
       and where the postgraduate study rooms are.

      Find out codes for any doors that you require.

      If you wish to apply for a car parking permit go to
       http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ancillary/carparks/. You will then need to email
       carparking@warwick.ac.uk with your name and University number and state that
       you are a full time postgraduate research student in the department of Biological
       sciences in order to extend the parking permit for car park 1A at Gibbet Hill.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                       Page 3 of 78
                                Guide to Postgraduate Study

                                Department of Biological Sciences
                                      University of Warwick



Purpose of the Guide
This handbook provides a wide range of information for all graduate students in the
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick.

Please read the first few pages (the beginning) as soon as possible, use the rest of
the booklet as we suggest and the need arises. There are three sections

The Beginning – the first few weeks at Warwick
During your PhD – your progress and monitoring, support and safety
The end – preparing and submitting your thesis

Should you have any questions

       Refer to this booklet
       Ask your fellow post graduates, those in the second and third year have the most
        recent experience and will have faced many of the issues that you come across
       Ask your supervisor
       Ask for help at Biological Sciences Post Graduate Office (pgbio@warwick.ac.uk)
       If none of the above provides a solution please come and talk with me, Professor
        Laura Green, Director of Post Graduate Affairs. The most reliable way to contact
        me is through email (laura.green@warwick.ac.uk) and we can agree a time to meet.

The disclaimer bit
Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this guide is as accurate as possible. However,
some parts may be incorrect, either because of errors or because of changes to guidelines by the
department, the university or other bodies (such as funding agencies). I apologise for the errors (please let
me know of any you come across), but there is little I can do about changes to guidelines (other than inform
students as soon as possible about any that I become aware of).




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                    Page 4 of 78
                                           Starting your PhD

A brief introduction to the Department

The Department of Biological Sciences is a consistently high-rated research department, having
been given a rating of 5 in each of the Research Assessment Exercises.

There is a critical mass of researchers:

       60 academic staff
       20 research fellows and honoraries
       70 technical support staff
       70 postdoctoral research fellows
       110 postgraduate students

The Department is arranged into four Research Themes:

        Populations and Environmental Sustainability
        Infection and Immunity
        Cell Biology and Biochemistry
        Animal and Physiological Sciences

In addition, there are a number of cross-cutting research interest groups enabling academic staff to
work together on interdisciplinary research topics.

The theme structure means that a high level of investment can be maintained in new and improved
instrumentation and facilities. Specialised facilities include:

       Molecular Biology Services (transcriptomics, DNA sequencing, real-time PCR).
       Proteomics Services (gels, Q-TQF mass spectroscopy)
       Microbial and viral containment laboratories
       Computational facilities
       Plant, animal and microbial laboratory facilities
       Microscopy (cryo-EM, confocal)

The Department receives substantial support from the Research Councils, charities and other
institutions, government departments and British and overseas industry.

        150 active grants
        £6.3 million income (2006-2007)
        £8 million per annum new grant value
        £30 million total grant value

Departmental Administrative functions
The Department of Biological Sciences has a departmental administrative team providing effective,
integrated, pro-active and responsive support services for the Department‟s activities and staff.
The administrative team comprises five sub-teams:

       Finance and General Administration
       Personnel
       Library
       Information Technology
       Academic Administration

More than 20 staff work within these sub-teams. Over the next few weeks please read Appendix A
for more information on each area of administration.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                             Page 5 of 78
Post graduate life in the department

Over the first few weeks you will
    Read scientific papers
    Meet with your supervisor
    Attend introductory courses
    Prepare your first written report and meet with your advisory committee

You are joining a large group of post graduate students. Because of this, many of the departmental
activities that will assist you to progress to an independent scientist follow a planned schedule.
Through these activities you can not only develop and demonstrate your scientific progress but
also develop writing and presentation skills and other related key skills, which are essential for life
after a PhD whatever you choose as your final career.

The table below summarises the time table of academic activities that you will follow over the three
years of your PhD. These help you and your supervisor to assess your progress. Details of what
you need to do at each stage are in the section called “working towards finishing your PhD”.
Please read the section for 7-week reports now.


Year of study   October          November       May                   June / July   Possible
                                                                                    outcomes
First           Welcome and      Submission     Submission of first   Interview     Continue to
                introductory     of 7 week      year report.          with          second year
                courses          report, meet   Attendance at         committee     Asked to leave*
                                 with           post graduate                       Asked to
                                 committee      symposium                           resubmit and be
                                                                                    re-interviewed
Second                                         Preparation of       Interview       Continue to third
                                               poster.              with            year
                                               Submission of        committee       Asked to write up
                                               written report.                      work as an MSc
                                               Attendance at                        with no funding*
                                               post graduate
                                               symposium.
Third                                          Oral presentation    Interview       Advice and
                                               of work at           with            discussion on
                                               symposium.           committee       time line for
                                               Submission of                        thesis
                                               written thesis plan.                 preparation and
                                               Attendance at                        submission
                                               post graduate
                                               symposium
Fourth          All laboratory   Submission of thesis by 30th September 2011
                work
                complete

* Sadly we occasionally have students who do not settle into their research programme and it is
not fair on the student, fellow students, supervisor or department to permit a student to continue
who is clearly not progressing or taking responsibility for their work.

We aim to avoid this at all costs: it is distressing for students and staff. Ultimately it is a
student’s responsibility to demonstrate good progress and knowledge at each assessment.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                               Page 6 of 78
How long do I need to spend on my PhD ?
The University of Warwick recommends that full-time students spend at least 1800 hours per year
on their PhD work. Students unable to commit to this length of time are advised to register part-
time for their PhD. To do the calculation for you - this is 8 hours a day, 5 days per week, for 45
weeks per year. In other words, treat your PhD as a regular job and you will progress well. Add in
other training areas and reflection from your PDP to consider whether you are happy woth your
progress and development.

Attending seminars within the department
The Departmental Friday Seminars and any meetings organized for the Research Group to which
they belong are compulsory for post graduates. These form part of the training programme as
formal teaching that is required by the Research Councils. It is also essential for your future career
that you can listen, understand and discuss your fellow academics work. Postgraduates must also
present seminars to the relevant Research Group at regular intervals.

Attending seminars within the university
There are a wide range of research seminars in other departments, these are open to all the
university so do go along to any that are of interest.

External meetings and courses
As a department we will help all postgraduate students to attend at least one relevant meeting
which includes international participation during their 2nd or 3rd Year. There are limited funds
available and students will have to find some funding from elsewhere.

These meetings help you familiarise yourself with the work of internationally-recognised scientists
in your own and closely related fields, and provides a perspective for your own research.
Attendance at meetings and courses is also a good way to put faces to names – these people are
possible future employers.

Find out from your supervisor and group the meetings that they attend. A list of some meetings is
in Appendix B.

Related training for post graduate students

Postgraduate training courses
To be an effective research scientist, it is important to develop a range of skills in addition to
competence in the laboratory. These extra skills, termed generic or transferable, include self-
management, effective communication (both written and oral) and active career development.
Traditionally, little attention has been paid to the explicit development of generic skills. However,
given that the range of career options open to PhD scientists has expanded considerably over
recent years, proficiency in generic skills is of increasing importance. The training package
provided by the Department of Biological Sciences and University of Warwick recognises the
opportunities available to you once you have completed your doctoral studies and combines
research-orientated workshops together with modules to increase your generic skills.

The following pages outline the training programme that you will be required to undertake as part
of your PhD. The training package is divided into two parts: Part 1 is compulsory for all PhD
students, while Part 2 offers a range of generic skills modules. It is your responsibility to attend
those skills courses that are most appropriate for you. When deciding which courses to take please
talk over your choice with your Research Supervisor and/or one of the Departmental Course
Organisers (listed overleaf).




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                               Page 7 of 78
Department Course Organisers:

Dr Corinne Smith                               Dr Teresa Pinheiro
Rm B129 (Bio Sci)                              Rm B124 (Bio Sci)
Tel: (5)22461                                  Tel: (5)28364
Email: Corinne.smith@warwick.ac.uk             Email: T.Pinheiro@warwick.ac.uk

Department Postgraduate Training Website:
http://template.bio.warwick.ac.uk/intranet/groups/postgrad/pghome.htm

University Postgraduate Training Website:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/academicoffice/postgrad/gsp/

Demonstrating to undergraduates

Another aspect of training is to assist those younger in their training with their studies.

Second and Third year postgraduate students are eligible to demonstrate laboratory practicals to
undergraduates in the Department. Occasionally, First and Fourth year students will also be
invited to demonstrate, especially if they have skills considered essential for the smooth running of
particular laboratories. It is a requirement of those postgraduate students holding a research
council studentship that they demonstrate as requested. Other postgraduates can opt out if
they wish, but as this is an opportunity to earn money it is highly unusual for students to refuse to
demonstrate.

Postgraduate demonstrators are used in all laboratory classes in the Department except for final
year research projects. Some classes require demonstrators with certain skills and academics
may choose which postgraduates they wish to act as demonstrators. Those not chosen are then
allocated any of the general molecular biology/microbiology classes.

All demonstrators are expected to attend a training course held in mid-September and run by the
Centre for Academic Practice. The session covers academic topics such as how people learn and
include practical exercises such as marking reports. Students who fail to attend this training
session may not be allocated demonstrating duties in the Department.

Demonstrators are expected to:
   Read the manual before the laboratory class.
   Attend any briefing sessions before the class.
   Mark reports as directed by the academic in charge of the class.
   Ensure that undergraduates are working safely.
   Answer to the best of their ability any questions posed by the undergraduates.

Payment is for a job well done and any complaints about the quality of demonstrating can result in
loss of payment. Typical student complaints about demonstrators are that they haven‟t read the
manual, are rude and know nothing. Not knowing an answer to a question is not held against you
(unless the answer is in the manual). You are not expected to be know-it-all gods - even though
undergraduates expect it !




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                 Page 8 of 78
You, the student
You are the only person who can make your time as a post graduate enjoyable and challenging.
You can do this by taking responsibility for yourself and your research. In 3 – 4 years time the
thesis that you produce will be written by you and will report the research that you have done.

No one else can do your research for you and no one else can write your thesis.

My supervisor said to me that during a PhD it is important to experience at least once, a time when you do
not think you can do the PhD physically (lab experiments all night, sampling from farms in cold wet weather,
swimming in warm salty oceans) or mentally. So, a comforting thought for when you reach these times, all
supervisors have also once been PhD students and so they can understand what you face.

Because of this we recommend that you
   1. Become familiar with your area of research as soon as possible
          a. Read recent articles
          b. Read the groups research in this area
          c. Talk to anyone and everyone
          d. Hit the web

    2. Think about your PhD in smaller chunks of time than 3 years and plan work within these
       shorter time intervals. Students have to produce
          a. a seven week written report
          b. a 9 month written report
          c. a 2 year poster and report
          d. a 3 year presentation and report outlining the thesis
    These assessments also provide useful intervals for planning your research

    3. Ensure that you get to know your supervisor
          a. What is the best way to contact them?
          b. How often will you meet?
          c. What preparation will you make before you meet?
          d. What will you do as a result of discussions after you have met?
          e. How long before a deadline do they need, to see drafts of reports?
          f. What else is going on in their working life?
          g. Where do you fit in to the research in the group?

    All students and all supervisors are different; it is worth working at developing a good working
    relationship with your supervisor.

    4. Use the research team.
          a. Get used to asking questions
          b. Seek guidance and advice

Students are formally supported by
    their supervisor
    their Advisory Committee
    the Department
    the University

You will also find support among
    your fellow post graduate students
    post doctorate researchers in your research group
    folk that you meet while taking further training courses
    members of the university that you meet through sport, music and other university activities
    the student counselling service, when you need more support, see Appendix C.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                   Page 9 of 78
Your supervisor / s
This is the academic who will oversee your research and training. You will be working in their field
of expertise and joining their research group. Academics have many demands on their time other
than research, from undergraduate teaching to administrative jobs. They are multi tasking whist
you will be highly focused on one research topic. As a consequence your priorities and your
supervisors are different. This may also mean that your supervisor is not always available to meet
at short notice, read reports with a 12 hour turn around etc. It does not mean that your supervisor
is not approachable or not interested, it just means that they are busy people.

It is a good idea to establish how you and your supervisor are going to work together over the next
few years. This takes time, but don‟t give up. Establish a pattern of relating, consider
When will you meet? (every week initially, longer intervals as work progresses well, whenever you
have something exciting or desperate to report (failed experiments are often quite exciting for
supervisors, don‟t hide them). Think about, what you will prepare in advance of the meeting? What
does your supervisor think is good progress? Can you help them in other projects or preparation of
a report?

Here is a quote from one of my students….
The relationship between the student and supervisor is an important one and probably the single most
important factor that determines the progress of your PhD. The role of your supervisor should be to guide
you, to help you to make decisions about your work and to give you support and encouragement when
needed. However, it is important to remember that no one will know more about the day to day progress of
your PhD than you will. Bearing this is mind it is important to always be honest with your supervisor,
particularly about what you have achieved (and more importantly what you have not!) Only then will they be
able to help you effectively. In order to gain the most from your relationship you should be well organised,
plan your meetings well and listen carefully to what opinions and advice your supervisor will give. Their
knowledge is invaluable and you should try to gain as much from their experiences as you can. However, it
is also important to remember that your supervisor will not know the answers to everything and you should
try to be proactive and do as much research as you can. Talking to other people about your work is also
helpful. It will get you to think about your work more and may give you some useful feedback from a
different perspective.

The Advisory Committee
You are assigned an Advisory Committee that will provide guidance and feedback to the student
during the project. The Committee is NOT a surrogate supervisor, it is expected to advise not
supervise. Each Committee consists of two specialists (with research interests relevant to the
project) and one non-specialist, one of the specialists will act as Chair and co-ordinate feedback
from the Committee to the student. The Committee decides whether a student has satisfied
the requirements expected of the 7-week and First Year Reviews and can proceed with their
PhD. You are encouraged to communicate with the Chair of their Committee on a regular basis.

In addition to these lines of support the department has three further committees that are
for all post graduates

1. Postgraduate Student Staff Liaison Committee
The Postgraduate Staff Student Liaison Committee (PG-SSLC) functions as a forum for discussion of any
matter of concern to the postgraduate students and/or staff in the Department of Biological Sciences.

2. Postgraduate Affairs Committee
The Postgraduate Affairs Committee is responsible for the Department's postgraduate review process. It
contains representatives from all parts of the process, including students and supervisors. See Appendix D
for details.

3. Postgraduate Management Group
A Postgraduate Management Group has been established to respond to individual issues and consists of
The Director of Graduate Studies, The deputy Chair of Department, the Chair of the relevant Advisory
Committee, and a member of staff with expertise in the appropriate research area. The Management Group
is likely to consider examples where the postgraduate process is not progressing satisfactorily.
Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                  Page 10 of 78
Unwritten rules of research
In your experimental work you will quickly discover the unwritten rules of research:
     Any experiment will take approximately ten times longer than you think to perform satisfactorily.
     When you are at the most crucial stage you will make your first discovery - a vital ingredient has not
         been prepared/ordered.

        Just when you arrive to use it, a shared piece of equipment will be booked.
        Subsequently, having abandoned your experiment and discarded the last aliquot of the expensive
         reagents you will find that the person who booked the equipment is either on holiday or decided two
         days previously that they did not after all need the machine but forgot to cancel their booking.

        The first attempt at a new procedure gives publication-quality results except for the annoying
         absence of a vital control. The next six repeat experiments will fail.
        When it finally works the results will contradict your first conclusions.


Advice from colleagues within the department (and elsewhere)

        The more you do during the first year of your PhD the happier you will be at the end.
        Don't use the word impossible.
        The point of a PhD is not to write a thesis - it is to become a scientist.
        Science works in stories - disbelieve them.
        Experiments that 'fix' are better than those that 'break'.
        Ask - what will the experiment show and will I be able to publish it?
        Never, ever, ever hide variability.
        Never, ever calculate 'statistics' without understanding what they mean (attend the training course !).
        Biological Science Departments are flammable.
        Experiments never proved anything.
        You get out of a PhD what you are prepared to put in.
        Bounce back from disappointments - it's a fact of real research that things sometimes don't work out.
        Seek help as soon as possible.
        Have short and long term goals.
        Regularly review where you are and where you are trying to get to.
        Keep reading papers - not just when it's time to write up.
        My strength lies solely in my tenacity (Louis Pasteur).
        In the field of observation, fortune favours only the prepared mind (Louis Pasteur).

Three recent comments from supervisors

I want my students....
....to be prepared to immerse themselves in science.....
....to bring their head to the lab, not just their hands....
....to find scientific discoveries interesting (even when not in their field)....
....to be excited by their work....
....to be involved in the group, not just their own project....
(...to work hard....) – goes without saying!

I hope for consistency, enthusiasm and a willingness to work through difficulties in a student.

A good student is one who engages with the problem, becomes increasingly interested, and develops
independence of thought and action. A clear understanding of the difference between technical and
academic is invaluable. A realisation of the way that science works and its role in society helps.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                        Page 11 of 78
Support
Students often feel pressured during their first year because of the perceived need to generate
results. Karl Marx once remarked, 'Beginnings are difficult in all the sciences'. For PhD students,
the first year or 18 months is always an acutely taxing time, involving multiple decisions and
transitions. You are simultaneously setting out on an extended life-project, choosing and
committing to an intellectual project and an approach, which you then have to live with, and
upgrading your normal work outputs to doctoral level.

The lack of results in the first year of a PhD is very common - indeed, few theses include data
generated in the first year of the project. The first year should be recognised much more as a
training period, learning techniques, getting to grips with the literature, and generally finding out
how to do research. Stick in there, things generally get easier as materials accumulate and
chunks of work get completed.

The third year is another time when students can experience pressure in generating enough
results to complete a thesis. It is impossible to generalise on how much data is required for a
thesis (different types of projects will generate different amounts of data) and students should
consult closely with their supervisors. Remember that the PhD is awarded more on your ability to
carry out scientific research than on the absolute amount of data generated.

Where can I get help?
Many students experience problems of one kind or another during their postgraduate studies. You
do not have to try to deal with these problems on your own and the Department and the University
have systems in place to try to help - but we can only do this if we are aware of the difficulty, so
please keep us informed. Other students, your supervisor, other academics and your advisory
committee are all available for you to talk to. Students concerned about the confidentiality of the
process should discuss their problems with the Senior Tutor (Professor Laura Green) or the
Chairman of the Department (Professor Andrew Easton).

Students with concerns about their supervision or other aspect of the postgraduate programme
should raise these with an appropriate person as soon as possible. Talk to your supervisor (s) and
those teaching on the skills programme. If you cannot resolve the issue then see the Chair of your
Advisory Committee, the Head of your Research Group, the Senior Tutor (Professor Laura Green),
or the Chair of the Department (Professor Andrew Easton).

The University Counselling Service
The Counselling Service is situated in the Student Development and Support Centre in University
House. The University Senior Tutor has general responsibility for all aspects of student welfare
and acts within the university welfare network of student support. Students may consult him on
issues such as accommodation; study skills; academic issues; appeals against academic
decisions; disciplinary charges.      The Senior Tutor      can be contacted via e-mail on
counselling@warwick.ac.uk or an appointment can be made by telephoning the secretary on
23761. For more information, see the website at
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/tutors/counselling


University Hardship Funds for Postgraduate Students
The University has set aside funds to assist postgraduate students experiencing financial difficulties:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/ourservices/funding/current/hardshipfunds/




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 12 of 78
Communication in the department

E-mail
You are allocated an E-mail address that ends in “@warwick.ac.uk” and this is the one that we will
use to contact you with information.

