Docstoc

PLEASE NOTE

Document Sample
PLEASE NOTE Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                                                  

                                                               FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
                          Findhorn House, Dochfour Business Centre, Dochgarroch, Inverness, IV3 8GY, Scotland, UK 
                    Tel: +44 (0) 1463 223 039          Fax: +44 (0) 1463 246 380         www.foodcertint.com 
  
  
                                                            
                                              PLEASE NOTE 
                                                     
 This report confirms the proposal to certify 2 of the original 3 distinct units of certification, 
                                                 
                                           namely: 
                                         (1) SETNETS, (2) DANISH SEINE 
                                                            
The  third  unit  of  certification  for  Demersal  Trawl  is  subject  to  an  official  Objection  and 
  
therefore a decision to recommend certification is currently ON HOLD pending the outcome 
of the MSC Objection procedure.  
  
DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice landed using Demersal trawl is not considered to be eligible 
  
for  MSC  Chain  of  Custody  until  a  decision  can  be  made  following  completion  of  the  MSC 
  
Objections procedure.  
  
All  information  contained  in  this  report  referring  to  Demersal  Trawl  should  therefore  be 
  
read in light of the above statement. 
  
For  further  details  on  the  Objection  currently  under  consideration  please  refer  to  the 
following  MSC  web  page:  http://www.msc.org/track‐a‐fishery/in‐assessment/north‐east‐
  
atlantic/Denmark‐North‐Sea‐plaice 
                                                            
                        MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES CERTIFICATION 
                               DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice Fishery 
                                                            
                                         Public Certification Report 
                                                            
                                                                                             
                                                    March 2011 
                                                            
                                                            
  
  

 Prepared For:      Danish Fishermen’s Producers Organisation (DFPO) 
 Prepared By:        Food Certification International Ltd



  
     version 1.0 (18/10/10) 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                       
 
 
 
 

Public Certification Report 
 
March 2011 
                                                       
 
Authors:        T. Southall, P. Medley, N.Pfeiffer, S.Sverdrup‐Jensen, A.Hervás, M.Gill 
 
 
 
Certification Body:                                        Client: 
Food Certification International Ltd                       Danish Fishermen’s Producer  
                                                           Organisation (DFPO) 
Address:                                                   Address: 
Findhorn House                                             Nordensvej 3  
Dochfour Business Centre                                   Taulov 
Dochgarroch                                                DK‐7000 
Inverness  IV3 8GY                                         Fredericia 
Scotland, UK                                               Denmark 
 
Contact : Melissa McFadden                                 Contact : Jonathan Broch Jacobsen        
Tel:     +44(0) 1463 223 039                               Tel:       +45 (7010) 4040 
Email:  melissa.mcfadden@foodcertint.com                   Email:  jbj@dkfisk.dk            
Web:   www.foodcertint.com                                             

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                March 2011 
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Contents 
Glossary of Terms ........................................................................................................................... i 
Summary ....................................................................................................................................... 1 
 
1.  Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 4 
    1.1 Scope ............................................................................................................................................ 4 
    1.2 Report structure ........................................................................................................................... 4 
    1.3 Inspections & Consultations ......................................................................................................... 5 
              .
2. The Fishery  ................................................................................................................................ 6 
    2.1 The unit of certification (UoC) ...................................................................................................... 6 
    2.2 The Danish Fisherman’s Producer Organisation .......................................................................... 7 
       2.2.1 Organisational structure and role .......................................................................................... 7 
       2.2.2 DFPO Code of Conduct ........................................................................................................... 8 
    2.3 Fishing Fleet & Fishing Method .................................................................................................. 10 
       2.3.1  Demersal Trawl ................................................................................................................... 11 
                                   .
       2.3.2 Trammel Net & Gill Net  ....................................................................................................... 12 
       2.3.3 Danish Seine ......................................................................................................................... 13 
    2.4 Target species ............................................................................................................................. 14 
       2.4.1 Geographic Range ................................................................................................................ 14 
       2.4.2 Lifecycle ................................................................................................................................ 15 
       2.4.3 Diet ....................................................................................................................................... 15 
    2.5 Catches and landings .................................................................................................................. 16 
       2.5.1 Landing patterns and trends ................................................................................................ 16 
       2.5.2 Catching Areas and Landing ports ....................................................................................... 16 
       2.5.3 Internal division of catch allocations ................................................................................... 17 
                                                                                                                              1
3. Target stock status & harvest controls (P1)................................................................................  9 
    3.1 Status of the Stock ...................................................................................................................... 19 
    3.2 Reference Points ......................................................................................................................... 21 
       3.2.1 Biological Limit Reference Points ......................................................................................... 21 
       3.2.2 Precautionary reference Points ........................................................................................... 21 
       3.2.3 Target Reference Points ....................................................................................................... 21 
    3.3 Rebuilding Stocks ........................................................................................................................ 22 
    3.4 Harvest Strategy ......................................................................................................................... 22 
    3.5 Harvest Control Rule and Tools .................................................................................................. 24 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                           March 2011 
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
    3.6 Information and Monitoring ....................................................................................................... 25 
       3.6.1 Total Catch ........................................................................................................................... 26 
       3.6.2 Catch Sampling ..................................................................................................................... 27 
       3.6.3 Abundance Index ................................................................................................................. 27 
    3.7 Stock Assessment ....................................................................................................................... 28 
                                                                                                                                   3
4. Environmental Elements (P2) ....................................................................................................  0 
    4.1 Retained Bycatch ........................................................................................................................ 30 
       4.1.1 Setnet (Gill and Trammel) .................................................................................................... 30 
       4.1.2 Demersal Trawl .................................................................................................................... 30 
       4.1.3 Danish Seine ......................................................................................................................... 31 
       4.1.4 Species specific considerations ............................................................................................ 31 
    4.2 Discarding/Bycatch ..................................................................................................................... 32 
       4.2.1 Demersal Trawl .................................................................................................................... 33 
       4.2.2 Danish Seine ......................................................................................................................... 33 
       4.2.3 Setnet ................................................................................................................................... 34 
    4.3 Endangered, threatened and protected species (ETP) ............................................................... 35 
       4.3.1 Common skate, Spurdog and Allis shad ............................................................................... 35 
       4.3.2 Harbour porpoise ................................................................................................................. 36 
       4.3.3 Seals ..................................................................................................................................... 36 
    4.4 Habitat ........................................................................................................................................ 37 
       4.4.1 Demersal Trawl .................................................................................................................... 38 
       4.4.2 Danish Seine ......................................................................................................................... 39 
       4.4.3 Setnet ................................................................................................................................... 39 
    4.5 Ecosystem ................................................................................................................................... 39 
                              .                                                                                                       4
5. Administrative context (P3)  ......................................................................................................  1 
                           .
    5.1 Governance & Policy  .................................................................................................................. 41 
       5.1.1 Legislative Framework ......................................................................................................... 41 
       5.1.2 Consultation, Roles & Responsibilities ................................................................................. 42 
       5.1.3 Objectives............................................................................................................................. 43 
       5.1.4 Incentives ............................................................................................................................. 44 
    5.2 Fishery Specific Management System ........................................................................................ 45 
       5.2.1 Compliance & enforcement ................................................................................................. 45 
       5.2.2 Decision making & Dispute Resolution ................................................................................ 46 
                                                                                                                                   4
6.  Background to the Evaluation...................................................................................................  8 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                          March 2011 
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
    6.1 Assessment Team ....................................................................................................................... 48 
                           .
       6.1.1 Peer Reviewers  .................................................................................................................... 50 
    6.2 Public Consultation ..................................................................................................................... 50 
    6.3 Stakeholder Consultation ........................................................................................................... 50 
       6.3.1 Extent of available information ........................................................................................... 50 
       6.3.2 Stakeholder issues ............................................................................................................... 51 
       6.3.3 Stakeholder Interview programme ...................................................................................... 51 
    6.4 Other Certification Evaluations and Harmonisation................................................................... 52 
    6.5 Information sources used ........................................................................................................... 52 
                                                                                                                                                 5
7.  Scoring .....................................................................................................................................  4 
    7.1 Scoring Methodology.................................................................................................................. 54 
    7.2 Scoring Outcomes ....................................................................................................................... 55 
                                                                                                                                  5
8. Certification Recommendation ..................................................................................................  6 
    8.1 Overall Scores ............................................................................................................................. 56 
    8.2 Conditions ................................................................................................................................... 56 
       8.2.1  Principle 1 Conditions ......................................................................................................... 57 
              Condition 1 .......................................................................................................................................... 57 
              Condition 2 .......................................................................................................................................... 57 
              Condition 3 .......................................................................................................................................... 58 
       8.2.2 Principle 2 Conditions .......................................................................................................... 58 
              Condition DT1 ...................................................................................................................................... 58 
              Condition DT2 ...................................................................................................................................... 60 
              Condition SN1 ...................................................................................................................................... 61 
              Condition SN2 ...................................................................................................................................... 61 
              Condition DS1 ...................................................................................................................................... 63 
              Condition DS2 ...................................................................................................................................... 64 

       8.2.3 Principle 3 Conditions .......................................................................................................... 64 
    8.3 Recommendations ...................................................................................................................... 64 
                                                                                                                                    6
9 Limit of Identification of Landings ..............................................................................................  6 
    9.1 Traceability ................................................................................................................................. 66 
    9.2. Processing at sea etc.................................................................................................................. 67 
    9.3 Point of Landing .......................................................................................................................... 67 
    9.4 Eligibility to Enter Chains of Custody .......................................................................................... 67 
10. Client Agreement to the Conditions ........................................................................................  8 
                                                                                                                               6
                           .
    10.1 Client Action Plan  ..................................................................................................................... 68 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                                    March 2011 
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
                                                                                                                                      7
Appendix 1 – MSC Ps & Cs .............................................................................................................  5 
                                                                                                                               7
Appendix 2a – Report text References ..........................................................................................  8 
                                                    .                                                                 8
Appendix 2b – Assessment Tree Principle 2 References  ................................................................  0 
                                                                                                                          8
Appendix 3 – Assessment Tree / Scoring sheets ............................................................................  4 
    Principle 1 – All Units of Certification ............................................................................................... 84 
    Principle 2 – Demersal Trawl ............................................................................................................ 97 
    Principle 2 – Setnet ......................................................................................................................... 123 
                              .
    Principle 2 – Danish Seine  .............................................................................................................. 146 
    Principle 3 – All Units of Certification ............................................................................................. 170 
Appendix 4 – Peer review reports ............................................................................................... 186 
Appendix 5 – Certificate Sharing Mechanism .............................................................................. 207 
Appendix 6 – Stakeholder Comments on Public Comment Draft Report ...................................... 208 
    Summary of comments .................................................................................................................. 208 
    Changes in Response to comments ................................................................................................ 209 
    MSC ................................................................................................................................................. 210 
    WWF / North Sea Foundation ........................................................................................................ 213 
    Ekofish Group ................................................................................................................................. 221 
    Danish vessels fishing under the Ekofish Group MSC certificate ................................................... 223 
    Dutch Fish Product Board ............................................................................................................... 225 
 

 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                            March 2011 
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Glossary of Terms 
ASCOBANS              (Bonn  Convention’s)  Agreement  on  the  Conservation  of  Small 
                      Cetaceans in the Atlanto‐Scandian and Baltic. 
ACOM                  ICES Advisory Committee 
ACFA                  ICES Advisory Committee on Fisheries and Aquaculture 
Bpa                   Precautionary reference point for spawning stock biomass 
Blim                  Limit biomass reference point, below which recruitment is expected to 
                      be impaired. 
CEFAS                 Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (UK) 
CFP                   Common Fisheries Policy 
CR                    Council Regulation 
DFPO                  Danish Fisherman’s Producer Organisation 
DTU Aqua              Danish Technical University – National Institute of Aquatic Resources 
EC                    European Commission 
EEZ                   Exclusive Economic Zone 
ETP                   Endangered, threatened and protected species 
EU                    European Union 
F                     Fishing Mortality 
Flim                  Limit reference point for fishing mortality that is expected to drive the 
                      stock to the biomass limit 
Fpa                   Precautionary reference point of fishing mortality expected to maintain 
                      the SSB at the precautionary reference point 
FAM                   MSC’s Fisheries Assessment Methodology 
FAO                   United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation 
HCR                   Harvest Control Rule 
ICES                  International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 
IMR                   Norwegian Institute of Marine Research 
ITQ                   Individual Transferable Quota 
IWC                   International Whaling Commission 
MCS                   Monitoring, Control and Surveillance 
MSC                   Marine Stewardship Council 
MSY                   Maximum Sustainable Yield 
NEAFC                 The North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission 
NEA                   North East Atlantic 
NGO                   Non‐Governmental Organisation 
OSPAR                 Oslo‐Paris  Convention  (Convention  for  the  Protection  of  the  Marine 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                               March 2011    i
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
                      Environment of the North‐East Atlantic) 
P1                    MSC Principle 1 
P2                    MSC Principle 2 
P3                    MSC Principle 3 
PI                    MSC Performance Indicator 
PO                    Producer Organisation 
RAC                   Regional Advisory Council 
RSW                   Refrigerated Sea Water 
SONAR                 Sound navigation and ranging 
SSB                   Spawning Stock Biomass 
TAC                   Total Allowable Catch 
UK                    United Kingdom 
UoC                   Unit of Certification – i.e. Definition of the fishery. 
UNCLOS                United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 
VMS                   Vessel Monitoring System 
VPA                   Virtual Population Analysis 
WWF                   World Wide Fund For Nature 
WGWIDE                ICES Working Group on Widely Distributed Stocks 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                        March 2011    ii
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Summary 
»        
»        
                                          PLEASE NOTE 
This report confirms the proposal to certify 2 of the original 3 distinct units of certification, 
»       
                                                   namely: 
»        
                                     (1) SETNETS, (2) DANISH SEINE 
»        
The  third  unit  of  certification  for  Demersal  Trawl  is  subject  to  an  official  Objection  and 
  
therefore a decision to recommend certification is currently ON HOLD pending the outcome 
  
of the MSC Objection procedure.  
  
DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice landed using Demersal trawl is not considered to be eligible 
for  MSC  Chain  of  Custody  until  a  decision  can  be  made  following  completion  of  the  MSC 
  
Objections procedure.  
 
All  information  contained  in  this  report  referring  to  Demersal  Trawl  should  therefore  be 
  
read in light of the above statement. 
 
For  further  details  on  the  Objection  currently  under  consideration  please  refer  to  the 
  
following  MSC  web  page:  http://www.msc.org/track‐a‐fishery/in‐assessment/north‐east‐
  
atlantic/Denmark‐North‐Sea‐plaice 
 
»       This report provides details of the MSC assessment process for Danish Fishermen’s Producer 
        Organisation (DFPO) fishery for Denmark North Sea Plaice. The assessment process began in 
        August 2009.   
»       This assessment covers Danish registered vessels as defined in section 2.1 of this report. This 
        is to be interpreted in strict accordance with operational practices defined within this report, 
        including  adherence  with  the  DFPO  Code  of  Conduct  defined  in  section  2.2  and  (where 
        applicable) the certificate sharing mechanism defined in Appendix 5.  A full and up to date 
        list  of  certified  vessels  will  be  maintained  by  the  DFPO  at  www.msc‐
        fiskere.dk/default.asp?id=35450.   
»       This assessment report covers a single target species, but assesses three different methods 
        of capture. As a result there are 3 separate ‘Units of Certification’ and resulting scores for:  
        ›       Demersal trawl vessels (inc. Fly shooting and otter trawl) 
        ›       Danish seine vessels 
        ›       Setnet vessels (gill & trammel net) 
»       Landings by Danish registered vessels using any other type of fishing gears are NOT covered 
        by this certification. 
»       As  a  result  of  the  ongoing  MSC  Objection  procedure  and  to  address  any  potential  risk  for 
        currently uncertified DFPO demersal trawl caught plaice to enter the MSC Chain of Custody 
        alongside certified Danish seine and set‐net caught fish, it should be noted that the copy of 
        the fisherman’s EU logbook supplied with the landed fish will identify the fishing gear used 
        thus enabling the first point of landing, whether through auctions or at primary processors, 
        to document the source of the plaice entering MSC Chain of Custody.  


 
MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                     March 2011           1
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
»       The assessment team for this fishery assessment comprised of Tristan Southall, who acted as 
        team  leader  and  Principle  3  specialist;  Paul  Medley  who  was  responsible  for  evaluation  of 
        Principle  1;  Nick  Pfeiffer  who  was  responsible  for  evaluation  of  Principle  2  and  expert 
        advisors Fiona Nimmo and Antonio Hervas.   
»       The Danish North Sea plaice fishery is an important year round fishery. Landings are higher 
        during the summer months. Fishing is entirely within the North Sea, and almost exclusively in 
        European waters of ICES division IVb. 
»       A  rigorous  assessment  of  the  wide  ranging  MSC  Principles  and  Criteria  was  undertaken  by 
        the  assessment  team  and  detailed  and  fully  referenced  scoring  rationale  is  provided  in  the 
        assessment tree provided in Appendix 3 of this report. 
»       On completion of the assessment and scoring process, the assessment team concluded that 
        the Danish Fishermen’s Producer Organisation (DFPO) fishery for Danish North Sea Plaice 
        be  certified  according  to  the  Marine  Stewardship  Council  Principles  and  Criteria  for 
        Sustainable Fisheries. This includes all three specified gear types. 
»       There are a number of areas in which the fishery scored well: 
        ›       Good  evidence  of  recent  successful  stock  rebuilding,  on  the  back  of  an  agreed 
                management  plan  and  supported  by  a  scientifically  robust  and  regular  stock 
                assessment. 
        ›       The  available  evidence  suggests  that  the  fishery  is  reasonably  clean  in  terms  of 
                bycatch percentage. Potential impacts of bycatch are mitigated by a high‐grading ban 
                and real time closures. Management is in place for the main bycatch species.  
        ›       Understanding of the North Sea ecosystem functionality and the role of plaice in this 
                ecosystem is adequate to inform fisheries management. 
        ›       The management system which governs the operation of the fleet and exploitation of 
                the  resource  both  at  Danish  and  European  level  has  been  found  to  be  robust, 
                supported  by  fair  consultation  and  comprehensive  monitoring  control  and 
                surveillance. 
        ›       Furthermore,  recent  and  on‐going  improvements  in  the  management  system, 
                increase confidence in its ability to deliver long term sustainable fisheries. It is noted 
                that the Danish Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries are playing an important 
                and positive role in the current reform of the EU Common Fishers Policy, supported 
                by  impressive  pilot  projects  to  demonstrate  new  approaches  to  fisheries 
                management. 
»       However a number of criteria which contribute to the overall assessment score, scored less 
        than the unconditional pass mark, and therefore trigger a binding condition to be placed on 
        the  fishery,  which  must  be  addressed  in  a  specified  timeframe  (at  least  within  the  5  year 
        lifespan of the certificate). Full explanation of these conditions is provided in section 8 of the 
        report, but in brief, the areas covered by these conditions are: 
        ›       In relation to Principle 1 (Target Stock) 
                ›        Achieving a stock status fluctuating around a target biomass 
                ›       Ensuring that the harvest control rule explicitly defines how exploitation rates 
                        are reduced as limit reference points are approached, and have ICES evaluate 
                        the plan as precautionary. 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                      March 2011           2
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
                 ›        Improving  the  quality  of  information  in  relation  to  all  removals  from  the 
                          fishery (such as discarding) 
        ›        In relation to Discarded Bycatch 
                 ›        There  is  a  condition  raised  for  discarded  bycatch  against  setnet  fisheries,  in 
                          part due to lack of available data and in part due to obvious potential for bird 
                          bycatch. 
        ›        In relation to ETP Species 
                 ›        There are conditions raised against all 3 gear types in relation to ETP species, 
                          although there is a slightly different emphasis according to gear – for example 
                          the focus for trawl fisheries is on skate bycatch, whereas the focus for set net 
                          fisheries  is  more  on  harbour  porpoise.  Across  all  fleet  sectors  an  improved 
                          management strategy and recording is required. 
        ›        In relation to Habitat 
                 ›        Conditions  are  raised  for  both  mobile  gears  (trawl  and  Danish  Seine)  in 
                          relation to habitat impacts. Fishing with demersal mobile gears is associated 
                          with  damage  to  sensitive  seabed  habitats  and  non  target  benthic 
                          communities.  The  conditions  require  improvements  in  understanding  and 
                          management response to mitigate this. 
»       Full explanation of how the DFPO intend to meet these conditions is provided in the client 
        action plan in section 10 of the report. 
For  interested  readers,  the  report  also  provides  background  to  the  target  species  and  fishery 
covered  by  the  assessment,  the  wider  impacts  of  the  fishery  and  the  management  regime, 
supported  by  full  details  of  the  assessment  team,  a  full  list  of  references  used  and  details  of  the 
stakeholder consultation process. 
FCI Ltd confirm that the fishery is within scope. 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011            3
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
1.  Introduction 
This report details the background, justification and results of Food Certification International’s (FCI) 
assessment of the Danish North Sea Plaice Fishery, carried out by FCI to the standard of the Marine 
Stewardship Council (MSC) sustainable fishery programme.   

1.1 Scope 
First  and  foremost,  the  purpose  of  this  report  is  to  provide  a  clear  and  auditable  account  of  the 
process  that  was  undertaken  by  the  team  of  FCI  assessors.  The  report  aims  to  provide  clear 
justification  for  the  assessment  scores  that  have  been  attributed  to  the  fishery,  and  identify  the 
sources  of  information  that  have  been  used  to  support  these.  This  should  enable  subsequent 
surveillance  or  even  re‐certification  teams  to  rapidly  pin‐point  where  the  key  challenges  lie  within 
the  fishery,  and  quickly  highlight  any  changes  which  may  affect  the  overall  sustainability  of  the 
fishery. 
In  order  to  provide  useful  background  and  information  for  a  wider  readership  it  is  also  useful  to 
provide a more qualitative account of the fishery in question. However, it should be reiterated that 
no primary research has been undertaken to inform this report. The report is therefore not intended 
to comply with the standard editing norms expected for scientific journals. Instead it is intended that 
the report should be sufficiently clear and unambiguous to be reviewed by fisheries specialists, whist 
remaining  sufficiently  accessible  to  provide  insight  for  interested  readers  throughout  the  supply 
chain  –  including  consumers.  This  is  a  challenging  balance  to  strike  without  alienating  either 
readership. 
 

1.2 Report structure  
Early  report  sections  provide  the  reader  with  a  clear  comprehension  of  the  nature  of  the  fishery, 
enabling a broader understanding of the issues debated by the team when scoring the fishery.  For 
the purposes of precision, this begins with a description of the unit of certification, before expanding 
to  outline  some  further  background  information,  including  details  of  the  Danish  Fishermen’s 
Producer Organisation, the fleet, fishing operations and gear and the species itself. 
Subsequent  sections  are  then  broadly  aligned  to  the  3  MSC  principles1,  which  form  the  basic 
structure of the assessment, namely: 
»            Principle 1: Target stock status and harvest controls (summarised in section 3) 
»            Principle 2: Wider impacts of fishery operations (summarised in section 4) 
»            Principle 3: The management System (summarised in section 5) 
Later  sections  of  the  report  explain  the  procedures  used  to  score  the  fishery,  give  details  of  the 
assessment team, and present the outcome of the team’s deliberations.  Finally the report provides 
a statement of the team’s recommendations as to whether or not this fishery should go forward for 
certification  to  the  standard  of  the  Marine  Stewardship  Council,  together  with  any  conditions 
recommended. 

 
 


                                                            
1
     Further information on the contents of the MSC principles and criteria are contained in Appendix 1. 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                        March 2011           4
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
1.3 Inspections & Consultations 
The full assessment process commenced  in August 2009.   In  February 2010 three members of the 
assessment  team,  supported  by  an  FCI  staff  member  undertook  a  site  visit  to  Denmark,  visiting 
Copenhagen,  Hanstholm  and  Thyborøn.  This  enabled  a  scheduled  programme  of  consultations  to 
take  place  with  key  stakeholders  in  the  fishery  –  including  skippers,  scientists,  fishery  protection 
officers, NGOs, fishery managers and technical support staff.  
A complete list of those stakeholders interviewed in the fishery can be found in Section 6.3 of this 
report. 
The scoring of the fishery against the MSC principles and criteria took place in Edinburgh (UK) from 
8th to the 12th March 2010. 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           5
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
2. The Fishery  
2.1 The unit of certification (UoC) 
Prior to providing a description of the fishery it is important to be clear about the precise extent of 
potential  certification  (ie.  what  is  specifically  being  assessed).    The  MSC  Guidelines  to  Certifiers 
specify  that  this  ‘Unit  of  Certification’  is  “The  fishery  or  fish  stock  (biologically  distinct  unit) 
combined with the fishing method/gear and practice (= vessel(s) and/or individual/s) pursuing the 
fish of that stock”.   
This  clear  definition  is  useful  for  both  clients  and  assessors  to categorically  state  what  is  included, 
and what is not. This is also crucial for any repeat assessment visits, or if any additional vessels are 
wishing to join the certificate at a later date.  
In  this  assessment,  3  fishing  methods  were  assessed.  As  there  are  significant  differences  between 
these fishing methods, fishing areas and the vessels which use them, it was deemed appropriate to 
score  them  separately.  Therefore  in  section  8  of  the  report  a  separate  score  and  certification 
recommendation  is  provided  for  each  of  these  UoCs  in  turn.  The  3  Units  of  Certification  for  the 
fishery under consideration are set out below.   
The fishery assessed for MSC certification is defined as: 
       Species:                                                European Plaice (Pleuronectes platessa  Linnaeus, 1758) 
       Stock:                                                  North Sea Plaice in ICES Subarea IV 
       Geographical area:                                      North Sea – ICES Subarea IV – Including territorial waters of 
                                                               the EU and Norway. 
       Harvest method:                                         Demersal Trawl2 
       Client Group:                                           DFPO  member  vessels  fishing  for  North  Sea  plaice3.  A 
                                                               register  of  eligible  vessels  will  be  maintained  at  www.msc‐
                                                               fiskere.dk/default.asp?id=35450.  
       Other Eligible Fishers4:                                Danish registered vessels fishing for North Sea plaice which 
                                                               are not currently members of the DFPO.  
 
       Species:                                                European Plaice (Pleuronectes platessa   Linnaeus, 1758) 
       Stock:                                                  North Sea Plaice in ICES Subarea IV 
       Geographical area:                                      North Sea – ICES Subarea IV – Including territorial waters of 
                                                               the EU and Norway. 
       Harvest method:                                         Setnets (Trammel net & Gill net) 
       Client Group:                                           DFPO  member  vessels  fishing  for  North  Sea  plaice.  A 
                                                               register  of  eligible  vessels  will  be  maintained  at  www.msc‐
                                                               fiskere.dk/default.asp?id=35450. 
                                                            
2
   Demersal trawl includes both otter trawl and fly shooting fishing methods (see 2.3.1 for full description) 
3
   This is to be interpreted in strict accordance with operational practices defined in this report, in particular the 
DFPO Code of Conduct defined in section 2.2.  This applies to all UoCs. 
4
   Under strict conditions defined within the Certificate Sharing Mechanism for this fishery (Appendix 5). This 
applies to all UoCs. 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                            March 2011      6
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
       Other Eligible Fishers:                                 Danish registered vessels fishing for North Sea plaice which 
                                                               are not currently members of the DFPO.   
 
       Species:                                                European Plaice (Pleuronectes platessa   Linnaeus, 1758) 
       Stock:                                                  North Sea Plaice in ICES Subarea IV 
       Geographical area:                                      North Sea – ICES Subarea IV – Including territorial waters of 
                                                               the EU and Norway. 
       Harvest method:                                         Danish Seine 
       Client Group:                                           DFPO  member  vessels  fishing  for  North  Sea  plaice.  A 
                                                               register  of  eligible  vessels  will  be  maintained  at  www.msc‐
                                                               fiskere.dk/default.asp?id=35450. 
       Other Eligible Fishers:                                 Danish registered vessels fishing for North Sea plaice which 
                                                               are not currently members of the DFPO.   
 

2.2 The Danish Fisherman’s Producer Organisation 
2.2.1  Organisational structure and role 
The  Danish  Fishermen’s  Producers  Organisation  (DFPO)  obtained  official  recognition  as  an  EU 
Producers Organisation (PO) in 1974, with the overarching objective of creating a balance between 
supply and demand in the market place for species to which minimum prices are applied under EU 
regulations.  Additionally,  the  DFPO  also  oversees  the  withdrawal  of  fish  from  market  in 
circumstances where landings are unable to obtain minimum withdrawal prices5. Plaice is one of the 
species that fall within the EU minimum price scheme along with the other main commercial species 
landed by the EU fleet. 

    European  Union  regulations  establish  a  common  market  for  fishery  products,  making  it  possible,  in  the 
    interests of producers and consumers, for Producer Organisations to stabilise prices, balance supply and 
    demand and ensure adequate supplies to a market. 
    Council Regulation (EC) No 104/2000 of 17 December 1999 on the common organisation of the markets in 
    fishery and aquaculture products. 
                                                                                                                    
DFPO members land approximately 60‐65 % of the total Danish catches of these species. All active 
Danish vessels are eligible for membership of the DFPO. Members pay a landings levy to the DFPO 
for  all  landings  of  relevant  species  and  in  return  the  DFPO  offers  a  safety‐net  in  the  form  of 
guaranteed minimum payments, if members cannot sell their fish at the minimum prices stipulated 
by  the  EU.  The  members  are  then  entitled  to  receive  a  guarantee  payment  or  refund,  which  is 
generally  at  the  same  level  as  the  withdrawal  price  itself.  All  withdrawn  fish  is  disposed  for  non‐
consumption purposes (production of pet food, mink feed and fishmeal and ‐oil). 
The DFPO is structured as follows: 
»            Members  Council:  responsible  for  statute  changes,  election  of  chairman  and  board,  and 
             outlining official policy in relevant fields of responsibility. 


                                                            
5
   Any  withdrawn  fish  still  counts  against  TAC  so  this  system  has  the  potential  to  reduce  catches  below  the 
annual biologically based TAC, but does not contribute in catches that exceed the TAC. 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                            March 2011      7
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
»            Chairman  and  board:  responsible  for  setting  minimum  prices  (regulations  permit  EC  guide 
             prices to be altered within +/‐ 10 %, according to current market situation). The board also 
             fixes the level of guaranteed payment to members in case of withdrawals from the market. 
»            Secretariat  (common  with  DFA):  21  employees,    DFPO  chairman  ‐  responsible  for  all 
             administrative matters. 
DFPO cooperates closely  with the Danish Fishermen’s Association on most fishing related matters, 
nationally as well as internationally. DFPO also represents its members on a number of committees 
under  the  Danish  Ministry  of  Food,  Agriculture  and  Fishing.  DFPO  is  also  a  member  of  the  EAPO 
(European  Association  of  Producers  Organisations).  In  addition  the  DFPO  also  undertakes  some 
business operations such as the production and the leasing out of cold storage facilities to members 
primarily located in the smaller fishing ports. Unlike some other European Producer Organisations, 
the  DFPO  do  not  play  any  role  in  either  holding  vessel  quota  or  monitoring  uptake  but  they  do 
sometimes play a role in arranging quota exchanges with other countries. 
2.2.2  DFPO Code of Conduct 
The code of conduct was first formally adopted by the DFPO in June 2008 and outlines the practices 
to  meet  the  goals  for  sustainable  and  responsible  behaviour  in  Danish  fisheries.  Sustainability  and 
minimising environmental impact are the main objectives and although fleet financial performance 
is not mentioned directly, there is a clear recognition that economic sustainability (profitability) is a 
vital  pre‐requisite  of  more  environmental  and  economic  sustainability.  In  this  respect  the  code 
therefore also includes elements in relation to areas likely to benefit vessel financial performance, 
such as catch handling and quality of the landings. 
Since then, and as part of the MSC assessment process, the DFPO have added to and enhanced their 
existing members Code of Conduct to more accurately reflect that sustainability goals outlined in the 
MSC Principles and Criteria. This now includes additional recording commitments to collate relevant 
data to enable further management refinement. Signing up to, and continued compliance with this 
Code  of  Conduct  (including  submitting  relevant  data  records)  is  a  pre‐requisite  requirement  of 
inclusion on  the MSC certificate,  and is monitored and enforced by the DFPO. A summary of the 
DFPO expanded Code of Conduct is provided in Figure 2.1.  
For chain of custody purposes, the DFPO keep an updated list of vessels that have signed up to this 
Code  of  Conduct  and  are  recording  relevant  data  and  are  therefore  eligible  to  land  plaice  in 
accordance  with  this  certification.  A  register  of  vessels  is  maintained  at  www.msc‐
fiskere.dk/default.asp?id=35450  6. In time, this site will also be linked to the electronic traceability 
system  the  DFPO  are  currently  building,  so  that  once  it  is  up  and  running,  buyers  will  not  have  to 
perform a separate check. 
Upon signature of the Code of Conduct a vessel is sent: 
»            recording sheets for relevant data on fishery interactions.  This will contain details of exactly 
             what interactions to record (bycatch species, relevant ETP species, habitat interactions) and 
             in what format the data should be recorded (weight, time, location etc.);  
»            reporting instructions / requirements; 
»            a  ‘Wheelhouse‐guide  to  protected  species’  listing  all  relevant  ETP  species  will  be  produced 
             and distributed to all members who have signed up to the revised Code of Conduct and who 
             will  be  eligible  to  use  the  MSC  certificates.  The  guide  contain  images  and  species 
             identification  tricks  for  difficult‐to‐identify  species  such  as  skates  and  rays,  produced  in 

                                                            
6
   The link is in the middle of the page where it states: "Download fartøjslisten som PDF til print her." ‐ the link 
being the word "her." 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                          March 2011           8
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
        collaboration  with  the  species  identification  experts  at  the  Natural  History  Museum  of 
        Denmark.  
Although  some  areas  of  the  CoC  are  purely  commitments  to  good  practice,  there  are  specific 
reporting  requirements  which  are  monitored  and  enforced  by  the  DFPO.  All  vessels  which  have 
signed  up  to  the  Code  of  Conduct  and  who  are  therefore  eligible  to  sell  their  product  as  MSC 
certified are required to submit quarterly data reports to the DFPO (either directly or through their 
local Fishermen’s Association).  
A vessel which does not comply with the operational procedures in the Code of Conduct or who fails 
to  submit  the  requisite  data  in  the  appropriate  form  will  be  contacted  directly  by  DFPO  staff  and 
issued with a warning. Continued non‐compliance  will result in  loss of the right of use of the  MSC 
certificates for one year. 
Additionally, any vessel which is successfully prosecuted for a fisheries violation which has material 
consequences for the sustainability of the fishery, on more than 1 occasion over a two year period 
will  lose  the  right  of  use  of  the  MSC  certificates  for  one  year  and  be  removed  from  the  vessel 
register. 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           9
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Fig 2.1: Summary of some of the key relevant elements of the DFPO code of conduct. 

        Minimise unwanted catches and discards:                     Minimise the environmental impact of fishing: 

           No high‐grading                                            Minimise fuel use and by use cleanest available 
           Fish in areas and at times with the lowest presence         fuel.  
            of unwanted species.                                       Develop gear which minimises the harmful effects 
           Clear & open fleet communication regarding areas            on the environment.  
            of undersized fish or unwanted species.                    Bring in‐organic waste ashore – including waste 
           Use and continue to develop selective gear for              caught in gear.  
            effective fishery.                                         Dispose of oil and other potentially 
           Efficient and appropriate use vessel quota‐pools            environmentally damaging substances in 
            opportunites for rental, exchange etc. to adjust            designated harbour facilities of. 
            vessel quota to actual catches.                            Notify SOK (the Danish Navy operations centre 
                                                                        responsible for pollution surveillance) whenever 
                                                                        pollution encountered at sea. 
                                                                       Recover lost fishing‐gear, assisting fellow vessels 
                                                                        and recording lost gear where recovery is not 
                                                                        possible. 

        Avoid capture of marine mammals and other                   Open collaboration with other stakeholders: 
        endangered or protected species. 
           The relevant species, and how to identify and              With authorities and politicians on the 
            record them, are described in a ‘Wheelhouse‐                development of policies and management.  
            guide to protected species’.                               With researchers on the development of 
           Record any capture events and if still alive, return        knowledge and data collection.  
            to the sea as quickly and carefully as possible.           With the control and monitoring agency on e.g. 
           Collected, aggregate and monitor data and pass to           developing better logbooks and control strategies. 
            relevant scientific institutions for analysis.             With organisations in and around the fisheries’ 
           Use year 1 analysis to adopt DFPO plan to reduce            sector.  
            impact (through guides, rules, research etc.),             With environmental NGOs on e.g. common advice 
            prioritising fisheries, species, seasons and areas          to The European Commission. 
            with greatest interaction.  
                                                                       Welcome observers onboard DFPO vessels. 
           The plan will be evaluated and adjusted annually 
            after each new year of monitoring. 

        Safeguard crews                                             Transparent information, traceability & quality 

                Ensure safety and good conditions for the                  Ensure correct and hygienic handling of 
                 crew at sea                                                 catches. 
                Ensure the continued appropriate education                 Monitor vessels by satellite and track catches 
                 of our crew.                                                with electronic logbooks.  
                Educate fishermen on interactions between                  An advanced system of electronically 
                 fishing, fish stocks and their environment.                 traceable fish‐boxes and electronic 
                                                                             traceability from catch to consumer 

 

2.3 Fishing Fleet & Fishing Method 
All certified vessels are Danish registered and members of the DFPO. There are 3 different gear types 
covered  in  this  assessment  report;  demersal  trawl,  Danish  Seine  and  Set  Net  (trammel  &  gill  net). 
The  potential  maximum  number  of  vessels  could  ultimately  include  all  Danish  registered  vessels, 
who are members of the DFPO and fishing plaice with the gears specified – provided they are fully 
compliant  with  the  terms  of  the  certificate.  The  probable  maximum  number  of  vessels  (based  on 
current fishing patterns of DFPO members) is likely to be 150 set net vessels, 100 trawl vessels and 
30 Danish Seine vessels. Details of each fleet component are set out below.  

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                     March 2011       10
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
2.3.1   Demersal Trawl 
The  demersal  trawl7  is  a  towed  fishing  gear  designed  and  rigged  to  have  bottom  contact  during 
fishing, towed by large trawl vessels, typically in excess of 15m. A demersal trawl is a cone‐shaped 
net  consisting  of  a  body,  closed  by  a  codend  and  with  lateral  wings  extending  forward  from  the 
opening. The two towing warps lead from the vessel to the otter boards which act as paravanes to 
maintain the horizontal net opening. These boards typically weigh between 0.5–2 t and drag across 
the  seabed  (with  potential  to  disrupt  seabed  structure  and  habitat).  The  boards  are  joined  to  the 
wing‐end  by  the  bridles  which  herd  fish  into  the  path  of  the  net.  The  net  opening  is  framed  by  a 
floating  headline  and  ground  gear  designed  according  to  the  bottom  condition  to  maximise  the 
capture  of  demersal  target  species,  whilst  protecting  the  gear  from  damage.  On  very  rough 
substrates special rock hopper gears are used.   
Figure 2.2: Vessel image / gear configuration 




                                                                                    Source: Galbraith & Rice 2004 
The trawl gear used by the certified fleet is designed and rigged to fish for demersal flat fish over a 
range  of  grounds.    The  North  Sea  plaice  grounds  are  characterised  by  areas  of  relatively  smooth 
seabed,  e.g.  sand  or  consolidated  mud,  therefore  the  footrope  can  be  relatively  light  and  simple, 
with small bobbins to enable to enable the gear to pass over uneven surfaces, but without the need 
for heavy rockhopper gear.  
Current regulations state that mesh size in the cod end must be a minimum of 110mm in EU waters8 
and  120  mm  in  Norwegian  Territorial  waters.  Many  Danish  fishermen  however  choose  to  fish  120 
mm    all  of  the  time,  mainly  because  they  fish  both  EU  and  Norwegian  waters  and  practical 
considerations mean it is not feasible to change cod ends when crossing over and back into and out 
of the Norwegian sector. 
Instruments  to  monitor  gear  performance  are  common  in  modern  bottom  otter  trawling.  Such 
instruments  monitor  geometry  (door  distance,  vertical  opening,  bottom  contact,  trawl  symmetry), 
trawl depth water temperature and the weight of catch in the trawl is also closely monitored (catch 
sensors) to give an indication of the appropriate moment to haul. 

                                                            
7
   The definition of demersal trawling does of extend to include Beam trawling, whereby bottom trawls are kept 
open through the use of steel beams as opposed to otter boards (trawl doors). 
8
   Although a smaller 80mm mesh size is permitted further south, in particular in the Dutch Beam trawl fishery, 
no such vessels are included in this assessment. 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                        March 2011            11
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Included within the demersal trawl unit of certification is ‘fly shooting’ (also known as Scottish seine 
or  fly  dragging).  This  fishing  method  combines  some  of  the  characteristics  of  otter  trawling  (as 
described  above)  with  characteristic  elements  of  Danish  seining  (see  Section  2.3.3).    It  is  a  towed 
ground fishing method for demersal fish where there the warps and net (conical net with two long 
wings  and  no  otter  boards)  are  laid  out  from  a  large  buoy  (which  is  not  anchored  as  per  Danish 
seine).    As  in  seining  the  vessel  encircles  the  fish,  however  for  hauling,  the  vessel  steams  forward 
(rather than winching in whilst at anchor), meaning that the net is dragged along the seabed. For this 
reason the fishing gear is typically heavier than for Danish Seine, and fishing grounds more typically 
overlap with demersal trawling. For this reason it has been deemed more appropriate to include fly 
shooting within the demersal trawl UoC. 
2.3.2  Trammel Net & Gill Net 
Another  fishing  method  employed  in  this  fishery  is  a  bottom  set  gill  net  with  vessels  specially 
designed for static gear operations, with a net hauler typically on the forward starboard quarter and 
sufficient deck space for sorting and storing the catch and for sorting and storing the nets. For most 
of the large set net vessels there is a covered shelter deck for all net handling and catch sorting. 
The vessels make use of two different types of bottom set net, both of which are covered within this 
Unit of Certification; namely the Trammel Net and the gill net. 
The majority of plaice landings are made with a trammel net. The trammel net used by this fleet is a 
triple mesh net, anchored to the seabed with a total height of around 1.5m. The inner central mesh 
is 150mm, sandwiched between 2 outer mesh layers (trammels) of 350mm. By having an inner panel 
of small mesh netting, loosely hung between the two outer panels of large mesh netting, when a fish 
strikes the net it pushes the small‐meshed netting forward through the large mesh, forming a pocket 
in which it is trapped. 
Fig 2.3: Typical trammel net configuration 




                                                                            Data source: FAO Gear type Factsheet 
A gill net  consists of a single netting  wall kept  more or less vertical by a float line and a weighted 
ground line. The net is set on the bottom, and kept stationary by anchors on both ends and at 50m 
intervals. A gill net mesh size is chosen to allow only the head and gill covers of the targeted size of 
fish  to  pass  through  and  be  trapped.  In  this  case,  each  net  is  approximately  3m  high  (from  the 
seabed) and 50m long with a monofilament mesh size of 190mm. Typically as many as 100 lengths of 
nets  are  joined  together  and  worked  as  a  single  net,  making  long  nets  sometimes  up  to  several 
kilometres in length. Vessels in this fleet typically carry enough net to make 3 lines parallel lines of 



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011            12
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
net, around 500m apart – these are then relatively easy to patrol, to ensure other vessels do not foul 
the gear.  
The  fishing  properties  of  static  nets  are  a  function  of  many  several  parameters  relating  to  the  net 
including  the  mesh  size,  no  of  filaments  making  up  the  twine  (monofilament  v.  multifilament), 
hanging ratio – the number of meshes mounted per unit length  of head/footrope, mesh colour as 
well as physical dimensions in terms of length and net height (measured in meshes). 
Both gill nets and trammel nets are set before dark, generally parallel to the tide. Nets are usually 
left  in  the  water  overnight  and  hauled  during  the  day.  Occasionally  nets  may  have  a  longer  soak 
time,  for  example  as  a  result  of  bad  weather,  but  this  is  to  be  avoided  as  the  catch  quickly 
deteriorates, both as a result of parasitic action and crabs which quickly destroy the trapped fish and 
are time consuming to remove from the net. 
Fig 2.4: Diagram of typical gill net configuration 




                                                                                     Source: Galbraith & Rice 2004 
Although  weighted  and  anchored,  the  nets  are  relatively  light  and  can  be  flattened  by  the  tide  so 
nets will not normally set during spring tides – in particular in regions of highest current (in the south 
of  the  fishing  region).  Nets  are  marked  by  Dhan  buoys’  with  the  vessel  identification  and  radar 
reflector. 
Technically the gill net fishing season is year round, however due to the nature of the gear and the 
fishing  characteristics of the net,  there are far higher landings during  the summer  months. Due  to 
the nature of the gear and vessel and crew ability to work the gear, nets are only shot or hauled in 
up to about wind speed of 20 m/s (Beaufort Force 6).  
2.3.3  Danish Seine 
The  Danish  Seine,  or  anchor  seine,  is  a  ground  fishing  method  for  demersal  fish  where  there  the 
warps  and  net  (conical  net  with  two  long  wings)  are  laid  out  from  an  anchored  dhan  buoy  by  the 
vessel. In order to surround the proposed fishing spot, the vessel steams a roughly triangular shaped 
course, firstly away from the dhan to one side of the spot paying out the first warp as it steams. The 
vessel then pays out net whilst passing astern of the fishing spot and finally returning to the dhan 
whilst paying out a second length of warp. The vessel then returns to the dhan buoy and secures to 
the anchor cable, in order to keep the vessel stationary whilst hauling.  
Hauling of the net is slow at first, with the two net warps herding fish towards the path of the net as 
they close. As hauling proceeds, winch speed increases and the net begins to move in the direction 
of  tow,  with  the  lateral  wings  of  the  net  increasingly  acting  to  herd  the  fish.  When  the  ropes  are 
nearly closed haul speed increases again enabling the net to capture the remaining fish in its path. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011            13
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Finally  the  net  is  bought  alongside  the  ship  (or  ships  stern  depending  on  vessel  configuration)  to 
allow the cod end to be craned / winched aboard and emptied.  
Although  Danish  seine  gear  is  generally  lighter  than  trawl  gear,  with  neither  heavy  trawl  doors  or 
clump weight, the gear is robust and strong to withstand abrasion over the seabed. The seine nets 
are generally made up from the same twisted polyethylene twines used by the demersal trawl fleet, 
with  a  weighted  ground  rope  which  may  be  supplemented  by  light  rubber  discs  or  bobbins  for 
rougher ground. 
Fig 2.5: Typical Danish Seining setting (a) and hauling (b) process. 




                                                                            Data source: FAO Gear type Factsheet 
Danish seining is considered a more fuel‐efficient method than demersal trawling and usually yields 
a  better  quality  of  catch  due  to  the  short  time  that  fish  are  towed  in  the  net  before  being  taken 
aboard the boat.   
 

2.4 Target species 
The  target  species  for  the  fishery  under  certification  is  North  Sea  Plaice  Pleuronectes  platessa 
(Danish:  Rødspætte).  As  indicated  initially,  this  report  does  not  intend  to  provide  a  scientifically 
comprehensive description of the species. Interested readers should refer to sources that have been 
useful in compiling the following summary description of the species. These include: 
»       Fishbase: 
        http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/speciesSummary.php?ID=1342&genusname=Pleuronect
        es&speciesname=platessa&lang=English 
»       ICES Fishmap: http://www.ices.dk/marineworld/fishmap/ices/default.asp?id=Plaice 
2.4.1  Geographic Range 
Plaice may be found from the western Mediterranean Sea, along the coast of Europe as far north as 
the White Sea and Iceland. Occasionally they occur as far west as the coast of Greenland. Juveniles 
are  found  in  shallow  coastal  waters  and  outer  estuaries,  with  older  plaice  typically  moving  into 
deeper water. During summer in the North Sea, juvenile plaice are concentrated in the Southern and 
German  Bights,  but  also  occur  along  the  east  coast  of  Britain  and  in  the  Skagerrak  and  Kattegat. 
Juveniles  are  found  at  lower  densities  in  the  central  North  Sea,  and  are  virtually  absent  from  the 
north‐eastern  part.  In  recent  years,  there  have  been  changes  in  the  distribution  of  juvenile  plaice, 
and juveniles now seem to occur in deeper waters than before. 
Despite  the  existence  of  major  spawning  concentrations  and  the  clear  homing  of  individuals  to 
specific spawning grounds, it is uncertain whether the offspring from each spawning ground return 
to  the  same  ground  to  spawn  and  thus  these  subpopulations  are  to  some  extent  reproductively 
isolated  units.  A  genetic  study  on  the  population  structure  of  plaice  in  northern  Europe,  however, 
revealed  that  the  North  Sea  Basin  constitutes  a  random‐mating  unit  with  high  gene  flow  among 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011            14
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
geographically recognizable stocks. Therefore, plaice in ICES sub‐area IV (North Sea) is assessed as 
one unit stock. 
Figure 2.6: chart of Global Distribution of Pleuronectes platessa 




                                                                                                Source: Fishbase 

2.4.2  Lifecycle 
Coastal and inshore waters of the North Sea represent essential nursery areas, with the Wadden Sea 
being  the  most  important  one.  One‐year‐old  plaice  show  a  strictly  coastal  distribution  while  the 
older age classes gradually disperse further offshore, away from the nursery areas  
Spawning may occur over most of the offshore and deeper parts of the southern North Sea and off 
the east coast of Britain from Flamborough Head to the Moray Firth. Centres of high egg production 
are the eastern Channel and the Southern Bight, while egg production around the Dogger Bank and 
in the German Bight is more diffuse. 
Nursery  grounds  for  plaice  tend  to  be  very  shallow,  even  occasionally  including  tidal  pools  on  the 
estuarine  tidal  flats.  Sediment  characteristics  are  thought  to  be  of  importance  during  larval 
settlement and positive relationships have been found between grain size and plaice densities. For 
example in the Wadden Sea, protected muddy areas are less populated by plaice than more exposed 
sandy flats. The preference for sandy sediments remains during the entire lifespan, although older 
age groups may be found on coarser sand. 
Plaice  make  selective  use  of  tidal  currents  in  various  stages  of  their  life.  Metamorphosing  larvae 
enter  estuarine  nursery  areas  by  migrating  to  midwater  during  the  flood  tide  and  settling  at  the 
bottom during ebb; juvenile plaice in the Wadden Sea move with the flood tide onto sandy flats to 
feed  and  move  back  to  the  surrounding  channels  on  the  ebb  tide.  Adult  plaice  are  also  known  to 
make use of tidal stream transport during their seasonal migrations between spawning and feeding 
grounds;  they  move  downstream  with  the  tide  in  mid‐water,  and  stay  on  the  bottom  during  the 
opposing tide, showing little or no movement. Part of the North Sea plaice population spawns in the 
Channel and returns to its feeding grounds in the North Sea afterwards. Progeny of this group enters 
the North Sea as eggs and early larvae by passive drift. 
2.4.3  Diet 
The diet of plaice larvae in the Southern Bight consists of appendicularians such as Oikopleura dioica 
and Fritillaria borealis, but several stages of copepods, algae, and bivalve post‐larvae are also eaten. 
Polychaete  worms,  especially  sessile  species  such  as  Pectinaria  koreni  and  tails  of  Arenicola,  and 
bivalves  are  important  food  groups  for  larger  plaice.  Other  important  prey  includes  small 
crustaceans (e.g. amphipods, mysids and small shrimps), siphons of bivalve molluscs (e.g. Abra spp., 
Mya spp. and Venus spp.), and, in certain areas, brittle stars (Ophiura spp.). Plaice are typical daylight 
feeders. The adults do not feed during the spawning period. 
 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           15
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
2.5 Catches and landings  
2.5.1  Landing patterns and trends  
Total landings of North Sea plaice, by fleets of all nationalities was 48,874 tonnes in 2008. This is the 
lowest recorded landings since the start of the time series in 1957. Landings and TAC have shown a 
generally  declining  pattern  for  over  two  decades  from  peak  recorded  landings  of  almost  170,000 
tonnes in 1989. The 2008 TAC of 48,000 tonnes was the lowest agreed TAC since their introduction 
in  1981,  although  the  TAC  agreed  in  2009  and  2010  has  increased,  in  line  with  both  the  agreed 
management plan and scientific advice. The 2010 TAC was set at 63,825 tonnes. 
Aside from a small Norwegian allocation (≈ 2%) of North Sea plaice, all landings are made by the EU 
fleet. The Netherlands is responsible for the largest share of the catch (some 20,000 tonnes in 2008 
or 41% of landings), followed by the UK (some 11,000 tonnes in 2008 or 23% of landings). The Danish 
fleet  receives  the  third  largest  share  of  the  plaice  quota  and  in  2008  landed  8,229  tonnes, 
representing just less than 17% of all landings.  
Figure 2.7: Quota Allocations For Plaice (IIa, IIIa (exc Skagerrak & Kattegat), IV)  

                                                          25,000
                Initial Annual Quota Allocations (2009)




                                                          20,000


                                                          15,000


                                                          10,000


                                                           5,000


                                                              0




                                                                   Source: Data from http://ec.europa.eu/fisheries 
The three units of certification covered by this assessment accounted for almost 90% of all Danish 
North  Sea  plaice  landings.  The  division  of  landings  in  2008  between  the  main  fleet  sectors 
responsible are set out below: 
»       Demersal Trawl – 56% (plus fly shooting: 1%) 
»       Danish Seine – 15.5% 
»       Static set nets (Gill & trammel combined) – 16.5% 
»       Others including beam trawl are responsible for the remainder – but these landings are not 
        covered by this assessment.  
2.5.2  Catching Areas and Landing ports 
The  main  fishing  area  for  plaice  for  the  Danish  fleet  is  in  ICES  Area  IVb  (central  North  Sea),  which 
accounts  for  some  96.5%  of  all  Danish  North  Sea  Plaice  landings.  The  remaining  small  percentage 
comes from IVa (Northern North Sea) or occasionally IVc (southern North Sea).  