You may already have an existing address (such as hotmail or Yahoo). If this is the case, please
set up a „forwarding rule‟ to your Warwick account so that effective communications via e-mail can
be maintained.

Paper mail
These are located near to the coffee room on the first floor of C-block. All postgraduate students
(and several other groups) share pigeon holes depending upon the first letter of their surname.
External mail, internal mail and departmental correspondence is placed in the pigeon hole on a
daily basis. Each letter of the alphabet has two boxes; one for new mail and one for older mail yet
to be collected. You should check you pigeon hole on a regular basis.

Notice boards
The departmental notice board is situated on the first floor of C-block, near to the bridge. The
noticeboard contains a variety of notices of general interest.

Information we need from you

Your bank details
For DTC students these are paid every 3 months in advance. You can only be paid directly into
your back account and so need to complete a form with your bank details and submit this to the
office.

For further details on payments and eligibility for supplementary payments please see Appendix E.

      It is important that you inform the Biology PG office of any changes to your contact details
       (address, telephone number, or e-mail address).
      You should also notify the Graduate School at University House of changes to your name
       or address.
      A name change will require documentary proof such as a marriage or deed poll certificate,
       or a passport.

Current contact details
Your current address and telephone number must be given to your supervisor and to the
Departmental Postgraduate Office, so that contact can be made in an emergency.

Change of Name or Address
Please ensure that you notify the Graduate School at University House of changes to your name or
address. A name change will require documentary proof such as a marriage or deed poll
certificate, or a passport. Please ensure that you also notify your academic department of
changes made to your records.

Annual Report to the Graduate School
The Graduate School requires you to submit a report on your progress at the end of each
academic year; this will be an opportunity for you to highlight any achievements you have made
during the course of the year and also raise any specific problems that may have emerged. A
report form is sent to all research students in June or July and is also available from the Graduate
School Office.
In exceptional cases, where progress is unsatisfactory, students may be required to withdraw (see
Regulation 19 governing termination of enrolment of candidates for Higher Degrees and
Postgraduate Diplomas in the University Calendar).
Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                            Page 13 of 78
Information you might need from the department

Student Status Letter
You might be asked for written confirmation that you are a student. We have a standard letter for
this, please complete the online application form to request a "To Whom It May Concern" letter
confirming your student status:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/ourservices/studentrecords/statusletter/

this then needs to be signed by your supervisor.

Applying for financial support to attend meetings
There is a limit to the money available to reimburse postgraduate students with costs for attending
conferences or travel to meetings. In order to ensure that financial economies are exercised and
'fair' treatment prevails, it is important that you adhere to the Departmental procedure. There are
two stages in obtaining reimbursement of expenses; complete an Approval Form before your trip,
and then complete form FR11a after your trip to claim reimbursement. The forms are available
from the Enquiries Office and the intranet. See Appendix F for details on this process.

Where can I work?

Room B001 is designated as the Postgraduate workroom.
It is accessed from the spiral staircase in B119 and has desks, lots of power points, computer
network ports, radiators (although you may doubt this when you first enter) and the welcoming
smell of cooking from the refectory.
Students should arrange desk space with Maureen Arch (Enquiries Office), who will also give
details of the access code.
Students outnumber desks and a sharing strategy may need to be implemented. Postgraduates
can work in several areas within the Department (library, computer room)

Library Carrels
There are a small number of carrels available in the Main University Library for the use of research
students. Application forms for carrels are available from the Graduate School Office in October.

Annual leave
The Research Councils allow up to a maximum of eight weeks holiday per year. This includes
public holidays and the times at Christmas and Easter during which the University is nominally
closed. Postgraduates must consult with their supervisors before taking leave of absence.


Illness
In the interest of the efficient running of the laboratory postgraduates must inform their supervisors
if they are absent because of illness or any other reason. In cases of repeated or prolonged
illness, the Chairman of the Department will require a Medical Certificate.

What if my supervisor is away?
Supervisors away from the Department for > 1 month will discuss this with their students. Typically
they will ask a fellow member of staff to act as supervisor for their postgraduate students. Staff will
inform the Departmental Postgraduate Office of the dates they will be absent and the name of their
replacement.

Protecting Intellectual Property arising from your postgraduate studies
During the course of your postgraduate studies, you may generate Intellectual Property (IP), for
example “know-how”, copyright, or patentable inventions. It is important that you take steps to
protect this IP to ensure that not only you are able to receive recognition for the inventions and
knowledge that you generate, but also to ensure that you retain the rights to use your research
results in further programmes of research. See Appendix G.


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                              Page 14 of 78
Safety at work


                            Safety is a very high priority in the Department and the Departmental
                            Safety Officer (Professor Sir Howard Dalton) will contact all new
                            members of the Department to ensure that they are aware of the
                            relevant regulations and local rules.

                            We are required to comply with the many rules and regulations of the
                            Health and Safety Executive, the Home Office, and others. The
                            regulations are under constant review and, during your time at
                            Warwick, some will change and new ones will appear - rarely do any
                            disappear. We are overseen very closely to ensure that we adhere to
                            the various regulations and it is essential that you learn and comply
                            with those that are relevant for you. Not only is this a legal requirement
but the regulations are designed to ensure your safety and the safety of others.


The department has a Health and Safety policy. It is your responsibility to know how to keep
yourself and others safe. All post graduates are expected to attend lectures on safety at work.
Even if you do not think you will use a laboratory please attend these lectures and take the policy
of the department seriously. Please read Appendix H for the departmental safety policy.

We also work to high standards in the laboratory and when handling biological material.
   There are rules on how to behave in the laboratory, see Appendix I.
   No biological material brought into the department from whole animals to cells can come
      into the department without permission. See Appendix J for further details.

Personal safety on campus

While the University Security tries to take every precaution to ensure the safety of staff and others
within the University grounds, it is important to realise that the campus is open to the public and
this may result in problems arising. If any person is seen acting suspiciously in any way, anywhere
on campus, please contact Security immediately (Extension 22083).

There have been incidents in Tocil Wood. This route to campus should be used with caution at all
times of day, especially by anyone who is unaccompanied.                  The University's official
recommendation is to use the footpath along the main road if you are alone. If anyone has to
make this trip during the evening and cannot find anyone to accompany them, there is a shuttle
bus that runs between the two sites until 2.00 am. Please telephone Security (22083) who will
arrange this service - please be advised that there could be a wait of 20 minutes for the shuttle bus
to arrive. See Appendix K for the bus timetable and route.

Any incidents which are reported to Security will be notified to the Chairman who will post a notice
to inform staff.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                             Page 15 of 78
                               Working towards finishing your PhD

Postgraduate Review Process
The postgraduate review process in summary
The are four major review points in the assessment of postgraduate progress:
      7-week review             Submitted 7-weeks after registering at Warwick
      First year review         Submitted in the May after registering at Warwick
      Second year review        Submitted in the May 2 years after registering at Warwick
      Third year review         Submitted in the May 3 years after registering at Warwick

Advisory Committees
The advisory committee is there to help students assess their own progress, offer support and ideas (which
are ideas, not a recommendation to change thesis direction) and ultimately to assess whether sufficient
progress is being made. This may seem conflicting to you as a student, both support and assessment, but
use your committee well and they can be a useful resource. The reality is that unsatisfactory progress is
usually the results of lack of interest or ability. Any other reason for lack of progress will be temporary and
can be addressed if you talk to your supervisor. PhD progress is very inconsistent, but there is always
progress – even if this six months of experiments that did not turn out as expected or computer analysis that
is not as predicted.

7-week review - will indicate whether the students progress is satisfactory, if not, the committee will discuss
this with the student and supervisor
First Year Review - will indicate whether the students progress is satisfactory, if not, the committee will
discuss this with the student and supervisor and students may be asked to leave if progress has not been
satisfactory.

Second year review - will indicate whether the students progress is satisfactory, if not, the committee will
discuss this with the student and supervisor Students may be requested to write up their work as an
MSc unfunded if insufficient progress has been made in the second year of the studentship.

7-week review
     Submitted 7-weeks after registering at Warwick.
     Student (with supervisor) prepares a report (7-10 pages) that describes the project.
     Student meets with members of the Advisory Committee.
     Advisory Committee provides written feedback to the student and supervisor.

First year review
       Submitted in the May after registering at Warwick (see below for late starters).
       Student (with supervisor) prepares a progress report and includes a plan for Years 2 and 3.
       Student meets with members of the Advisory Committee.
       Advisory Committee provides written feedback to the student and supervisor.

Second year review
     Submitted in the May 2 years after registering at Warwick (see below for late starters).
     Student (with supervisor) prepares a progress report and includes a plan for Year 3.
     Student presents a poster at the Postgraduate Symposium.
     Student meets with members of the Advisory Committee.
     Advisory Committee provides written feedback to the student and supervisor.

Third year review
      Submitted in the May 3 years after registering at Warwick (see below for late starters).
      Student (with supervisor) prepares a thesis plan (including progress and plans for completing the
      project).
      Student presents a seminar at the Postgraduate Symposium.
      Student meets with members of the Advisory Committee.
      Advisory Committee provides written feedback to the student and supervisor.

Fourth year review (for students who have not submitted their thesis after 42-44 months)
     Regular contact with the Senior Tutor.
     If necessary, student meets with the Postgraduate Management Group.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                    Page 16 of 78
Late starters
Although most students register at the University in September/October, some do not and need to be
accommodated within the review process. In all cases, the 7-week review is completed 7 weeks after
registering at Warwick. However, for the annual reviews, students are included into the most appropriate
schedule; students registering before February are considered as having started in the previous October
(their First Year Review will be scheduled in the May following their registration), students registering in
February or later are considered as starting in the following October (their First Year Review will be
scheduled in the May the year after their registration). The dates can also be changed to accommodate
individual circumstances. The important thing is that the student, supervisor, committee and PG office are
aware of any changes to the schedule.


A paper trail
It is not only appropriate for us to operate to acceptable standards with regards to our postgraduate process,
we must also be able to demonstrate that we operate to these standards. This places certain responsibilities
on students, supervisors and members of Advisory Committee. One aspect is the creation of a paper trail
that provides evidence that we use appropriate operating standards, such evidence would be a major factor
in responding to any complaints received by the Department. The Department has tried to develop a PhD
review process which is as simple and unobtrusive as possible. It is important that all students, supervisors
and members of Advisory Committees are aware of the review process and engage fully and completely in
the system.


What happens if my Advisory Committee does not respond ?
All Committee members have been informed of the need of engaging in the review process and Committees
generally meet well within the advised timings. Work commitments for some members can sometimes make
meetings difficult to arrange and the student is asked to be understanding with this regard. However, all
Committees should meet and provide feedback to the student within a reasonable time and students who are
not contacted by their Committee, or fail to receive written feedback on their project, should inform the
Director of Graduate Studies (Professor Laura Green).




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                   Page 17 of 78
7-week Review

       Student submits a 7-to-10 page report 7 weeks after arriving at Warwick.
       Student meets with Advisory Committee to discuss the report.
       Committee Chair provides written feedback to student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.
       If necessary, student submits a revised report to the Advisory Committee.
       If necessary, project is referred to Postgraduate Management Group.



Submitted 7-weeks after registering at Warwick (mid-November for students starting in September/October),
the 7-week report is a project review and experimental plan. The report is prepared by the student but
supervisors are expected to provide significant advice on content and presentation. The student should give
a copy of the report to each member of their Advisory Committee and to the Biology PG Office (the easiest
way is by using the appropriate pigeon holes). The report is considered by the Advisory Committee and
discussed at a meeting (~30 minutes) between the student and members of the Committee. All members of
the Committee should comment on the report and, preferably, attend the meeting with the student. Where it
proves difficult to convene a full Committee within a reasonable timeframe, the Chair can decide to meet with
the student with whichever committee members are available. The Chair provides written feedback to the
student, the supervisor and the Biology PG Office, incorporating the views of all members of the Advisory
Committee. Comments from the Committee should be included on the 7-week Comment Form provided by
the Department (see below). If a Committee recommends that the report is NOT acceptable it will be
returned to the student and supervisor for revision. The revised report will be reconsidered by the
Committee. Very few students are expected to be referred to the Postgraduate Management Group at the 7-
week review. A poorly written report is not grounds for referral (students should be asked to prepare a
revised report). In contrast, refusal to submit a report should be reported to the Management Group.

The possible outcomes of the 7-week review are:
  1. The student is recommended to proceed.
  2. The student is requested to provide a revised report to be considered by the Advisory Committee.
  3. The student is referred to the Postgraduate Management Group.

Students are understandably anxious about the outcome of their 7-week review and the co-operation of the
Advisory Committee in this matter would be appreciated. It is expected that the review process of 7-week
reports will be completed within 14 weeks of a student registering at Warwick (for students starting in
September/October, the process is expected to be complete by Christmas).


Preparing the Report
The report should contain 7-to-10 pages (12 point, 1.5-line spacing), excluding title page and references, and
will be returned if it deviates significantly from this. Format is a personal choice but the following sections
would normally be expected in most reports:
Title Page - all reports should use the Title Page provided by the Department (see below).
         Abstract - not to exceed 200 words.
         Aims - clearly identified and preferably hypothesis-driven.
         Introduction - sufficient background to explain the significance of the project.
         Results - probably short (possibly very short) section describing experimental results.
         Experimental Plan - see below.
         Bibliography - complete and in an acceptable format.

The Experimental Plan should include sufficient detail to allow the Advisory Committee to determine that
the project is not only appropriate for a PhD but that it is also achievable. There should be an account of the
first 12 months work, stating the experimental approaches that you expect to use and giving enough details
to allow an appraisal of the proposals. There should also be a section that considers how the work might
develop in Years 2 and 3, this can legitimately include options which can only be decided in light of
experiments.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                    Page 18 of 78
Role of the Student
      To prepare the report on time (7-weeks after arriving at Warwick).
      To submit copies of the report to each member of their Advisory Committee.
      To submit a copy of the report to the Biology PG Office.
      To discuss the project with their Advisory Committee.
The preparation of the report should accompany your laboratory work and is not expected to be your sole
activity in these first few weeks.

Role of the Supervisor
    To advise and assist the student in preparing the report.
    If necessary, to help revise reports considered unsuitable by the Advisory Committee.

Role of the Advisory Committee
     To meet with the student within 3 weeks of receiving the report.
     To provide a written response to the student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.
     If necessary, to return unsuitable reports to the student and supervisor for revision.
     If necessary, to refer the student to the Postgraduate Management Group.
The Chair of the Committee is responsible for co-ordinating the interaction of the Committee with the
student, the supervisor and the Biology PG Office.

Timings for the process
Wk 7          Student submits report to Advisory Committee.
Wk 8-10       Student meets with Committee.
Wk 10         Committee provides written feedback to student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.
Wk 12         If necessary, revised reports submitted to Committee.
Wk 14         If necessary, students referred to Postgraduate Management Group.
It is expected that the 7-week review for students starting in September/October will be completed by
Christmas. Although most students register at the University in September/October, some do not and need
to be accommodated within the review process. In all cases, the 7-week report is completed 7 weeks after
registering at Warwick.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                               Page 19 of 78
                                                 7-week Report

                                    Department of Biological Sciences
                                          University of Warwick




             Title of the project (concise and informative)




                                                 Your name




Committee:
    Dr One (Chair)
    Dr Two
    Dr Three




Supervisor:




Date report submitted: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Date of registration at Warwick: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 20 of 78
                                     7-week Review Comment Form

             Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick

Name of Student: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chair of Advisory Committee: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Members who contributed to the report: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Members who did not contribute to the report: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .



1.       Is the research project likely to make a significant contribution to knowledge ?



2.       Do the research methods appear appropriate and achievable ?



3.       Is there a realistic plan for continuation of the project ?



4.       Does the student demonstrate a satisfactory understanding of the project ?



5.       Any other comments ?


Recommendation for PhD progression- please tick (this section MUST be
completed)

           Proceed
           Request revised report (provide comments to guide the revision)
           Refer to Postgraduate Management Group


Comment on written report for 7-week stage                           Comment on oral skills for 7-week stage
           Above standard                                            Above standard
           Average                                                   Average
           Below average                                             Below average

Chair's signature: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                Date: . . . . . . . . . . . . .



Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                                   Page 21 of 78
First Year Review

       Student submits a 12-15 page report in May following their registration at Warwick.
       Student meets with Advisory Committee to discuss the report.
       Advisory Committee determines whether the project is suitable for a PhD.
       Committee Chair provides written feedback to student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.
       If necessary, student submits a revised report to the Advisory Committee (August).
       If necessary, project is referred to Postgraduate Management Group (September).



Towards the end of Year 1 (end-May), students prepare a report of their project for submission to the
Advisory Committee. The report is prepared by the student but supervisors are expected to provide
significant advice on content and presentation. The student should give a copy of the report to each member
of their Advisory Committee and to the Biology PG Office. The report is considered by the Advisory
Committee and discussed at a meeting (~30 minutes) between the student and members of the Committee.
All members of the Committee should comment on the report and, preferably, attend the meeting with the
student. Where it proves difficult to convene a full Committee within a reasonable timeframe, the Chair can
decide to meet with the student with whichever committee members are available The Chair provides
written feedback to the student, the supervisor and the Biology PG Office, incorporating the views of all
members of the Advisory Committee. Comments from the Committee should be included on the First Year
Review Comment Form provided by the Department (see below). The Committee is required to confirm
that the project is suitable for a PhD and that the student should proceed with the project. If a Committee
recommends that the report is NOT suitable it will be returned to the student and supervisor for revision.
Revised projects will need to be approved by the Advisory Committee before the student is permitted to
continue. If the Committee considers the revised report to be unsuitable, the project is referred to the
Postgraduate Management Group who will make a decision on behalf of the Department.

The possible outcomes of the First Year review are:
  1. The student is recommended to proceed.
  2. The student is requested to provide a revised report to be considered by the Advisory Committee.
  3. The student is referred to the Postgraduate Management Group for further consideration.

Students are understandably anxious about the outcome of their First Year review and the co-operation of
the Advisory Committee in this matter would be appreciated. It is expected that the review process of First
Year Reviews will be completed within 4 weeks of a student submitting their Review.


Preparing the Report
The report should contain 12-to-15 pages (12 point, 1.5-line spacing), excluding title page and references,
and will be returned if it deviates significantly from this. Format is a personal choice but the following
sections would normally be expected in most reports:
        Title Page - all reports should use the Title Page provided by the Department (see below).
        Abstract - not to exceed 200 words.
        Aims - clearly identified and preferably hypothesis-driven.
        Introduction - sufficient background to explain the significance of the project.
        Results & Discussion - describing your results and their relationship to other studies.
        Experimental Plan - detailed outline for Years 2 and 3.
        Bibliography - complete and in an acceptable format.

Role of the Student
    To prepare the report on time (mid-May of Year 1).
    To submit copies of the report to each member of their Advisory Committee.
    To submit a copy of the report to the Biology PG Office.
    To discuss the project with their Advisory Committee.

Role of the Supervisor
    To advise and assist the student in preparing the report.
    If necessary, to help revise reports considered unsuitable by the Advisory Committee.