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                           March 2011            16
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Fig: 2.8 Annual aggregated VMS plots for Danish plaice landings from the otter trawl (a), Danish Seine (b) 
and Set net (c) fleets. 




                                                                                 Source: Danish Fisheries Directorate. 
The  majority  of  plaice  landings  by  the  Danish  fleet  are  into  fishing  ports  on  the  West  coast  of  the 
Jutland  peninsula  –  ports  ideally  situated  for  the  proximity  of  the  fishing  grounds.  The  most 
important port for plaice landings by the Danish fleet is Thyborøn, followed by other Danish ports on 
the west of Jutland such as Hvide sande, Hanstholm, Thorsminde and Esbjerg. There are also some 
international ports for Danish landings of plaice, which include Lauwersoog in the Netherlands and 
Grimsby in the UK. 
Fig 2.9: 2008 Landings of Plaice by the Danish Registered Fleet (inc. Map) 

                                                   Thyborøn
                                                 Hvide sande
                                                  Hanstholm
                                                 Lauwersoog
                                                 Thorsminde
                                                      Lemvig
                                                      Esbjerg                                             % Value
                                                     Grimsby
                                                                                                          % Volume
                                               Thorup strand
                                               Nørre vorupør
                                                    Hirtshals
                                                  Den helder
                                                         Urk

                                                                0%   10%   20%     30%     40%    50%

                                                         Source: Data provided by the Danish Fisheries Directorate.  

2.5.3  Internal division of catch allocations 
Plaice quota is divided within Denmark using a system of Individual Transferable Quotas (ITQs). The 
objective  of  this  programme  was  to  facilitate  modernisation  in  the  pelagic  fleet  and  improve  the 
profitability of the demersal fishing fleet through a substantial capacity reduction, thereby reducing 
the pressure on demersal fish stocks (in particular from discard and high grading).  
Moves  began  in  2003,  firstly  in  the  pelagic  sector  with  a  system  of  fixed  quota  allocations  being 
attached to vessels, based on track record. Over time the system has evolved to be applicable to a 
wider  number  of  species,  including  demersal  species  (such  as  plaice).    Since  2009  this  system  has 
become a full system of Individual Transferable Quota (ITQ), where the quota allocation is no longer 
fixed to a given vessel. The major driving force behind this was the need to improve the economic 
functioning  of  the  demersal  fishing  fleet  and  reduce  the  pressure  on  demersal  fish  stocks  (in 
particular from discarding and high grading) through a substantial capacity reduction. 
Vessels  can  pool  their  quota  allocations.  Typically  these  “quota  pools”  are  formed  on  a  regional 
basis. Vessels can easily arrange quota leases or swaps within the pool to ensure efficient use of the 
pool’s fleet capacity, and at the same time discards related to vessel quota limitations are avoided.  

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                            March 2011           17
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
In  2009  there  were  11  such  quota  pools  comprising  a  total  of  709  vessels.  Quota  loans  between 
fishing vessels outside quota pools are also permitted with some limitations.  Not all DFPO members 
are members of a pool – but by far the majority. The most important pools for NS plaice are Dansk 
Puljefiskeri (72 % ‐ vessels from Hvide Sande, Thorsminde, Thyborøn, Hirtshals and Bornholm) and 
Hanstholm Puljeselskab (25 %, Hanstholm and many vessels in other ports too). 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                   March 2011           18
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
3. Target stock status & harvest controls (P1)   
The Principle 1 of the Marine Stewardship Council standard states that: 
         A fishery must be conducted in a manner that does not lead to over fishing or depletion of 
         the exploited populations and, for those populations that are depleted, the fishery must be 
         conducted in a manner that demonstrably leads to their recovery. 
Principle  1  covers  all  fishing  activity  on  the  entire  north  Sea  Plaice  stock  ‐  not  just  the  fishery 
undergoing  certification.  However,  the  fishery  under  certification  would  be  expected  to  meet  all 
management  requirements,  such  as  providing  appropriate  data  and  complying  with  controls, 
therefore demonstrably not adding to problems even if the problems will not cause the certification 
to fail. 
In the following section the key factors which are relevant to Principle 1 are outlined. The primary 
sources of information on this section are: 
»       ICES.  2009a.  Report  of  the  Working  Group  on  the  Assessment  of  Demersal  Stocks  in  the 
        North Sea and Skagerrak ‐ Combined Spring and Autumn (WGNSSK), 6 ‐ 12 May 2009, ICES 
        Headquarters, Copenhagen.. 1028 pp; 
»       ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009. 
 

3.1 Status of the Stock 
It is likely that the stock is above the point where recruitment would be impaired. Assessments of 
years 2008 and 2009 estimated SSB at levels above Bpa and therefore the stock is considered rebuilt 
according to the long term management plan (see section 3.4).  However, spawning stock biomass 
did not reach yet levels consistent with BMSY.  
The spawning stock biomass (SSB) in 2009 was estimated at 388,131 tones, well above the biomass 
precautionary  reference  point  (Bpa)  of  230,000  tones.    SSB  trends  show  that  biomass  levels  have 
been  above  the  precautionary  reference  point  since  2006  (based  on  ICES  2009  assessment)  and 
significant increases in SSB have occurred in years 2008‐2009 and is predicted to occur for the year 
2010 (Figure 3.1). 
The  increase  in  the  Stock  Spawning  Biomass  experienced  from  year  2007  has  occurred  under 
average  recruitment  conditions  (see  Figure  3.3)  and  is  not  caused  by  a  higher  productivity  of  the 
stock.  Instead, increasing SSB levels are mainly due to the reduction of fishing mortality under the 
present  management  plan  (see  sections3.4  &  3.5).  Estimated  fishing  mortality  (F)  appears  to  have 
been  below  the  precautionary  fishing  mortality  reference  point  (Fpa  =  0.6  y‐1)  since  year  2004.    In 
2008,  fishing  mortality  was  estimated  at  0.25  year‐1  and  therefore  below  Ftarget  (F  =  0.3  y‐1)  (Figure 
3.2) used for the management of the plaice North Sea stock (Council Regulation (EC) N° 676/2007).  
Fishing mortality is estimated to remain at 2008 levels on the basis of the EU long term management 
plan in years 2009‐2010.   
The stock is not yet at levels consistent with BMSY, which is the biomass at which the stock fluctuates 
when fished at Fmsy.  Ftarget (F = 0.3 y‐1) has the objective of exploiting the stock on the basis of the 
maximum sustainable yield (see Section 3.2.3).  Therefore Ftarget can be interpreted as an estimate of 
Fmsy.  Based on a spawning biomass per recruit (SSB/R) analysis (where recruitment is assumed to be 
at  the  long  term  geometric  mean),  a  target  of  Ftarget  =  0.3  y‐1  gives  an  estimate  of  BMSY  of  around 
500MT.    SSB  was  estimated  in  2009  at  338  MT  and  is  estimated  to  increase  to  around  442  MT  in 
2010.  Therefore, the stock cannot be considered yet to be at levels consistent with BMSY.   
 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                           March 2011            19
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Fig  3.1.    Trends  in  Spawning  Stock  Biomass  compared  to  the  limit  and  precautionary  biomass  reference 
points (Blim & Bpa).  SSB (2010) based on short term predictions.   


                              500,000
                                                SSB trend
                              450,000
                                                Blim
                              400,000
                         )                      Bpa
                         s 350,000
                         e
                         n
                         n300,000
                         o
                         t
                         (
                          
                         B250,000
                         S
                         S
                           200,000
                              150,000

                              100,000
                                       1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

                                                                       Year

                                                        Source: Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
Fig 3.2.  Trends in fishing mortality (F) compared to fishing mortality based reference points Flim, Fpa, Ftarget 
and Fmsy (from yield per recruit analysis). F (2010) = 0.24 based on EU management plan.   


                               0.9
                               0.8                                                                      F
                          ) 0.7
                          1
                          ‐
                          Y
                          (                                                                             Flim
                            0.6
                          y
                          t
                          i
                          l
                          a 0.5
                          t
                          r                                                                             Fpa
                          o
                          M 0.4
                           
                          g                                                                             Ftarget 
                          n
                          i 0.3
                          h
                          s
                          i 0.2
                          F
                                                                                                        Fmsy
                               0.1
                                 0
                                  1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
                                                                Year


                                                       Source: Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009.   
 
Figure 3.3. Trends in recruitment estimates (R) at age 1 and long term recruitment geometric mean. R (2009) 
= GM (1957‐2006).   

                                 1,800,000

                                 1,600,000
                               s
                               n 1,400,000
                               o
                               i
                               l
                               l
                               i
                               B
                                 1,200,000
                               )
                               1
                                
                               e
                               g 1,000,000
                               A
                               (
                                
                               t 800,000
                               n
                               m
                               e
                               i
                               u 600,000
                               t
                               r
                               c                                                Recruitment
                               e
                               R 400,000
                                                                                Recruitment GM (1957‐
                                     200,000
                                                                                2006)
                                          0
                                           1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

                                                                       Year 

                                                       Source: Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 

 
 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                          March 2011    20
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
3.2 Reference Points 
 Reference points for the North Sea plaice stock were estimated in 2004 and their appropriateness 
for  the  assessment  and  management  for  the  stock  was  evaluated.    Biomass  and  fishing  mortality 
based reference points are shown in table 3.1.   
Table 3.1: Reference points used for the stock assessment 
                          Type                  Value                                 Technical Basis 
    Precautionary        Blim      160,000 t                        Bloss  = 160,000 t, the lowest observed biomass in 
    Approach                                                        1997 as assessed in 2004 
                         Bpa       230,000 t                        Approximately 1.4  Blim 

                         Flim      0.74                             Floss for ages 2‐6 

                         Fpa       0.6                              5th percentile of Floss (0.6) ‐ implies that Beq>Bpa & 
                                                                    a 50% probability that SSBMT ~Bpa 
    Target               Fy        0.3                              EU management plan 

                                           Data Source: Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 

3.2.1  Biological Limit Reference Points  
There is not a stock‐recruitment relationship with a clear breakpoint where recruitment is impaired 
at  lower  spawning  stocks.    As  a  result  of  this,  the  limit  biomass  reference  point  (Blim  =  Bloss)  was 
defined as the smallest spawning biomass observed in the series of annual values of the spawning 
biomass.  Blim was set at 160,000 t.  There is a certain amount of subjective opinion in setting this 
level, but 160 000 tonnes would seem to be a safe level, based on the history of the fishery which 
has been sustained despite relatively high sustained fishing mortalities.  
The  limit  fishing  mortality  reference  point  (Flim)  was  estimated  as  Floss,  defined  as  the  fishing 
mortality that leads the stock biomass to fall below Blim in the long term.  Flim was estimated at 0.74 
year‐1 as the highest observed fishing mortality for ages 2‐6. 
3.2.2  Precautionary reference Points  
Based on the application  of the precautionary approach, ICES advice is that  for stock and fisheries 
there  should  be  a  high  probability  that  SSB  is  above  a  limit  Blim  below  which  recruitment  become 
impaired.    Hence,  the  definition  of  precautionary  reference  points  Bpa  (higher  than  Blim)  and  Fpa 
(lower than  Flim) takes into account uncertainty related  to the  estimation of fishing mortality rates 
and  spawning  stock  biomass  in  order  to  ensure  a  high  probability  of  avoiding  recruitment  failure.  
ICES considered that Bpa could be set at 230,000 t using the default multiplier of 1.4.  However, the 
ICES  Working  Group  acknowledges  that,  since  noisy  discards  estimates  were  included,  the 
uncertainty of the estimates of stock status is much greater than the multiplier applied.   
The  precautionary  fishing  mortality  reference  point  (Fpa)  was  set  at  0.6  year‐1  which  is  the  5th 
percentile  of  Floss  and  gave  a  50%  probability  that  SSB  is  around  Bpa  in  the  medium  term.  
Equilibrium  analysis  suggested  that  F  of  0.6  is  consistent  with  an  SSB  of  around  230,000  t.    These 
precautionary levels form the basis of the harvest control rule. 
3.2.3  Target Reference Points  
A target fishing mortality based reference point (Ftarget) set at 0.3 years‐1 was added to the reference 
points  in  2008,  following  the  EU  long  term  management  plan.  The  value  of  0.3  was  adopted  as  a 
result of the ICES ad hoc Group on Long term Management Advice (AGLTA) (ICES CM 2005/ACFM).  
The AGLTA (2005) concluded “if the objective is to obtain a high long term yield in combination with 
a low risk to B , the preferred level of human consumption fishing mortality could be in the area of 
                  lim



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                              March 2011             21
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
F =0.2 to F =0.3 “.  The STECF advised a target fishing mortality rate of 0.3 y‐1 (fishing mortality due 
    t       t 
to human consumption and discards) to exploit the stock of the basis of the maximum sustainable 
yield.   
The  target  fishing  mortality  is  set  to  achieve  biomass  levels  consistent  with  BMSY.    However  its 
definition differs from the latest ICES candidate fishing mortality rate that will achieve the maximum 
sustainable yield from a yield per recruit analysis (Fmax=0.17 years ‐1) (Ages 2‐6).   
While these reference points lack some clarity in their provenance, they appear consistent and have 
been  agreed  by  the  EU  whose  states  catch  most  of  the  plaice.  The  management  plan  allows  for 
updates of the reference points based upon the advice of the STECF.  
 

3.3 Rebuilding Stocks 
Assessments  of  years  2008  and  2009  estimated  SSB  at  levels  above  Bpa  and  therefore  the  stock  is 
considered  rebuilt  according  to  the  long  term  management  plan  (see  section  3.4).    However, 
spawning  stock  biomass  did  not  reach  yet  levels  consistent  with  BMSY  and  therefore  the  stock  is 
considered  to  be  in  rebuilding  status  according  the  MSC  standard.  A  stock  is  in  rebuilding  status 
when the stock biomass is between the limit biomass and target biomass reference points. 
The  management  plan  has  shown  evidence  that  rebuilding  will  be  complete  within  the  shortest 
practicable  timeframe.    The  plaice  fishery  is  implementing  an  explicit  long  term  management  plan 
with  two  defined  stages  (see  section  3.4),  in  which  the  first  stage  aims  to  rebuild  the  stock  above 
precautionary level (Bpa).  The second stage aims to reduce the exploitation rate to a target level that 
will allow the stock to be harvested at MSY.   
After a continuous increase in SSB in successive years, the first stage of the management plan has 
been  completed  successfully.    The  increase  in  the  Stock  Spawning  Biomass  experienced  from  year 
2007 has occurred under average recruitment conditions and is not caused by a higher productivity 
of the stock.  Instead, increasing SSB levels are mainly due to the reduction of fishing mortality under 
the  present  management  plan.    The  management  plan  has  entered  the  second  stage  which  sets 
targets  for  the  fishing  mortality  (F  =  0.3  y‐1)  based  on  the  principle  of  maximum  sustainable  yield.  
The  target fishing  mortality has been already achieved and temporal trends in SSB shows that  the 
stock biomass is increasing toward target long term yields within the shortest practicable timeframe. 
Based  on  a  spawning  biomass  per  recruit  (SSB/R)  analysis  (where  recruitment  is  assumed  to  be  at 
the long term geometric mean), a target of F = 0.3 y‐1 gives long term biomass around 500 MT.  SSB 
was estimated in 2009 at 338MT and is estimated to increase to around 442 MT in 2010.  
 

3.4 Harvest Strategy 
The North Sea plaice is managed as a distinct stock.  Plaice and sole are managed together as in the 
major  part  of  the  fishery  (beam  trawls)  they  are  caught  at  the  same  time.  The  plan  consists  of  9 
articles in Council Regulation (EC) N° 676/2007 of 11 June 2007 establishing a multiannual plan for 
fisheries exploiting stocks of plaice and sole in the North Sea (Official Journal L 157, 19/06/2007 P. 
0001 – 0006).  
This plan has two stages. The first stage aims at an annual reduction of fishing mortality by 10% in 
relation to the fishing mortality estimated for the preceding year, with a maximum change in TAC of 
15% until the precautionary reference points are reached for both plaice and sole in two successive 
years.    ICES  interprets  the  F  for  the  preceding  year  as  the  estimate  of  F  for  the  year  in  which  the 
assessment  is  carried  out.  The  basis  for  this  F  estimate  in  the  preceding  year  will  be  a  constant 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                            March 2011            22
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
application of the procedure used by ICES in 2007.  ICES 2009 advice for plaice and sole indicate that 
the first stage of the management plan has been completed.  In the second stage, the management 
plan  aims  for  exploitation  at  the  target  fishing  mortality  rate  of  0.3  y‐1  and  0.2  y‐1  for  plaice  and 
sole, respectively.  
ICES  has  evaluated  the  agreed  long‐term  management  plan  for  plaice  and  sole.  The  management 
plan evaluation is not yet conclusive with regards to consistency with the precautionary approach.  
The primary control on fishing mortality is the total allowable catch (TAC). The TACs in the past have 
been  agreed  between  the  European  Commission  and  Norway  and  aimed  to  restrict  the  fishery. 
Norway  has  not  signed  the  current  management  plan,  but,  given  it  is  not  a  dominant  fleet  in  this 
fishery, its absence is not critical to the success of the plan. 
With other management initiatives outlined below, the TAC appears to have been more effective in 
controlling the exploitation rate than in the past. TACs in the past have not been effective, because 
the species is caught in a mixed fishery and exceeding the TAC for one species may not prevent the 
fleet from continuing to fish, but would simply lead to additional discarding. The landings have been 
very close to the agreed TAC since the recovery plan was implemented in 2004.  
The fishing effort of the major fleets exploiting North Sea plaice has decreased since the mid‐1990s.  
Fishing is restricted by Kilowatts‐days allocated to each country for each fleet segment (EC Council 
Regulation No. 1342/2008).  The kilowatts‐days are decreased or increased depending on changes in 
the estimated fishing mortality for the North Sea cod stock. There are no controls limiting effort for 
vessels of less than 10m length and do not have  to use logbooks.  However, landings are counted 
against individual vessel quotas through the sale notes system.  
Several other technical measures constrain the plaice fishery, including mesh size regulations, gear 
restrictions and a closed area (Plaice Box and inshore waters). South of 56°30 N where the majority 
of the overall EU plaice fishery operates (but not the Danish vessels covered by this assessment), the 
minimum  mesh  size  for  towed  gears  is  80mm  and  100mm  for  gill  nets.  The  maximum  aggregated 
beam length for beam trawlers is 24m. Within the 12‐nautical mile zone and in the Plaice Box the 
maximum aggregated beam length is 9m, fishing is forbidden for beam trawlers with engine power 
greater  than  300  HP  (221  kw),  and  a  120mm  mesh  applies  to  otter  trawlers  fishing  for  cod.  The 
Plaice Box is primarily designed to reduce the discarding of plaice in the nursery grounds along the 
continental coast of the North Sea. 
Due to a range of factors such as TAC constraints on plaice, effort limitations, and increases in fuel 
prices, the fishing effort of the major fleets has concentrated in the southern part of the North Sea. 
This is the area where many juvenile fish are found. In addition, juvenile plaice has shown a more 
offshore distribution in recent years. The combination of a change in fishing pattern and the spatial 
distribution  of  juvenile  plaice  has  led  to  an  apparent  increase  in  discarding  of  plaice.  Technical 
measures applicable to the mixed flatfish fishery will affect both sole and plaice.  
The minimum mesh size of 80 mm selects sole at the minimum landing size. However, this mesh size 
generates high discards of plaice which are selected from 17 cm, well below the minimum landing 
size of 27 cm. Mesh enlargement would reduce the catch of undersized plaice, but would also result 
in  a  short‐term  loss  of  marketable  sole.  An  increase  in  the  minimum  landing  size  of  sole  could 
provide an incentive to fish with larger mesh sizes and therefore mean a reduction in the discarding 
of plaice. Recent discard estimates indicate fluctuations around 50% discards in weight.  
It is generally recognized by the European Commission that the fleet capacity exceeds that required 
to  reach  the  TAC  at  the  target  stock  size  (CEC  2009).    It  has  been  estimated  that  the  same  catch 
could be taken with a fleet at 77% of its size (Lindebo, 2005 in ICES 2009a). This has led to an on‐
going  capacity  reduction  policy  with  limited  success  (CEC  2009).  The  'days  at  sea'  limitation  in  the 
North Sea has not resulted in a significant reduction in the total capacity of the beam trawler fleet; 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                            March 2011            23
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
the total power was reduced by 2.9% while the tonnage decreased by 0.5%.  The EU fleet reduction 
programs  have  resulted  in  a  less  than  proportional  decrease  in  harvesting  capacity.  Fleet 
replacement  programs  associated  with  the  reduction  programs  may  have  offset  the  capacity 
reductions.    In  January  2009,  25  Dutch  trawl  vessels  were  decommissioned.  However,  in  some 
instances, reflagging vessels to other countries has partly compensated these reductions. Therefore, 
overcapacity is likely to remain a problem as an incentive to overfish. 
The  ICES  working  group  considered  that  although  it  is  clear  that  the  North  Sea  ecosystem  is 
undergoing  change  and  this  will  affect  fish  stocks,  the  causal  mechanisms  linking  the  environment 
with fish stock dynamics are not yet clearly enough understood for such information to be used as 
part of fisheries management advice (ICES 2009a). It is unlikely that the plaice population will have a 
pivotal role within the ecosystem, the main issue being the impact of beam trawlers on the benthic 
habitat and community (Kaiser et al. 2000 in ICES 2009a). 
 