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                 Page 22 of 78
Role of the Advisory Committee
     To meet with the student within 4 weeks of receiving the report.
     To provide a written response to the student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.
     To decide whether the student should proceed to Year 2.
     If necessary, to return unacceptable reports to the student and supervisor for revision.
     If necessary, to consider whether revised reviews are suitable for proceeding to Year 2.
     If necessary, to refer the project to the Postgraduate Management Group.
The Chair of the Committee is responsible for co-ordinating the interaction of the Committee with the
student, the supervisor and the Biology PG Office.

Timings for the process
Mid-May       Student submits report to Advisory Committee.
Early-June    Committee meets with student to discuss the report and the project..
Mid-June      Committee provides written recommendation to student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.
End-August If necessary, revised projects submitted to Committee.
Mid-Sept      If necessary, revised projects submitted to Postgraduate Management Group.

Although most students register at the University in September/October, many do not and need to be
accommodated within the review process. For the annual reviews, students are included into the most
appropriate schedule; students registering before February are considered as having started in the previous
October (their First Year Review will be scheduled in the May/June following their registration), students
registering in February or later are considered as starting in the following October (their First Year Review
will be scheduled in the May/June the year after their registration).




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                   Page 23 of 78
                                               First Year Report

                                    Department of Biological Sciences
                                          University of Warwick




             Title of the project (concise and informative)




                                                 Your name




Committee:
    Dr One (Chair)
    Dr Two
    Dr Three




Supervisor:




Date report submitted: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Date of registration at Warwick: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 24 of 78
                                   First Year Review Comment Form

                    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick


Name of Student: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chair of Advisory Committee: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Members who contributed to the report: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Members who did not contribute to the report: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .



1.       Is the research project likely to make a significant contribution to knowledge ?



2.       Do the research methods appear appropriate and achievable ?



3.       Does the student have knowledge and skills appropriate to this stage of the project
?



4.       Is there a realistic plan for completion of the project ?



5.       Any other comments ?


Recommendation for PhD progression- please tick (this section MUST be
completed)

           Proceed
           Request revised report (provide comments to guide the revision)
           Refer to Postgraduate Management Group
Comment on written report for year 1                       Comment on oral skills for year 1
           Above standard                                            Above standard
           Average                                                   Average
           Below average                                             Below average


Chair's signature: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                Date: . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                                   Page 25 of 78
Second Year Review

       Student submits a 4-8 page report in May of Year 2.
       Student presents a poster of their work at the Postgraduate Symposium (May/June).
       Student meets with Advisory Committee to discuss the report and poster.
       Committee Chair provides written feedback to student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.



Towards the end of Year 2 (end-May), students prepare a report of their project for submission to the
Advisory Committee. The report and poster are prepared by the student but supervisors are expected to
provide significant advice on content and presentation. Students also prepare a poster of their work to be
presented at the Department's Postgraduate Symposium (May/June). The student should give a copy of the
report and poster (a reduced A4 or A3 version of the poster is sufficient) to each member of their Advisory
Committee and to the Biology PG Office. The report and poster are considered by the Advisory Committee
and discussed at a meeting (~30 minutes) between the student and members of the Committee. All
members of the Committee should comment on the report and, preferably, attend the meeting with the
student. Where it proves difficult to convene a full Committee within a reasonable timeframe, the Chair can
decide to meet with the student with whichever committee members are available The Chair provides
written feedback to the student, the supervisor and the Biology PG Office, incorporating the views of all
members of the Advisory Committee. Comments from the Committee should be included on the Second
Year Review Comment Form provided by the Department (see below).

Although there is no formal process of recommendation to proceed to Year 3, the Committee is expected to
comment on whether the project is likely to be appropriate for the completion of the PhD.

Preparing the Poster
Advice on presenting the poster will be provided at the appropriate time.

Preparing the Report
The report should normally contain 4-to-8 pages (12 point, 1.5-line spacing), excluding title page and
references, and will be returned if it deviates significantly from this. The report should focus more on what
remains to be done than what has already been achieved, there is no need to include a lengthy background
to the project and existing results can be summarised. There should be a clear strategy for bringing the
research to completion in Year 3. Format is a personal choice but the following sections would normally be
expected in most reports:
        Title Page - all reports should use the Title Page provided by the Department (see below).
        Abstract - not to exceed 200 words.
        Aims - clearly identified and preferably hypothesis-driven.
        Results - summarising your existing results.
        Experimental Plan - detailed outline for Year 3.

Role of the Student
    To prepare the report on time (mid-May of Year 2).
    To prepare a poster of their work.
    To submit copies of the report and poster to each member of their Advisory Committee.
    To submit a copy of the report and poster to the Biology PG Office.
    To discuss the report and poster with their Advisory Committee.
    To present the poster at the Postgraduate Symposium.

Role of the Supervisor
    To advise and assist the student in preparing the report and poster.

Role of the Advisory Committee
      To meet with the student within 4 weeks of receiving the report and poster.
      To provide a written response to the student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.
The Chair of the Committee is responsible for co-ordinating the interaction with the student, the supervisor
and the Biology PG Office. Although there is no formal process of recommendation to proceed to Year 3,
the Committee is expected to comment on whether the project is likely to be appropriate for the completion
of the PhD.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                   Page 26 of 78
Timings for the process
Mid-May       Student submits report and a copy of the poster to Committee
End-May       Student presents poster at Departmental Postgraduate Symposium.
Early-June    Committee meets with student to discuss report and poster.
Mid-June      Committee provides written response to student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.

Although most students register at the University in September/October, many do not and need to be
accommodated within the review process. For the annual reviews, students are included into the most
appropriate schedule; students registering before February are considered as having started in the previous
October, students registering in February or later are considered as starting in the following October.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                 Page 27 of 78
                                            Second Year Report

                                    Department of Biological Sciences
                                          University of Warwick




             Title of the project (concise and informative)




                                                 Your name




Committee:
    Dr One (Chair)
    Dr Two
    Dr Three




Supervisor:




Date report submitted: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Date of registration at Warwick: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 28 of 78
                                Second Year Review Comment Form

             Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick

Name of Student: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chair of Advisory Committee: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Members who contributed to the report: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Members who did not contribute to the report: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


1.       Is the research project likely to make a significant contribution to knowledge ?



2.       Do the research methods appear appropriate and achievable ?



3.       Does the student have knowledge and skills appropriate to this stage of the project?



4.       Is there a realistic plan for completion of the project ?



5.       Was the poster of an appropriate standard ?



6.       Any other comments ?

Recommendation for PhD progression- please tick (this section MUST be
completed)

           Proceed
           Request revised report (provide comments to guide the revision)
           Refer to Postgraduate Management Group


Comment on written report for year 2                       Comment on oral skills for year 2
           Above standard                                            Above standard
           Average                                                   Average
           Below average                                             Below average


Chair's signature: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .               Date: . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                                   Page 29 of 78
Third Year Review

       Student submits a 4-8 page Thesis Plan in May of Year 3.
       Student presents a seminar of their work at the Postgraduate Symposium (May/June).
       Student meets with Advisory Committee to discuss Thesis Plan and seminar.
       Committee Chair provides written feedback to student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.



Towards the end of Year 3 (end-May), students prepare a Thesis Plan of their project for submission to the
Advisory Committee. The Thesis Plan should outline the schedule for bringing the PhD work to its
conclusion. There should be a clear strategy for bringing the experimental work to completion in the
remaining few months in the laboratory. The Thesis Plan should summarise the content for each chapter
proposed for the thesis, highlighting experiments that remain to be performed. A realistic timetable for
completing this experimental work must be included. Students also prepare a seminar of their work to be
presented at the Department's Postgraduate Symposium (May/June). The Thesis Plan and seminar are
prepared by the student but supervisors are expected to provide significant advice on content and
presentation. The student should give a copy of the Thesis Plan to each member of their Advisory
Committee and to the Biology PG Office. The Thesis Plan and seminar are considered by the Advisory
Committee and discussed at a meeting (~30 minutes) between the student and members of the Committee.
All members of the Committee should comment on the report and, preferably, attend the meeting with the
student. Where it proves difficult to convene a full Committee within a reasonable timeframe, the Chair can
decide to meet with the student with whichever committee members are available The Chair provides
written feedback to the student, the supervisor and the Biology PG Office, incorporating the views of all
members of the Advisory Committee. Comments from the Committee should be included on the Third Year
Review Comment Form provided by the Department (see below).

There is no formal process of recommendation to proceed to Year 4. The feedback from the Committee
should include a discussion on the amount of data generated during the project, although it should be
recognised that it is impossible to give definitive advice on the amount of material required for a successful
thesis.

Preparing the Seminar
Advice on presenting the seminar will be provided at the appropriate time.

Preparing the Thesis Plan
The Thesis Plan should normally contain 4-to-8 pages (12 point, 1.5-line spacing), excluding title page and
references, and will be returned if it deviates significantly from this. It should summarise the content for each
chapter proposed for the thesis. Experiments that remain to be performed should be highlighted, and a
realistic timetable for completing this experimental work must be included. The summary for each chapter
should be fairly detailed. A likely date for submission of the completed thesis should also be given. Format
is a personal choice but the following sections would normally be expected in most plans:
          Title Page - all plans should use the Title Page provided by the Department (see below).
          Abstract - not to exceed 200 words.
          Aims - clearly identified and preferably hypothesis-driven.
          Introduction - list topics likely to be covered in the finished Introduction.
          Results - summarise each chapter in terms of results obtained and work to be completed.

Role of the Student
    To prepare a seminar of their work.
    To prepare a Thesis Plan on time (mid-May of Year 3).
    To submit copies of the Thesis Plan to each member of their Advisory Committee.
    To submit a copy of the Thesis Plan to the Biology PG Office.
    To present the seminar at the Postgraduate Symposium.
    To discuss the seminar and Thesis Plan with their Advisory Committee

Role of the Supervisor
    To advise and assist the student in preparing the seminar and Thesis Plan.


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 30 of 78
Role of the Advisory Committee
      To meet with the student within 4 weeks of receiving the Thesis Plan.
      To provide a written response to the student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.
The Chair of the Committee is responsible for co-ordinating the interaction with the student, the supervisor
and the Biology PG Office. Although there is no formal process of recommendation to proceed to Year 4,
the Committee is expected to comment on whether the project is likely to be appropriate for the completion
of the PhD.

Timings for the process
Mid-May        Student submits Thesis Plan to Committee
End-May        Students present seminar at Postgraduate Symposium.
Early-June     Committee meets with student to discuss Thesis Plan and seminar.
Mid-June       Committee provides written response to the student, supervisor and Biology PG Office.
These timings are suitable for Students starting in September/October. Equivalent timings will apply to
students starting at other times.

Although most students register at the University in September/October, many do not and need to be
accommodated within the review process; students registering before February are considered as having
started in the previous October, students registering in February or later are considered as starting in the
following October.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                  Page 31 of 78
                                                   Thesis Plan

                                    Department of Biological Sciences
                                          University of Warwick




             Title of the project (concise and informative)




                                                 Your name




Committee:
    Dr One (Chair)
    Dr Two
    Dr Three




Supervisor:




Date plan submitted: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Date of registration at Warwick: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                   Page 32 of 78
                                  Third Year Review Comment Form

                                       Department of Biological Sciences
                                             University of Warwick


Name of Student: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chair of Advisory Committee: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Members who contributed to the report: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Members who did not contribute to the report: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .



1.       Is the research project likely to make a significant contribution to knowledge ?



2.       Does the student have knowledge and skills appropriate to this stage of the project
?



3.       Is there a realistic plan for completion of the project ?



4.       Was the seminar of an appropriate standard ?



5.       Any other comments ?
As there is no formal process of recommendation to proceed to Year 4 the Committee is expected to
comment on whether the project is likely to be appropriate for the completion of the PhD.




Comment on oral skills for third year
           Above standard
           Average
           Below average



Chair's signature: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                Date: . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                                   Page 33 of 78
                                         Finishing your PhD
Submitting your PhD

When must I submit?

All full time PhD students must submit their theses within 4 years of the date of their registration in the
University. This applies to students on both 3-year and 4-year programmes.

Students are strongly encouraged to submit well within the 4 year period because this is one way in which
organised and something missing? Extension beyond the 4 year term can only be granted by the University
Graduate School and can only be obtained in very exceptional circumstances such as documented long-
term illness. Applications for extensions require the support of the Department.

General guidance

When you begin, and for some time afterwards, the preparation of your thesis will seem a long way off. This
is dangerously deceptive and you should ask a final year student for his/her views on the time available to
generate data for a thesis. You must start thinking in terms of planning and writing a thesis as soon as
possible - preferably NOW !

Begin by examining a few theses in the Departmental library, but do not assume they are all perfect models !
Writing a clear scientific document is difficult; it is not easy to think and express yourself clearly on complex
and sometimes debatable matters. We will encourage you to acquire writing skills by asking you to prepare
reports at various stages of you graduate research but the primary motivation must be your own. The only
sure way to improve your thinking and communication skills is by practice. Read the literature as carefully as
though you had to defend the work as your own, and identify the failings as well as the strengths of the work.
Remember that the authors will be unlikely to point out flaws in their experiments or logic, and no paper is
perfect in every detail. This sort of exercise will improve your critical faculties.

Get to know the literature in your field as quickly and thoroughly as you can. Then think about it in relation to
your own aims and ideas. It is too late when you are writing your thesis to find a seminal paper published
two years previously that throws doubt on your approach. Use the library facilities inside and outside the
department including the photocopier, but read what you copy. We all fall into the trap of assuming that
having a copy of a paper means that we will somehow absorb the information without having to go through
the time-consuming process of actually reading it. Many papers are now available in electronic format.
Again, storing files to a hard disk is not the same as reading them.

Do not neglect research areas which you may think are peripheral to your work. Keep informed about other
areas by reading reviews and attending seminars. You will be expected to understand the wider context of
your own research and you may be able to adapt ideas and techniques from other areas for your own use.

Reading other peoples ideas can too often be used as a substitute for having your own, and can make it
difficult to develop your own thoughts. There are no hard and fast ways to avoid this other than by recording
your thoughts and notions, however vague, so that you can return to them later. In this way you can develop
your own ideas as a basis for your work.

Experiments are difficult, expensive and mean hard work. They are thus essentially undesirable, though
unavoidable. This means that you must carry them out only as a dire necessity. In view of this it is unwise
not to spend time thinking and discussing how experiments should be carried out. With sufficient thought
you may find that a particular experiment may not be worthwhile - not doing unnecessary experiments is an
excellent way of saving time. On the other hand, having decided that an experiment is necessary do it to the
best of your ability - an experiment that is poorly conceived and performed will generate poor results. Also
remember that if an experiment is worth doing at all it is worth doing at least twice. Never rely on the results
of a single experiment. This is particularly true in work where there is a lag between carrying out the work
and the results. A backup will save time in the event of (likely) failure or (just possible) success.

When doing experiments record everything. This will avoid the embarrassment of being unable to repeat
your work or being unable to explain precisely what went on. Record what you did rather than what you
intended to do.


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 34 of 78
When you obtain a result, think about it and write down your thoughts. If you write as you go along you will
save a lot of time at the end of your graduate research when every minute counts and when your once clear
reasoning may have been blurred by intervening events. It is all too common to think that simply by carrying
out bench work progress is being made. Careful consideration of each step should ensure that the next
experiment is even better than the last. Similarly, merely being in the Department or lab does not constitute
work. Work means thinking about, doing and discussing research.

In the laboratory, you will be surrounded by people who can offer the benefits of practical experience. Make
use of them. It is likely that someone knows much more than you about certain procedures or equipment. It
is not an indication of inferiority to admit ignorance and to seek assistance from others.

Finally you should realise that you are entering a discipline which is populated with individuals who eat, sleep
and live research. If you are to be successful, you cannot compete with them on a part-time basis. It is
necessary that you apply yourself to your career with all of the energy that you can muster. The main
difficulty in doing this is that no one will be able to do it for you. You must become self-propelled. Despite all
of the above, research should, and can, be fun - but only if you do it well.

Managing your ideas
From "Authoring a PhD" by Patrick Dunleavy.

        The best way to get a good idea is to get a lot of ideas - Linus Pauling.

Jotting down thoughts whenever you have them is an obvious but crucial aspect of increasing your creativity.
Empirical research shows that on average we can hold only about seven ideas at the forefront of our
attention. Very clever people are perhaps able to focus on nine ideas at once, while less adept people may
only be able to concentrate on five ideas at a time. When we are confronted by larger sets or longer lists of
ideas we tend to react by randomly dropping some elements from the forefront of our attention. Hence if you
think of a lot of ideas without jotting them down, you may appropriately be anxious that you will forget them.

One way we normally counter this fear of forgetting is to keep recycling the same seven (or five or nine)
things in the forefront of our attention, the repetitions serving to reassure us that the original notions are still
there, still retrievable. The more stressed we get (often without noticing it) the more we may repeat this
operation, squeezing out having new ideas. To get new ideas you need to break out of this cycle of anxiety
and recycling. Jotting things down as notes in a regularly maintained or filed notebook, or in a well-saved
and cumulative file on your PC, is a key step. It creates a 'paper memory', which normally helps to give you
the psychological security to move on and think of new ideas, secure in the knowledge that you will not
forget what was value-added or worthwhile in today's session.
Jotting everything down also means keeping a notebook of problems or questions or possible ideas for
development with you constantly - for use in seminars, during conversations with friends and colleagues,
even when you are out and about, and even perhaps by your bed at night. It is best to have a system for
your jottings that allows you to keep your records safely, but also allows you to extract sheets for refilling in
appropriate folders or files. You cannot afford to have these materials floating around on whatever scraps of
paper are to hand, for then they may still get lost, undermining the psychological security you need to stop
recycling what you already have and to instead think of new ideas. You can also use this notebook for
capturing references to potentially relevant literature.

If you jot things down you can also take advantage of the well-documented tendency for people saturated in
a field of study to get creative ideas or breakthrough insights by chance associations, almost when they are
not looking for it.

Other sources of information
The University Graduate School produces a series of guidelines for supervision and monitoring:
        http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/ourservices/gsp/guidance/student_handbook.pdf
        http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/ourservices/gsp/admin/graduateschool/guide-supervisefee.pdf

The BBSRC guidebook for postgraduate students includes a lot of general information of interest to non-
BBSRC students.
     http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/funding/training/studentships_booklet.pdf

The following New Scientist site contains useful information on 'doing a PhD':
      http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns;jsessionid=FBDCPGEBLFOO?id=mg18524872.200

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                         Page 35 of 78
Relevant reading
Copies of these books are available for reference use in the Departmental Library and loanable copies are
available from the Main Library.

Cohen, J. and Medley, G.F. (2000)
Stop working and start thinking: a guide to becoming a scientist.
Stanley Thornes

Dunleavy, P.
Authoring a PhD. How to plan, draft, write and finish a doctoral thesis.
Plagrave study guides.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                Page 36 of 78
Completion of Laboratory Work

All full time PhD students are required to submit their theses within 4 years of the date of registration at the
University. It can take as much as 6-9 months to prepare a thesis, students are encouraged to complete their
laboratory work as early as possible.

Laboratory work
All full time PhD students on 3-year programmes are expected to complete their laboratory work within 36
months of joining the Department. After this time, registration as a full time student ceases, although the
University of Warwick maintains registration to allow access to facilities required for writing up.
All full time PhD students on 4-year programmes are expected to complete their laboratory work within 39
months of joining the Department.