3.5 Harvest Control Rule and Tools 
The harvest control rule is defined by 9 Articles of Council Regulation (EC) No 676/2007 of 11 June 
2007  establishing  a  multiannual  plan  for  fisheries  exploiting  stocks  of  plaice  and  sole  in  the  North 
Sea (Official Journal L 157, 19/06/2007 P. 0001 – 0006; WGNSSK 2008: pages 504‐507).  
The  current  harvest  control  rule  for  plaice  is  described  in  Article  7  (Figure  3.4).    The  management 
plan is divided into stages based on the determination of the current stock status. The first stage has 
the objective of rebuilding the stock to safe biological limits by reducing fishing mortality by 10% per 
year with a constraint on the change to the TAC of 15% (Article 3). When the stocks have remained 
above the safe limit (precautionary level) for two successive years (Article 5), the second stage would 
be  implemented.  The  second  stage  sets  targets  for  the  fishing  mortality  based  on  the  principle  of 
maximum sustainable yield, and aim to apply a fishing mortality greater than or equal to 0.3 on ages 
two  to  six  years  (Article  4).  However,  the  plan  allows  for  the  target,  limit  and  precautionary 
reference points to be updated based on the scientific advice from the STECF which could advise on 
new levels consistent with maximum sustainable yield (Article 5). Any changes would be reviewed by 
the North Sea Regional Advisory Council.  
The evaluation of the EU management plan has not been conclusive. The plan was adopted before it 
was fully evaluated and despite some evaluations, there remains uncertainty over how well the plan 
will perform. While the simulation testing of the management plan (MSE) considered how robust the 
harvest  control  rule  was  to  some  uncertainties  (Machiels  et  al.  2008),  it  was  not  exhaustive. 
Estimations  of  plaice  stock  status  appear  to  have  a  retrospective  pattern,  underestimating  fishing 
mortality  and  overestimating  SSB,  which  was  not  taken  into  account.  In  addition,  there  is  no 
accepted stock recruitment relationship, and while two stock‐recruitment models were considered, 
it  was  hard  to  account  for  all  possible  effects.  The  working  group  concluded  that  additional 
evaluations  of  the  management  plan  are  necessary  to  take  account  fully  of  these  uncertainties  on 
the precautionary nature of the plan in the long term.  
While  some  shortcomings  are  noted,  there  is  a  clear  improvement  over  the  previous  approach  to 
management  of  this  stock.  The  management  advice  overall  concludes  that  the  fishing  mortality  in 
2010 when applying the management plan is expected to give benefits in terms of long‐term yield 
and low risk to the stock compared to the application of Fpa (ICES 2009).  




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                        March 2011            24
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Figure 3.4: Arrangement on long‐term management of North Sea Plaice 

    Article 7 Procedure for setting the TAC for plaice: 
        1.   The Council shell adopt the TAC for plaice at that level of catches which, according to a scientific 
             evaluation carried out by STECF is the higher of: 
                 a.   That  TAC  the application  of  which  will  result  in  a  10%  reduction  in  the  fishing  mortality 
                      rate  in  its  year  of  application  compared  to  the  fishing  mortality  rate  estimated  in  the 
                      preceding year; 
                 b.   That TAC the application of which will result in the level of fishing mortality rate of 0.3 on 
                      ages 2 to 6 years in its year of application. 
        2.   Where application of paragraph 1 would result in a TAC which exceeds the TAC of the preceding 
             year by more than 15%, the Council shall adopt a TAC which is 15% greater that the TAC of that 
             year. 
        3.   Where the application of paragraph 1 would result in a TAC which is more than 15% less than the 
             TAC of the preceding year, the Council shall adopt a TAC which is 15% less than the TAC of that 
             year.  

 

3.6 Information and Monitoring 
This performance indicator is assessed in relation to the adequacy of the information for the stock 
assessment. While this assessment will need the component of the fishery being certified to meet 
the recommended scientific monitoring, there are no special requirements. 
Extensive  research  has  been  devoted  to  study  the  geographical  distribution  of  North  Sea  plaice.  
There  exist  a  number  of  major  spawning  concentrations  and  the  individuals  tend  to  return 
repeatedly to the same spawning grounds. However, it is uncertain whether the offspring from each 
spawning  ground  return  to  the  same  ground  to  spawn.    Furthermore,  a  genetic  study  on  the 
population  structure  of  plaice  in  northern  Europe  revealed  that  the  North  Sea  Basin  constitutes  a 
single unit with high gene flow among geographically recognizable stocks (Hoarau et al. 2002). 
The  life  history  is  clearly  documented  is  clearly  documented  and  well  understood  from  eggs  to 
spawning (see section X: Biology of the Target Species).  Natural mortality is assumed to be 0.1 for all 
age groups and constant over time. There is no strong justification for this figure. A fixed maturity 
ogive is used for the estimation of SSB in North Sea plaice, although maturity‐at‐age is not likely to 
be  constant  over  time.  A  study  of  the  effect  of  the  fluctuations  of  natural  mortality  on  the  SSB  in 
2004  showed  that  incorporating  the  historic  fluctuations  had  little  effect  on  SSB  estimates  in  the 
period 1999 – 2003.  
Extensive  research  has  been  carried  out  in  the  North  Sea  with  the  aim  of  understanding  the 
interactions  between  different  components  of  the  ecosystem,  including  fish  population  dynamics 
and its relation with the marine ecology and physical oceanography.  A wide range of information on 
the  North  Sea  Ecosystem  has  been  collected  from  different  ICES  working  group  and  used  for 
undertaking an Integrated Ecosystem Assessment of the North Sea (IEA).   
Specific  information  is  available  on  fishing  methods  and  gear  types  of  all  fleets  which  is  regularly 
updated. A summary of this information is reported in the working group report each year. Vessel 
activity  and  landings  are  recorded  by  fleet  nationality.  Fishing  methods  and  gear  types  are  known 
throughout the fishery.   
The stock assessment relies on three main types of data: 



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                  March 2011            25
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
»       Total Catch: Total catch is recorded through the use of the European Logbooks and discards 
        sampling programmes, which provide estimates of discards from the catch.   
»       Catch composition data:  These are obtained from  biological sampling of landings data and 
        provide information on stock structure. The stock assessment requires catches broken down 
        by age. 
»       Abundance index: Three separate research surveys provide abundance indices.  The research 
        vessels  surveys  generate  disaggregated  tuning  indices  which  are  currently  used  for 
        calibration purposes in the assessment of the stock.  
3.6.1  Total Catch  
Landings  of  the  fleet  being  certified  are  accurately  recorded  trough  the  use  of  the  European 
Logbooks, which is the main source of information to keep track of catches.  The use of logbooks is 
required  for  vessels  of  length  greater  than  10m  in  EU  waters.    Catch  and  effort  information  is 
obtained from the EU logbooks. Information recorded included; kilograms of plaice caught per day, 
number of hours fish per day and ICES subdivision where fishing operations occur.   
Figure 3.5. Trends in landings compared to TAC for years 1999‐2008. Data source:  

                         120,000
                                                                                           landings
                         100,000
                                                                                           TAC

                         80,000
                       s
                       e
                       n 60,000
                       n
                       o
                       T
                          40,000

                          20,000

                               0
                                   1999 2000 2001 2002       2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

                                                                Year

                                             Source: Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
Landings data is reported by country. Total landings of North Sea plaice in 2008 were estimated to 
be 48874 t, which is 870 t less than the 2007 landings. Since year 2004 landings have been of similar 
value  to  the  TAC  set  by  management  (Figure  3.5).    Discard  sampling  programs  started  in  the  late 
1990s  to  obtain  discard  estimates  from  several  fleets  fishing  for  flatfish.  These  sampling  programs 
give information on discard rates from 1999 but not for the historical time series.   
Observations  indicate  that  the  proportions  of  plaice  catches  discarded  at  present  are  high  (Figure 
3.6) (80% in numbers and 50% in weight) and have increased since the 1970s.The discards estimates 
since 2000 have been derived under EC project 98/097 and under the EC data regulation (EC 2001), 
which  provide  discards‐at‐age  estimates.  Because  of  the  different  sampling  strategies  by  the 
different  countries,  only  some  country’s  data  were  used,  which  account  for  approximately  85%  of 
the landings.  It is important to note that discards by the entire Danish demersal trawl fisheries in 
the  North  Sea are estimated 100 tonnes which is  considered  to  be low  compared with the overall 
figures. Discards by setnets and Danish seine are considered non‐significant.  
Total sampling effort of the discards is low, and data are sparse. Also, samples may not always be 
available  from  relevant  fleets  and  fisheries  within  a  country.    A  model  is  used  to  reconstruct 
discards‐at‐age  for  the  years  prior  to  2000.  The  inclusion  of  discard  estimates  reduces  the 
retrospective bias that was previously observed in this assessment.  

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                        March 2011         26
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Figure 3.6. Comparison between landings and discards for years 1999‐2009. 

                      120,000
                                                                                        Landings 
                      100,000
                                                                                        Discards 
                       80,000
                    s
                    e
                    n 60,000
                    n
                    o
                    T
                       40,000

                       20,000

                             0
                                 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
                                                              Year

                                              Source: Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea).Book 6. ICES Advice 2009 

3.6.2  Catch Sampling 
Age compositions were available for Netherlands, Germany, Belgium, Denmark and France. Landings 
from  countries  that  do  not  provide  age  compositions  were  raised  to  the  international  age 
composition.  From  2002 onwards,  each  country  is  obliged  to  sample  landings  from  foreign  vessels 
that land in their country, mostly Dutch beam trawlers. Since many flag vessels still bring the catches 
to the Dutch auctions, a substantial sample of these vessels exists in the Netherlands.   
The stock weights of age groups 1 – 4 are calculated using modelled mean lengths from survey and 
back‐calculation  data,  and  converted  to  a  mean  weight  using  a  fixed  length‐weight  relationship. 
Stock weights of the older ages are based on the market samples in the first quarter. Stock weight at 
age  has  varied  considerably  over  time,  especially  for  the  older  ages.  Discard  weights  at  age  are 
calculated the same way as the stock weights of age groups.   In 2008 the stock weights at age of 
most of the ages were above the 2007 estimates, but in‐line with the last 4 years average. 
3.6.3  Abundance Index 
Three different abundance survey indices are used: Beam Trawl Survey RV Isis (BTS‐Isis), Beam Trawl 
Survey  RV  Tridens  (BTS‐Tridens)  and  a  Sole  Net  Survey  in  September‐October  (SNS).  An  additional 
survey index (Demersal Fish Survey: DFS) is used for recruitment estimates in some analyses, but is 
not used in the stock assessment. 
The Beam Trawl Survey RV Isis (BTS‐Isis) was initiated in 1985 and covers the south‐eastern part of 
the North Sea. Since 1996 the BTS‐Tridens covers the central part of the North Sea, extending the 
overall survey area. The Sole Net Survey (SNS & SNSQ2) was carried out with RV Tridens until 1995 
and  then  continued  with  the  RV  Isis.  Until  1990  this  survey  was  carried  out  in  both  spring  and 
autumn, but after that only in autumn. The stations fished are on transects along or perpendicular to 
the coast, and is directed at juvenile plaice and sole. Due to different selectivity properties of these 
surveys,  they  are  used  to  index  the  different  age  groups  separately.  However,  overall  the  internal 
consistency of the survey indices used for fitting appears relatively high for the entire age‐range of 
each individual survey.  
As well as the research surveys, there are two commercial LPUE series: a Dutch beam trawl fleet and 
UK beam trawl fleet excluding all flag vessels. These data consist of an effort series and landings‐at‐
age  series  that  can  be  used  to  fit  the  model.  The  LPUE  series  required  correction  due  to  quota 
restrictions. The age specific LPUE series from 1997 are used for fitting the model in XSA.  


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011          27
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Different trends in catch have been observed in different areas of the North Sea. Commercial LPUE 
series and a survey index in the central part of the North Sea appear to indicate an increase in the 
plaice stock size, whereas a survey in the southern North Sea indicates that the stock has remained 
at  a  low  level,  and  a  survey  in  the  coastal  region  indicates  a  decrease  in  the  plaice  stock.  These 
discrepancies add to error in the assessment.  
There  also  some  monitoring  of  secondary  effects  of  fishing.  For  example,  plaice  and  sole  have 
become mature at younger ages and at smaller sizes in recent years than in the past. This has been 
attributed  variously  to  a  genetic  fisheries‐induced  change  or  changes  in  eutrophic  pollution  levels 
(Grift et al., 2004). 
 

3.7 Stock Assessment 
The assessment is appropriate for the stock and for the harvest control rule, and is evaluating stock 
status  relative  to  reference  points.  The  stock  assessment  method  is  Extended  Survivors  Analysis 
(XSA), which is a standard virtual population analysis method used by ICES. It uses catch‐at‐age data 
and  abundance  indices  to  estimate  the  fishing  mortality  and  population  size  of  each  age  in  each 
year. The name arises because of the focus on obtaining the best estimates of survivors from fishing 
and  natural  mortality,  which  are  used  to  derive  SSB,  the  indicator  most  of  interest.  The  model  is 
fitted  using  least  squares.  It  incorporates  some  features  of  statistical  catch‐at‐age  models,  but  is 
computationally much less demanding.  
The  stock  assessment  has  not  included  probabilistic  outputs  indicating  uncertainties,  although 
structural  uncertainties  in  the  model  are  discussed.  With  inexpensive  computer  power,  it  is 
reasonable  to  expect  stock  assessments  to  produce  measures  of  uncertainty  as  well  as  point 
estimates  for  the  values  of  interest.  The  XSA  method  does  not  include  an  integrated  approach  for 
probabilistic  outputs,  such  as  standard  errors,  confidence  intervals  or  probability  profiles  for 
statistics  of  interest.  However,  other  simple  methods  might  be  applied  to  estimate  the  effect  of 
sampling  error.  For  example,  a  non‐parametric  bootstrap  could  be  used  to  explore  various 
uncertainties in the data (Miller and Shelton 2007). 
A  management  strategy  evaluation  (MSE)  has  been  conducted  to  test  out  the  harvest  control  rule 
(Machiels  et  al.  2008).  The  MSE  used  a  simple  operational  model  to  generate  possible  data  sets, 
which was used with the XSA assessment to provide advice within the simulation. The result of the 
MSE  indicated  that  the  year  on  year  10%  reduction  in  fishing  mortality  should  be  adequate  for 
rebuilding the stock.   
Using MSE to test the entire decision rule is a very welcome procedure. However, the MSE did not 
take  the  opportunity  to  test  all  possible  sources  of  uncertainty,  in  particular  possible  changes  in 
survey catchability and natural mortality. The MSE was independently reviewed (Poos and Machiels, 
pers. comm.). The reviewers agreed that the MSE needed to be developed to take account of more 
uncertainties,  but  differed  in  opinion  over  whether  the  current  simulation  provided  sufficient 
information to imply that the rule is precautionary. 
Landings  and  discards  have  both  declined  in  recent  years  (Figure  3.6),  SSB  is  estimated  to  have 
increased above the Bpa (Figure 3.1), while fishing mortality has declined (Figure 3.2). Recruitment 
has been of average strength from year 2005 onwards.  On this basis, short‐term forecast at current 
fishing  levels  indicate  an  increase  in  landings  in  2010  (to  around  64,  000  t).    SSB  is  forecasted  to 
increase in 10% (to around 442,000 t) compared to SSB estimates for 2009.  
Discarding probably introduces the biggest uncertainty into the assessment of this stock as discard 
sampling  is  low,  but  discards  form  approximately  50%  of  the  catch.  The  assessment  of  plaice  in 
Subarea IV included modelled discard estimates for recent years.  


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                           March 2011            28
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Differences in the abundance indices trends have  been found  over the last seven years. The  more 
northern  BTS‐Tridens  index  indicates  higher  stock  abundances  than  the  two  other  indices,  BTS‐Isis 
and SNS. Because of the historic correspondence between the VPA estimates and the BTS‐Isis index 
in the XSA assessment, it has a higher weight in estimating the stock numbers for ages 1 – 4 in recent 
years.  This  undermines  to  some  extent  the  pattern  of  increasing  SSB  which  has  indicated  an 
apparent recovery of the stock. 
Figure 3.7. Comparison of current assessment with previous assessments (current assessment in red).  




                                                                                          Source: ICES 2009 Advice.  
A  retrospective  analysis  of  the  assessment  shows  some  recurring  bias  (figure  3.7).    SSB  is 
underestimated  in  five  of  the  six  years,  but  this  bias  is  in  the  same  order  of  magnitude  as  the 
variance  in  the  SSB  time  series  of  the  last  assessment  of  those  six  years  (Figure  3.8).    The  current 
estimates  of  the  biomass  over  the  last  three  years  are  considerably  higher  than  the  previous 
assessments. This is thought to be due to changing interactions between the survey indices and age 
structure, which generally increases the uncertainty.  
Figure 3.8.  SSB time series estimates and 95% confidence interval 




                                                                                      
                                                                                              Source: WGNSSK 2009. 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                           March 2011            29
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
4. Environmental Elements (P2)   
Principle 2 of the Marine Stewardship Council standard states that:   
         Fishing operations should allow for the maintenance of the structure, productivity, function 
         and  diversity  of  the  ecosystem  (including  habitat  and  associated  dependent  ecologically 
         related species) on which the fishery depends.   
The  following  section  of  the  report  highlights  some  of  the  key  characteristics  of  the  fishery  under 
assessment with regard to its wider impact on the ecosystem.   
 

4.1 Retained Bycatch   
A  wide  range  of  mainly  demersal  species  are  taken  and  retained  as  commercial  catch  along  with 
European plaice across the three Units of certification that are the focus of this assessment. Analysis 
of actual landings data taken from the 2008 official landings data for Danish vessels targeting plaice 
enables  the  retained  species  profiles  for  each  of  the  specified  UoCs  to  be  determined.  Details  of 
these findings are set out below: 
4.1.1  Setnet (Gill and Trammel) 
For the setnet fishery, the manner in which catches are reported in the EU logbook scheme has not 
facilitated the profiling of retained species by setnet type (gillnet v. trammel net). It is understood 
that the majority of setnet captured plaice are however caught using trammel nets which has a catch 
profile which suits the mixed‐fishery strategy of most Danish fishermen. Despite this, considerable 
quantities of plaice are also captured using gillnets. For this reason and the fact that catches are not 
separated  and  reported  by  setnet  type,  all  setnets  used  to  capture  plaice  are  assessed  under 
Principal 2. 
For setnet fisheries targeting plaice, the target species constituted the greater majority of the catch, 
considered  by  weight  (1,261  t  or  62.5%)  for  2008.  Other  species  taken  along  with  plaice  included 
Atlantic cod, Dab and Common sole, all of which are considered main retained species. Other species 
taken  in  lesser  amounts  (comprising  less  than  5%  by  weight  of  total  NS  setnet  landings)  included 
hake, lemon sole and turbot.  
Setnet fisheries are in the main highly selective – they tend to catch a narrow range of species and, 
depending on the precise technical specifications of the nets employed, also a narrow size range for 
those  species  that  are  captured.  A  principal  reason  for  the  greater  overall  selectivity  of  setnets  is 
that  the  gear  essentially  is  designed  to  intercept  fish  rather  than  herd  them  together  as  in  mobile 
equipment such as trawls. By altering the construction and material used in manufacturing setnets, 
as well as the areas and manner in which they are fished, fishers have greater potential to determine 
both the retained species and discard profile of setnets. 
4.1.2  Demersal Trawl 
According to 2008 data, the main retained non‐target species, taken in Danish demersal trawl plaice 
fisheries in the North Sea are (along with 4,666 tonnes of plaice) North Sea Cod (614t) , Lemon sole 
(798t) and Norwegian lobster (401t). 
The  trawl  fishery  takes  place  in  both  the  European  and  Norwegian  sectors  of  the  North  Sea. 
Accordingly, different regulations apply in relation to the gear type used ‐ minimum permitted mesh 
sizes  in  Norwegian  waters  are  120mm  as  opposed  to  the  110mm  permitted  in  European  waters. 
Many Danish fishermen however experience that the larger mesh size required by Norway further 
reduces  bycatch  of  undersize  and  unwanted  species  and  therefore  continue  to  use  the  larger 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011            30
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
120mm  mesh  even  when  fishing  in  the  European  sector  (this  situation  is  in  part  due  to  practical 
considerations  ‐  it  is  not  feasible  to  change  codends  each  time  a  vessel  crosses  from  European 
waters into Norwegian waters and vice versa, especially if vessels fish using twin rigged trawls).  
4.1.3  Danish Seine 
For Danish seine vessels fishing in the North Sea during 2008, the main species landed in the fishery 
along with 1339 tonnes of plaice were North Sea Cod Gadus morhua (290t)  as well as much smaller 
volumes of hake (66t), Dab (58t) and haddock (45t). The retained species bycatch profile of Danish 
seine net fisheries for plaice, demonstrates that a very limited number of species are bycaught and 
landed.  Landings  data  for  2009  show  that  plaice  constituted  over  70%  of  landings  by  Danish  seine 
vessels fishing in the North Sea.  
4.1.4  Species specific considerations 
The status, management and supporting information of all main retained species are considered in 
detail during the assessment scoring process and in the detailed scoring commentary in appendix 3. 
Below is a brief summary of some key points for the main retained species (across the 3 UoCs). 
Cod 
All  Units  of  Certification  catch  and  land  relatively 
small quantities of cod as part of their operations. For           From Landing Quotas to Catch Quotas 
2008, landings data show that combined landings for                The Danish Fisheries sector, in association with the 
all  gear  types  covered  in  this  assessment  was  1,232        Danish  Ministry  of  Food,  Agriculture  and  Fisheries 
                                                                   have  recently  been  pioneering  investigations  into 
tonnes of North Sea cod. ICES advice for 2008 was for              the  use  of  video  surveillance  onboard  North  Sea 
a  total  catch  of  North  Sea  cod  of  22,000  tonnes.          fishing  vessels  as  a  tool  to  aid  in  conservation  of 
Nevertheless  it  is  recognised  that  it  remains  a             cod. This “fully documented fishery project” aims to 
likelihood  that  The  Danish  North  Sea  plaice  fishery         account  for  all  cod  removals  from  the  fisheries  by 
                                                                   using a passive electronic video monitoring system 
that  is  the  subject  of  the  present  assessment  is  one      In return for accounting for all catches (as opposed 
such  fishery.  In  this  context  the  fishery  has  ongoing      to  landings)  vessels  receive  an  increased  quota 
potential to impact depleted North Sea cod stocks.                 entitlement. 

From 2004 to 2008 advice from ICES for NS Cod was  The pilot programme has shown to be successful at 
                                                              documenting  total  cod  removals  onboard  the 
for  a  zero  catch  due  to  stock  status  concerns  and  vessels  where  it  has  been  trialled  and  results  have 
because  ICES  did  not  consider  the  former  cod  been  presented  as  part  of  the  on‐going  review  of 
recovery plan precautionary. In spite  of this advice a  the  EU  Common  Fisheries  Policy.  Although  the 
small  TAC  small  consistently  set  during  this,  number  of  vessels  involved  is  currently  small  (and 
                                                              no credit is given for this in this MSC scoring), it is 
principally  in  recognition  of  the  North  Sea  mixed  eventually  hoped  to  extend  the  programme across 
species  fisheries  that  feature  cod  bycatch.  Even  all fleets.
during  this  period  it  was  recognised  that  total 
removals of North Sea cod most likely exceed the agreed TAC, either through discarding of sublegal 
size fish or the discarding of adult fish for which there is no quota from mixed species fisheries. 
The ICES advice for 2010 indicates that catches of cod can be allowed under the new management 
agreement.    In  December  2008  the  European  Commission  and  Norway  agreed  on  a  new  cod 
management  plan  implementing  a  new  system  of  linked  effort  management  with  a  target  fishing 
mortality of 0.4 (1). ICES has evaluated the EC management plan in March 2009 and concluded that 
this  management  plan  is  in  accordance  with  the  precautionary  approach  only  if  implemented  and 
enforced adequately.  The management plan is seen to be effective and recent landings have been 
within the agreed TAC for the stock. 
Both  the  original  and  revised  cod  recovery  plan  aim  to  rebuild  the  stock  from  a  historic  low. 
Associated  measures  include  quota  restrictions  in  other  mixed  fisheries  which  may  also  catch  cod, 



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                  March 2011              31
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
effort controls, increased enforcement, strict bycatch limits, minimum permitted codend mesh size 
(110mm has been shown to reduce bycatch of sublegal size cod) etc. 
When considering cod as a retained species, it is also important to recognise the element of the cod 
catch  taken  during  fishing  for  plaice  by  the  UoC  fisheries,  and  which  may  not  be  landed  –  i.e.  the 
discarded bycatch. It is recognised however that not all cod that is captured will be landed and some 
cod may still discarded, either as a result of being undersized or once the available NS cod quota has 
been  exhausted9.  Data  from  the  Danish  discard  monitoring  programme  estimates  that  for  2008,  a 
total  of  890  tonnes  of  Cod  were  discarded  by  the  Danish  demersal  trawling  fleet  operating  in  the 
North Sea and an estimated 17 tonnes of NS cod were discarded in the Danish seine fishery. These 
discard  estimates  form  part  of  the  basis  for  the  cod  assessment  and  resulting  management 
proposals. 
Recent changes that are considered likely to further reduce NS cod discard levels include a provision 
for real time area closures where juvenile cod numbers are observed to be high, based on bulk catch 
sampling,  as  well  as  voluntary  use  of  120mm  mesh  by  many  fishermen  who  fish  in  both  the 
Norwegian sector as well as the European sector of Area IV.  
While cod discarding is a major concern in the management of North Sea fisheries, according to ICES, 
current  measures  (principally  the  Cod  Recovery  Plan)  will  achieve  recovery  for  this  stock  by  2015. 
The EU are also considering the introduction of a discard ban within the near to medium term. 
Norway Lobster 
Norway lobster are believed to originate from two separate functional units (Norwegian Deep and 
Horn’s  Reef)  out  of  a  total  of  eight  such  units.  Although  ICES  assesses  these  functional  units 
separately  and  advises  the  EU  to  manage  them  separately,  the  quota  remains  North  Sea‐wide 
(although  the  NSRAC  is  due  to  table  a  proposal  which  will  contain  some  degree  of  separate 
management). 
The  two  Norway  lobster  functional  units  affected  by  the  trawl  fishery  are  likely  to  be  within  safe 
biological  limits;  while  ICES  reports  that  the  stock  status  for  the  Horn’s  Reef  functional  unit  is 
uncertain, landings remain well below advice for the stock. 
Data from the Danish discard monitoring programme estimates that for 2008, a total of 115 tonnes 
of Norway lobster are discarded in Danish North Sea mixed demersal trawl fisheries. These discard 
estimates  form  part  of  the  basis  for  the  Norway  lobster  assessment  and  resulting  management 
proposals. 
Lemon sole 
There  is  no  TAC  or  quota  for  lemon  sole,  however  the  assessment  did  not  uncover  any  particular 
concerns in relation to lemon sole stocks and the quantities retained in the UoCs under assessment 
are unlikely to be of concern from a stock security perspective (trawl landings for 2009 amounted to 
some 800t). 
Data from the Danish discard monitoring programme estimates that for 2008, a total of 9.2 tonnes 
of Lemon sole are discarded in Danish North Sea mixed demersal trawl fisheries.  
 