An additional 3 month grace period
Students wishing to continue laboratory work after their expected initial period (36 months for 3-year
students, 39 months for 4-year students) must obtain the agreement of their supervisor. If the supervisor is
agreeable, laboratory work may continue for a maximum of 3 months past the end of the expected initial
period (end of December for 3-year students starting in September/October; end of March for 4-year
students starting in September/October). If the supervisor does not agree to an extension of laboratory work
the student is not permitted to continue in the laboratory - students may appeal against this decision to the
Chairman of the Department. No funding to cover laboratory costs will be provided by the Department for
this additional work. Store's codes for all students are suspended at the end of their expected initial period
and students will not be able to use the code of another individual (regardless of whether the student has the
agreement of their supervisor to remain in the laboratory).


Formal application for further extension to laboratory work
Students who wish to continue in the laboratory beyond the 3 month grace period must make a formal
Extension Application to the Department. The application will be considered by the Postgraduate
Management Group (previously the Extensions Committee).

(a)   Applications must be made at least 2 months before the end of the 3 month 'grace' period granted to
      all students. Applications received after this will not be considered.

(b)   Applications are made by the student with the co-operation of the supervisor. However there may be
      occasions when a direct approach to the committee by a student alone may be appropriate.

(c)     The application must contain the following information:
        The length of time being requested for the extension.
        An explanation why the work has not been completed in the expected timeframe.
        A clear indication of the work to be done and a timetable for the work.
        An outline of any progress made in preparing the thesis.

(d)   Applications will be considered for a maximum of 3 months. The Postgraduate Management Group
      may approve only a portion of the extension with the remainder being subject to satisfactory progress.

(e)   In reaching a decision, the Management Group may meet independently with both student and
      supervisor to discuss the circumstances surrounding the application, and may consult any other party
      who they feel can offer them useful information, e.g. members of the student's Advisory Committee.

(f)   The Group's decision will be made available within one month of the application. If permission is
      given to work in the laboratory, no funding to cover laboratory costs will be provided by the
      Department.

Grounds on which applications are likely to be successful fall into two categories:
     (i)   misfortune outside the student's control e.g. all mice dying/ freezer failure/ late change of
           project/ poor supervision etc.
     (ii)  demonstrable research benefit to the student and the department of a short period of additional
           work e.g. to complete a piece of publication work which would enhance both the department's
           and student's reputations where transferring the project to another person would result in
           unacceptable delay/inefficiency. Applications on the grounds of insufficient data due solely to
           insufficient time and effort spent will not be considered sympathetically.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 37 of 78
Preparing a Thesis
The 4 year deadline
All full time PhD students are required to submit their thesis within 4 years of the date of registration at the
University. Failure of students to submit their theses within the 4 year period is viewed very badly by
Research Councils and other funding bodies and will have a negative effect on our applications for funding
for future postgraduate students. As a consequence extensions are rare.

Signing on while writing up
Students who receive financial support for only 3 years (and do not receive any financial support while
writing their thesis) are able to claim financial support as they are technically unemployed. However, you are
advised that some local offices are aware of this practice and may investigate your claims. The issue is that
you should be seeking work while unemployed - and be available for work. Claiming that you are looking for
work but are trained only to be Professor of Biology is unlikely to win many friends at the unemployment
office. In extreme cases, they may ask you to retrain to increase your chances of finding employment.

One approach (which many of you will be doing anyway) may be to apply for postdoctoral positions while
writing up. Keeping copies of the applications, and any replies, will provide a useful record of your attempts
to find suitable employment if required to do so by the authorities.

Obviously, students on 4-year DTAs receive support for their fourth year and are not eligible for claiming
unemployment benefits.


General advice on the preparation of a thesis
The primary piece of advice is start early. It will always take longer than you expect to complete a thesis
and an early start will leave a little leeway for any untoward occurrences.

A thesis is regarded as a publication. It is deposited in both the University and British National Libraries and
is available world-wide. It must therefore be accurate. While presentation is not everything, even
outstanding data need to be presented well. Average or very ordinary data can be transformed by
appropriate presentation. Poor presentation can fail a thesis. In preparing a thesis it is necessary to
consider several factors, many of which will be relevant in particular cases only. This means that each thesis
is unique and there can be no definitive description of the "perfect thesis". The initial consideration of the
structure of the thesis should be carried out by the student together with the supervisor but it must be
remembered that the thesis is to be the work of the student and a supervisor will only offer advice, which
can be accepted or rejected. Overlaid on this are the requirements set down in the University regulations,
primarily relating to format, which are obligatory for all. The attached document, which will be given to all
external examiners, is aimed at giving general and specific advice about the presentation of a thesis within
the Department of Biological Sciences. It is intended as an adjunct to advice from a supervisor, not a
substitute and has been generated as a result of feedback from students, supervisors and, most importantly,
examiners.

When considering the preparation of a thesis it is worthwhile to decide what you want to say. Having written
a substantial part it would be undesirable to have to scrap it to begin again because you have changed your
mind about the structure. The best way to do this is to assemble all of your data, preferably in the most
complete form you can, and to look through it all to decide on the best order in which things will be
presented. This has two main advantages;
      (i)    you will see what else you may need to fill any holes in the data.
      (ii)   having decided on the order that the data is best presented in, it should be possible to write in a
             logical way with each section following on from the other.

If possible, it is best to generate the photographs and diagrams for the results section. These will allow you
to consider the order of events you are going to present and will make it easier when you are writing the
results sections (it is always easier to refer to a figure when you have it in front of you rather than trying to
construct a figure to fit the text). For statistical data it is essential that an appropriate style of presentation is
used so that the point being made is not obscured. For this type of presentation, consultation with a
knowledgeable colleague before writing is strongly encouraged.

The order in which the sections of a thesis are written is largely a matter of individual choice but remember
that it is always very difficult to go back to a section thought to have been finished and alter it to take account
Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                         Page 38 of 78
of something you have said in a section that will appear later in the thesis. This is particularly true of the
Introduction which will set the scene for the thesis. If you choose to write the introduction in the early stages
go back to it when everything else is completed and read it to ensure that it does not contain extraneous
material which is not relevant.

Having started writing on a word processor ALWAYS back up your work EVERY DAY, or more frequently
(using the autosave function to save every 15 minutes or so is an easy option). Keep more than one up-to-
date copy, preferably in more than one place. The reasons are obvious. Similarly, keep extra copies of
diagram files. Make sure that the various copies of the thesis remain identical; errors can be introduced into
a thesis at a late stage by use of a non-updated file for printing.

The role of the supervisor
Your supervisor (to quote the regulations) "is permitted to advise you" on the preparation of your thesis.
They should give general advice and comments and are likely to agree to read over the work. However, it is
unreasonable to expect a supervisor to act as a ghost writer or a proof-reader (a simple spellcheck will often
achieve this). But remember, you are ultimately responsible for your thesis and will be required to defend it
in an oral examination. On the basis of the thesis and your performance in the viva, the examiners will
decide if you satisfy the requirements for the award of the degree.

The supervisor is not the examiner
The University makes the following statement in its advice to postgraduate students:
     http://www2.warwick.ac.uk//services/academicoffice/ourservices/examinations/postgraduate/

The duty of a supervisor is to help you carry out research and present your results to the best advantage.
The duty of an examiner is to consider whether the results so presented meet the appropriate academic
standards. The duties of a supervisor and examiner should be kept separate and distinct. You should note
that your supervisor's support for submission of the thesis is not a guarantee of its success.

How long will it take to write ?
It should not be necessary to take more than 6 months to complete the writing of a thesis. After all, working
8 hours a day, 5 days a week for 6 months requires an average output of only 2 pages of double spaced A4
paper per day for a 250 page thesis (a long thesis !).

Think about the reader - before you start
From "Authoring a PhD" by Patrick Dunleavy.

Producing a PhD is normally a longer piece of writing than anything you have ever done before. It may be
the longest text you ever complete, even assuming you enter an academic career and keep writing for many
years. As a scientist you will rarely get three or four years again to work full time on a single research
project. So the simplest reason why it is important to think systematically about how to author a thesis is that
producing so much joined-up text for the first time is unavoidably difficult. The longer the text the more
demanding it becomes for you as an author to understand your own arguments and to keep them marshalled
effectively. It is also harder for your readers to follow your thoughts as the text grows in size. Readers'
difficulties will increase the more unfamiliar the material. This is a substantial problem for PhD students who
are supposed to be undertaking original research. Almost by definition, much of your thesis will be unfamiliar
even to experienced readers.

Writing with readers in mind will hugely help the quality of your text. Seeing things from a reader's
perspective is not an easy task. Academic authors typically spend so long in developing their research,
clarifying their theories, and expressing their arguments in a close-joined way, that they can find it hard to
see how their text will be received and interpreted. For PhD students this problem is especially acute
because the thesis is their first extended piece of writing, and usually has a limited audience whose reactions
are difficult to ascertain.

Acceptable formats
There are requirements set down in the University regulations, primarily relating to format, which are
obligatory for all. This document is aimed at giving general and specific advice about the presentation of a
thesis within the Department of Biological Sciences. It is intended as an adjunct to advice from a supervisor,
not a substitute, and has been generated as a result of feedback from students, supervisors and, most
importantly, examiners. The intention is that it will help to establish the most acceptable format(s) for theses
from this department.


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 39 of 78
Guidelines from the University of Warwick
The Registry produces three relevant documents:

      (i)     Requirements for the presentation of research theses.
              Available upon request from University House, Graduate School Office

      (ii)    Higher degree regulations.

      (iii)   Guidance to students, supervisors and examiners concerning higher degrees by research.

Here are some pertinent extracts from these documents.

"A candidate must, through his supervisor and his Chairman of Department, submit a title for his thesis for
approval by the Board of the appropriate Faculty within the approved period of study".

"To satisfy the requirements of the degree of PhD a thesis shall constitute a substantial original contribution
to knowledge which is, in principle, worthy of publication. The thesis shall be clearly written and well argued
and shall show a satisfactory knowledge of both primary and secondary sources. In addition it shall contain
a full bibliography and, where appropriate, a description of methods and techniques used in the research".

"A thesis should be as short as consistent with the subject and unnecessary length may be to the
candidate's disadvantage. Necessary data not directly required in the thesis might better be placed in
appendices".

"Two copies of a thesis are required unless there is a second internal examiner, in which case three will be
required. The thesis must be printed or typed. Copies may be reproduced by any means - provided that
each copy is entirely legible. The proper size should be A4".

From the Senate meeting of 4th July, 1984:
"Concerning a set of guidelines set out by the Department: Candidates be required to specify in the
bibliography to the thesis the particular set of guidelines used".


The following University website may also be useful:
      http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/ourservices/examinations/postgraduate/guide_to_rexams_05-06.pdf




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                               Page 40 of 78
Guidelines from the Department of Biological Sciences
Comments on style
The accepted style to be used for all PhD theses in the Department of Biological Sciences has changed over
time. The following illustrates the currently adopted format. It is essential that the style is followed. This
means that using certain past theses will NOT be a guide to the required style.

(a)   Theses must be typewritten on good quality A4 paper with a margin of at least 1.5" (4 cm) on the left
      hand side. The margins on the other three sides must be adequate to allow trimming of the pages
      which occurs during hard binding. A margin of 1" (2.5 cm) at the top, bottom and right hand side are
      adequate. Page numbers should be placed at least 0.5" (1.25 cm) into the page at the bottom. Pages
      must be typed on one side only and 1.5 spacing used throughout except in figure legends,
      bibliography and the summary as indicated below. The font used should be Times New Roman in 12
      point. If material included in this thesis has been published, reprints of the relevant publications
      should be bound in with the thesis at the end.

(b)   The title should describe the contents of the thesis accurately and concisely.

(c)   The title page (of each volume if more than one) must give, in the order listed;
        i)     the full title of the thesis and any subtitle.
        ii) the total number of volumes if more than one and the number of the particular volume.
        iii) the full name of the author, followed, if desired, by any qualifications and distinctions.
        iv) the qualification for which the thesis is submitted.
        v) the name of the institution to which the thesis is submitted.
        vi) the department, faculty or organisation in which the research was conducted.
        vii) the month and year of submission.

(d)   The table of contents immediately follows the title page. This must list, in order, with page numbers,
      all relevant subsections of the thesis. These include the title of chapters, sections and subsections of
      the chapters as appropriate, the list of references, the bibliography, the list of abbreviations and any
      appendices.
      If a thesis consists of more than one volume, the contents of the whole thesis must be shown in the
      first volume and the contents of the subsequent volume shown in a separate contents list in the other
      volume.

(e)   A list of tables and figures follows the list of contents and should list all tables, photographs and
      diagrams etc. in the order in which they occur in the text.

(f)   Any acknowledgements should be on the page following the list of contents. This should indicate
      whether any other person(s) has been involved directly in the work. If they have carried out all or
      parts of an experiment this, and the relevant work, should be made clear.

(g)   The declaration follows the acknowledgements under a separate heading. The author must indicate
      in a declaration any material contained in the thesis which has been used before or which has been
      published. If material has been presented previously for another degree it must be clearly identified
      and while it can be used to support a thesis such material cannot be considered as part of the work
      contributing towards the award of a PhD or MD. If the thesis contains joint work the nature and extent
      of the author's individual contribution must be indicated. Usually this will take the form of identifying
      the piece of work carried out jointly as the exception to the author's sole efforts.

(h)   The thesis must contain a summary, not exceeding 300 words. The summary should not extend
      beyond one page of A4 and may be single-spaced to facilitate this. The summary will be a synopsis of
      the thesis and should state clearly the nature and scope of the research undertaken and the
      contribution made to the knowledge of the subject under consideration. It should include a brief
      statement of the method of investigation, if appropriate, an outline of the major divisions of the work
      and the conclusions reached. After acceptance of the thesis the summary will be made available on
      an international database for computer searches. This means that accuracy is paramount.

(i)   Where abbreviations are used a key must be given in the form of an alphabetically listed table. For
      an abbreviation not in common use, the term should also be given in full at the first instance of its use
      in the text followed by the abbreviation in brackets.


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                    Page 41 of 78
(j)   If photographs are included they should be mounted on good quality paper and should be inserted in
      the thesis as close as is practical to the point in the text where they are first mentioned. It is
      permissible to use scanned images in place of photographs if they are of equal quality to
      photographs, and these must be printed on good quality paper to produce an image of photographic
      quality. Photographs or scanned images may be placed on separate pages or, where appropriate,
      embedded in the text at a suitable point. All diagrams must have a figure legend which is placed
      immediately underneath the figure to which it refers. There must be a clear separation of the legend
      and the surrounding text. The legend should contain the figure number, a title, and an appropriate
      description of the figure contents. The figure and associated legend should be on the same page.
      Diagrams larger than A4 are permissible and these should be folded well inside the front edge of the
      thesis to allow for trimming during binding.

(k)   Theses must contain a full bibliography. This section must be single-spaced, with a blank line
      between each individual reference. The references must be cited as shown below.

      When referencing in the text, numbers must not be used. When referring to a paper with two authors
      the style required is, Smith and Jones (1997) or (Smith and Jones, 1997) and for three or more
      authors, Smith et al. (1997) or (Smith et al., 1997). References to papers by the same author(s) in the
      same year should be distinguished in the text and in the reference list by the letters a, b etc. (e.g.
      1995a or 1995a,b).

      In the reference section papers should be listed alphabetically by first author. Papers with three or
      more authors should be listed in chronological order after any other papers by the first author (i.e. the
      alphabetisation should not extend beyond the first three authors). References must include the
      authors (in bold), year of publication, title of the paper in full, the name of the journal (in italics), the
      volume (in bold) and the first and last page numbers, both in full. References to books must include
      the year of publication, title, edition, editor(s) (if any), place of publication and publisher, in that order.
      When the reference is to a particular part of the book, the inclusive page numbers and, if appropriate,
      the title of the chapter, must be given. No deviations from this style will be acceptable.

      Example of a journal reference:
      Kurath, G., Higman, K. H. and Björklund, H. V. (1997). Distribution and variation of NV genes in
      fish rhabdoviruses. J. Gen. Virol. 78, 113-117.

      Example of a book reference:
      Schoub, B. D. and Blackburn, N. K. (1995). Flaviviruses. In Principles and Practice of Clinical
      Virology, 3rd edn, pp. 485-515. Edited by A. J. Zuckerman, J. E. Banatvala and J. R. Pattison.
      Chichester: John Wiley and Sons.


Comments on Content
The primary aim of the author of a thesis should be to consider the field of study, present the data in as clear
and concise a fashion as possible and to place the results in perspective. This is because it is essential to
be able to communicate clearly.

Decisions about the content of the various sections of a thesis have to be made by the author and will be
determined by the nature of the research. For example, while the conventional approach is to have an
introduction followed by materials and methods, results and a final discussion, it may be considered more
appropriate in some cases to have several sections with each containing a methods, results and brief
discussion subsection. The latter organisation is not likely to be common for most laboratory-based projects
and such decisions are best taken in consultation with the supervisor.

Two general points must always be borne in mind:

      i)     Plagiarism is sufficient grounds to fail a thesis.
             When using references and reviews care must be taken to avoid any hint of this.

      ii)    While theses are descriptions of scientific work they must conform to the usual rules of English
             grammar and it is the responsibility of the student to check this aspect. There is no excuse for
             poor English. Similarly, all reasonable attempts should be made to ensure correct spelling.
             Some examples of common errors in theses are given at the end of this document.


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                        Page 42 of 78
Introduction
A general introduction is required. This should be a clear and concise review of the literature of the
relevant field. It should not be an extensive exposition of a complete field of biology. It is expected that
decisions will have been taken to leave out certain topics which, though interesting, are not considered
directly relevant to the field of research. However, this does not mean that the student does not need to
know about them and they are legitimate topics for discussion in the examination. Reference to a good,
recent, review will often suffice for such topics. A degree of balance is called for but the introduction should,
as its name suggests, introduce the areas of interest. It is expected that when a statement is made that the
appropriate reference is cited using the proper format (see below). It is obviously more difficult to decide
what to leave in or take out when a research area spans two disciplines. However it is essential that this be
done. Leaving in large tracts of text of dubious value is a guaranteed way to lose immediately the sympathy
of the examiners. The introduction should conclude with a clear, full, description of the aims of the thesis.
For the aims to be clear it is necessary to clarify the hypotheses being tested by stating them clearly. By
doing this, the various aspects of the introduction can be drawn together.


Materials and methods
The aim of the section is to give sufficient information about the methods employed to allow an assessment
of the results obtained using them. A useful rule of thumb is to consider whether the information given would
allow the reader to repeat the experiments exactly. The section should be written as briefly and concisely as
possible while ensuring accuracy. It is not necessary to write out each method in full. A description of a
method should, wherever possible, merely refer to the relevant paper from which it was taken and do not
write out the protocol. If a modification to the method has been used, that alone should be identified.
Similarly, many of the solutions and media used are standard and it is not necessary to give them. If these
are available in standard laboratory manuals simply quote the reference. It is not necessary to spell out the
constituents of restriction enzyme reactions and a statement to the effect that the recommendations of the
manufacturer were followed is sufficient. When commercial kits have been used these must be clearly
identified and a statement to the effect that the recommendations of the manufacturer were followed is
sufficient unless a modification has been made in which case this alone should be described. It is important
that the purpose of each reagent in a kit is understood as this is a legitimate area for questioning in an
examination.