4.2 Discarding/Bycatch 
The  ranges  of  fish  species  that  feature  as  discards  across  all  units  of  certification  include  common 
dab,  starry  ray,  grey  gurnard,  haddock.  Juveniles  or  undersize  of  commercially  important  species 
                                                            
9
     The Danish NS cod quota for 2008 was 3,831 tonnes 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011            32
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
such  as  plaice,  cod  and  saithe  are  not  considered  as  they  have  already  been  taken  into  account 
elsewhere in the assessment (either under P1 target species, or as retained species). 
Although  many  recent  European  initiatives  in  relation  to  reducing  discarding  have  a  focus  on  cod, 
there are associated benefits for other bycatch species. Measures include:  
»       a ban on ‘high‐grading’ – preceded by a Danish National ban, some years before the EU; 
»       a system of real time closure areas in the North sea to protect juvenile cod, saithe, haddock 
        and whiting; 
»       agreement to use more selective gears when a certain part of the North Sea cod quota has 
        been utilised; 
»       EU  guarantee  to  Norway  that  vessels  entering  the  Norwegian  sector  of  the  North  sea  will 
        actually have quotas for the species that they intend to fish. 
An eventual discard ban in European waters, as has operated in Norwegian waters for some time, is 
under  discussion  at  EU  level,  however  the  outcome  of  these  discussions  do  not  yet  appear 
inevitable, in part because of counter arguments presented in relation to loss to real discard data (by 
making the practice illegal). 
A broad spectrum of other technical control measures is already in force in the North Sea that assists 
in minimising discarding. However these are considered less effective when it comes to the issue of 
discarding  market  size  commercial  species  on  the  basis  of  insufficient  or  no  species  quota 
entitlements. The initiatives described above should, in theory, begin to address this particular issue 
by  incentivising  the  use  of  more  selective  gears.  In  addition,  for  the  Danish  fleet  there  are  the 
smooth  running  pool  quota  rentals,  specifically  monitored  by  the  Ministry  for  its  effect  when  it 
comes  to  keeping  quota  available  all  year  round  and  at  a  reasonable  price  –  thus  reducing  the 
likelihood of high‐grading. 
In ongoing efforts to monitor the effectiveness of technical controls that are intended to reduce or 
minimise bycatch rates and levels of discarding, DTU Aqua maintain an at sea observer programme 
that is designed to collect data in relation to bycatch and discarding in the fishery.  
In  2009,  DTU  Aqua  conducted  observer  trips  for  discard  monitoring  on  Danish  commercial  fishing 
vessels as follows: 
»       Setnet fleet for mesh sizes between 100 and 219mm (279 vessels) – 5 observer trips 
»       Trawl fleet for mesh sizes between 105 and 120mm (181 vessels) – 30 observer trips 
»       Danish seine fleet for mesh sizes between 105 and 120mm (47 vessels) – 4 observer trips 
Details of these findings are outlined below for each unit of certification. 
4.2.1  Demersal Trawl 
Demersal trawl fisheries in the North Sea were estimated to have discarded 1,731 tonnes of Starry 
Ray, 257 tonnes of Saithe, 93 tonnes of Haddock, 115 tonnes of Common dab, 100 tonnes of plaice 
and  115  tonnes  of  Norway  lobster  in  2008.  .  The  status  of  affected  populations  for  all  these  main 
discard species have been reviewed and the estimated discarding levels are not considered to be a 
significant threat to any. Discards of plaice are considered under Principal 1, discards of cod under 
retained species. 
4.2.2  Danish Seine 
For 2008, Danish seine vessels operating in the North Sea are estimated to have discarded 99 tonnes 
of Starry ray, 66 tonnes of Common dab and 53 tonnes of Grey gurnard. Much smaller volumes of a 
wide range of other species are also estimated as having been discarded. 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011            33
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
The  estimated  total  discard  volumes  for  the  fishery  have  declined  substantially  in  recent  years 
according  to  observer  data  however  data  are  not  weighted  according  to  effort  levels.  The  main 
discard species are all non quota species of limited commercial interest. Grey gurnard and dab are 
reported to be amongst the top ten most abundant fish species in the North Sea, while Starry ray is 
the most abundant elasmobranch. The Danish seine fishery is subject to the same technical control 
measures as the demersal trawl fishery, the key elements of which are summarised above.  
4.2.3  Setnet 
The  Danish  fleet  sampling  programme  that  monitors  discarding  levels  does  not  routinely  monitor 
discarding  on  setnet  vessels.  While  monitoring  was  carried  out  for  periods  in  the  past  for  these 
vessels a decision was taken by DTU Aqua to discontinue sampling on account of near zero levels of 
discarding that were observed. 
This confirms that the levels of discarding within the setnet fishery are negligible – practically all fish 
captured  are  retained.  Under  certain  conditions,  dab  taken  in  setnets  may  be  discarded  (mainly 
when market conditions are poor). Dab is not a quota species and is widely reported as being one of 
the most abundant species in the North Sea.  
Aside from fish species, the bycatch issue that is undoubtedly most relevant in the context of setnets 
relates to incidental capture of diving seabirds. This problem is increasingly coming to the attention 
of those charged with ensuring that European fisheries are managed in a sustainable way and that 
all ecosystem impacts of a fishery are considered. Although widely acknowledged, bird bycatch has 
not been the focus of many directed studies that seek to investigate the bird bycatch profile of the 
different setnet types used in different areas of European waters.  
As  a  result,  no  quantitative  estimates  of  seabird  bycatch  are  available  for  this  fishery.  However  a 
review of published studies on bird bycatch in setnet fisheries indicates that the species likely to be 
affected  by  this  fishery  include  Common  guillemot,  Great  Cormorant,  Red‐throated  diver,  Red‐
breasted  merganser,  Black  guillemot,  Great‐crested  grebe,  Razorbill,  Common  scoter  and  Velvet 
scoter. Dabbling duck and occasional gull bycatch is also likely. 
Anecdotal  information  and  some  unpublished  data  in  relation  to  Danish  setnet  fisheries  suggests 
that  the  greater  problem  in  relation  to  Danish  setnet  fisheries  is  likely  to  occur  in  Inner  Danish 
waters of the Kattegat and Belt Seas. Within these areas, waters tend to be shallower and there are 
extensive and diverse populations of diving seabirds and in some areas diving waterfowl also. In part 
this  fact  may  be  corroborated  by  the  number  of  Special  Protection  Areas  (Natura  2000)  that  are 
proposed for Inner Danish waters. However the problem of bird bycatch is by no means confined to 
areas outside of the North Sea and it is highly likely that bird bycatch is a significant bycatch feature 
of  the  North  Sea  gillnets  fisheries  also.  Most  North  Sea  plaice  setnet  fisheries  occur  in  waters  less 
than 50m deep – well within the diving range of several species – and in close proximity to coastal 
bird roosts and nesting sites. 
Finally, the assessment considers the fact that setnets have the ability to continue to catch fish for 
varying periods of time in the event that they become lost. Gear can be lost in a number of ways – it 
can  become  tangled  up  with  mobile  gears,  can  be  swept  away  in  extremes  of  current  and  or 
weather, or surface dhan buoys that mark the gears location can become separated from the gear. 
In the event that gear is lost, it is normal for vessels to attempt to recover it by grappling for it on the 
seabed,  which  may  or  may  not  be  successful.  In  any  event,  although  there  is  potential  for  gear  to 
become lost, fishermen try very hard to avoid such an event as it results in expensive replacement 
costs. Setnet fishermen have reported that they replace between 10 and 20% of their gear annually, 
the majority of which is necessary as a result of wear and tear on the gear that reduces its efficiency, 
rather than replacement of lost gear. 
 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                          March 2011            34
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
4.3 Endangered, threatened and protected species (ETP) 
ETP species are defined as those that are recognised as such by national legislation and/or binding 
international  agreement  (e.g.  CITES)  to  which  the  jurisdictions  controlling  the  fishery  under 
assessment  are  party.  Species  that  are  appear  exclusively  on  non‐binding  lists  such  as  ASCOBANS, 
IUCN Red List, OSPAR, HELCOM or that are only the subject of intergovernmental recognition (such 
as FAO International Plans of Action) and that are not included under national legislation or binding 
international agreement are not considered as ETP under MSC protocols.  
Most  capture  fisheries  have  at  least  some  potential  to  interact  with  Endangered,  Threatened  or 
protected species.  The ETP interaction profile for each gear type varies and is greatly influenced by 
the manner in which it is utilised. Factors such as frequency of use, duration of deployment, season, 
and location all play a role in defining a gear types ETP interaction profile.  
In general, populations of endangered, threatened and protected (ETP) species are well studied and 
in the North Sea, with considerable levels of work undertaken in relation to the regular  monitoring 
of  fishing  activity  through  the  deployment  of  onboard  scientific  observers,  capture  of  anecdotal 
information, and a wide range of EU and nationally funded research programmes.  
Table  4.1  lists  the  ETP  species  that  have  been  identified  as  being  relevant  to  the  assessment  of 
Danish North Sea plaice fisheries. The inclusion of a species here means that that the assessment has 
identified a potential for at least one of the three units of certification to interact with that species. 
Table 4.1 Endangered, Threatened and Protected species, North Sea 
                                                                      NORTH SEA ETP SPECIES 
                                                       DK signed            Denmark transposed into national 
                                                         1977                            legislation 
                                                                           Council Directive       EU Council Reg 
         Convention or legislative instrument            CITES                92/43/EEC               23/2010 
                                                                           Habitats Directive 
                           SPECIES                     Appendix II           Appendix II                   
         Harbour Porpoise Phocoena phocoena                                                        
         Harbour Seal Phoca vitulina                                                               
         Grey Seal Halichoerus grypus                                                              
         Angel shark Squatina squatina                                                             
         Common Skate Dipturus batis                                                               
         Basking shark Cetorhinus maximus                                                          
         Spurdog Squalus acanthias                                                                 
         Allis Shad Alosa alosa                                                                    
         Sturgeon Acipenser sturio                                          Priority species       
 
During the assessment of the plaice fisheries, the assessment team have considered the above list of 
species in the context of the potential interactions with individual units of certification. The result of 
this analysis determined the Outcome Status score.  To score well, a fishery must be conducted in a 
manner that ensures ETP impacts fall within acceptable limits (as defined under legislation and /or 
binding agreements that are in place).  
4.3.1  Common skate, Spurdog and Allis shad 
North Sea demersal trawl and Danish seine fisheries are known to catch Common skate and Spurdog 
from time to time. Spurdog were once widely distributed within the North Sea while Common skate, 
which  were  once  commonly  found  in  shallow  waters  of  the  European  shelf,  are  now  generally 
concentrated in waters of the shelf edge, outside of the main plaice trawling areas, and in deeper 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                March 2011    35
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
waters  of  the  Norwegian  trench.  Common  skate  may  be  landed  only  where  it  is  taken  outside  of 
European  waters  (according  to  Council  Regulation  43/2009).  If  skate  are  taken  within  European 
waters, they must be returned to the water immediately.  
Spurdog no longer has a Total Allowable Catch (set at 0 tonnes). Spurdog landings are restricted to a 
bycatch  limit  of  10%  (2.61t)  of  the  Danish  quota  for  2009  (Council  Regulation  23/2010)  from  ICES 
areas IIa and IV. Accordingly, a directed Spurdog fishery is no longer permitted and Spurdog >100cm 
must be returned alive to the sea. The trawl fishery has been known to capture Allis shad in the past. 
However, recent discard sampling data (2005‐2008) do not indicate the capture of Allis shad in the 
demersal trawl or Danish seine fisheries. 
4.3.2  Harbour porpoise 
In  general,  setnet  fisheries  are  known  to  have  considerable  potential  to  interact  with  a  range  of 
cetacean species. In the North Sea, the dominant cetacean species is Harbour porpoise. 
Denmark  is  a  signatory  to  the  "Agreement  on  the  Conservation  of  Small  Cetaceans  of  the  Baltic, 
North  East  Atlantic,  Irish  and  North  Seas”3  (ASCOBANS)  which  was  concluded  in  1991  under  the 
auspices of the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS or Bonn Convention) and entered into force 
in  1994.  The  agreement  seeks  to  formalise  and  coordinate  efforts  to  conserve  the  small  cetacean 
species shared between member countries in the ASCOBANS Area, conscious that the management 
of  threats  to  their  existence,  such  as  bycatch,  habitat  deterioration  and  other  anthropogenic 
disturbance, requires concerted and coordinated responses, given that migrating cetaceans regularly 
cross  national  boundaries.  A  Conservation  and  Management  Plan  forming  part  of  the  Agreement 
obliges Parties to engage in habitat conservation and management, surveys and research, pollution 
mitigation and public information. Other recent projects have focussed on mapping small cetacean 
in North East Atlantic waters (often focussing on the North Sea). A recent notable example has been 
the Small Cetaceans in the European Atlantic and North Seas project (SCANS & SCANS II). 
The Harbour porpoise is unlikely to detect the presence of nylon mesh in water, (although in theory 
if their sonar is directed toward the net, detection is more likely) and entanglement risks are high for 
this  species  in  both  gillnet  and  trammel  net  fisheries.  While  there  are  measures  in  place  that  may 
assist in reducing capture of Harbour porpoise, these are not co‐ordinated or designed specifically to 
address  the  issue  of  porpoise  bycatch.  Estimates  available  suggest  that  up  to  5,500  were  caught 
annually in Danish setnet fisheries in the North Sea (the present fishery accounted for an estimated 
annual average of 820 captures) between 1987 and 2001. However, it is acknowledged that changes 
have occurred since this data was recorded, such as: 
»      a major reduction in overall set net effort, due to decommissioning and fleet consolidation;  
»      mandatory use of pingers in those fisheries with the highest HP by catch rates; 
»      furthermore it is noted that the net used during the collection of this data is different from the 
       nets under assessment. 
In 2008, ICES was asked to evaluate the bycatch of harbour porpoises in the North Sea against the 
Ecological Quality Objective used by OSPAR, which states that bycatch should be kept below 1.7% of 
the best population estimate. ICES referred to the findings of the SCANS II project for an abundance 
estimate  (239,061  animals  in  the  North  Sea),  but  were  unable  to  provide  a  complete  bycatch 
estimate, nor state whether bycatch was below the 1.7% objective. In consequence, it has not been 
possible  to  state  whether  the  fishery  is  meeting  international  requirements  for  the  protection  of 
Harbour porpoise in the North Sea. 
4.3.3  Seals 
Both Harbour seal and Grey seal are also known to be captured incidentally in both types of mobile 
gear  as  well  as  in  the  setnet  fishery.  Limited  data  have  been  available  to  the  assessment  team  to 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011            36
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
suggest  that  it  can  and  does  occur,  the  indications  are  that  it  is  at  a  low  level  relative  to  seal 
populations in the North Sea and northeast Atlantic which are known to be increasing. 
There  are  relatively  few  focussed  management  initiatives  in  place  in  relation  to  all  units  of 
certification which specifically address ETP interaction. While individual measures may help to limit 
the  problem  there  is  a  clear  need  for  greater  levels  of  focussed  and  effective  management 
measures, which need to be brought together to form a strategy to manage ETP species interactions. 
It was noted that the fishery does not yet operate a suitable Code of Conduct. Although the terms of 
a  proposed  CoC  have  been  broadly  defined  and  agreed  within  the  DFPO,  it  has  yet  to  be 
implemented. The CoC is seen as an important initiative in the context of managing ETP, yet it is only 
one potential element of an appropriate management strategy.  
 

4.4 Habitat  
Figure 4.1 presents an overview of seabed bathymetry for the North Sea. The North Sea can broadly 
be  described  as  having  a  shallow  (<50  m)  southeastern  part,  which  is  sharply  separated  by  the 
Doggerbank from a much deeper (50–100 m) central part running north along the British coast. The 
central  northern  part  of  the  shelf  gradually  slopes down  to  200  m  before  reaching  the  shelf  edge. 
Another main feature is the Norwegian Trench running in the east along the Norwegian coast into 
the Skagerrak with depths up to 500  m. Further  to the east, the Norwegian Trench  ends abruptly, 
and the Kattegat is of similar depth as the main part of the North Sea.  
Figure 4.1 & 4.2 North Sea bathymetry & Generalised North Sea seabed habitats  




          Source: Source: RIVO, Netherlands (4.1) 
          & North Sea Digital Atlas (4.2) 




 
Figure  4.2  shows  generalised  seabed  habitats  for  the  North  Sea.  The  substrates  are  dominated  by 
sands in the southern and coastal regions and by fine muds in deeper and more central parts. Sands 
become  generally  coarser  to  the  east  and  west,  interspersed  with  patches  of  gravel  and  stones  as 
well. Local concentrations of boulders are found in the north eastern part of the North sea, where 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                          March 2011            37
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
much  of  the  plaice  fishery  takes  place.  In  the  shallow  southern  part  this  hard‐bottom  habitat  has 
become scarcer, because boulders caught in beam trawls are often brought ashore. The deep areas 
of the Norwegian Trench are covered with extensive layers of fine muds, while some of the slopes 
have rocky bottoms. Several underwater canyons extend further towards the coasts of Norway and 
Sweden. A number of sand banks across the North Sea qualify for protection under the EU habitats 
directive,  mainly  along  the  UK  coast,  eastern  Channel,  the  approaches  to  the  Skagerrak,  and  the 
Dogger Bank. Extensive biogenic reefs of Lophelia have recently been mapped along the Norwegian 
coastline in the eastern Skagerrak, while Sabellaria reefs have been reported in the south, although 
their  distribution  and  extent  is  not  known.  Gravels  also  qualify  for  protection,  but  comprehensive 
maps at a total North Sea scale are not readily available. 
Comparing the above maps with the fleet VMS tracks (Figure 2.8), it can be seen that much of the 
North  Sea  plaice  fishery  occurs  on  sandy  seabeds,  while  plaice  may  also  be  targeted  on  muddy 
seabeds,  sandy  gravel  and  gravel  or  stones  to  a  lesser  extent.  The  fisheries  take  place  almost 
exclusively in waters less than 100 meters deep. 
4.4.1  Demersal Trawl 
Demersal trawling is spatially the most widely distributed means of fishing for plaice, with most parts 
of the central and eastern central North Sea featuring some level of activity. Seabed habitats within 
this  area  form  a  mosaic  that  comprises  sands,  muds  and  coarser  sediments  such  as  gravely  sand, 
sandy gravel and stones.  
Mobile demersal fishing gears are known to have significant potential to impact seabed habitats and 
biological  communities.  Impacts  are  generally  greatest  in  habitats  that  support  sensitive 
communities  such  as  corals,  burrowing  megafauna  and  seapens  and  seagrass  beds;  habitats  that 
typically are not subject to high rates of natural disturbance. The North Sea supports many examples 
of  such  communities,  distributed  widely  over  a  diverse  range  of  seabed  habitats.  With  demersal 
trawl gears, the main impact is associated with the heavy steel trawl doors that are used to keep the 
net open. These are towed along the seabed and may weigh up to 1200Kg each, while vessels fishing 
two  trawls  in  a  side  by  side  arrangement  (twin‐rigged)  must  also  tow  a  clump  weight  or  bottom 
roller along the seabed. This is also required to be heavy, in order to keep the inner end of both nets 
on  the  seabed.  The  heavy  nature  of  the  gear  results  in  physical  damage  to  the  seabed  that  is 
evidenced  by  scour  tracks  which  can  sometimes  be  detected  for  a  long  time  after  a  fishing  event 
using  side  scan  sonar.  The  ground  rope  of  the  net  used  in  the  mixed  species  fishery  tends  to  be 
relatively light, with the dominant catch species (plaice) preferring sandy habitats that are unlikely to 
cause the gear to snag on the seabed. Nevertheless repeated trawling of an area can cause longterm 
changes  in  seabed  communities  and  tends  to  reduce  the  seabed  to  a  two  dimensional  structure. 
Long  lived  and  slow  growing  species  tend  to  be  removed  by  multiple  passes  of  trawls  or  by  the 
effects of sedimentation as each pass of the net re‐suspends sediment which then may settle on and 
smother sessile fauna. In this way, large, long lived and slow growing fauna are gradually replaced by 
small,  short  lived  and  fast  growing  organisms  that  are  capable  of  rapid  reproduction  and 
recolonisation. 
While extensive research has been conducted in relation to the impacts of mobile fishing gears on 
seabed habitats, this has not as yet resulted in any clear initiatives to set acceptable limits of impact, 
at national or EU level. While various EU regulations refer to the need for all ecosystem impacts of 
fisheries to be taken into account in order to ensure sustainability, this has not yet occurred in the 
context of seabed impacts of mobile gears. Some of the fisheries that are included under the present 
assessment take place in proposed conservation sites such as the Dogger Bank SCI, which has been 
designated  as  a  Natura  2000  site  on  account  of  its  habitat  conforming  to  the  Habitats  Directive 
Annex  I  habitat  ‘sandbanks  covered  by  water  at  all  times’  .  While  the  fishing  method  used  on  the 
Dogger Bank is mainly Danish seine, which has less of an impact on the seabed than trawling, there 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           38
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
remains a need for an evaluation of the sensitivity of the habitats to mobile gears in this area. In the 
future it is plausible that there may be conflicting interests with respect to nature conservation and 
fisheries  interests  on  the  Dogger  Bank,  once  designations  have  been  completed;  detailed  habitat 
maps are available; and management planning pursues clear conservation objectives. In the interim 
period  it  is  too  early  (and  not  possible)  to  consider  detailed  implications  of  a  Natura  2000 
designation for the Dogger Bank on any Units of Certification. 
4.4.2  Danish Seine 
The Danish seine fisheries are concentrated in two main areas – off the northwest Jutland coast and 
in  the  central  North  Sea,  in  the  area  of  the  Dogger  Bank.  Seabed  habitats  in  these  areas  are 
characterised by a mosaic of different, mainly sedimentary habitats that comprise sandy gravel and 
gravel.  Areas  of  stones  are  also  evident  close  to  some  of  the  areas  fished  by  Danish  seine  (Figure 
4.2).  As a means of fishing, Danish seine netting permits smaller areas to be targeted, e.g. patches of 
clear ground lying between areas of rocky or stony seabed in areas that are not suitable for trawling. 
Impacts  from  Danish  seine  net  fishing  operations  are  not  as  severe  as  those  associated  with 
demersal  trawling,  as  there  is  no  need  for  the  heavy  trawl  doors  or  the  clump  weight  or  bottom 
roller  used  in  twin  rig  arrangements.  The  main  impact  is  associated  with  the  passage  of  the  seine 
ropes  over  the  seabed.  These  serve  to  retrieve  the  net  but  also  have  an  important  function  in 
herding fish into the path of the net by creating a visual and acoustic stimulus as the ropes begin to 
close. Sediment may become re‐suspended while the ropes may damage or destroy sensitive seabed 
fauna. 
4.4.3  Setnet 
The setnet fisheries are very much concentrated in several small areas adjacent to and immediately 
west  of  the  Danish  Jutland  North  Sea  coast,  as  far  as  5˚E.  The  fisheries  occur  on  sandy  and  sandy 
gravel seabed types and generally in waters less than 50 meters deep. 
Set gill nets have little significant interaction with the habitat, and given the nature of the gear and 
the nature of the substrate, are highly unlikely to reduce habitat structure or function to the point 
where there would be serious or irreversible harm. These nets are static, lightweight and are only set 
for relatively short periods, avoiding extremes of tide and weather, and areas of fouling macro‐algae. 
The nets are anchored to the sandy or mud / sand seabed by a small (~20kg) four‐fluke fisherman’s 
anchor, at either end, and at intervals of a few hundred meters when nets are linked. 
 

4.5 Ecosystem  
There is considerable knowledge of the habitats and ecosystem of the North East Atlantic, drawing 
on  more  than  one  hundred  years  of  regular  monitoring  and  research,  the  intensity  of  which  has 
accelerated in recent decades. Food webs and trophic relationships of the North Sea are the subject 
of ongoing research and investigation, much of this research finds its way into the working and study 
group reports of the International Council for the Exploration of the  Sea (ICES).  Efforts to  improve 
and refine the science which underpins the fishery management systems applied in European waters 
has  intensified  in  recent  years  as  Europe  has  made  a  clear  commitment  to  applying  the 
precautionary approach,  taking into account all ecosystem impacts of fisheries, in deciding on future 
management systems and structures. 
There is a good level of information on the trophic position and role of various life history stages of 
plaice  within  the  North  Sea  food  web.  Many  studies  have  been  completed  that  examined  the  fish 
community structure in the North Sea. These confirm that adult plaice largely act as an energy sink 
in the North Sea, while juvenile and smaller plaice are an important prey species for other fish and 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                        March 2011            39
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
birds  in  inshore  and  nursery  areas.  ICES  provide  an  annual  overview  of  the  state  of  the  North  Sea 
Ecosystem. This has been an important source in reviewing the scoring in relation to ecosystem. 
In  managing  potential  habitat  and  ecosystem  impacts,  industry  and  management  authorities  are 
guided by Danish commitment to a number of relevant conventions and European Directives, such 
as: 
»      OSPAR  Biological  Diversity  and  Ecosystems  Strategy  which  is  concerned  with  all  human 
       activities  which  can  have  an  adverse  effect  on  the  protection  and  conservation  of  the 
       ecosystems  and  the  biological  diversity  of  the  North  East  Atlantic.  The  Strategy  (i)  sets 
       ecological  quality  objectives  in  support  of  the  ecosystem  approach  to  the  management  of 
       human  activities,  (ii)  requires  assessments  of  species  and  habitats  that  are  threatened  or  in 
       decline, (iii) the development of an ecologically coherent network of marine protected areas 
       and  (iv)  the  assessment  of  human  activities  which  may  adversely  affect  ecosystems  and  the 
       development of programmes and measures to safeguard against such harm. 
»      ASCOBANS ASCOBANS was concluded in 1991 as the Agreement on the Conservation of Small 
       Cetaceans of the Baltic and North Seas (ASCOBANS) under the auspices of the Convention on 
       Migratory  Species  (CMS  or  Bonn  Convention)  and  entered  into  force  in  1994.  Denmark  is  a 
       signatory nation. 
»      Council Directive 79/409/EEC of 2 April 1979 on the conservation of wild birds Directive 1979 
       and  its  amending  acts  aim  at  providing  long‐term  protection  and  conservation  of  all  bird 
       species naturally living in the wild within the European territory of the Member States (except 
       Greenland). 
»      Council  Directive  92/43/EEC  on  the  conservation  of  natural  habitats  and  of  wild  fauna  and 
       flora  came  into  force  on  21  May  1992.  The  central  aim  of  the  Directive  is  to  conserve 
       biodiversity  across  the  area  of  the  European  Union  through  a  coherent  network  of  Special 
       Areas of Conservation (SACs). 
»      CBD  ‐  the  Convention  on  Biological  Diversity  was  signed  at  the  UN  Rio  Conference  on 
       Environment  and  Development  (1992).  This  aims  conserve  biological  diversity,  encourage 
       sustainable  use  of  its  components  and  the  fair  and  equitable  sharing  of  the  benefits  arising 
       from the use of these resources. 
           
Through  its  representative  organisation,  the  DFPO,  the  Danish  North  Sea  fishing  fleet  (demersal 
trawl, Danish seine and setnet vessels) which is the subject of this assessment report, has recently 
agreed the draft text in relation to a Code of Conduct for all member fishing vessels. The DFPO are 
committed to introducing the scheme as part of the MSC certification process.  No credit could be 
given in relation to this undertaking during the present assessment as the CoC was not yet in place 
at  the  time  of  the  site  visit  in  February  2010.  However  it  is  recognised  as  a  positive  move  as  it 
includes  reference  to  limiting  wider  ecosystem  and  environmental  impacts,  for  example  through 
changes to fishing practices and more general ‘housekeeping’ issues such as  proper waste disposal 
procedures,  procedures  for  dealing  with  hazardous  waste.  The  CoC  generally  aims  to  increase 
awareness and encourage responsible behaviours amongst fishermen, in order to minimise impacts 
of the fisheries on the wider ecosystem. 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011            40
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
5. Administrative context (P3)   
Principle 3 of the Marine Stewardship Council standard states that:   
         The  fishery  is  subject  to  an  effective  management  system  that  respects  local,  national  and 
         international laws and standards and incorporates institutional and operational frameworks 
         that require use of the resource to be responsible and sustainable.   
In  the  following  section  of  the  report  a  brief  description  is  made  of  the  key  characteristics  of  the 
management system in place to ensure the sustainable exploitation of the fishery under assessment.   
 

5.1 Governance & Policy 
5.1.1  Legislative Framework 
EU 
Denmark  is  a  Member  State  of  the  European  Union  (since  1973),  and  its  fisheries  are  therefore 
subject to the principles and practices of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) of the EU. The North Sea 
Plaice fishery is managed through the CFP in accordance with the basic fisheries regulation.  
The  first  EU  common  measures  in  the  fishing  sector  date  from  1970,  when  it  was  agreed  that,  in 
principle,  EU  fishermen  should  have  equal  access  to  Member  States'  waters.  However,  in  order  to 
ensure  that  smaller  vessels  could  continue  to  fish  close  to  their  home  ports,  a  coastal  band  was 
reserved for local fishermen who have traditionally fished these areas. It was also decided that the 
EU  was  best  placed  to  manage  fisheries  in  the  waters  under  their  jurisdiction  and  to  defend  their 
interests in international negotiations. The CFP came into being in the form we recognise today in 
1983.  It was reviewed thoroughly in 2002 and the current basic fisheries regulation (No.2731/2002) 
was adopted by the Council of Ministers on 20th December 2002. The current policy is under review, 
and a revised policy is likely to be enacted in 2013. 
The  scope  of  the  CFP  extends  to  conservation,  management  and  exploitation  of  living  aquatic 
resources and aquaculture, as well as processing and marketing of fishery products, covering related 
activities, both within EU waters and by any member state vessel or national – with due regard to 
the  UN  Convention  on  the  Law  of  the  Sea  (UNCLOS)  and  without  prejudice  to  the  primary 
responsibility of the flag State. 
The CFP regulation is a ‘chapeau’ regulation setting out the strategic aims of the CFP and enabling 
the Council of Ministers, or in certain cases the Commission, to make more detailed Regulations. In 
total  there  are  in  excess  of  600  related  regulations  broadly  divided  into  4  categories  (Structural 
measures,  State  Aid,  Management  of  Resources,  market  organisation).  Included  within  these  are 
regulations dealing with almost all fisheries management related aspects from control requirements, 
to  fleet  structure,  technical  conservation,  marketing,  annual  total  allowable  catches  (TAC)  and 
species management and recovery plans.  
Outside the CFP framework other EU legislation dealing with habitats and species protection and is 
also relevant to fisheries management and to fishermen. 
National 
Implementation of the CFP at a national level is carried out through the individual Member States. In 
Denmark  responsibility  for  fisheries  management,  legislation  and  policy  lies  with  the  Ministry  of 
Food, Agriculture and Fisheries (established by Royal Decree in December 1996). 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011             41
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
The main Danish enabling legislation is the 1999 Fisheries Act (Act No. 281 of 1999, consolidated as 
LBK  No.  978  of  26  September  2008)  which  makes  provision  for  the  management  of  fisheries  for 
purposes of protection and enhancement of living Resources in marine and freshwater and for the 
protection  of  other  marine  animal  and  plant  live,  and  to  safeguard  the  basic  foundations  of 
commercial fishing and related commercial activities and possibilities for sport fishing. 
5.1.2  Consultation, Roles & Responsibilities 
There  are  several  relevant  organisations  and  bodies  which  take  an  active  role  in  the  fishery  under 
assessment.  Their  roles  are  explicitly  defined  and  well  understood,  and  the  interaction  between 
them works effectively. 
Industry Representation 
There are several tiers of industry representation, which form a crucial role in providing the industry 
with  an  effective  voice  in  both  management  and  science.  They  also  play  an  important  role  in 
lobbying.  Not  least  among  these  various  representative  bodies  is  the  DFPO  –  already  described  in 
section 2.2 of this report. 
In addition to the DFPO, the Danish Fishermen's Association plays an important role in representing 
vessel  owners  and  fishermen  (typically  skippers).  The  Danish  Fishermen's  Association  was 
established in 1994 when the two former fishermen's organisations "Danmarks Havfiskeriforening" 
og "Dansk Fiskeriforening" merged and is now a nationwide organisation comprising some 50 local 
fishermen's organisations, whose main object is to represent the interests of the fishermen in any 
place  where  fishing  is  on  the  agenda  ‐  no  matter  if  local,  national  or  international.  The  Danish 
Fishermen's Association represent the interests of Danish Fishermen at Regional Advisory Councils.  
The creation of Regional Advisory Councils (RACs) was one of the pillars of the 2002 reform of the 
Common  Fisheries  Policy  in  response  to  the  EU  and  stakeholders’  desire  to  increase  the  latter’s 
participation  in  the  CFP  process.  The  RACs  can  submit  recommendations  and  suggestions  on  any 
aspect of fisheries in their area to the EC or relevant national authorities. The RACs are made up of 
representatives of the fisheries sector and other groups (including NGOs) affected by the CFP while 
scientists  are  invited  to  participate  in  the  meetings  of  the  RACs  as  experts.  The  Commission  and 
Member States representatives may be present at the meetings as observers. The relevant RAC to 
this  assessment  is  the  North  Sea  Regional  Advisory  Council,  which  includes  a  working  group  on 
Demersal Stocks.  
There  is  also  union  representation  for  crew  members.  Fishing  crew  members  are  typically 
represented by the transport section of the United Federation of Danish Workers, a member union 
of  the  Danish  Confederation  of  Trade  Unions  (LO).  The  confederation  is  the  largest  central 
organisation  for  workers  on  the  Danish  labour  market,  with  more  than  1.3m  workers  (across  all 
Danish  industry)  members  of  one  of  LO’s  affiliated  unions.  These  1.3m  members  constitute 
approximately 50 % of all workers in Denmark. 
Scientific Advice 
The  core  backdrop  to  the  management  of  this  fishery  is  the  advice  provided  by  the  ICES  Advisory 
Committee  (ACOM)  which  draws  on  the  on‐going  work  of  international  scientists  from  relevant 
research  laboratories  and  institutions  on  the  stock  biology  and  marine  science.  The  main  working 
group  responsible  for  providing  advice  on  North  Sea  plaice  fisheries  is  the  Working  Group  on  the 
Assessment  of  Demersal  Stocks  in  the  North  Sea  and  Skagerrak  (WGNSSK),  which  also  regularly 
reviews stock assessment and data gathering methodologies. 
There  is  an  excellent  level  of  relevant  scientific  capacity  in  Denmark.  In  terms  of  fisheries  the 
statutory national scientific role is provided by DTU Aqua (Danish Technical University). The purpose 
of DTU Aqua is to “provide research, advice and education at the highest international level on the 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           42
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
sustainable exploitation of living marine and freshwater resources, the biology of aquatic organisms 
and  the  development  of  ecosystems”.  DTU  aqua  therefore  plays  an  important  role  in  commercial 
fisheries through research and advice on fish and shellfish population biology, stock status, dynamics 
and  interaction  with  other  organisms.  This  is  an  important  contribution  to  the  ICES  advice  and 
several DTU Aqua staff are members of the WGNSSK. 
National Management Bodies 
Within  the  Danish  Ministry  of  Agriculture,  Food  &  Fisheries,  responsibility  for  administration, 
regulation, enforcement and inspection lies with The Danish Directorate of Fisheries. In addition the 
Directorate is represented in various international committees, working groups in the EU and other 
international institutions. 
A  further  important  area  of  responsibility  of  the  Directorate  is  to  work  out  primary  statistics  on 
fisheries  in  Denmark  and  to  report,  for  instance  to  the  EU  and  other  international  institutions. 
Responsibility  also  extends  to  landing  inspections,  including  inspections  of  fish  landings  and 
logbooks, 24 hour fisheries monitoring, thus ensuring that EU regulations and national legislation are 
observed at all times. 
The  Danish  Directorate  for  Fisheries  comprises  a  central  unit  (Copenhagen)  with  65  members  of 
staff.  In  addition,  three  fisheries  inspectorates  with  115  members  of  staff  and  four  fisheries 
inspection  vessels  with  80  members  of  staff  are  responsible  for  undertaking  all  control  and 
enforcement activities in Danish waters and ports. 
Fig 5.1: Organisational structure of the Danish Directorate of Fisheries 




                                                                            Source: www. http://www.fd.fvm.dk 

5.1.3  Objectives 
The  2002  reform  of  the  European  Common  Fisheries  Policy  aimed  at  delivering,  among  other 
objectives: 
»       efficient fishing activities within an economically viable and competitive fisheries industry;  
»       the sustainable development of fishing activities from an environmental, economic and social 
        point of view;  
»       a fair standard of living for those who depend on fishing activities and taking into account the 
        interests of consumers; 
»       ensure sustainable exploitation of living aquatic resources;  

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           43
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
»       a precautionary approach to protect and conserve living aquatic resources; and  
»       to minimise the impact of fishing activities on marine eco‐systems.  
In addition to the CFP, high level EU objectives are enshrined in other strategy documents such as 
the EU Sustainable Development Strategy, adopted in 2006, which includes a stated objective of: 
         ‘Improving  management  and  avoiding  overexploitation  of  renewable  natural  resources  such  as 
        fisheries……..  restoring  degraded  marine  ecosystems  by  2015  in  line  with  the  Johannesburg  Plan 
        (2002) including achievement of the Maximum Yield in Fisheries by 2015’.  
In  2008,  the  EU  Marine  Strategy  Directive  was  adopted  which  commits  members  states  to  further 
foster  the  integration  of  environmental  concerns  into  other  relevant  policies,  such  as  the  CFP  in 
order to achieve ‘good environmental status’ in the marine environment, through the development 
and implementation of national level policies based on an ecosystem approach, in order to meet the 
following targets by 2020: 
»       populations  of  all  commercially  exploited  fish  and  shellfish  must  be  within  safe  biological 
        limits, exhibiting an age and size distribution that is indicative of a healthy stock; 
»       all  elements  of  the  marine  food  web  must  occur  at  normal  abundance  and  diversity  and 
        levels capable of ensuring the long‐term abundance of the species and the retention of their 
        full reproductive capacity; 
»       biological diversity must be maintained and the quality and occurrence of habitats, and the 
        distribution and abundance of species, are to be kept in line with prevailing conditions;  
»       sea  floor  integrity  is  maintained  at  a  level  that  ensures  the  safeguarding  of  structure  and 
        functions of the ecosystems. 
5.1.4  Incentives 
The reform of the Common Fisheries Policy in 2002, was an important step in ensuring that subsides 
are not used to increase fleet capacity or contribute in any way to unsustainable practices. Although 
subsides  are  still  available  to  fleets  of  members  states  through  the  European  Fisheries  Fund,  the 
conditions of funding are now much tighter with focus shifted to safety and reducing environmental 
impact. 
In  spite  of  these  welcome  reforms,  the  current  CFP  still  includes  very  few  positive  incentives  to 
encourage  the  individual  fisher  to  fish  sustainably.  Taken  in  combination  with  long‐term  poor 
economic  performance  of  many  EU  fleet  segments,  responsibility  for  ensuring  sustainable 
exploitation  of  the  fish  resources  has  rested  squarely  with  the  authorities  rather  than  with  the 
industry. The emphasis has therefore been placed on what may be described as ‘negative incentives’ 
such  as  tight  monitoring,  control  and  enforcement,  supported  by  a  strong  system  of  penalties  for 
non‐compliance.  
The Green Paper on the latest Reform of the CFP in 2012 has recognised the need for more positive 
incentives and has increased the emphasis on possible measures to encourage industry to take more 
responsibility sustainable operational practices.  Among the measures mentioned in the Green Paper 
are: 
»       results‐based management instead of rules on how to fish, shifting the focus to the industry 
        to demonstrate that it operates responsibly in return for access to fishing; 
»       rights‐based management schemes to encourage the industry to eliminate surplus capacity 
        and invest more efficiently. 
Although  this  debate  on  the  revision  of  the  CFP  including  the  incentive  structure  is  ongoing  and 
outcome  uncertain,  it  is  clear  that  there  is  a  growing  need  of  the  potential  role  for  positive 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           44
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
incentives  to  play  in  European  fisheries  management.  The  Danish  industry  and  ministry  are  also 
actively involved in this consultation process, and are perhaps the leading voice advocating a more 
results  based  approach  to  management.  In  particular  the  ministry  is  calling  for  a  change  from 
‘landing’ to ‘catch’ quotas, meaning that all fish caught are counted against the quota – as opposed 
to  just  those  landed,  thus  reducing  motivation  to  discard  and  rewarding  more  selective  fishing.  In 
order to demonstrate the merits of this approach, the Danish industry has undertaken a pilot study 
looking  at  the  potential  of  ‘fully  documented  fisheries’  using  CCTV  to  monitor  all  catches  (and 
discards) in return for an increased quota. The pilot so far indicates that this incentive is leading to a 
change  in  behaviour  and  the  pilot  is  being  extended  and  expanded  to  30  vessels  (including  many 
covered by this assessment) in 2010. 
 

5.2 Fishery Specific Management System  
The  management  of  EU  fisheries  is  gradually  changing  from  an  ad‐hoc  approach  involving  annual 
political decisions informed by scientific advice to more pre‐determined and scientifically evaluated 
multi‐annual  strategies  where  decision  rules  are  agreed  in  advance  along  with  restrictions  on  the 
degree of fluctuation (in TAC) from one year to the next. This increases confidence and certainty in 
the industry (both in good times and bad) and greatly reduces the potential for unpredictable and 
often counterproductive politically based decisions over annual resource use and allocation. Plaice is 
now  one  of  several  EU  fisheries  managed  on  the  basis  of  an  agreed  long‐term  management  plan, 
which  clearly  defines  stock  limits  and  target  fishing  mortalities.  The  first  stage  of  this  plan  was 
deemed a recovery plan, whilst the stock rebuilt to safe level. 
This  long  term  management  strategy  approach  is  a  key  tool  in  meeting  the  objective  set  out  by 
member  states  at  the  World  Summit  on  Sustainable  Development  in  Johannesburg,  to  achieve 
maximum sustainable yield (MSY) for depleted stocks by 2015 at the latest.  
Evaluations  of  these  long  term  management  plans  are  an  important  tool  in  ensuring  that  the  plan 
continues to deliver the required actions to meet long term objectives. The plaice management plan 
has undergone a number of directly relevant evaluations in recent years which include: 
»       evaluation of the North Sea Plaice & Sole Management Plan (Machiels et al (2008));  
»       evaluations of the Plaice Box;  
»       in November 2009 the STECF also met to evaluate the North Sea Plaice and Sole Mgt Plan – 
        result pending (to be reviewed during the first MSC surveillance audit). 
5.2.1  Compliance & enforcement 
There  is  a  high  degree  of  enforcement  and  control  in  the  Danish  fisheries  sector.  The  Danish 
Directorate of Fisheries is responsible for all enforcement, both at sea and on landing.  Inspections 
also occur throughout the sales and supply chain to ensure that all fish handled is legally caught. 
According the Danish Fisheries Inspectorate, at sea inspections of Danish fishing vessels operating in 
the North Sea during 2008 amounted to 124 inspections of setnet vessels, 35 inspections of Danish 
Seine  vessels  and  121  inspections  of  demersal  trawling  vessels.  A  high  rate  of  compliance  with 
regulations is reported as  a result of  the inspection  programme.  For 2008, the numbers of vessels 
inspected  was  at  least  in  accordance  with  target  levels  of  inspection  set  by  the  Inspectorate  (the 
target for 2008 being 124, 35 and 120 inspections respectively). 
There  is  clear  system  of  monitoring  quota  uptake,  based  around  the  use  of  log  books  (including 
electronic  logbooks  for  vessels  over  24m  –  and  15m  after  July  2011),  cross  referenced  with  sales 
notes from auction or first sale. Strategic spot checks ensure the accuracy of these figures. Typical 
inspections at sea include logbook verification, measurement of mesh size, hold inspection 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011            45
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Such activity forms the backbone of the CFP Monitoring Control and Surveillance (MCS) system, and 
performance of this system against national and CFP targets, including details of infringements and 
prosecutions, is reported on an annual basis. These activities are coordinated through the new EU 
Fisheries Control Agency based now based in Vigo, Spain. 
The  Fisheries  Directorate  will  pass  any  report  of  infringement  or  non‐compliance  to  the  public 
prosecutor, which typically results in a fine, although the exact scale of sanction is determined by the 
public prosecutor. 
Overall  there  is  a  high  degree  of  confidence  in  the  enforcement  system  and  no  evidence  of 
systematic non‐compliance. 
5.2.2  Decision making & Dispute Resolution 
All  EU  member  states  (including  Denmark)  have  signed  up  to  CFP,  and  are  therefore  bound  by 
European legislation. The European Commission is a politically independent, civil service which lies 
at  the  heart  of  the  European  Union  legislative  /  decision‐making  process.  The  Directorate‐General 
for Maritime Affairs and  Fisheries (DG Mare), is  the administrative department of  the Commission 
with responsibility for fisheries. The Commission is responsible for the preparation of proposals for 
new  laws,  which,  once  adopted  by  the  Commissioners,  are  sent  to  The  Council  of  the  European 
Union. 
The Council is made up of elected national representatives, generally ministers, responsible to their 
national  parliaments  (and  indirectly,  public  opinion).  The  Council  makes  Community  laws,  after 
reviewing proposals of the commission, and depending on their nature, after consulting with various 
committees and The European Parliament.  
The  European  Parliament  is  composed  of  elected  representatives  from  the  Member  States.  Their 
role  is  to  contribute  to  the  Community's  legislative  process,  to  ensure  that  the  Commission  makes 
proper use of its power and, with the Council, to take decisions over the Community budget.  
In  drafting  legislative  proposals  DG  Mare  consults  widely,  including  with,  relevant  groups,  third 
countries and regional fisheries organisations. In doing so, DG Mare may request special studies and 
consult with other Commission departments, such as those responsible for environment or regional 
policy  to  ensure  harmonised  community  laws.  Additionally,  various  committees  consisting  of 
representatives  of  the  Member  States,  industry  and  science  have  been  set  up  to  assist  in  the 
implementation of the CFP by providing advice to DG Mare on proposed legislation. The commission 
provides a secretariat for these committees. Two such committees are particularly important in DG 
Mare’s consultation process: 
    » Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee on Fisheries (STECF)  
        The  implementation  of  the  CFP  requires  the  assistance  of  highly  qualified  scientists, 
        particularly  in  the  fields  of  marine  biology,  marine  ecology,  fisheries  science,  fishing  gear 
        technology  and  fishery  economics.  The  Members  of  the  STECF  are  nominated  by  the 
        Commission and serve a renewable 3 year term.  
        The  STECF  may  be  consulted  by  DG  Mare  on  all  problems  connected  with  the  provisions 
        governing  access  to  zones  and  resources  of  EU  fisheries  and  the  regulation  of  fisheries 
        activities.  The  opinion  of  STECF  is  crucial  in  the  process  of  setting  annual  Total  Allowable 
        Catches TACs and quotas. The STECF produces an annual report on the situation as regards 
        fisheries resources and on developments in fishing activities. It also reports on the economic 
        implications of the fishery resources situation 
    » Advisory Committee on Fisheries and Aquaculture (ACFA)  