Results
This section should be divided into subsections or chapters, one for each clearly divisible component of the
thesis. Each subsection should have a brief introduction and discussion relevant to the topic under
consideration. The results should be expressed as clear descriptions of the experiments, without
methodological details, and the results of each relevant experiment with reference to appropriate figures.
The figures themselves require titles and clear and complete figure legends as indicated above. The first
line of the legend should serve as a title, highlighted in bold. A title such as "Graph to show the effect of X
on Y" is adequate. The legends should explain sufficiently clearly the experiment under consideration,
without methodological detail, such that in conjunction with the diagram the figure can be understood without
reference to the text. Lanes should be clearly identified and comprehensible with standards indicated in
each figure. When using numerical data standard error bars should be included wherever possible. A
worked example of each statistical method used should be given in the text. While it may not necessary to
explain the underlying principles of the methods employed it is essential to understand these. Each results
section will contain an element of discussion but wherever possible this should be limited to a consideration
of a critique of the data generated and to whatever conclusions are necessary to lead logically on to the next
section. The conclusions should be kept to the minimum necessary to maintain the flow of the thesis and to
leave general discussion to the relevant section (below) with the minimum of repetition. Wherever practical
all raw data necessary to support conclusions must be presented. In certain circumstances it may not be
necessary to include the original data in the results section e.g. large amounts of nucleotide sequence data
from an automated sequencing machine or data from large numbers of individual assays presented as
averages in the results section. Consideration must be given to the inclusion of this data in an appendix,
referenced appropriately in the main text. Examiners have the right to see the original data on request to
verify specific points or, in some circumstances, to ask that it be included in the thesis for clarification.


Discussion
The discussion section should bring together the various components of the results sections and place them
in the perspective of the published literature. The conclusions drawn should be clearly stated in the context
of the stated aims and hypothesis to be tested. Any potential consequences which may ensue from the

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 43 of 78
conclusions should be considered and if it is possible to test these consequences that should be pointed out.
Inevitably the discussion may involve a small amount of reiteration of the results sections but this must be
kept to a minimum as indicated above. The discussion should involve a detailed consideration of the results
and will draw in relevant information from other areas which may not have been covered in the introduction.
The tone and to some extent content will, of course, be set by the introduction.

If it has been decided to include a discussion with each subsection of the results it is still essential to have a
final discussion. This should not merely be a summary of the results but should draw together the various
strands of the work into a cohesive whole. The aim should be to write the discussion in such a way that it
can be read independently of the rest of the thesis.


Length of the thesis
These should be written clearly and concisely. You should not feel that your thesis must necessarily be as
long as the maximum word limit allowed. You should discuss the appropriate length for your thesis with your
supervisor in view of the nature of the work you have undertaken. The maximum lengths of theses set by
the University are:

MSc and MS shall NOT exceed 40,000 words excluding appendices, footnotes, tables and bibliography.
MPhil shall NOT exceed 60,000 words excluding appendices, footnotes, tables and bibliography.
PhD and MD shall NOT exceed 70,000 words excluding appendices, footnotes, tables and bibliography.

Theses which exceed the word limit may not be accepted for examination.

Theses are frequently too long !
Short theses are quicker to write, cheaper to produce and easier on the examiners. `Length' depends on too
many factors (text, photographs, figures, tables, etc.) to give precise guidance, but somewhere between 200
and 250 pages in total should be more than enough for anyone.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                      Page 44 of 78
Common errors found in theses
Make sure the thesis is well written, organised and proof-read and is not too long. All of these things irritate
examiners. Sloppy presentation can mean sloppy lab work and that means examiners question everything.
The following are just some of the errors that are guaranteed to upset most examiners.

       Incorrect use of capitals and/or italics in nomenclature.

       Use of genus names to mean individual bacteria e.g. Erwinia when Erwinia spp. or Erwinia sp. is
        meant. Note that spp is not italicised. Do not use the same letter for different genera in shorter
        names e.g. using S for both Serratia and Salmonella in the same document is not acceptable.

       Incorrect use of accepted conventions for gene designations. In bacteria the gene mnemonic, the
        letter and the allele number are italicised and no space is left between them. If you start sentences
        with genes the first letter of the mnemonic must not be capitalised. Do not split the mnemonic and
        the gene letter i.e. „lac Z, Y and A‟ is wrong and „lacZYA‟ (or lacZ, lacY and lacA) is correct. When
        describing transposons the number is italicised but the letters are not e.g. Tn5.

       Absorbance and optical density are not synonymous and must be used correctly.

       Incorrect use of apostrophes e.g. DNA's (possessive) instead of DNAs (plural). Especially learn the
        difference between „its (= of it)‟ and „it‟s (= it is). Be aware that computer spell checks invariably get
        this wrong.

       et al. must be italicised and al. but not et must be followed by a full stop.

       Using conditionals with absolutes e.g. more homology (think of more pregnant).

       Lead for led.

       Affect instead of effect (or the other way around).

       Dependant (a noun) instead of dependent (an adjective; check in a dictionary).

       Media (plural) instead of medium (singular). e.g. a single strain is cultured in medium, many strains
        may use several types of media. Similarly, use datum/data and bacterium/bacteria. Note, this
        means that correct usage would be "the data were..." or "the data are ..." not “the data is...”.

       Avoid laboratory jargon (you never 'spin' a sample you centrifuge it, bacteria are cultured, not
        „grown‟).

       The term 'significant' must be used carefully. When referring to numerical data should only be used
        in conjunction with a statistical test in which case the term „statistically significant‟ is more accurate.

       Plasmids are not transformed into bacteria, bacteria are transformed with plasmids.

       Any of wild type, wild-type (or even wildtype) are acceptable but there must be consistency
        throughout with only one used.

       i.e. or ie are acceptable, but ie. is not. Similarly for e.g.

       Correct spelling of inoculate.

       Principle and principal.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                       Page 45 of 78
Binding the thesis
The thesis must be submitted for examination in the first instance in a soft temporary binding. Two copies of
the thesis must be soft bound. This work should be carried out by Print Services to University specifications
and will be thermo-plastic glued with red leatherette grained card sides. The bindery section of Print
Services is located in the Copyshop outlet on the ground floor of the Students' Union Building (Ext 72715). It
is open from 09.00-17.30 Monday-Friday (throughout the year) and 'while-you-wait' service operates except
at very busy times. If the work contains any mounted photographs or illustrations, acetates, folding maps or
diagrams or any other non-standard material, the bindery staff must be informed at the time the work is given
in. They will advise on the suitability for binding and any additional preparation work may incur extra cost.

Submitting the thesis
All full time PhD students are required to submit their theses within 4 years of the date of registration at the
University. Students are strongly encouraged to submit well within this period. Extension beyond the 4 year
period can only be granted by the University Graduate School and can only be obtained in very exceptional
circumstances such as documented long-term illness. Applications for extension require the support of the
Department.

Candidates are required to submit the soft bound copies of the thesis to the Graduate School Office, Senate
House, in person whenever possible. Delivery to a department does not constitute a formal submission. If
being sent by post, copies should be adequately and safely packaged and sent by secure registered post.
Please note that the copies submitted to the Graduate School Office cannot be returned to you before the
examination so they should be checked thoroughly for typographical and binding errors.

No theses will be forwarded to the examiners for examination unless they are accompanied by a cheque or
money order to pay for the cost of hard binding (about £25), made payable to the University of Warwick and
crossed and by two completed copies of the Library Declaration Form. After a successful examination the
Graduate School Office will arrange for one copy to be permanently hard bound for deposit in the University
Library, or academic department (Science departments only). The Library will also retain the second
examiner‟s copy in soft bound form. The Graduate School Office can only arrange for the Library copy to be
hard bound. Hard binding of additional copies must be arranged by candidates on a private basis.

The department requires a copy of the 'final' corrected version of your thesis. This can be provided as a
hard copy (we do not expect this to be bound and will do this at our expense) or as an electronic copy on
CD. Either way, please give the copy to your internal examiner when you meet to confirm corrections.


Library Declaration Form
A Library Declaration Form can be downloaded from the following site:
      http://www2.warwick.ac.uk//services/academicoffice/ourservices/examinations/pg/libdeclform.pdf

Early submission
The University's regulations permit candidates to submit theses a few months before the end of fee-paying
registration. The definition of early submission for each research degree (full or part-time) is as follows:
       PhD or MD                  5 months
       MPhil                      4 months
       Master's by research       2 months

If you wish to go ahead with the early submission, you should as your supervisor to complete the Early
Submission Form for a Research Thesis, copies of which are available from the Graduate School Office (Ext
22790, D.G.Botterill@Warwick.ac.uk).


Appointment of examiners
Students will receive a copy of the Form for the Submission of a Research Thesis and the Nomination of
Examiners for Research Degrees prior to the end of your fee-paying registration. Copies are also available
from the Graduate School Office, if required. It is the student's responsibility to complete Part A of the form
and forward it to the supervisor to arrange the nomination of examiners (Part B) well in advance of the date
expected for submission. The student does not choose the examiners and does not have a veto over the
choice. Of course, some supervisors may discuss possible examiners with students. Students should bear
in mind that it may take several months for supervisors to identify suitable examiners and obtain their
agreement to serve. Any delay in submission of the nomination form may lead to a delay in the final
examination.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 46 of 78
Normally two examiners should be nominated of whom one is a member of academic staff of the University
and one who is external to Warwick, usually an academic staff at another institution of higher education or
research institute.

       Probationary staff shall not be appointed to examine higher degrees by research.
       Examiners are normally expected to have previous experience of supervising and examining theses
        for the degree they are being nominated to examine.
       Examiners for a higher degree by research must normally hold a qualification or a record of
        completed research comparable to that required for the higher degree in question.
       An external examiner shall not normally be a former member of staff of the University unless at least
        three years have elapsed since their resignation from the University.

Examiners should normally be nominated at least one month before the expected submission date and
preferably earlier.

It may be appropriate, or necessary, to appoint an Examination Adviser. The adviser will be a member of
staff of the University other than the candidate‟s supervisor. The examination adviser will assist the
examiners in following University procedures and chair and maintain a record of the oral examination but not
otherwise act as an examiner of the thesis. In cases where there are two external examiners an examination
advisor must be appointed.


What happens after submission ?
As long as your examiners have already been appointed your thesis will normally be sent for examination
within a few days of submission. Examiners are asked to examine the thesis within a maximum of four
months from the date on which they receive it (two months for Master‟s by Research). The Graduate School
Office will do its best to inform you if it seems likely that there will be a delay in the examination beyond this
period.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                      Page 47 of 78
The oral examination (viva voce examination)
The purpose of the viva
The purpose of the oral examination is to enable the examiners to clarify any ambiguities in the thesis, to
satisfy themselves that the thesis is the candidate‟s own work, that the candidate is familiar with the relation
of the work to the field of study and also that their knowledge and appreciation of adjoining fields in the
subject are up to the standard expected for the award of the appropriate degree.


Arranging the viva
All candidates for doctoral degrees and for the degree of MPhil are required to attend an oral examination.
Candidates for other degrees may also be required to attend such an examination. The internal examiner is
responsible for organising the oral examination. The date chosen should be as convenient as possible to all
parties, including the student. If you have any particular constraints with regard to the timing of the oral you
should ensure that the internal examiner is aware of these. In such circumstances, efforts will be made to
arrange the viva at a time which is as convenient as possible for you, but the day chosen will depend on the
other commitments of the examiners. At least two weeks before the date of the oral examination, the
internal examiner should inform the external examiner, the candidate and the supervisor in writing of the date
and place of the oral examination. The internal examiner should also act as „host‟ for the oral examination.
The oral should normally be held in the University and be attended by all examiners. In exceptional
circumstances an oral examination may be held away from Warwick (for example at the external examiner‟s
institution) but it should be conducted in an appropriate academic environment.

Ideally, supervisors should be present in the Department before and after the student undergoes a viva voce
examination to provide friendly support. However, it is recognised that this may not always be possible. The
examiners‟ decision is subject to the approval of the Chair of the Graduate Studies Committee of your faculty
who will scrutinise the examiners‟ reports before recommending the award of your degree by the Senate.


Advice about the viva
Remember, the examiners are trying to confirm the following:
You did the work.
The work is of publishable quality.
You understand what you did, and why you did it.
You can relate your work to that of others.
You appreciate adjoining fields in the subject.

Examiners are not restricted to asking solely about the precise details of the project, and indeed are
specifically required not to. This means that students should be prepared to display a general knowledge of
their field and in particular about systems/work that is ongoing in the Department. It is disappointing to have
a student declare no knowledge of a system for which their research group has a strong reputation.


Before the viva

       Ask your supervisor/colleagues to give you a mock viva (our committee system is good preparation).

       Be familiar with your thesis - read it again before the viva.

       Make sure you know the basics of your subject.

       Make sure you can discuss the background literature cited in the Introduction.

       Make sure you can explain the purpose of the work clearly.

       Make sure you understand the methods used and the principles involved.

       Take a list of corrections (grammar, spelling, missing references) that you have found since
        submission into the viva. Also, if you have been preparing chapters for publication, take the drafts in
        with you. This shows that you have continued to work on the material.

       Think about the questions that you would ask if you were the examiner - and think of the answers.
Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 48 of 78
      Know your examiners, especially the external. Find out what areas they work in or have worked in,
       and if that suggests areas related to your thesis then do some reading !

      If you quote any of the examiner's work make sure it is correct and that you can discuss it.

      Do plenty of background reading, not just the key papers directly relevant to your experiments. Then
       you'll be confidently knowledgeable in the face of the odd peripheral question that may get sparked
       by a throw-away line in your introduction.

      Be aware of the most recent papers that have appeared since the thesis was finalised.

      It does not say you have to wear a suit - be smart but be comfortable.


During the viva

      It is an oral examination - it helps if you are prepared to talk.

      Make it a two way dialogue - not just answering questions.

      Answer the questions without rambling on for hours.

      Think about the questions do not rush into answers.

      Attempt to answer all of the questions - if you do not know the specific answer try to offer an
       alternative relevant example.

      Examiners want to put you at your ease so the first question is usually pretty innocuous - along the
       lines of "summarise your work". It makes the start a lot easier if you have thought about an answer.

      If the viva is not going too well you may be asked a simple question to help you out.

      Examiners have to ensure that it is your own work - that's why they sometimes ask daft questions.

      There are no trick questions.

      If you do not understand the question ask for clarification.

      Don't be afraid to tell the examiners if they are wrong - you are expected to defend your work and
       yourself.

      If the examiners miss something, or do not realise the difficulty/importance of a piece of work, tell
       them.

      Don't fall out with the examiners - give in when an examiner is adamant about something.

      Don't be afraid to ask questions: "At the time it seemed the obvious way to do it. How would you
       have done it?".

      Examiners need to satisfy themselves that it is your work - so some questions will be no-brainers.

      The examiners will be looking for evidence of knowledge outside of the thesis subject, so volunteer
       information on other systems that may have interesting parallels or contrasts.

      It is an examination, so the examiners will be continually asking you to defend yourself, or explain
       aspects of the thesis. After an hour of this it can feel as though its going really badly. It isn't - it's just
       the examiners doing their job.

      Show judgement in understanding the limitations of your work.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                        Page 49 of 78
      Don't be afraid of criticising your own work: "If I had to do this again, I would approach it in a
       completely different way".

      Do not invoke your supervisor or others in the viva. "Because my supervisor told me to" is to be
       avoided - the examiners are examining you and your thesis, not your supervisor.

      You are the expert - no one else has spent so long working on this project.

      Be confident about the work you have presented - any doubts about the quality surface quickly.

      Do not try to flannel - the examiner's have been around a lot longer than you and know all the tricks
       (a variation on the "you can't bullshit a world expert").

      Say if you need a drink (non-alcoholic) or want a comfort break.

      Enjoy it - this is a chance to talk to someone about your work.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                  Page 50 of 78
Requirements for each degree
Requirement for an MSc
A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements of a degree of Master shall be clearly and concisely
written, show evidence of originality in knowledge and in interpretation, and shall also be judged on its
scholarly presentation. In addition it shall contain a full bibliography.

Requirement for an MPhil
A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of MPhil shall constitute an original
contribution to knowledge. The thesis shall be clearly and concisely written and well argued and shall show
a satisfactory knowledge of both primary and secondary sources. In addition it shall contain a full
bibliography and, where appropriate, a description of methods and techniques used in the research.

Requirement for an MD
To satisfy the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Medicine a thesis shall constitute a substantial original
contribution to medical knowledge which is, in principle, worthy of publication. The thesis shall be clearly
and concisely written and well argued and shall show a satisfactory knowledge of both primary and
secondary sources. In addition, it shall contain a full bibliography and, where appropriate, a description of
methods and techniques used in the research.

Requirement for a PhD
To satisfy the requirements of the degree of PhD, a thesis shall constitute a substantial original contribution
to knowledge which is, in principle, worthy of peer-reviewed publication. The thesis shall be clearly and
concisely written and well argued and shall show a satisfactory knowledge of both primary and secondary
sources. In addition it shall contain a full bibliography and, where appropriate, a description of methods and
techniques used in the research.


The decisions
The examiners will conclude with one of the following recommendations:
1.    the work submitted be approved for the degree in question.
2.    the work submitted be approved for the degree in question, subject to minor corrections.
3.    the degree be not awarded, but be permitted to submit a revised thesis for the same degree.
4.    the work be not approved for the degree in question but be approved for a degree of a lower status.
5.    the work be not approved for the degree in question, but that the candidate be permitted to submit a
      revised thesis for a degree of lower status.
6.    that no degree be awarded.

Specific recommendations for particular degrees:
      (MSc by research) that the thesis be re-examined for the degree of MPhil.
      (MPhil only) that the thesis be re-examined for the degree of PhD.
      (MSc) that the degree be awarded with Distinction.


Minor corrections
A candidate will frequently be asked by the examiners to make minor corrections to the thesis before the
examiners recommend the award of the degree and the thesis is in a satisfactory state to be lodged in the
University Library. Minor corrections should require no further research: they are largely mechanical in
nature, such as typographical and grammatical corrections or corrections to references or diagrams.
Rewriting of small sections of a thesis may also be regarded as minor corrections where the work required
does not exceed amendment of more than can reasonably be completed within one month.

NOTE that an earlier definition of „minor corrections‟ allowed rewriting of small sections of a thesis where the
work required does not exceed amendment of more than six pages of the thesis in total, in addition to
correction of typographical errors.

The current definition is very flexible, but may be difficult to apply – how many changes, for example, can
someone make in a month ? It is likely that the performance of the student in the viva will be a crucial
element in deciding whether the changes required to a thesis can be classed as „minor corrections‟ or
whether the thesis should be resubmitted.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 51 of 78
If you are required to do minor corrections, the examiners will explain to you the changes required in a
separate accompaniment to their report. If your corrections necessitate reprinting of your thesis, it must
again be provided in soft bound form. The internal examiner will confirm that the corrections have been
carried out to his or her satisfaction and the degree cannot be awarded until this has been confirmed in
writing to the Graduate School Office. ONE corrected copy should be returned to the Graduate School
Office (previous recommendations required two copies, but this was changed in 2005). However, please
remember that we require a copy of the thesis to be submitted to the departmental library.