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011            46
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
         The  implementation  of  the  rules  of  the  Common  Fisheries  Policy  also  requires  that  the 
         opinion of relevant stakeholders is taken into consideration. ACFA was therefore established 
         in  1971  (renewed  in  1999)  and  is  today  composed  of  21  representatives  of  the  following 
         interests:  professional  organisations  representing  the  production  sector,  the  processing 
         industry  and  trade  in  fishery  and  aquaculture  products  as  well  as  non‐professional 
         organisations representing the interests of consumers, the environment and development. 
Once  enacted  the  European  Commission  (DG  Mare)  then  has  responsibility  for  implementation, 
management  and  control  of  community  law  in  Member  States.  Where  appropriate,  European 
legislation is enacted at the national level through relevant primary and secondary legislation. 
The annual decision on quota allocations for the forth‐coming fishing season provides an indication 
of  the  how  the  European  decision‐making  process  works.  The  ICES  working  groups  with 
responsibility of stock assessment (in the case of Plaice this is WGNSSK), submit annual assessments 
to  ICES  ACOM,  who  in  turn  review  and  disseminate  to  the  European  Commission  (DG  Mare).  The 
advice will be reviewed by STECF before preparing recommendation for the commissioners. In doing 
so,  every  effort  is  made  to  consider  and  assess  the  implications  of  decisions  in  view  of  pragmatic 
solutions at stakeholder (Catching Sector) level. This process is facilitated by the RAC structure and 
ACFA  will  typically  also  contribute  to  this  consultation  process.  The  Commissioners  then  pass 
recommendations to the Council of the European Union, who take the final decision at the annual 
December council negotiations. 
From  a  Danish  perspective,  input  is  therefore  provided  into  the  decision‐making  process  by 
contributing  input  at  a  number  of  levels  –  in  forming  the  original  advice  (ICES),  in  reviewing  the 
advice  (STECF)  and  in  preparing  final  recommendations  (commissioners),  and  finally  in  taking 
decisions (Council). 
Disputes between Member States and the Commission are resolved in the Council of Ministers and 
outside  the  machinery  of  government,  there  are  a  wide  range  of  institutional  solutions  to  dispute 
resolution – through trade organisations, professional associations, and a range of decision‐making 
bodies (at local, regional and national levels). 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011            47
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
6.  Background to the Evaluation  
6.1 Assessment Team 
Assessment team leader: Tristan Southall  
This  evaluation  was  led  by  Tristan  Southall,  an  experienced  fisheries  assessor  who  has  worked  as 
both  principles  2  and  3  expert  on  a  number  of  previous  MSC  assessments,  including  the  Scottish 
Pelagic  assessments  for  both  herring  and  mackerel.  More  recently  Tristan  led  the  IPSG  Mackerel 
Assessment and has also been involved in the development and trialling of a new MSC assessment 
methodology, based on risk analysis, for use in data deficient situations. 
When  not  assessing  the  sustainability  of  fisheries  Tristan  specialises  in  fishing  and  marine  industry 
consultancy,  combining  detailed  understanding  of  marine  ecosystems  with  broad  experience  of 
fishing and aquaculture industry systems, infrastructure and management. This provides him with an 
informed  position  which  balances  the  needs  of  marine  ecosystems,  biodiversity  and  wider 
environment  with  the  practicalities  of  the  industry  operation.  Bridging  these  two  important  areas 
enables sustainably‐minded consultancy, able to interpret and advise upon the impacts of different 
management decisions on both marine ecosystems and economics.  
Tristan’s professional experience also includes the evaluation of fisheries on sub‐sea environments, 
analysis  of  fishery  and  fleet  performance,  and  a  wide  range  of  fisheries  and  aquaculture  planning 
and  management  studies,  all  of  which  seek  to  combine  both  socio‐economic  and  environmental 
perspectives.  Tristan  has  recently  coordinated  EU  fisheries  training  and  promotion  activities  – 
covering all aspects of sustainable fisheries management and control. 
Expert team member: Nick Pfeiffer 
Nick  Pfeiffer  is  a  fisheries  and  marine  environmental  consultant  with  a  diverse  experience  and  in‐
depth  knowledge  of  Irish  marine  fisheries.  Nick  is  involved  in  a  number  of  MSC  assessments, 
including acting as the P2 expert on the recent assessment of IPSG mackerel. 
Nick’s  experience  as  a  fishery  scientist  spans  ten  years  and  includes  the  development  of  fisheries 
technical conservation measures for commercial fisheries as well as the evaluation of the impacts of 
a variety of fishing methods on marine ecosystems. As an industry analyst, Nick has been involved in 
many projects related to the fisheries sector since 2002 and most recently carried out a review of 
fisheries on Irish offshore islands. 
Through his work, Nick has always sought to develop a greater understanding of the principles that 
relate  to  the  sustainability  of  coastal  and  fishing  livelihoods.  In  this  regard  he  is  committed  to 
promoting the concept that natural resources can be harvested in a balanced sustainable manner, 
thereby ensuring long‐term security for coastal communities and natural systems. 
Expert team member: Dr Paul Medley 
Dr Paul Medley is an experienced fishery scientist and population analyst and modeller, with wide 
knowledge  and  experience  in  the  assessment  of  pelagic  stocks  (amongst  a  range  of  marine  fish 
stocks and ecosystems). He holds a first degree in Biology and Computer Science (1st class honours) 
from  the  University  of  York,  and  a  doctorate  from  Imperial  College,  London,  based  on  a  thesis 
“Interaction between Longline and Purse Seine in the South‐West Pacific Tuna Fishery”. 
He  has  travelled  widely  and  worked  with  a  range  of  fishery  systems  and  biological  stocks,  both  as 
principal  researcher  and  as  evaluator.  He  is  familiar  with  MSC  assessment  procedures,  having 
participated in a significant number of MSC full assessments across a range of fisheries, undertaken a 
substantial number of pre‐assessments and acted as peer reviewer in still others. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011            48
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
He is familiar with a wide range of fisheries in the North East Atlantic and other parts of the world, 
and  over  the  period  2000  to  2005  he  has  been  serving  with  the  Centre  for  Independent  Experts, 
University  of  Miami,  as  an  evaluator  of  various  US  fishery  research  programmes.  He  has  been 
working  with  the  MSC  on  the  development  of  guidelines  for  certification  of  small  scale,  data  poor 
fisheries. He is based in York (UK). 
Expert team member: Prof Sten Sverdrup‐Jensen 
Sten  has  more  than  30  years  of  experience  with  Danish  and  international  fisheries.  In  1978‐81  he 
was  the  Director  of  the  North  Jutland  County/Aalborg  University  Fisheries  Research  Group 
undertaking  the  first  EU  fisheries  research  project  in  Denmark.  As  founding  director  of  Danish 
Institute  of  Fisheries  Technology  1981‐  87  Sten  Sverdrup‐Jensen  was  involved  in  various  research 
and consultancy projects focusing on fisheries management and development in Denmark.  
After leading a global  evaluation of EU fisheries development aid Sten Sverdrup‐Jensen in 1991 took 
up  a  position  as  Planning  Adviser  to  the  Director  General  and  Acting  Director  of  Social  Science 
Division at ICLARM  (now  World Fish Center).  Upon his return to Denmark Sten Sverdrup‐Jensen in 
1993  was  the  founding  director  of  IFM  and  involved  in  research  and  consultancy  work  related 
primarily  to    institutional  aspects  of  fisheries  management  for  a range  of  Danish  and  international 
clients. After having served as Chief Technical Adviser to Danida/Mekong River Commission on the 
establishment of fisheries R&D institutes in Cambodia and Laos in 1999‐2002 Sten Sverdrup‐Jensen 
re‐joined IFM and took up positions as Senior Researcher and Acting Director/Head of Centre.  
His  most  recent  research  work  relates  to  EU  fisheries  (e.g.  Indicators  for  Fisheries  Management  in 
Europe,  IMAGE).  His  most  recent  expert  assignments  include  studies  on  a)  Economic  and  Social 
impacts of the proposed scenarios for a long term management plan for Baltic pelagic fisheries and  
b) Impact Assessment Studies related to the  2012 revision of the CFP, both commissioned by the DG 
MARE  as  well  as  the  assessment  of  Danish  pelagic  fisheries  for  MSC  certification.  In  2008  Sten 
Sverdrup‐Jensen was appointed Professor (adj.) at Aalborg University. 
Expert advisor: Dr Antonio Hervas 
Dr.  Antonio  Hervás  is  Food  Certification  International’s  Fisheries  Development  Manager.    He  is  an 
established Fisheries Scientist specialised in quantitative stock assessment methods and the design 
of management strategies for the sustainable exploitation of the fish resources.  
Dr.  Hervás  holds  a  BSc  in  Marine  Sciences,  a  Higher  Diploma  (postgraduate  course)  in  Fisheries 
Management,  Development  and  Conservation  and  a  PhD  in  the  development  of  stock  assessment 
procedures.  
From 2001 to 2008 he worked as a fisheries scientist for the assessment on mollusc stock of Ireland 
at Trinity College Dublin and at the marine Science‐MRI at the National University of Ireland, Galway. 
During this time Dr. Hervás was an active member of the National Shellfish Management Framework 
with  responsibilities  on  providing  scientific  advice  on  the  status  of  mollusc  stocks  for  their 
management.   
Dr. Hervas has published  an extensive  number of peer reviewed papers, technical reports  and has 
acted as peer reviewer for the ICES Journal of Marine Science.   
From 2009, Dr. Hervas has acted as Team Leader and Principle 1 expert against the MSC standard. 
Expert Advisor: Martin Gill 
Martin Gill, the Managing Director of FCI, coordinated the assessment process, and participated as a 
team  member  during  the  assessment  as  required.  Martin  is  a  marine  biologist  and  fisheries 
specialist,  a  former  staff  member  of  the  Copenhagen‐based  Eurofish  international  fishery 



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                      March 2011           49
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
development  organisation,  and  is  a  shareholder  and  board  member  of  Food  Certification 
International.  
Martin was appointed as Executive Director of Food Certification (Scotland) Ltd in June 2002 and led 
a  successful  management  buyout  in  early  2007.  He  joined  from  a  five  year  period  with  FAO 
EASTFISH,  a  Food  and  Agriculture  Organisation  of  the  United  Nations  project  providing  a  fish 
marketing  and  investment  service  for  Central  and  Eastern  Europe  based  in  Copenhagen.  (This 
project  is  now  known  as  Eurofish).  Among  other  duties  he  acted  as  the  founding  editor  of  the 
organisation’s Eurofish magazine. 
A graduate in Marine Biology from University College, Swansea, he was also a former Editor of World 
Fishing magazine for 5 years and has contributed since 1992 to the Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of 
the Year with the commercial fisheries section. 
6.1.1 Peer Reviewers 
Peer reviewers used for this report were Dr Jake Rice and Dr Michael Pawson.   
 

6.2 Public Consultation 
Public announcements of the progression of the assessment were made as follows:  
 Date           Announcement                                                           Method of notification

31/08/09        Notification of Commencement of Assessment                            MSC website  
17/12/09        Nomination of Assessment Team Candidates                              MSC website 
from 31/08/09  Solicitation of Inputs to Stakeholder Consultation and Assessment      email, phone and mail 
25/01/10        Announcement of Assessment Tree and Scoring Guideposts                MSC website 
25/01/10        Announcement  of  Assessment  Visit  and  Convening  of  Stakeholder  direct email, MSC website  
                Consultation Meetings 
22/02/10  to    Assessment Visit                                                      Advertisement                in 
02/03/10                                                                              Fiskeritidende 
11/05/10        Notification  of  Proposed  Peer Reviewers                            MSC website  
11/11/10        Notification of Public Comment Draft Report                           MSC website 
18/01/11        Notification of Final Report                                          MSC website 

 
6.3 Stakeholder Consultation   
6.3.1  Extent of available information 
A total of 13 stakeholder individuals and organisations having relevant interest in the DFPO Danish 
North Sea plaice assessment were identified and consulted during this assessment. The interest of 
others  not  appearing  on  this  list  was  solicited  through  the  postings  on  the  MSC  website,  and  by 
advertising in the Danish Press (Fiskeritidende). 
Initial  approaches  were  made  by  email  and  followed  up  by  phone.    Issues  raised  during 
correspondence were investigated during research and information gathering activities, and during 
interviews. Records of all interviews and consultations are kept by FCI and form an important part of 
the audit trail of assessment. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                     March 2011                 50
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Most stakeholders contacted during this exercise either indicated that they had no direct interest in 
this  fishery  assessment,  or  that  they  had  no  particular  cause  for  concern  with  regard  to  its 
assessment to the MSC standard. 
6.3.2  Stakeholder issues 
Written  and  verbal  representations  were  provided  to  the  assessment  team  expressing  a  range  of 
views,  opinions  and  concerns.  The  team  is  of  the  view  that  matters  raised  have  been  adequately 
debated and addressed as a part of the scoring process for this fishery, and that none of the issues 
raised, therefore, require separate attention beyond that represented in this report.  
6.3.3  Stakeholder Interview programme 
Following  the  collation  of  general  information  on  the  fishery,  a  number  of  meetings  with  key 
stakeholders were scheduled to discuss the assessment.  These meetings were held as follows:  
 
Name                      Position                                     Organisation

Jonathan Jacobsen        Client representative 
Per Nielsen              Skipper 
                                                                   DFPO 
Flemming Neilsen         Skipper 
Johnny Puolsem           Skipper 
Jørgen Dalskov           Head  of  section  for  Public  Sector 
                         Consultancy 
Morten Vinther           Senior Advisor                            DTU Aqua (National Institute of Aquatic Resources) 
Marie Storr‐Paulsen      Head of Monitoring 
Lotte Kindt              Mammal scientist  
Ulla Wiborg + others     Coordinator  for         certification,  Fisheries Directorate & Inspectorate 
                         traceability etc 
Arne Madsen              Head of Fisheries Inspection              Fisheries Directorate & Inspectorate 
Mr Ole Poulsen           Head of fisheries policy                  Ministry of FAF 
Christoph Mathiesen      Programme  Officer,  Fisheries  &  WWF Denmark 
                         Aquaculture, 
Inger Näslund            Marine  &  Fisheries  Conservation  WWF Sweden 
                         Officer 
Sally Clink              Secretariat                               Baltic RAC 

Magnus Eckeskog          Assistant Secretary                        
Karsten Kristensen       NGO Representative                        United Federation of Danish Workers 
Jesper Kobbero           NGO Representative                        Alliance of Social & Ecological Consumer Organisation  
 
All  relevant  stakeholders  were  able  to  attend  meetings  during  the  site  visit  or  at  other  scheduled 
moments. A record of the meeting is held in file by the certification body. No stakeholders chose to 
make  written  submissions  instead  of  attending  a  meeting  with  the  assessment  team.  The 
assessment team were therefore able to get a full understanding of the range of stakeholder views 
and  draw  upon  relevant  expertise  or  additional  sources  of  material.  The  scope  of  views  and  the 
identified sources have, where relevant been used in the scoring of the fishery and are referenced 
accordingly  in  the  assessment  tree.  There  are  therefore  no  additional  written  submissions  from 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                  March 2011        51
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
stakeholders,  nor  issues  of  concern,  over  and  above  normal  scoring  practice,  which  require 
additional mention over and above normal reporting. 
Following  publication  of  the  ‘Public  Comment  Draft  Report’  further  stakeholder  comment  was 
received. This is included in full in this report, along with the assessment team’s response to these 
comments in Appendix 6.  
 

6.4 Other Certification Evaluations and Harmonisation 
Two assessments of North Sea Plaice have so far been undertaken and completed. In addition there 
is  one  other  North  Sea  plaice  fishery  currently  under  assessment.  In  the  first  two  cases  these 
fisheries  use  otter  trawl  vessels,  landing  predominantly  into  the  Netherlands.  The  third  of  these 
fisheries uses a variety of trawl methods and distributes its products worldwide.   
Details of the two certified fisheries can be found here: 
»      Ekofish Group‐North Sea twin rigged otter trawl plaice. Certified as sustainable in June 2009: 
       http://www.msc.org/track‐a‐fishery/certified/north‐east‐atlantic/Ekofish‐Group‐North‐Sea‐
       twin‐rigged‐otter‐trawl‐plaice 
»      Osprey Trawlers North Sea twin‐rigged plaice. Certified as sustainable in September 2010: 
       http://www.msc.org/track‐a‐fishery/certified/north‐east‐atlantic/Osprey‐Trawlers‐North‐Sea‐
       twin‐rigged‐plaice 
Details of the other assessment currently in progress can be found here: 
»      Cooperative Fishery Organisation (CVO) North Sea plaice and sole: Entered full assessment in 
       April 2010: 
       http://www.msc.org/track‐a‐fishery/in‐assessment/north‐east‐atlantic/cooperative‐fishery‐
       organisation‐cvo‐north‐sea‐plaice‐and‐sole 
The  responsible  certification  body  is  Moody  Marine  for  both  the  completed  assessment,  and  the 
assessments  currently  taking  place.  No  official  harmonisation  meeting  has  taken  place  between 
Moody  Marine  and  FCI  although  informal  discussions  to  ensure  a  degree  of  harmonisation  over 
some of the key conditions have occurred. In particular this focused on ensuring harmonisation on 
principle 1 scoring. Although the P1 scores are not identical, the scores were brought more into line 
during this contact between the two teams and both teams were aware of the slight differences in 
terms of emphasis / interpretation taken by the other. The degree of difference remains small and 
neither  contradicts  the  other.  On  principle  2  the  potential  operational  differences  between  the 
fisheries  are  greater,  therefore  the  need  for  exact  harmonization  is  less,  none‐the‐less,  the  teams 
briefly discussed the areas that conditions would focus upon and were reassured that a sufficiently 
similar approach was being taken to ensure that a fuller harmonization exercise was not required. 
Both  the  overall  scores  awarded  to  the  fisheries  and  the  approximate  focus  of  the  conditions  are 
similar, therefore it is concluded that an appropriate degree of harmonisation has taken place.  
 

6.5 Information sources used 
The  principal  sources  of  information  used  in  this  assessment  process  derive  from  information 
presented  to  the  team  by  the  client  and  fishery  managers,  by  information  derived  as  a  result  of 
interviews and consultations with members of the fishing industry, processors, regulators, and other 
stakeholders, and as a result of literature search. 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                      March 2011           52
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
The primary sources of information on this stock and the fishery are the: 
»       WGNSSK (2009). Report of the Working Group on the Assessment of Demersal Stocks in the 
        North  Sea  and  Skagerrak  ‐  Combined  Spring  and  Autumn,  6  ‐  12  May  2009,  ICES 
        Headquarters, Copenhagen.. 1028 pp.  
»       WGRED  (2008).  Report  of  the  Working  Group  for  Regional  Ecosystem  Description,  25–29 
        February 2008, ICES, Copenhagen, Denmark. ICES CM 2008/ACOM:47. 203 pp. 
»       EC  (2007)  Council  regulation  No  676/2007  of  11  June  2007  establishing  a  multiannual  plan 
        for fisheries exploiting stocks of plaice and sole in the North Sea 
»       ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
Taken in combination these provide a clear consolidated view of the stock, the fisheries that exploit 
the stock, and the science behind advice on the management of the stock. In addition a number of 
other sources have been used in this assessment, which is detailed in full in Appendix 2. 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                   March 2011           53
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
7.  Scoring   
7.1 Scoring Methodology  
The  MSC  is  dedicated  to  promoting  “well‐managed”  and  “sustainable”  fisheries,  and  the  MSC 
initiative  focuses  on  identifying  such  fisheries  through  means  of  independent  third‐party 
assessments  and  certification.  Once  certified,  fisheries  are  awarded  the  opportunity  to  utilise  an 
MSC promoted eco‐label to gain economic advantages in the marketplace. Through certification and 
eco‐labelling  the  MSC  works  to  promote  and  encourage  better  management  of  world  fisheries, 
many of which have been suggested to suffer from poor management. 
The MSC Principles and Criteria for Sustainable Fisheries form the standard against which the fishery 
is assessed and are organised in terms of three principles:  
»       MSC Principle 1 ‐ Resource Sustainability 
»       MSC Principle 2 ‐ Ecosystem Sustainability  
»       MSC Principle 3 ‐ Management Systems 
A  fuller  description  of  the  MSC  Ps  &  Cs  and  a  graphical  representation  of  the  assessment  tree  is 
presented as Appendix 1 to this report.   
The  MSC  Principles  and  Criteria  provide  the  overall  requirements  necessary  for  certification  of  a 
sustainably  managed  fishery.  To  facilitate  assessment  of  any  given  fishery  against  this  standard, 
these  criteria  are  further  split  into  performance  indicators  which  provide  a  detailed  checklist  of 
factors  necessary  to  meet  the  MSC  standard.  The  assessment  of  this  fishery  against  the  MSC 
standard is achieved through measurement of 31 Performance Indicators.  
Scoring of the attributes of this fishery against the MSC Ps & Cs involves the following process: 
»       Decision  to  use  the  MSC  Default  Assessment  Tree  contained  within  the  MSC  Fishery 
        Assessment Methodology (FAM v2) 
»       Description of the justification (and supporting references) as to why a particular score has 
        been given to each sub‐criterion 
»       Allocation of a score (out of 100) to each Performance Indicator 
In  order  to  make  the  assessment  process  as  clear  and  transparent  as  possible,  the  Scoring 
Guideposts  are  presented  in  the  scoring  table  and  describe  the  level  of  performance  necessary  to 
achieve  100  (represents  the  level  of  performance  for  a  performance  indicator  that  would  be 
expected  in  a  theoretically  ‘perfect’  fishery),  80  (defines  the  unconditional  pass  mark  for  a 
performance indicator for that type of fishery), and 60 (defines the minimum, conditional pass mark 
for each performance indicator for that type of fishery).  
There  are  two,  coupled,  scoring  requirements  that  constitute  the  Marine  Stewardship  Council’s 
minimum threshold for a sustainable fishery:  
»       The fishery must obtain a score of 80 or more for each of the MSC’s three Principles, based 
        on the weighted average score for all Criteria and sub‐criteria under each Principle; and  
»       the fishery must obtain a score of 60 or more for each Performance Indicator.  
A  score  below  80  at  the  principle  level  or  60  for  any  individual  Performance  Indicator  would 
represent a level of performance that causes the fishery to automatically fail the assessment. 
 
 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           54
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
7.2 Scoring Outcomes 
The  assessment  team  convened  a  scoring  meeting  from  8th  to  12th  March  2010  in  Edinburgh  (UK). 
The output of these meetings is shown in the scoring sheets (assessment tree) forming Appendix 3 
to this report.  The scores allocated to the assessment tree at Sub‐criterion, Criterion and Principle 
levels are shown schematically in Figure 7.1. The scores for those performance indicators where a 
score of below 80 has been allocated – and thus triggering the placing of a condition to bring that 
element up to good industry practice ‐ are indicated in red. 
Figure 7.1: Summary of the scores for the Danish North Sea Plaice Fishery. 
               Principle 1 – Stock Status / Harvest Control Rules                        All gear types 
     1.1.1                                Stock status                                         70 
     1.1.2        Outcome (status)        Reference Points                                     80 
     1.1.3                                Stock Rebuilding                                     100 
     1.2.1                                Harvest Strategy                                     85 
     1.2.2                                Harvest control rules & tools                        75 
                    Management 
     1.2.3                                Information & monitoring                             75 
     1.2.4                                Assessment of stock status                           80 
 
                     Principle 2 – Wider Ecosystem Impacts                          Trawl    Danish        Set 
                                                                                             Seine         Net 
     2.1.1                                Outcome (status)                           80
                                                                                               80          85
     2.1.2        Retained Species        Management                                 90        90          90
     2.1.3                                Information                                O 
                                                                                     80        90          85
     2.2.1                                Outcome (status)                           B  
                                                                                     80        80          75
     2.2.2            Bycatch             Management                                 80        90          75
     2.2.3                                Information 
                                                                                     J   
                                                                                     85        90          75
     2.3.1                                Outcome (status)                           E  
                                                                                     75        75          70
     2.3.2           ETP Species          Management                                 C  
                                                                                     60        60          60
     2.3.3                                Information                                70        70          60
     2.4.1                                Outcome (status) 
                                                                                     T   
                                                                                     75        80          90
     2.4.2            Habitats            Management                                 I 
                                                                                     70        75          85
     2.4.3                                Information 
                                                                                     O
                                                                                     85        80          85
     2.5.1                                Outcome (status)                           90        90          90
     2.5.2           Ecosystem            Management                                 N 
                                                                                     90        90          90
     2.5.3                                Information                                90        90          90
 
                   Principle 3 – Management / Governance                                 All gear types 
     3.1.1                                Legal & customary framework                          90 
     3.1.2                                Consultation, roles & responsibilities               85 
                Governance & Policy 
     3.1.3                                Long term objectives                                 100 
     3.1.4                                Incentives for sustainable fishing                   85 
     3.2.1                                Fishery specific objectives                          80 
     3.2.2                                Decision making processes                            80 
                  Fishery‐specific 
     3.2.3                                Compliance & enforcement                             85 
                Management System 
     3.2.4                                Research plan                                        80 
     3.2.5                                Management performance evaluation                    85 



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011        55
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
8. Certification Recommendation  
The actual Eligibility Date is 1st September 2010  
 

8.1 Overall Scores 
The performance of the fishery in relation to MSC Principles 1, 2 and 3 is summarised below:  
                                                                           Fishery Performance 
                        MSC Principle    
                                                                 Trawl        Danish Seine        Set Nets
     Principle 1: Sustainability of Exploited Stock                             81 – Pass 
     Principle 2: Maintenance of Ecosystem                     UNDER 
                                                              80 – Pass         82 – Pass      80.3 – Pass 
                                                              OBJECTION 
     Principle 3: Effective Management System                                   86 – Pass 
 
The  Danish  seine  and  set  net  fisheries  attained  a  score  of  80  or  more  against  each  of  the  MSC 
Principles and did not score less than 60 against any MSC Criteria.   
It was therefore determined that the Danish Seine and Set Net components of the DFPO Denmark 
North Sea Plaice Fishery be certified according to the Marine Stewardship Council Principles and 
Criteria for Sustainable Fisheries.  
The  decision  to  uphold  this  determination  was  confirmed  by  the  FCI  Certification  Sub‐Committee 
following  a  recommendation  by  the  assessment  team,  and  review  by  stakeholders  and  peer‐
reviewers.   
 

8.2 Conditions  
The fishery attained a score of below 80 against a number of Performance Indicators, as indicated in 
figure  7.1.  The  assessment  team  has  therefore  set  a  number  of  conditions  for  continuing 
certification  that  the  Danish  Fishermen’s  Producers  Organisation,  as  the  client  for  certification,  is 
required  to  address.  The  conditions  are  applied  to  improve  performance  to  at  least  the  80  level 
within a period set by the certification body but no longer than the term of the certification. 
Further  elaboration  on  the  justification  for  the  scores  is  provided  in  the  relevant  performance 
indicator in the assessment tree in Appendix 3. 
As  a  standard  condition  of  certification,  the  client  shall  develop  an  'Action  Plan’  for  meeting  the 
conditions for continued certification, to be approved by Food Certification International.  
The conditions are associated with key areas of performance of the fishery, each of which addresses 
one  or  more  Performance  Indicators.  Conditions,  associated  timescales  and  relevant  Performance 
Indicators are set out below. 
In setting conditions for the certification to proceed, it is the intention of the certification body to 
assist  the  fishery  attain  ‘best  practice’  in  the  areas  where  scoring  has  made  it  necessary  for 
conditions to be applied. 
 
 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011          56
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
8.2.1   Principle 1 Conditions 
    Condition 1          Stock Status 
    Performance      All Gears  
    Indicators:      1.1.1 ‐ Stock Status 
                     The  stock  is  at  a  level  which  maintains  high  productivity  and  has  a  low  probability  of 
                     recruitment overfishing 
                     Score:         70 
    Timelines        5 years of certification 
    Summary of       There is some evidence that the stock is NOT at or fluctuating around its target reference point. 
    issues 
    Suggested        Rebuilding  strategies  are  in  place  and  there  is  evidence  that  they  are  rebuilding  stocks 
    Action           continuously.    Currently  the  management  plan  is  the  second  stage,  which  aims  to  reduce  the 
                     exploitation rate to a target level that will allow the stock to be harvested at MSY.  However, 
                     the  current  target  fishing  mortality  rate  is  not  consistent  with  the  candidate  target  fishing 
                     mortality suggested by ICES.  Therefore the fishery should work with relevant stakeholders to 
                     support the implementation of Article 5 of council regulation No 676/2007 which states that the 
                     latest  scientific  advice  from  the  STECF  that  would  permit  the  exploitation  of  the  stocks  at  a 
                     fishing mortality rate compatible with maximum sustainable yield should be adopted.
 