Resubmission
Alterations of a more substantial nature than „minor corrections‟ will require resubmission of the thesis, which
will need to be completed within 12 months or such shorter period as recommended by the examiners. If
you are asked to resubmit your thesis you will be informed by the Graduate School Office which will send
you notes for guidance prepared by the examiners on the revisions you are required to undertake. These
should be listed in a clear and unambiguous way and in sufficient detail to enable the student to be sure of
what is required of them. The supervisor is expected to provide guidance to the candidate on the work to be
done in light of the notes for guidance prepared by the examiners. Where necessary the supervisor and the
candidate may wish to discuss the changes required with the internal examiner but the latter must normally
avoid taking on a substantial supervisory role in relation to the candidate during the resubmission period. A
time limit will be set for the resubmission and this must be strictly adhered to. There will be a fee payable
when you resubmit (this was £150 in 2006, you will be informed of the current level of fee when you are
notified formally by the Graduate School of the requirement to resubmit). Under the University‟s regulations,
the examiners may allow you to resubmit your thesis once only and they may choose to hold a second viva
voce examination if they wish.

Examination of a resubmitted thesis
When assessing a resubmitted thesis, examiners should pay particular attention to the way in which the
candidate has revised the thesis according to the recommendations made by the examiners in their written
statement to the candidate. The procedures for the examination of a resubmitted thesis are essentially the
same as for the initial submission of the work and independent reports and a joint report are again required.
However, there is no requirement for a second oral examination although one may be held at the discretion
of the examiners. Only one resubmission of a thesis is permitted and therefore the recommendation on a
resubmitted thesis can only be:
1.      to award the degree.
2.      to award the degree subject to completion of minor corrections.
3.      to award a lower degree with or without minor corrections.
4.      to fail the candidate.

Approval of the Examiners' recommendation
The recommendation of the examiners is subject to the approval of the Chair of the Graduate Studies
Committee of the appropriate Faculty who will scrutinise the examiners‟ reports before approving the
recommendation. There may therefore be a short delay between the viva voce examination and the
approval of the award of a degree by Steering Committee on behalf of Senate.

Award of your degree
Once the award of your degree has been approved by the Senate you will be invited to attend the next
Degree Congregation. Congregations are held in mid-July and in mid-January each year and you may
receive your degree in person or in absentia. You will not be permitted to graduate any debts to the
University have been cleared and you should note that you cannot receive your degree certificate until the
degree has been conferred formally at a Congregation whether you decide to be present in person or not.

Appeals procedure for postgraduate students
Students are entitled to appeal against a decision of the examiners. If it is decided that your performance
merits the award of a lower qualification than the one for which you were registered or does not merit the
award of a qualification at all, you have the right of appeal to the University. Regulation 16.3 (Regulations
governing academic appeals a postgraduate research level) sets out the procedure to be followed:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/ourservices/examinations/postgraduate

Students should note that there is no right of appeal against the requirement to resubmit work or resit
examinations nor against the decision to award a Master's degree at pass level rather than with distinction.
Forms for making an appeal can be downloaded from the following site:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk//services/academicoffice/ourservices/examinations/postgraduate/appeals_pro_for
ma.pdi

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 52 of 78
What do I need to do when I have finished ?
A copy of your thesis for the department
The department requires a copy of the 'final' corrected version of your thesis. This can be provided as a
hard copy (we do not expect this to be bound and will do this at our expense) or as an electronic copy on
CD. Either way, please give the copy to your internal examiner when you meet to confirm corrections.


Don’t forget to leave your samples and date in good order
Before you leave the Department, it is your professional duty to ensure that any materials and data which
may form the basis for future work by others, or form part of a scientific publication, are left in good order
such that others can pick up where you left off. If you do not do this, you could miss out on being named in
valuable publications.

Requesting an extension beyond 4-years
Extension beyond the 4-year period can only be granted by the University Graduate School and can only be
obtained in very exceptional circumstances such as documented long-term illness. Applications for
extension require the support of the Department and must be forwarded to the Graduate School through the
Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Biological Sciences – requests made directly to the
Graduate School by the student and/or supervisor will be returned to the Department.

The procedure for an extension application requires the following information to be sent to the Director of
Graduate Studies in the Department of Biological Sciences.
An application for an extension from the student – supported by written evidence where possible.
A brief summary of the current status of the thesis.
A timetable for when the remaining work will be completed.
A revised submission date.
A letter of support from the supervisor.

Please be realistic in the length of time requested in the extension. The University would prefer requests for
short extensions but there is little point in applying for a 3-month extension if you know it will take longer than
this to complete your thesis - apply for the length of time you think it will take. However, requests for more
than 6-months are likely to be granted only in exceptional circumstances.

Requesting an extension beyond the 4-year period has the following consequences:

1. The extension is not necessarily without financial costs and the student may be expected to pay an
additional registration fee to remain registered at the University - this will depend on the length of the
extension sought.

2. The extension will take the student beyond the 4-year period from initial registration. We will therefore
need to record the student as not having submitted within the 4-year period when requested by the BBSRC
(and other funding agencies) - sanctions are likely to be applied against departments where the completion
rate within 4 years is low.
                                                                                          th
There is regular contact between the Biology PG Office and students in their 4 year of registration.
Students are asked to inform the Director of Graduate Studies (Professor Laura Green) as soon as there is
the possibility that they may not make the submission deadline. Students who do not raise concerns about
the possibility of not meeting deadlines are concerned to be on target to make the deadline.

Extension requests should be received by the Graduate School at least 1 month before the current
submission date.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                       Page 53 of 78
                                                                                               Appendix A
Administrative support in the department

Stores

The stores operates a computerised system for the issue of goods. Each member of the Department is
given an individual Customer Code, which must be specified for every issue of goods. Non-stock goods or
services that you require must be requested via the Lab Managers of your research group. All non-stock
goods must be signed for on the appropriate Stores docket. The dockets are retained for 6 months.

Stores is normally open 8.45 - 10.30, 10.45 - 12.30, 13.30 - 17.00 (16.00 on Fridays), times may vary during
staff holidays.

      Stores Manager               John Sidwell
      Stores Assistants            Tim Keam and Sean Tiernan

In addition to stocking a wide range of low price chemicals and equipment, stores is responsible for the
signing out of the following equipment/services:

Audio visual aids (slide projectors, data projectors etc.
Centrifuge rotors
Solvents - issued on a daily basis and are available after 13.30
Laboratory coats - please return to stores for laundering (on a regular basis)
Departmental transport - a departmental van and bike (pedal) can be booked via stores

Workshop
The Department has its own workshop (Room C003), where most repairs to equipment are undertaken. If
items need to be repaired or customised equipment needs to be designed and made then applications
should be processed through Chief Technicians.
Tools for small repairs are available through Chief Technicians. Stores have some tools for loan by
arrangement with Stores staff.

Glassware Preparation Rooms
There are two preparation rooms in the Department. These provide centralised glassware washing and
sterilising facilities and general supplies of glassware and non-disposable plastic ware. In addition they
process infected material (see safety manual for details) and may sterilise equipment for individuals by
arrangement with the Supervisors.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                  Page 54 of 78
Computing facilities within the Department
Mr Paul McDonald     IT manager
Dr Keith Leppard     Chair of the Computing Facilities Committee.
Homepage : https://chimera.bio.warwick.ac.uk/metadot/index.pl?id=3296&isa=Category&op=show (log in required)

The Department Network
The Department‟s computing needs are met primarily by a Novell PC network providing applications from our
servers from the Novell-delivered Applications (NAL) tab on the PC toolbar. Workstations use Windows XP
as the standard operating system. Some machines with specific uses which cannot be met through this
system run Windows98, Windows2000 or connect through a terminal server environment (i.e. the
workstation operates as a 'dumb terminal'). There are also UNIX machines, which can be accessed over the
network and several users have workstations running Linux. There are also Apple Macintosh computers that
run in a workstation capacity. In addition, the University IT Services maintain UNIX machines and a campus
PC network to which our network is linked.

Where and how to access the system
Networked PCs are located throughout the Department in laboratories and offices. There is also a cluster of
machines in the room B107 within the library, which is provided specifically for post-doctoral fellows and
post-graduate students of the Department. There is a second cluster of machines connected to University IT
Services network in the Undergraduate Teaching Block in room E104. However, this is for undergraduate
use and so is not available to members of the Department during working hours in term-time.

Access to the Department PC network requires a username and password. This is different from the
University IT Services username and password. Our structure is <first letter of forename><surname> eg
JBloggs. Where this is common to more than one user then middle initials are taken into account eg
JEBloggs. You must visit an IT technician in room B103 to have your password set up. The system requires
users to update their passwords regularly. Your password will not appear on the screen; you should make
sure that no-one else gets to know your password. To logon use only lower case and ensure the box
labelled 'workstation only' is NOT ticked. Enter the first initial of your name followed by the first few letters of
your surname then press the TAB key. The username field should be automatically completed. If the
characters entered are not unique then a list of usernames will be displayed for you to choose from. In the
password field enter the initial password (password) followed by the ENTER/RETURN key and you will be
logged on to the network. Pressing CTRL-ALT-DELETE and choosing the option „Change Password‟ will
enable you to change your password.

Support for the system
The IT staff are located in room B103. Further contact details and information are available on the IT
services page of the Department Web site https://chimera.bio.warwick.ac.uk .In order to request support
there is an electronic job posting system under the Job Reporting Systems folder on desktops toolbar Novell
Delivered Applications. To request support for the University IT system and Outlook Email see
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/its/helpfaq/

Network rules
The following rules apply to avoid exposing the Department to legal sanctions and to protect the network
from malicious or accidental damage.

    1.     No software may be loaded onto any multi-user machine, except by a member of the IT staff.
    2.     Software additional to that provided centrally may be purchased from approved suppliers on a
           single-user basis by staff holding budgets. Such software may be installed on either a single-user
           machine by the user or onto one multi-user machine by the IT staff on request. The software
           disks and supporting documentation and manuals should be retained by the purchaser. A
           photocopy of the licence and a copy of the media where possible should be given to the IT
           Manager to be retained as a record.
    3.     Freeware or shareware may be installed only on the same basis as purchased software.
    4.     All media containing software, documents or other files brought into the Department must be
           checked for virus contamination before files are opened. This should happen automatically on
           networked PC‟s.
    5.     All files downloaded from the Internet should be checked for virus contamination.
    6.     The IT staff will conduct periodic audits of software loaded on machines connected to the network;
           any software which appears to be unlicensed may be removed.
    7.     Games must not be played on multi-user machines if there are other users waiting.
Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                        Page 55 of 78
Available software
All staff have access to the following programs as standard from NAL:

Microsoft Office suite:      word, excel. powerpoint, access and vision
Word                         word processing
Excel                        Spreadsheets
Powerpoint                   basic graphics and slide making
Microsoft Access             Databases
Visio                        flow charts and technical drawing
Photodraw                    graphics and photographic manipulation
Outlook                      Email Client
Thunderbird                  Email Client
Internet Explorer            web browser
Firefox                      web browser
Netscape                     web browser
Clone Manager                Suite of basic DNA maps and virtual cloning tools
Chromas                      viewing of DNA sequencer output
SPSS                         statistics package
Microsoft FrontPage          web-authoring package
Endnote                      reference database manager
Mathematica                  mathematical package
SPlus                        statistical analysis
Exceed                       remote access, particularly local UNIX machines
Utilities                    useful tools for users

The following applications are available on the network under metered or restricted access, so you may be
unable to open the programme if all the licences are currently in use:

Adobe Photoshop              graphics and photographic manipulation
Corel Draw                   graphics and photographic manipulation
PaintShop Pro                graphics and photographic manipulation
TotalLab                     gel image manipulation and quantisation
Matlab                       mathematical software
PDQUEST                      protein analysis
Instat                       data analysis and biostatistics
Prism                        graphing, curve fitting and statistics
Adobe Acrobat                reading, converting to and editing PDF files
Lasergene (DNAStar)          DNA and protein sequence analysis


Printing
There are several printers connected to the Department network, as well as numerous printers associated
locally with specific PCs. Three of the highest capacity networked printers are located in corridor B100
(outside the library). The main printer is the Phaser 7750 and is a laser printer capable of printing in colour
and monochrome up to A3 size. The Phaser 840 is a wax transfer printer and will print in colour and
monochrome up to A4 - note that the colour images may fade with time and the output cannot be laminated
as the wax image will melt ! (This is only used as a backup printer should the 7750 become inoperable). The
Phaser 5500 is a laser printer and will print monochrome up to A3. All three printers can print double-sided
(duplex). It is requested that you print double sided whenever possible to save paper.

The drivers for these printers are installed on all networked PCs. To send work to one of them, you need to
select the relevant printer in the print options of the application you are using before activating the print
function. Jobs are sent to a print queue manager from which they must be released using the terminal
located next to the printers. The reason for setting up a print queue is to prevent jobs mistakenly being sent
to these printers. The Xerox Phaser 5500 should be your default network printer as it will process any job
format at high speed. Your print job can be transferred to another printer via the print manager should you
discover that your original destination printer has a fault. YOU MUST DO THIS BEFORE YOU RELEASE
THE JOB.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 56 of 78
Scanners
There is a scanner available for general use in the library B104 and in B107. There are also several
scanners at various locations in the Department, including some laboratories and staff offices.

Data Storage
Local and network storage is provided. The local PC disk is drive D and your private network drive is H.
Drive C is used by the operating system and should not be used for storage. Drive S is a shared drive
provided to each research group or division. There is also a drive X available to everyone as a data dump.
Please note that drive X is deleted on the first Monday of each month and is not backed up. Drives H and S
are backed up to tape each night by our IT staff and the backup retained for up to 4 weeks for disaster
recovery use. Users should also ensure they perform backups of their own data as an extra precaution.

Training
IT Services runs a series of training courses throughout the year in the use of specific software packages
which members of the Department can apply to attend http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/its/training/.

E-Mail
The Department uses the University IT Services Microsoft Exchange mail system. Your username for this
system will be in the form lsxxxx with an associated email address of username@warwick.ac.uk. Note that
this is the same username as for the University IT Services system but you may wish to use a different
password for Exchange. Aliases of the form A.Bloggs@warwick.ac.uk (or Another.Bloggs@warwick.ac.uk)
are allocated to everyone who registers for a user account with IT Services. It is your @warwick email
address that you should declare to contacts as this will remain valid even if the University changes the email
system at a later date. Go to http://www.warwick.ac.uk/cgi-bin-Phones/email and enter your University ID
number to view your forwarding settings and to change them. Your mail should normally be forwarded to
you by selecting the option username@warwick.ac.uk. Help in using Exchange and email issues is available
at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/its/facilities/email/.

When you register as a UNIX user with University IT Services, you will receive a second email address of the
form: username@mail.csv.warwick.ac.uk. These usernames are 5-letter codes. Mail sent to this address is
not automatically forwarded to your emailbox in the Department. However, it is possible to set this up - ask
University IT Services for advice.

Library IT systems
There are three computers in the library itself, as well as those in the workroom just off the library. You will
find a scanner in the library and one in the workroom.
Several relevant databases are available for literature searching. SCOPUS and the Web of Knowledge are
two of the more commonly used. Both operate through a standard web browser and can be accessed, along
with other useful databases, at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/main/electronicresources/databases/.
You will require an ATHENS username and password for many databases, especially if you are working off-
campus. More information about this is available on the University Library web site at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/main/electronicresources/passwords/.
The reference manager used by the department is EndNote.
To set up table of contents/recently published paper alerts use ZETOC – details are available at:
http://zetoc.mimas.ac.uk/.
The University Library catalogue is available on-line at http://webcat.warwick.ac.uk. This covers items held in
the Michael Loveitt Library in Biological Sciences, as well as those kept in the main campus library.
The University Library subscribes to many journals electronically. You can find available journal titles on their
web site at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/electronicresources/journals/.
For off-campus access to online journals you should use your library barcode and PIN, available at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/main/electronicresources/passwords/.

The Michael Loveitt Biomedical Library
From Dee King (Information Assistant).

After you‟ve been at Warwick a few weeks and have become familiar with your lab and the people who work
in it, maybe you‟ll feel it‟s time to venture further afield? In which case, come and discover the delights of the
Michael Loveitt Biomedical Library! It‟s based right here in your department and holds many useful
resources:- reference journals, archives of papers published by the different groups in the department (so
you can check up on who‟s researching what) and copies of theses that have been presented by previous

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                      Page 57 of 78
generations of students in this department - very useful, just remember to sign them out when you wish to
loan them AND return them to the library before you finish your own PhD! It‟s also a great quiet place to
study in peace.

The University subscribes to many journals - either as hardcopy or in electronic format. However, it does not
subscribe to ALL journals. If there is an article you require in a journal we do not hold, then please use the
University Document Supply Service - forms available in the Departmental Library.

Next to the library you‟ll find the postgraduate/postdoctoral computer workroom - as soon as you‟ve been
given your departmental login you‟ll be able to use this. Check out the Library‟s web page (there are links to
this via the departmental staff intranet - https://chimera.bio.warwick.ac.uk) for useful links, eg to electronic
resources, including full-text online journals and relevant databases to use in your research. The Main
Library‟s web pages also provides useful information: https://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/main/

If you need help in using any of these resources please do come and ask me. I work Monday to Friday 10
am-2.30 pm (roughly) and don‟t bite! I can also be contacted on extension 72629 or by email:
dee.king@warwick.ac.uk

So do come and have a look round the library, I look forward to meeting you all…

Finance and General Administration
This sub-team works to monitor and control income and expenditure to ensure that the Department‟s
financial position is secure. This means that expenditure budgets must be set in accordance with the level of
income available and that systems of control are implemented to ensure that expenditure remains within the
budgets set. This includes ensuring that the University‟s finance system is configured and used in a way that
allows the Chair of Department to monitor income and expenditure in a meaningful way. These activities are
undertaken by the Departmental Finance Officer assisted by four finance and three stores staff.

Academic Administration
This team comprises eleven staff and its purpose is to handle all aspects of student administration (both
undergraduate and postgraduate). This includes managing the application and admission process, the
teaching timetable, the examinations process and all aspects of administering PhD projects. In addition this
team provides secretarial support to all academic staff in the Department.

This team also includes two staff who control the Enquiries Office. This office forms an essential part of the
day to day functioning of the Department, dealing with a wide variety of tasks ranging from dealing with
enquiries to preparing starter packs for staff and postgraduate students to controlling the Department‟s room
booking system.

Personnel
This team comprises one administrator with clerical support and its main function is to handle all aspects of
personnel management, ranging from preparing job specifications and job advertisements through to the
candidate selection process and liasing with the University‟s Personnel Office regarding making offers of
employment. The team also represents a valuable source of advice on all personnel matters in the post-
appointment phase. This team deals with all technical, clerical and research grade appointments.

Research Support Services
Research Support Services at the University supports applications for externally funded research grants and
contracts and the subsequent management of successful awards. Elizabeth Cromwell is the Research
Development Officer in Biological Sciences. Contact Elizabeth (Elizabeth.Cromwell@warwick.ac.uk, tel. 024
7657 3997, Room C106) for any questions regarding opportunities for funding, putting together an
application, advice on rules and regulations, and the University‟s authorisation process of grant and
fellowship applications.

You may also like to look at Research Support Services home page http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/rss/
(click on the funding link on the left-hand side for links to information about internal and external funding
opportunities).




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 58 of 78
                                                                                                   Appendix B
Societies

Biochemical Society (www.biochemsoc.org.uk)
Membership is open to any individual with an interest in biochemistry.
Student membership costs £15 per year, and brings the following benefits:
     Free personal online access to Biochemical Journal and Biochemical Society Transactions.
     Free subscription to “The Biochemist”, a quarterly magazine that has much to interest a biochemist.
     Access to Society grants and bursaries – including travel grants (see below).
     Free colour figure in Biochemical Journal - a potential saving of £550 (for you and your supervisor).
     Discounts on Portland Press journals (there are lots of these) and 25% off books.
     Reduced registration fees at Society Meetings.
     Reduced registration fees at meetings of affiliated societies.
     Careers conferences.
     CV consultation.

Postgraduate members can apply for a Student Travel Grant. These are available to support attendance at
Society Focused meetings and Society sponsored Independent meetings. The applicant must be registered
as a student member of the Society by the closing date for poster abstract submission for that particular
meeting. The maximum award for Student Travel Grants is £150.

All members (including students) can apply to the General Travel Grant fund to meet the costs of attending
scientific meetings or for short visits to other laboratories. Applications for grants are assessed competitively
by the Travel Grants Committee, and will usually be for a proportion (25-40%) of the projected costs and will
not normally exceed £500. The Travel Grants Committee will however consider awarding a maximum £750
for exceptionally well argued and well supported cases describing high quality research from outstanding
scientists or those with recognised potential on the threshold of their careers. Meetings for which grants are
sought must have a substantial biochemical content and the applicant must give evidence of active
participation in the meeting (e.g. Abstract of Presentation). Members may apply for their first travel grant
after they have been a member of the Biochemical Society for one year (by the relevant closing date)
although applicants will not be eligible if they have been awarded a Student Travel Grant within the last year.
Thereafter, applicants will not be eligible if they have been awarded a Travel Grant from the Society during
the previous two years.


British Pharmacological Society (www.bps.ac.uk/)
Society covers the whole spectrum of pharmacology, including laboratory, clinical and toxicological aspects
of drugs and the way they work.
Student membership (Associate Membership) costs £20 per year, and brings the following benefits:
     Access to Society grants and bursaries – including travel grants.
     Discounts on journal subscriptions.
            o Includes British Journal of Pharmacology, British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Trends
                in Pharmacological Sciences, Current Opinion in Pharmacology.


British Society for Cell Biology (www.bscb.org/)
Student membership costs £10 per year (£15 if not by direct debit) and brings the following benefits:
     Free subscription to “BSCB Newsletter”, a twice yearly magazine.
     A copy of the Members‟ Handbook, which lists addresses of all members.
     Access to Society grants and bursaries – including travel grants (see below).
     Discount on subscriptions to journals published by the Company of Biologists (www.biologists.com/).
           o Includes Journal of Cell Science, Development, Traffic, BioEssays, Journal of Cellular
                Biochemistry.
     Students costs of attending the BSCB Spring Meeting are often covered in full.
     Reduced registration fees at BSCB-affiliated meetings.

The Honor Fell Travel Awards are available for members of at least one year's standing (or less if joining as
a first year postgraduate). The amount of the award depends on the location of the meeting; awards will be
up to £300 for UK meetings, up to £400 for European meetings and up to £500 for meetings in the rest of the
world. The Society holds a Student Poster Competition at its major annual meeting, for which the First Prize
is a trip to the USA to attend the annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 59 of 78
The BSCB Annual Spring Meeting is the major meeting in the calendar (~500 delegates). The meeting is
often held jointly with the British Society for Cell Biology (BSCB) or Genetics Society Spring meetings. The
BSCB Autumn Meetings are smaller (80-100 delegates) and devoted to the in depth discussion of a
particular area of Cell Biology.


British Society for Developmental Biology (www.bms.ed.ac.uk/services/webspace/bsdb/welcome.htm)
Membership is open to any individual with an interest in the science of Developmental Biology.
Student membership costs £15 per year, and brings the following benefits:
     Free subscription to “BSDB Newsletter”, a twice yearly magazine.
     A copy of the Members‟ Handbook, which lists addresses of all members.
     Access to Society grants and bursaries – including travel grants (see below).
     Discount on subscriptions to journals published by the Company of Biologists (www.biologists.com/).
           o Includes Development, Journal of Cell Science, Journal of Experimental Biology, BioEssays,
                Current Biology, Molecular Reproduction and Development.
     Students costs of attending the BSDB Spring Meeting are often covered in full.
     Reduced registration fees at BSDB-affiliated meetings.

Travel Awards are available for student members to cover conference fees, travel and accommodation. The
amount of the award depends on the location of the meeting; full amount for BSDB meetings, up to £400 for
Overseas meetings and up to £500 for Practical Courses. Students can receive one grant per year.

The BSDB Annual Spring Symposium is the major meeting in the calendar (~500 delegates). The meeting is
often held jointly with the British Society for Cell Biology (BSCB) or Genetics Society Spring meetings. The
BSDB Autumn Meetings are smaller (80-100 delegates) and devoted to the in depth discussion of a
particular area of Developmental Biology.


Genetics Society (www.genetics.org.uk)
Student memberships costs £10 per annum when paid by direct debit, and brings the following benefits:
     Free subscription to “Newsletter”, a quarterly magazine.
     Access to Society grants and bursaries – including travel grants (see below).
     Reduced registration fee at Society meetings.
     Discount on subscriptions to journals of interest to geneticists.
          o Includes Genes and Development, Nature Genetics, Trends in Genetics, BioEssays,
              Heredity, Genes and Function, Current Biology, Current Opinion in Genetics and
              Development and Genetical Research.
     Reduced registration fees at other scientific meetings in the genetics area.

Travel Awards are available for student members to cover conference fees, travel and accommodation, at
Society meetings and other scientific meetings in the genetics area. Society meetings include an annual
three-day spring meeting, a one-day symposium each November and other one-day meetings on topics of
special interest, all with registration fees at a reduced rate for Genetics Society members.


Physiological Society (www.physoc.org)
Membership is open to any individual with an interest in physiology.
Student membership (affiliate membership) costs £20 per year, and brings the following benefits:
     Free subscription to “Newsletter”, a quarterly magazine.
     Free subscription to Physiology News.
     Access to Society grants and bursaries – including travel grants (see below).
     On line access to journals such as Journal of Physiology.
     Students costs of attending the Society Scientific Meetings are often covered in full.
     Membership of "The Young Physiologists Scheme" – with added financial benefits.

Travel Awards are available for student members to cover conference fees, travel and accommodation, up to
a total of £400 in a calendar year. First applications must be to attend meetings sponsored by the
Physiological Society, but subsequent applications may be submitted to attend any meeting.



Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                  Page 60 of 78
Society for Endocrinology (www.endocrinology.org)
Membership is open to any individual with an interest in endocrinology.
Student membership (Junior Membership) costs £20 per year, and brings the following benefits:
     Free subscription to “The Endocrinologist”, a quarterly newsletter.
     A Society Handbook, listing the names and contact details of other members.
     Access to Society grants and bursaries – including travel grants (see below),
     Free online access to the full text of the Society's journals for Junior members;
     Discounts on journal subscriptions.
            o Includes Journal of Endocrinology, Journal of Molecular Endocrinology, Endocrine-Related
               Cancer, Clinical Endocrinology.
     Reduced registration fees at Society Meetings (including the annual spring meeting).

Junior members can apply for a Travel Grant of up to £500 to attend the Society's own meetings, the
Molecular Endocrinology Workshop at Summer School, and overseas endocrine meetings. Junior members
can also apply to the Clinical Endocrinology Trust for grants to visit labs to learn a technique or to carry out
experiments essential to their project. Up to £500 is available for visits to labs based in the UK or Europe
and up to £1000 for labs based in the rest of the world.

Society for Experimental Biology (www.sebiology.org)
Membership is open to all with an interest in any aspect of experimental biology.
Student membership costs £10 per year, and brings the following benefits:
     Free subscription to a quarterly news bulletin.
     Access to Society grants and bursaries – including travel grants (see below).
     Costs of attending the SEB Main Meeting are substantially reduced.
     Discount on subscriptions to Society journals.
            o Includes The Plant Journal, Plant Biotechnology, Experimental Biology Reviews,
               Comparative Genomics, Advances in Experimental Biology.
     Reduced registration costs at SEB-affiliated conferences.
     The opportunity to win over £2,000 as an SEB Young Scientist.
     The chance to “Get down and dirty on the SEB social scene” – quote from website !

Travel Grants are available for student members to cover conference fees, travel and accommodation. Up
to £250 is available for a UK visit, and up to £500 for an overseas visit.

Society for General Microbiology (www.socgenmicrobiol.org.uk/)
Membership is open to postgraduate students registered for a higher degree in a microbiological subject.
Student membership costs £21 per year, and brings the following benefits:
     Free subscription to “Microbiology Today”, a quarterly magazine.
     Access to Society grants and bursaries – including travel grants (see below).
     Costs of attending the SGM-sponsored Meetings are often covered in full.
     Discount on subscriptions to journals of interest to microbiologists.
            o Includes Microbiology, Journal of Virology, Journal of Medical Microbiology, International
               Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology.
     Entry into the annual Young Microbiologist of the Year competition (cash prizes).
     Participation in special events at SGM meetings.
     Free careers advice.

Postgraduate Student Meetings Grants cover the registration, accommodation and travel of Student
Members of the Society to attend one (of the four) SGM-sponsored meeting each year. Postgraduate
members can also apply to the President's Fund. Small grants to assist towards travel worldwide to present
work at a scientific meeting or attend an approved course (including GRADschools), are limited to £150 in
the UK, £250 for another European country, and £350 for travel outside Europe. Larger awards of up to
£2,000 are available for making short research visits of up to two months duration. All applicants must be
paid up members of the SGM of at least 3 calendar months standing before the date of their application for a
grant. All applicants who are funded by a research council or other funding body that regularly supports
conference attendance or activities connected with the applicant's work must submit evidence that they have
applied for sponsorship from that body. Only one application for a meeting or course may be made to the
President's Fund during the term of a postgraduate studentship or first postdoctoral position.

There are many other societies relevant to work in the department, ask your supervisor for those most
appropriate for you.

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 61 of 78
Overseas societies
Students can also apply for membership of some overseas societies.
       American Society for Cell Biology.
       Endocrine Society.

Sources of funding
University Hardship Funds for Postgraduate Students
The University has set aside funds to assist postgraduate students experiencing financial difficulties:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/ourservices/funding/current/hardshipfunds/

Donald Bates Bequest Fund
A new series of bursaries for postgraduate students suffering financial hardship was set up in 2006 due to
the generosity of Warwick Graduate Donald Bates (1927-2004). Donald graduated with an MA in Industrial
and Business Studies in 1969. As a postgraduate student he received financial support from the Senior
Tutor‟s Hardship fund and this prompted him to bequeath Warwick a £55,000 contribution to the Hardship
Fund. In line with his wishes this money will be invested and the annual interest used to fund the new
bursaries in perpetuity.
For further information on the Donald Bates Bequest Fund contact Vivienne Sykes on Ext. 72952 or
V.Sykes@warwick.ac.uk.

Warwick Postgraduate Research Fellowship Scheme
The Warwick Postgraduate Research Fellowship Scheme is a prestigious programme of awards for PhD
students run by the Warwick Graduate School. The award scheme is run on a competitive basis and
competition for the awards is keen. If you are a high calibre candidate with a proven academic track record
and the potential to be an outstanding researcher in your field, they would welcome an application from you.

Up to 30 Warwick Postgraduate Research Fellowships are available each year, offering:
      The payment of your academic fees at the Home/EU rate.
      A combined salary and maintenance grant of £12,300 (for full-time award holders in 2005-2006).
      The opportunity to gain valuable work experience within your academic department.

The scheme is open to UK, EU and overseas students.
Applicants for a Warwick Postgraduate Research Fellowship are required to apply for alternative funding, for
example UK and EU students should apply to the UK Research Councils and overseas students to the
Overseas Research Studentship Competition.

British Federation of Women Graduates
The British Federation of Women Graduates have an award available to women entering their final formal
year of doctoral research. Applications are handled directly by the British Federation of Women Graduates,
not through the Graduate School Office. Application materials and details can be downloaded at:
www.bfwg.org.uk.

University of Warwick Awards for International Students
The University offers awards for students in various countries and also participates in jointly funded
scholarship schemes. Full details are available on the International Office website or email the International
Office at Int.Office@warwick.ac.uk.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office British Chevening Awards
The application process is organised by the British Council, British Embassy or High Commission in your
home country. Information is also available on the Foreign and Commonwealth Office website.

Commonwealth Scholarships and Fellowship Programme
Commonwealth scholarships are available for candidates in Commonwealth countries or British dependent
territories who qualify for postgraduate study (taught courses and research degrees). Further details are
available from the Ministry of Education in your home country and on the Association of Commonwealth
Universities website.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 62 of 78
Overseas Research Student Awards Scheme
This scheme is open to overseas applicants who want to follow a postgraduate research degree in the UK.
The scheme pays the difference between the home and overseas fees for full-time students of outstanding
merit and research potential. You must hold an offer from the University to study for a MPhil/PhD or PhD
before applying for an ORSAS award. Application forms and further information for awards starting in
September 2005 can be found at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/postgrad/


Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Awards
The Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Awards are a new national initiative to bring outstanding students from
India, China, Hong Kong, Russia and the developing world to the UK to study for PhDs in top-rated research
environments. The scheme will pay overseas fees and a maintenance stipend. The Dorothy Hodgkin
Postgraduate Awards will be open to top-quality science, engineering, medicine, social sciences and
technology students. More detailed information on the background to the Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate
Awards is available at:
http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/hodgkin/

Warwick is normally allocated four Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Awards. If you have any queries about
any aspect of the scheme at Warwick please email pgoffice@warwick.ac.uk. The Awards are funded by the
UK Research Councils and industrial sponsors.
The awards allocated to Warwick are as follows:
      EPSRC/BP (two awards)
      ESRC/Hutchison Whampoa (only open to students from mainland China and Hong Kong)
      ESRC/BP
      PPARC/BP

Am I eligible to apply for a Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Award?
To be eligible, you must hold a very good first degree (the equivalent of a UK first class honours degree)
from a prestigious institution. You must also meet the University's English language requirements. For some
subjects, you may also need the equivalent of a UK Master's degree in a relevant subject.
Further details on entry qualifications for PhDs at Warwick are available at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/

Of the four awards allocated to Warwick, one is in the subjects covered by the Engineering and Physical
Sciences Research Council (www.epsrc.ac.uk), two in subjects covered by the Economic and Social
Research Council (www.esrc.ac.uk) and one in subjects that fall under the remit of the Particle Physics and
Astronomy Research Council (www.pparc.ac.uk/home_old.asp). Please see the websites of the research
councils to check if your subject is eligible or contact the department at Warwick where you would like to
study.

Students who wish to apply for PhDs at Warwick in the Arts and Humanities (with the exception of social
history subjects covered by the ESRC), national environment research, Philosophy, the Warwick Medical
School and the Institute of Education will not be eligible to apply for the scheme.
The scheme is not open to UK or EU students.
One of the two ESRC awards at the University of Warwick is jointly sponsored by Hutchison Whampoa.
Only nationals of China and Hong Kong may apply for these awards. The other three awards are jointly
sponsored by BP. Students from all the eligible countries may apply for these awards.

How do I apply for a Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Award at Warwick?
If you would like to apply for a Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Award to start at Warwick in October 2005,
you should apply to the University's Warwick Postgraduate Research Fellowship Competition, using the
Warwick Postgraduate Research Fellowship form. Eligible applicants will be considered for both the Dorothy
Hodgkin Postgraduate Awards and the Warwick Postgraduate Research Fellowship. However, you cannot
hold both awards.
The application form and further details about the Warwick Postgraduate Research Fellowship Scheme are
available at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/postgrad/

You can apply online at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                 Page 63 of 78
What happens if I applied for a Warwick Postgraduate Research Fellowship in the first round and
want to be considered for a Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Award?
If you are eligible for a Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Award and were either awarded a Warwick
Postgraduate Research Fellowship or placed on the reserve list in the first round of the competition, then
your application will automatically be considered for a Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Award. You do not
need to apply again.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                Page 64 of 78
                                                                                                     Appendix C

Welfare Services Available to Students

Senior Tutor

For guidance and advice on personal issues and broader academic matters, you may contact the
University‟s Senior Tutor who offers an important service to students. See: go.warwick.ac.uk/seniortutor

The Senior Tutor liaises with closely with both the Personal Tutor system and the Student Support and
Welfare services on campus.

For an appointment with the Senior Tutor, please contact the Senior Tutor‟s Office on Tel: 024 7652 3761.

University Counselling Service

The University Counselling Service has a number of professionally trained counsellors who offer a
confidential service to students who feel that emotional or psychological problems are affecting their ability to
study or function properly whilst at the university. Students may be seen individually or in groups. The
service also organises single session groups on study skills, time management and stress management
throughout the academic year.

For more information on the service and resources such as self help material and email counselling see our
website at: go.warwick.ac.uk/counselling


Student Mental Health Co-ordinator

The Student Mental Health Co-ordinator, Diane Cook, provides information, support and, if needed, access
to other services for students who have mental health problems. She works closely with other Student
Support Services and in liaison with Health Professionals to ensure students receive the support needed to
help them to manage their studies and life at university.

Diane can be contacted           on   extension    50226,    mobile    07920    531118     or   by   e-mail   at:
diane.cook@warwick.ac.uk.

Students are encouraged to disclose their mental health problems either at enrolment or at any time
afterwards so that they can actively take part in how best to manage any difficulties that may arise.


University Disability Services

Disability Services is based in University House. Our team advises and provides services for students who
can define as 'disabled' under the Disability Discrimination Act. This includes physical and sensory
impairments, learning differences (e.g. dyslexia, dyspraxia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia), autistic spectrum
conditions, mental health difficulties, 'unseen' conditions (e.g.asthma, epilepsy, diabetes, heart conditions),
and other conditions (e.g. CFS, ME) for example.

We encourage applicants and students to notify us on application, enrolment or at any time later of a
disability, learning difference or other condition in order that we can provide advice and services to facilitate
study at the University. We can also advise on whether individual circumstances are definable as a 'disability'
under the law and thus whether students are entitled to have reasonable adjustments made for their
studies. Information provided to Disability Services is held in confidence and is only shared with written
agreement. We do encourage information sharing to enable the university to make any reasonable
adjustments required.

For further information or advice, including advice on Disabled Students Allowances, please contact
disability@warwick.ac.uk, telephone the Disability Co-ordinator on 02476 573734 or visit the website:
go.warwick.ac.uk/disability.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 65 of 78
The Health Centre

There are two medical practices based at the University Health Centre providing a full range of general
practitioner services for registered patients. The Health Centre has both male and female doctors (although
a doctor will not be at the centre throughout the opening times), Nurse Practitioners and Practice Nurses.
Both practices run an appointments system for consultations with the doctors and the nurses.

The Health Centre offers sexual health and contraceptive clinics, travel clinics and immunisation facilities.
There are also physiotherapy sessions at the health centre to which doctors can refer patients.

If ill, registered patients will be given an appointment at the Health Centre as soon as possible. If the Health
Centre is closed, arrangements can be made for an emergency consultation. Full information is provided
when students register with one of the GP practices.

International Students resident here on courses lasting more than three months are entitled to full NHS
(National Health Service) facilities. The NHS does not cover students on courses of less than three months,
unless they come from a country, which has a reciprocal arrangement with the UK, or from the EEA and
have an European Health Card, and then only if the need for treatment arises while the student is resident in
the UK.

Students on courses of study of less than three months in duration are advised to take out private medical
insurance before they arrive in the UK where possible.

Registering with the Health Centre
To use the Health Centre, you must register with them as soon as you arrive at University. In an emergency,
the Health Centre may be able assist non-registered students. Students who are resident on campus or
within the catchment area of south-west Coventry are strongly advised to register with the Health Centre on
campus (Please note, Leamington Spa does not fall within the catchment area). Students resident outside
this area are advised to register with a practice close to where they are living (www.nhs.uk/england can help
find a local doctor, dentist, optician, pharmacist etc).

Non-registration with a doctor may cause problems if you are ill or you need a doctor in an emergency.

New students living on campus or within the South West area of Coventry should register with the Health
Centre during enrolment week in the Students‟ Union Building North from Friday 28th September to
Wednesday 3rd October. You will need to provide the following information to register:
• your NHS number (bring your NHS Medical Card) if you have lived in this country before (essential).
• the name and address of your present (most recent) GP in this country
• Details of any immunisations you have had and any past medical history

Many students from overseas have been to British Boarding Schools or lived in this country before and
would have been registered with a GP then – you must ensure that you bring with you your NHS number and
name of the GP practice you were registered with.


Students’ Union Advice and Welfare Services

Advice and Welfare Services is a confidential Students‟ Union service and is independent of the University.
We can give information and advice on many areas of University life including:

       Accommodation and housing
       Problems with your course, lecturer, supervisor or department
       Money and debt problems
       Support and representation with complaints, appeals, and disciplinary matters
       Legal and police problems
       Consumer problems
       Immigration advice

If you are not sure who to talk to or where to get advice try Advice and Welfare Services first. If it is not us
we probably know who the right person is and can help put you in touch.
http://www.sunion.warwick.ac.uk/portal/advice/

Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 66 of 78
The University and Students' Union also takes its responsibilities for Equality and Diversity and the
eradication of Bullying and Harassment very seriously. The relevant web pages are listed below:

Equality and Diversity: go.warwick.ac.uk/equalops

Bullying and Harassment: go.warwick.ac.uk/harassmentguidelines




The International Office

The International Office warmly welcomes all new international students to the University of Warwick.

We are a friendly team of experienced staff, here to support all EU and overseas students during your
studies at the University of Warwick. We would like you to come and see us if you have queries or difficulties
about anything during your stay. We run the annual Orientation induction programme for new international
students, and throughout the year we help with queries about police registration, banking and student status
letters. We also work pro-actively to give you opportunities to improve your student experience at Warwick
by organising a programme of cultural days out and social events for students and families and administering
the HOST programme (a national programme enabling overseas students to stay with families across the
UK). We have a team of qualified advisers who provide free, confidential immigration advice and assistance.
We provide advice on matters such as extending your visa, travelling abroad and working visas and
regulations.

We also support foundation, visiting and exchange students who are here under Erasmus partnerships or
any other of the wide range of exchange agreements and visiting programmes (including JYA).

As well as dedicated student support staff, we have regional teams who are responsible for students from
particular areas of the world. You may have met some of these staff before at exhibitions or at pre-departure
receptions or school visits, and you are very welcome to refer to your individual contact after you arrive.

Our office is situated on the first floor of University House and is open from 9am to 5pm Monday to Thursday
and 9am to 4pm on Fridays (tel: +44 (0)24 765 23706).

For more information on the wide range of support we offer, please see our website at:
go.warwick.ac.uk/international


The University Nursery

Registered for 47 children aged between 3 months and 4 years, the University Nursery is based on
Westwood campus with a dedicated baby unit for 15 under twos and a larger “pre-school” unit for 2, 3 and 4
year olds. Registered with OFSTED, we accept 3 and 4 year olds eligible for LEA funding, as well as
employer-based childcare vouchers.

The Nursery provides a welcoming, safe, stimulating and challenging environment, providing for children‟s
social, emotional, physical and moral development to enable them to grow and develop to their full potential.
We strive to create an atmosphere of working in partnership with parents and carers so that the children are
happy to attend Nursery and you feel confident about leaving your child in our care.

We believe that children learn best through play. In a Nursery as unique as ours, where children can
experience as many as 20 different languages and cultures in the course of a normal day, we feel that by
allowing the children to express themselves through their play and some carefully structured activities we are
allowing them to develop at a pace that makes sense to them.

Contact us on: 02476 523389
debbie.castle@warwick.ac.uk

Website:
go.warwick.ac.uk/nursery


Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                   Page 67 of 78
The Chaplaincy

At the heart of central campus, the Chaplaincy is a vibrant space open to all members of the University
community. You can come here for meetings, to relax or study together, enjoy light refreshments, or spend
time in public worship or quiet thought. It‟s a popular gathering place that welcomes students of any or no
faith.

The Chaplaincy is home to the Anglican, Roman Catholic, Free Church and Jewish chaplains, who are
always glad to meet students socially and pastorally. As a valued part of the University‟s Welfare network,
the chaplains offer everyone a sympathetic ear in total confidence. The University also has a dedicated
Islamic Prayer Hall immediately adjacent to the Chaplaincy building.

More information on the chaplaincy can be found at: go.warwick.ac.uk/chaplaincy

Sexual, Racial and Personal Harassment
The University and the Students‟ Union regard all forms of harassment as unacceptable and are prepared to
take disciplinary action against offenders. Both the University and the Students‟ Union are committed to
creating a community that is free from harassment and discrimination. Sexual, racial and personal
harassment can seriously worsen conditions for staff and students at the University and may also, in certain
cases, be unlawful.

The     Sexual,     Racial    and     Personal    Harassment: Guidelines  for   Students     website,
go.warwick.ac.uk/harassmentguidelines, has the University‟s statement of equal opportunities and full
contact details for advice and assistance including:

   University Senior Tutor and Counselling Service, telephone 024 7652 3761 or extension 23761
   Students‟ Union Advice and Welfare Services, telephone 024 7657 2824 or extension 72824
   Welfare and Equal Opportunities Officer (Students‟ Union sabbatical officer), telephone 024 7657 2778
    or extension 72778
   Nightline (please note that Nightline is a listening service and will not offer advice), 9pm-9am, telephone
    024 7641 7668 or extension 22199
   Chaplaincy, telephone 024 7652 3519 or extension 23519




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                    Page 68 of 78
Appendix D

Terms of Reference for post graduate affairs committee
    To consider all issues relating to the recruitment, training, progression and completion of
       postgraduate research students.
    To monitor the policies and requirements of the major studentship-awarding bodies in order to
       maximize the number of studentships available.
    To review policies and arrangements for advertising projects, allocating studentships and recruiting
       students to ensure that the Department attracts and appoints the most able students, while taking
       account of the benefits to the Department of allocating studentships to newly appointed staff.
    To review policies and arrangements for monitoring student progress and for approving progression
       to later years of study, to ensure that students are supported and that progression criteria are
       stringently applied.
    To maintain information on student progression and completion for internal management purposes
       and for presentation to external stakeholders.
    To monitor submission and completion rates and to review arrangements so that these are
       maintained at high levels.
    To consider significant issues raised by PG students through the PG student staff liaison committee.
    To report and make recommendations to Heads of Groups and Staff Meeting.


Membership and responsibilities
Director of Graduate Studies                                        Professor L Green
Postgraduate admissions                                             Professor C Robinson
PG Senior Tutor                                                     Professor L Green
MOAC Doctoral Programme Liaison                                     Dr C Smith
MD students                                                         Professor C Dowson
Overseas PG recruitment                                             Professor M McCrae
EU funded studentships (Marie Curie)                                Dr H Burgert
PhD training programme                                              Dr C Smith
Taught postgraduate programmes                                      Dr C Dow
PG short courses                                                    Dr R Bland
PG Symposium                                                        Dr A Green
Chair of Department                                                 Professor A Easton
Biology PG Secretaries                                              Clare Holt and Leanne Bull
Student chair of PG SSLC                                            Mrs Cristina Matos




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                Page 69 of 78
Appendix E

Payments of Doctoral Training Grants
Payments continue to be paid to DTG students until the student submits their thesis, starts full-time
employment, or reaches the end of their 4 years of support; whichever is the earlier. It is unlikely that the
Department would ask for any repayment after a stipend has been paid.


Charges and Routes for Support

Fees for research degrees (2007)
The following annual fees apply to all laboratory-based degrees (PhD, MPhil, MSc):
Home/EU full-time               £ 3,240
Home/EU part-time               £ 1,620 (registered after Sept. 2006) / £1,025 (registered before Sept.
2006)
Overseas full-time              £12,600
Overseas part-time              £ 7,560



Young Dependant's Allowance for Doctoral Training Awards
This allowance is to assist students who are lone parents and who declare themselves to have 'sole financial
responsibility' for their child(ren) Sole financial responsibility means that you are not in receipt of monies
from other sources in support of your child(ren) and also where no contribution whatsoever is received from
another party into the household which may be used directly or indirectly towards the upkeep and/or benefit
of the child(ren). For the purposes of this allowance, Child Benefit received by the student will be
disregarded. Where a spouse or partner is a member of the household, additional support either financial or
in kind is deemed to exist and the child(ren) cannot be taken to be solely dependent upon the student for
support. Therefore, where there is a spouse or partner, entitlement to the allowance for child(ren) does not
exist. Current conditions and rates of YDA are set out in the BBSRC Studentships Handbook.


Maternity leave
The BBSRC allows up to four months paid maternity leave without abatement of the stipend, and, if required,
the studentship will be extended by a commensurate period. BBSRC will be as flexible as possible in
considering changes in the circumstances of the studentship when the student is ready to return.


Paternity leave
The BBSRC allows a total of ten days paternity leave. This can be taken at any time during a partner's
pregnancy or within three months following the birth.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                   Page 70 of 78
Appendix F

Applying for financial support to attend scientific meetings
    The Approval Form must be filled in before your trip.
    You should include full details of the expected cost of your trip.
    The form must be signed by your Academic Supervisor.
    If you are asking for Departmental funding (rather than from a Research Grant) then the Approval
       Form must also be signed by the Director of Graduate Studies.
    You will be expected to show that you are making every attempt to obtain external funding and give
       details on the form of the amounts promised by funding bodies and professional societies (the
       department expects all students to join at least one society).
    Funding for students to attend meetings will normally be available only to students presenting work
       (oral or poster presentations) at the meeting.

Please note that departmental resources are very limited, and we are unlikely to be able to meet all requests
for funding. The Approval Forms should be submitted to the PG office (via the pigeon hole) and will be
returned to your pigeon hole as soon as possible.

Some advice on how to maximise the chances of receiving support:
    Submit the form as early as possible, and certainly before you incur any expense.
    Provide all of the information required.
    Demonstrate that you have explored alternative sources of funding (internal and external). See
      appendix B.
    Be a member of a professional society, and demonstrate that you have applied for funding.
    Raise part of the funds from elsewhere.

Some students may choose to "save" the departmental support until their third year, when it may help to fund
attendance at an international meeting.

To claim reimbursement of travel expenses, you need to complete form FR11a (available from the Enquiries
Office). Only actual sums expended may be reclaimed and you must enclose receipts for everything you are
claiming. You must declare any payments received from other sources. The claim forms should be returned
to Jenny Tipson (Room D120) and payment will be made by BACS. Claims need to be made within 3
months of travel, or else there is the possibility the Finance Office will not reimburse you.

Note, the basis of reclaim must be that the expenditure was "wholly, exclusively and necessarily" incurred on
the University's business, or it may be subject to taxation by the Inland Revenue.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                   Page 71 of 78
Appendix G

Intellectual property

In the first instance you can protect your IP by the appropriate use of laboratory notebooks:
      Use bound notebooks with numbered pages to record your work. These should be dated and
          written in permanent ink.
      Errors and blank unused pages should be crossed through. Ideally tables of results etc should be
          stuck in.
      State clearly the methodology you use – if you are using methodology from another lab make sure
          you clearly describe it or provide a reference source.
      One of your lab colleagues (who is independent of your work) should sign and date the lab book
          monthly at the end of the current work to confirm that they have seen and understood your notes.

As a postgraduate student or member of staff, any intellectual property arising from your work remains the
property of the University, which operates a scheme of sharing the benefits of exploiting IP with its staff and
students. Further details about these regulations can be found in Section 29 of the University regulations
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/ and Section 24 of the Finance regulations at
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/finance/regs/.

Queries about how to protect your IP in the first instance may be addressed to Helen Reynolds, Contracts
Officer (H.Reynolds@warwick.ac.uk, tel. 024 7657 3102).

Queries about commercialising or exploiting            IP   should   be   directed   to   Warwick    Ventures
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ventures/.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                    Page 72 of 78
Appendix H

Departmental Health and Safety Policy Statement

1.   The Department is aware of and will comply with; the University Safety Regulations as describe din
     the document Safety in the University (SITU) in accordance with the Health and Safety at Work Act
     1974, to ensure as far as reasonably practicable the health, safety, and welfare at work of employees
     and postgraduate students. Any reference to 'staff' below will include employees and postgraduate
     students.

2.   The Department is aware of and will comply with; its responsibilities to ensure the health and safety of
     undergraduate students and visitors in accordance with recommendations in SITU.

3.   The Department is committed to maintaining and improving its standards in the areas of health and
     safety.

4.   Overall responsibility for the Health and Safety policy Statements rests with the Chairman of the
     Department.

5.   All staff will be given copies of the Health and Safety Policy Statement and copy will be displayed in
     the Department.

6.   The attention of all staff will be drawn to the document Safety in the University, which is available in
     the Department.

7.   All staff will be given appropriate training and guidance and are required to work in a safe manner at
     all times, following the safety regulations and guidelines.

8.   The Health and Safety Policy will be reviewed regularly to ensure that it remains up to date and is
     relevant to the work of the Department.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                  Page 73 of 78
Appendix I

Good Laboratory Practice

1.    Wear a laboratory coat in the laboratory at all times, correctly fastened. Remove it whenever you
      leave the laboratory. Laboratory coats must not be worn anywhere that food or drink is consumed and
      must not be worn outside the Department.

2.    Never smoke, eat drink or apply cosmetics in the laboratory.

3.    Never mouth-pipette anything.

4.    Keep your work area clean and tidy.

5.    Know the procedures to follow in the event of an emergency.

6.    Record all accidents in the Accident Record Book (kept in Stores).

7.    Safety spectacles must be worn when handling strong acids or alkalis, and when using liquid nitrogen
      and vacuum lines.

8.    Safety gloves must be worn when handling strong acids or alkalis, and hot and ultra cold materials.

9.    Flammable solvents must be kept in storage cabinets available in each laboratory.

10.   Solvents should be handled in the fume hoods. If this is impractical then adequate ventilation must be
      provided, but consult with the Departmental Safety Officer before embarking on such an operation.
      The user must ensure that no naked flames are present in the laboratory.

11.   Bunsen burners should be turned off when not in use.

12.   Gas cylinders may only be moved by those wearing safety shoes.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                  Page 74 of 78
Appendix J

Introducing biological material into the Department
We are required to maintain a list of ALL material stored within the Department. No biological material
including micro-organisms, cell lines, infectious agents, and materials potentially containing infectious agents
(such as clinical tissue) may be introduced into the Department without prior permission. Application to
introduce new material should be made using the appropriate forms. Forms and advice can be obtained from
the Departmental Safety Officer (Professor Hodgson) or Departmental Biological Safety Officer (Dr A Morris).
ANY material found to have been introduced without prior permission will be immediately destroyed.

It is a requirement of the HSE regulations that we maintain a list of all plasmids stored in the Department. If
you bring any vectors or plasmids containing inserts with you when you join the Department or introduce
them subsequently they must be registered with the Genetic Manipulation Safety Committee, in advance.
Forms can be obtained from Chief Technicians and advice can be sought from the Departmental Safety
Officer or the Chair on the Genetic Manipulation Safety Committee.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                     Page 75 of 78
Appendix K

University shuttle bus

Where The Bus Goes
The bus operates on a fixed circuitous (7.5 km) route. The driver does not respond to telephone requests,
and does not deviate from the route. A complete circuit takes about 30 minutes, dependant upon traffic
congestion and unavoidable delays.




Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                Page 76 of 78
Operational Times
Every evening, during the first two terms of the academic year and during the Christmas vacation, the first
bus leaves the Arts Centre Koan at 18:00. At other times of the year, the first bus leaves the Arts Centre
Koan at 20:00. On the weekends (Fridays and Saturdays) of all three terms, the last bus leaves the Arts
Centre Koan at 01:30. On all other days, the last bus leaves the Arts Centre Koan at 23:30.
Listed below, in visitation order, are various representative points along the route, together with their earliest
departure times. To guard against missing the bus, prospective passengers should start waiting for the bus
no later than the specified time.

      Time                                      Location                                          Map Ref

      00     and 30   minutes past each hour:   Arts Centre Koan                                  1
      02     and 32   minutes past each hour:   Library Steps                                     2
      05     and 35   minutes past each hour:   Gibbet Hill Old Bus Stop (in Car Park 1)          3
      09     and 39   minutes past each hour:   Redfern Sports Pavilion Barrier                   4
      12     and 42   minutes past each hour:   Lakeside Decking                                  5
      16     and 46   minutes past each hour:   Westwood Arden Corner                             6
      18     and 48   minutes past each hour:   Westwood Refectory (Avon Road)                    7
      21     and 51   minutes past each hour:   University House Front Doors (in Car Park 17)     8
      23     and 53   minutes past each hour:   Main Gate                                         9
      24     and 54   minutes past each hour:   Claycroft (Sports Centre Road Barrier)            10
      27     and 27   minutes past each hour    Arts Centre Koan                                  1

Who May Ride
The (free of charge) service is intended for people, male or female, who feel vulnerable. The bus will not
carry more passengers than the vehicle is licensed to carry, and, therefore, very occasionally, less
vulnerable people may be asked to alight or be refused boarding. In such rare situations, the driver may
radio Security in order to inform them that people are waiting for assistance.

How The Bus Operates
During normal operating hours, people wishing to board the bus should not telephone Security (except in
extraordinary circumstances), but should go to the nearest safe point along the route and wait for the bus.
Outside normal operating hours, any individual who feels vulnerable should telephone Security (on
024 7652 2083, or on extension 22083 from an internal phone), to request an escort. However, please bear
in mind that it may take a short time to organise. It is also possible that the escort might not be in a vehicle,
but may be on foot.

Like a conventional bus, the shuttle bus does not stop when there is no-one waiting to board the bus and
there is no-one wishing to alight from the bus. People waiting to board should clearly signal to the driver as
the bus approaches. The bus will not pick people up who are not on campus. Passengers wishing to alight
may do so anywhere (on the route) of their choosing, and should call (loudly and clearly) to the driver to stop.
A circuit starts and finishes at the Arts Centre Koan. Circuits start every half an hour, on the hour and on the
half hour. The service is suspended for half an hour between 10:30 pm and 11:00 pm when the driver takes
a refreshment break. Children must be accompanied, and must wear the fitted seat-belts.

Service Restrictions
Passengers boarding when the bus is on its last circuit of the evening should be aware that the bus will not
be re-visiting destinations encountered earlier in the circuit.

Baggage And Luggage
Each passenger may carry only a small amount of hand-baggage into the seating area. Such hand-baggage
must not, under any circumstances, block any of the gangways and exits. Therefore, passengers must be
able to store their hand-baggage under the seat in front of them, or on their laps. All baggage must be
accompanied; i.e. baggage may not be carried for any non-passenger. Unlike an aircraft or a coach, the
shuttle bus does not have separate luggage-carrying facilities. People wishing to move large amounts of
luggage or shopping around campus cannot rely upon the shuttle bus, but should hire a taxi, to do so.



Guide to Postgraduate Study (September 2007)                                      Page 77 of 78

								
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