    Condition 2          Harvest Control Rules
    Performance      All gears  
    Indicators:      1.2.2 ‐ Harvest control rules and tools 
                     There are well defined and effective harvest control rules in place 
                     Score:        75 
    Timelines        5 years of certification 
    Summary of       ICES evaluated the current decisions rules set out in the EU multiannual management plan.  The 
    issues           management  plan  evaluation  is  not  yet  conclusive  with  regards  to  consistency  with  the 
                     precautionary approach. Under article 18, the management plan allows for a reduction of the 
                     exploitation rate below that provided by the current decision rules.  However decision rules are 
                     not explicitly defined regarding ensuring that exploitation rates are reduced as limit reference 
                     points are approached.  
                     The definition of precautionary reference points Bpa takes into account uncertainty related to 
                     the estimation of fishing mortality rates and spawning stock biomass in order to ensure a high 
                     probability of avoiding recruitment failure.  ICES considered that Bpa could be set at 230,000 t 
                     using the default multiplier of 1.4.  However, the ICES Working Group acknowledges that, since 
                     noisy discards estimates were included, the uncertainty of the estimates of stock status is much 
                     greater than the multiplier applied.  
                      
    Suggested        Working  with  relevant  stakeholders  to  support  the  adoption  of  well  defined  harvest  control 
    Action           rules  which  are  consistent  with  the  harvest  strategy  and  ensure  that  the  exploitation  rate  is 
                     reduced as limit reference points are approached.   
                     Bpa  is  generally  used  in  the  definition  of  harvest  control  rules.    Therefore  it  should  be 
                     comprehensively  estimated.    The  multiplier  applied  to  Blim  for  the  estimation  of  Bpa  should 
                     take  into  account  the  uncertainty  related  to  the  estimation  of  fishing  mortality  and  Spawning 
                     stock biomass. 
 
 
 



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                       March 2011           57
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
    Condition 3      Information & Monitoring
    Performance      All gears  
    Indicators:      1.2.3 ‐ Information / monitoring 
                     Relevant information is collected to support the harvest strategy 
                     Score:        75 
    Timelines        1  year  of  certification  –  provide  assessment  team  with  robust,  accurate  and  independent 
                     discard profile of all 3 UoC 
                     5  years  of  certification  –  see  improved  evidence  of  plaice  discard  estimates  in  the  ICES 
                     assessment 
    Summary of       Discarding  is  not  well  monitored.    The  low  number  of  sampling  trips  brings  significant 
    issues           uncertainty to the estimation of discarding and subsequent estimation of total catch.  

    Suggested        Work  with  relevant stakeholders to ensure that there is some evidence that stock abundance 
    Action           and  fishery  removals  are  regularly  monitored  at  a  level  of  accuracy  and  coverage  consistent 
                     with  the  harvest  control  rule,  and  one  or  more  indicators  are  available  and  monitored  with 
                     sufficient frequency to support the harvest control rule. 
                     The DFPO is required to collaborate with a recognised national scientific institution to provide 
                     robust independent assessment of the discard profile of all 3 UoCs. Ideally, this could be done in 
                     collaboration with the National Discard sampling programme, but any limitations / delay in any 
                     such  programme  should  not  prevent  the  DFPO  from  carrying  out  appropriate  sampling.  Data 
                     generated  should  be  included  in  national  discarding  estimates.  Although  this  sampling  should 
                     focus on the discard of target species (plaice) this should also fully quantify any other species 
                     (commercial  /  non  commercial  /  ETP)  caught  by  the  fishery,  in  order  for  an  accurate  overall 
                     catch profile to be presented. 
 
8.2.2  Principle 2 Conditions 
All  Danish  Plaice  Units  of  Certification  have  scored  less  than  80  in  one  or  more  performance 
indicators for Bycatch; Endangered Threatened and Protected species and/or Habitats Performance. 
There  are  no  conditions  associated  with  retained  species  or  ecosystems.    To  assist  further  in 
providing  clarity  and  comprehensive  explanation,  principle  2  conditions  are  grouped  according  to 
Unit of Certification, taking each gear type in turn. This results in considerable potential overlap or 
even apparent repetition  within a single Unit of Certification as  well as between different Units of 
Certification.  These  overlaps  provide  an  obvious  and  deliberate  opportunity  for  a  strategic 
approach  to  addressing  principle  2  management  and  information  requirements  across  all  fleet 
sectors, thereby streamlining the processes and initiatives that need to be implemented in order to 
address all conditions that apply to the Danish North Sea plaice fisheries. Such an approach is likely 
to be of considerable benefit to other DFPO fleet sectors seeking certification in the future.  
Demersal trawl Unit of Certification 
    Condition DT1   Endangered, Threatened and Protected Species
    Performance       Demersal trawl  
    Indicators:       2.3.1 ‐ Status 
                      The fishery meets national and international requirements for protection of ETP species.   
                      The  fishery  does  not  pose  a  risk  of  serious  or  irreversible  harm  to  ETP  species  and  does  not 
                      hinder recovery of ETP species. 
                      Score:       75 
                       
                      2.3.2 ‐ Management strategy 
                      The fishery has in place precautionary management strategies designed to: 
                       m
                      ‐  eet national and international requirements; 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                         March 2011           58
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
                     e
                    ‐  nsure the fishery does not pose a risk of serious or irreversible harm to ETP species; 
                     e
                    ‐  nsure the fishery does not hinder recovery of ETP species; and 
                     m
                    ‐  inimise mortality of ETP species. 
                    Score:      60 
                     
                    2.3.3 ‐ Information / monitoring 
                    Relevant  information  is  collected  to  support  the  management  of  fishery  impacts  on  ETP 
                    species, including: 
                     i
                    ‐ nformation for the development of the management strategy;  
                     i
                    ‐ nformation to assess the effectiveness of the management strategy; and 
                     i
                    ‐ nformation to determine the outcome status of ETP species. 
                    Score:      70 
    Timelines       By  the  1st  Surveillance  audit  –  develop  and  implement  full  ETP  management  strategy  and 
                    recording protocols. Devise and implement across the certified fleets a log for recording details 
                    in relation to the capture of all ETP species, including Common skate and Spurdog.   
                    By the 2nd Surveillance Audit and for all subsequent years – Provide collated data in relation to 
                    the capture of ETP species including Common skate and Spurdog by all Units of Certification. 
                    Provide analysis of generated data and show how this is integrated into revised management 
                    to greatly reduce or eliminate bycatch mortality of Spurdog and Common skate. 
                    Within  the  life  of  the  certificate  eliminate  or  reduce  to  a  level  where  it  is  considered  to  be 
                    insignificant, the level of bycatch mortality of Common skate and Spurdog. This will apply for as 
                    long as Common skate and Spurdog remain endangered, threatened or protected. 
    Summary of      Landings data for Danish vessels in the North Sea in both 2009 and 2010 reveal that Common 
    issues          skate  were  landed  even  after  the  imposition  of  a  ban  on  landings  by  EU  vessels  from  the 
                    European sector of the North Sea ICES Area IV (EC Reg 43/2009). It is noted that Danish vessels 
                    may still land Common skate taken in the Norwegian sector Area  IV. Furthermore, Spurdog, 
                    for which Denmark had a quota of 26.1 tonnes in 2009, no longer has a Total Allowable Catch 
                    (set at 0 tonnes). Under Council Regulation 23/2010 Denmark is permitted maximum bycatch 
                    landings  of  Spurdog  during  2010  equivalent  to  10%  of  the  2009  Danish  quota,  equivalent  to 
                    2.61  tonnes,  from  ICES  areas  IIa  and  IV.  Early  indications  indicate  that  there  is  a  risk  of  this 
                    bycatch  limit  being  exceeded,  in  part  due  to  a  lack  of  broad  awareness  of  restrictions.  The 
                    fishery is also known to interact with other ETP species including Shad and both Harbour and 
                    Grey seal. 
    Suggested       Demonstrate a clear commitment to eliminating landings of Common skate and Spurdog, and 
    Action          landings should be reduced to zero for Common skate and to no more than 2.61t of Spurdog.  
                    Develop  and  implement  a  full  strategy  in  relation  to  managing  all  ETP  species  potentially 
                    affected  by  the  fishery,  including  having  in  place  and  operational  an  appropriate  Code  of 
                    Conduct  for  responsible  fishing,  which  explicitly  refers  to  ETP  species  identified  during  the 
                    assessment, and which introduces robust and reliable means to monitor, manage and reduce 
                    or  eliminate  impacts  on  ETP  species.  In  this  regard,  the  initial  focus  of  the  strategy  and 
                    initiatives  (such  as  an  ETP  log)  should  be  for  Common  skate  and  Spurdog,  however  any 
                    initiatives  should  recognise  the  fact  that  further  species  may  be  added  to  the  ETP  list  in  the 
                    future and should thus readily facilitate their inclusion. 
                    Provide  data  and  analysis  to  comprehensively  clarify  the  impact  of  demersal  trawling  on  ETP 
                    species.  This  should  be  achieved  through  the  operation  of  an  ETP  log  on  all  certified  vessels, 
                    cooperating  in  scientific  research  and  increased  observer  coverage.  Liaise  with  scientists  to 
                    ensure data gathered is relevant, robust and useful to include (for example) date and area of 
                    capture, numbers, length or weight as well as condition on release. Collate & analyse all data 
                    generated  in  relation  to  ETP  on  an  annual  basis  for  all  certified  vessels  and  use  to  inform 
                    strategy  development  and  make  available  to  relevant  authorities.  In  order  to  meet  with  the 
                    requirement  to  reduce  or  eliminate  bycatch  mortality  of  Common  skate  and  Spurdog,  it  is 
                    strongly  suggested  that  gear/area/temporal  adjustments  to  fishing  patterns  should  be 
                    investigated as a means of reducing or eliminating mortality. The issue of post capture survival 
                    of Common skate and Spurdog that are returned to the sea must also be investigated in order 
                    to determine the efficacy of landings restrictions in preventing mortality of Common skate and 
                    Spurdog. The fishery should engage and assist in research that addresses this issue. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                          March 2011            59
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
 
    Condition DT2   Habitats 
    Performance      Demersal Trawl  
    Indicators:      2.4.1 ‐  Status  
                     The fishery does not cause serious or irreversible harm to habitat structure,  considered on a 
                     regional or bioregional basis, and function. 
                     Score:       70 
                      
                     2.4.2 ‐ Management strategy 
                     There is a strategy in place that is designed to ensure the fishery does not pose a risk of serious 
                     or irreversible harm to habitat types. 
                     Score:        75 
    Timelines        By  1st  surveillance  audit  ‐  Provide  map  data  and  integrate  habitat  considerations  and  data 
                     recording into the CoC.  
                     By  the  third  surveillance  audit  clearly  demonstrate  a  commitment  to  protecting  seabed 
                     habitats  in  the  North  Sea  that  are  sensitive  to  trawling  through  participating  in  developing 
                     management initiatives and supporting research and collection of seabed habitat data for the 
                     areas where the fishery takes place. 
                     Within  5  years  of  certification  –  Demonstrate  data  generated  and  research  undertaken  is 
                     effective  at  shaping  the  development  of  management  strategy  to  mitigate  adverse  habitat 
                     impacts 
    Summary of       Demersal  trawling  is  associated  with  damage  to  sensitive  seabed  habitats  and  non  target 
    issues           benthic communities. The Danish demersal trawl fisheries are widely distributed over much of 
                     the  central  and  north  eastern  sectors  of  the  North  Sea.  The  seabed  over  this  area  is  not 
                     homogenous and available broadscale habitat maps show that the area comprises a mosaic of 
                     different seabed habitats. Accordingly, it is likely that there is variation in the sensitivity to the 
                     effects  of  trawling  across  the  range  of  affected  habitats.  While  datasets  and  maps  that  have 
                     been  available  to  the  assessment  team  do  not  indicate  the  presence  of  known  sensitive 
                     habitats  or  communities  in  the  areas  fished,  the  resolution  of  such  maps  has  not  been 
                     adequate or sufficient for the purpose of evaluating the fishery at SG80.  
    Suggested        Provide detailed habitat and / or seabed community maps for all areas of the North Sea ICES 
    Action           Area IV where demersal trawling for plaice and other species occurs – with particular focus on 
                     most  intensively  fished  areas.  It  is  not  intended  that  the  DFPO  should  have  to  produce  such 
                     maps,  as  it  is  likely  that  significant  additional  relevant  information  already  exists  within 
                     governments and EU research organisations that share an interest in the North Sea. Maintain a 
                     record of all potential sources consulted.  
                     Include  strategic  provisions  relating  to  protecting  vulnerable  seabed  habitats  in  the  Code  of 
                     Conduct. A log for recording encounters with vulnerable seabed habitats should be established 
                     and  maintained as  part  of  the  Code  of  Conduct on  all  certified  vessels.  This  could  include  an 
                     undertaking to explore technical measures to reduce unacceptable impacts where identified.  
                     Use resulting information to enhance the management strategy for the impacts of the fishery 
                     to seabed habitats at least to a point where measures combine into a cohesive, reactive and 
                     documented  strategy  that  shows  an  understanding  of  how  the  management  measures  work 
                     together to achieve the objective of minimising impacts to seabed habitats. This should include 
                     active  participation  in  wider  habitat  management  initiatives,  for  example  with  a  wider 
                     stakeholder grouping, such as other demersal trawl fisheries operating in the area, and those 
                     involved in the development of Natura 2000 objectives and management. 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                      March 2011           60
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Setnet Unit of Certification  
    Condition SN1   Discard Species 
    Performance      Set net  
    Indicators:      2.2.1 ‐ Status 
                     The  fishery  does  not  pose  a  risk  of  serious  or  irreversible  harm  to  the  bycatch  species  or 
                     species groups and does not hinder recovery of depleted bycatch species or species groups. 
                     Score:     75 
                      
                     2.2.2 – Management strategy 
                     There is a strategy in place for managing bycatch that is designed to ensure the fishery does 
                     not pose a risk of serious or irreversible harm to bycatch populations. 
                     Score:      75 
                      
                     2.2.3 ‐ Information / monitoring 
                     Information on the nature and amount of bycatch is adequate to determine the risk posed by 
                     the fishery and the effectiveness of the strategy to manage bycatch. 
                     Score:      75 
                      
    Timelines        By 1st surveillance audit – implement code of conduct and seabird impact evaluation  
                     By 2nd surveillance audit – preliminary results and analysis available 
    Summary of       The  European  Commission  has  recently  sent  a  communication  to  the  Council  of  Ministers 
    issues           relating  to  community  action  to  reduce  the  incidental  capture  of  seabirds  in  fisheries.  Diving 
                     seabirds are abundant in coastal waters and shallow offshore banks of the Baltic and the North 
                     Sea  and  are  the  most  common  species  caught  in  gillnets  –  this  may  include  incidental  bird 
                     captures  by  the  Danish  North  Sea  demersal  setnet  fishery.  The  actual  magnitude  and 
                     significance  of  the  mortality  caused  by  entangling  nets  remains  largely  unknown  due  to  low 
                     levels of monitoring. 
    Suggested        Implement  an  appropriate  Code  of  Conduct  which  explicitly  refers  to  issues  in  relation  to 
    Action           bycatch  /  discards  that  have  been  identified  during  the  assessment  (including  seabirds)  and 
                     should introduce on‐going means to monitor,  manage and reduce or eliminate bycatch of all 
                     species. 
                     Initiate  a  quantitative  evaluation  of  the  nature  and  scale  of  interactions  between  all  set  net 
                     gear  types  and  seabirds,  overseen  (or  in  cooperation  with)  by  an  independent  body  or 
                     organisation,  covering  all  seasons  and  areas.  Bird  bycatch  data  should  allow  accurate 
                     estimation of total bird bycatch by scaling based on fishing effort. 
 
    Condition SN2   ETP Species 
    Performance      Set net  
    Indicators:      2.3.1 ‐ Status 
                     The fishery meets national and international requirements for protection of ETP species.   
                     The  fishery  does  not  pose  a  risk  of  serious  or  irreversible  harm  to  ETP  species  and  does  not 
                     hinder recovery of ETP species. 
                     Score:      70 
                      
                     2.3.2 ‐ Management strategy 
                     The fishery has in place precautionary management strategies designed to: 
                      m
                     ‐  eet national and international requirements; 
                      e
                     ‐  nsure the fishery does not pose a risk of serious or irreversible harm to ETP species; 
                      e
                     ‐  nsure the fishery does not hinder recovery of ETP species; and 



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                        March 2011           61
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
                     m
                    ‐  inimise mortality of ETP species. 
                    Score:     60 
                     
                    2.3.3 ‐ Information / monitoring 
                    Relevant  information  is  collected  to  support  the  management  of  fishery  impacts  on  ETP 
                    species, including: 
                     i
                    ‐ nformation for the development of the management strategy;  
                     i
                    ‐ nformation to assess the effectiveness of the management strategy; and 
                     i
                    ‐ nformation to determine the outcome status of ETP species. 
                    Score:     60 
    Timelines       By  1st  surveillance  audit  –  Fully  implement  comprehensive  Code  of  Conduct  and  on  board 
                    reporting 
                    By  2nd  surveillance  audit  –  Show  results  of  data  analysis  and  theoretical  and  practical 
                    evaluation of potential management measures 
    Summary of      The  combined  incidental  capture  of  Harbour  porpoise  in  all  North  Sea  fisheries  is 
    issues          unsustainable. The scale of North Sea Harbour porpoise bycatch in Danish setnet fisheries is a 
                    cause for concern. The setnet fishery shares responsibility for incidental captures of porpoise 
                    and figures suggest an annual incidental capture by Danish vessels fishing with setnets in the 
                    North Sea of approximately 800 animals. 
    Suggested       Review of the measures for reducing interaction between demersal setnet fisheries and North 
    Action          Sea  Harbour  porpoise,  such  as  seasonal  avoidance  of  high  density  areas,  changes  to  fishing 
                    techniques  and  application  of  new  technologies  such  a  acoustic  deterrents,  barium  sulphate 
                    nets  etc.  Undertake  practical  investigation  of  at  least  one  of  these  potential  means  for 
                    reducing  incidental  capture  of  Harbour  porpoise.  Fully  engage  in  this  process  with  relevant 
                    national institutions that share responsibility for managing Harbour Porpoise. 
                    Develop  and  implement  a  full  strategy  to  manage  all  Endangered,  Threatened and  Protected 
                    species that may be affected by the fishery. This could include an appropriate Code of Conduct 
                    that  explicitly  refers  to  ETP  species  identified  during  the  assessment  and  which  introduces 
                    robust and reliable means to monitor, manage and reduce or eliminate impacts. 
                    Evaluate  the  nature  and  scale  of  interactions  between  the  setnet  fisheries  and  Harbour 
                    porpoise,  seals  and  other  ETP  within  both  inshore  and  offshore  DFPO  North  Sea  setnet  fleet 
                    segments, as well as across the range of gear types in use. This should be complemented by an 
                    observer programme, conducted by independent bodies/organisations and should cover at all 
                    seasons and areas.  
                    This  data  should  be  used  to  accurately  profile  the  ETP  species  bycatch  in  Danish  North  Sea 
                    demersal  setnet  fisheries  and  be  used  to  refine  management  strategies,  with  information 
                    being made fully and freely available to appropriate bodies.   
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                    March 2011          62
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Danish Seine Unit of Certification 
    Condition DS1   ETP Species 
    Performance      Danish Seine  
    Indicators:      2.3.1 ‐ Status 
                     The fishery meets national and international requirements for protection of ETP species.   
                     The  fishery  does  not  pose  a  risk  of  serious  or  irreversible  harm  to  ETP  species  and  does  not 
                     hinder recovery of ETP species. 
                     Score:      75 
                      
                     2.3.2 ‐ Management strategy 
                     The fishery has in place precautionary management strategies designed to: 
                      m
                     ‐  eet national and international requirements; 
                      e
                     ‐  nsure the fishery does not pose a risk of serious or irreversible harm to ETP species; 
                      e
                     ‐  nsure the fishery does not hinder recovery of ETP species; and 
                      m
                     ‐  inimise mortality of ETP species. 
                     Score:      60 
                      
                     2.3.3 ‐ Information / monitoring 
                     Relevant  information  is  collected  to  support  the  management  of  fishery  impacts  on  ETP 
                     species, including: 
                      i
                     ‐ nformation for the development of the management strategy;  
                      i
                     ‐ nformation to assess the effectiveness of the management strategy; and 
                      i
                     ‐ nformation to determine the outcome status of ETP species. 
                     Score:      70 
    Timelines        by  the  1st  Surveillance  audit  –  develop  and  implement  full  ETP  management  strategy  and 
                     recording protocols 
                     by  the  2nd  Surveillance  Audit  –  provide  analysis  of  generated  data  and  show  how  this  is 
                     integrated into revised management. 
    Summary of       Landings data for Danish vessels in the North Sea in both 2009 and 2010 reveal that Common 
    issues           skate  were  landed  even  after  the  imposition  of  a  ban  on  landings  by  EU  vessels  from  the 
                     European sector of the North Sea ICES Area IV (EC Reg 43/2009). It is noted that Danish vessels 
                     may still land Common skate taken in the Norwegian sector Area  IV. Furthermore, Spurdog, 
                     for which Denmark had a quota of 26.1 tonnes in 2009, no longer has a Total Allowable Catch 
                     (set at 0 tonnes). Under Council Regulation 23/2010 Denmark is permitted maximum bycatch 
                     landings  of  Spurdog  during  2010  equivalent  to  10%  of  the  2009  Danish  quota,  equivalent  to 
                     2.61  tonnes,  from  ICES  areas  IIa  and  IV.  Early  indications  indicate  that  there  is  a  risk  of  this 
                     bycatch  limit  being  exceeded,  in  part  due  to  a  lack  of  broad  awareness  of  restrictions.  The 
                     fishery is also known to interact with other ETP species including Shad and both Harbour and 
                     Grey seal. 
    Suggested         Demonstrate a clear commitment to eliminating landings of Common skate and Spurdog, and 
    Action           landings should be reduced to zero for Common skate and to no more than 2.61t of Spurdog.   
                     Develop  and  implement  a  full  strategy  in  relation  to  managing  all  ETP  species  potentially 
                     affected  by  the  fishery,  including  having  in  place  and  operational  an  appropriate  Code  of 
                     Conduct  for  responsible  fishing,  which  explicitly  refers  to  ETP  species  identified  during  the 
                     assessment, and which introduces robust and reliable means to monitor, manage and reduce 
                     or eliminate impacts on ETP species. 
                     Provide  data  and  analysis  to  comprehensively  clarify  the  impact  of  Danish  seining  on  ETP 
                     species.  This  could  be  achieved  through  the  operation  of  the  ETP  log  on  certified  vessels, 
                     cooperating  in  scientific  research  and  increased  observer  coverage.  Operationally  this  should 
                     be  linked  to  measures  that  are  designed  to  address  Condition  3  in  so  far  as  this  requires 
                     greater  levels  of  observer  monitoring  and  surveillance.  Liaise  with  scientists  to  ensure  data 
                     gathered  is  relevant,  robust  and  useful  to  include  (for  example)  date  and  area  of  capture, 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                           March 2011            63
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
                     numbers, length or weight as well as condition on release. Collate & analyse all data generated 
                     in  relation  to  ETP  on  an  annual  basis  for  all  certified  vessels  and  use  to  inform  strategy 
                     development and make available to relevant authorities. 
 
    Condition DS2   Habitats 
    Performance      Danish Seine  
    Indicators:      2.4.2 ‐ Management strategy 
                     There is a strategy in place that is designed to ensure the fishery does not pose a risk of serious 
                     or irreversible harm to habitat types. 
                     Score:       75 
    Timelines        By the 1st Surveillance audit integrate habitat considerations and data recording into the CoC. 
                     Within  5  years  of  certification  ‐  Demonstrate  data  generated  and  research  undertaken  is 
                     shaping the development of management strategy to mitigate adverse habitat impacts. With 
                     respect to the Dogger Bank SCI demonstrate that the fishery is consistent with and supports all 
                     conservation objectives and management requirements; where these have been agreed 
    Summary of       Fishing with demersal mobile gears is associated with damage to sensitive seabed habitats and 
    issues           non target benthic communities. The Danish seine fisheries are widely distributed over much 
                     of  the  eastern  central  and  central  North  Sea,  including  the  Dogger  Bank  SCI  in  particular. 
                     Within these areas, it is likely that there is variation in the sensitivity to the effects of mobile 
                     gears  that  make  physical  contact  with  seabed  of  different  seabed  habitats  where  Danish 
                     seining takes place. Danish seine fishing may conflict with some of the conservation interests 
                     for  the  Dogger  Bank  SCI  which  is  designated  under  Natura  2000  for  sandbanks  covered  by 
                     seawater all of the time. Datasets and maps that have been available to the assessment team 
                     do  not  indicate  the  accurate  location  of  any  sensitive  habitats  or  communities  in  the  areas 
                     fished,  particularly  on  the  Dogger  Bank,  but  the  resolution  of  seabed  habitat  maps  has  not 
                     been adequate or sufficient for the purpose of evaluating the fishery at SG80. 
    Suggested        Include  strategic  provisions  relating  to  protecting  vulnerable  seabed  habitats  in  the  Code  of 
    Action           Conduct. A log for recording encounters with vulnerable seabed habitats should be established 
                     and maintained as part of the Code of Conduct on all certified vessels, able to generate useful 
                     management  information  sufficient  to  demonstrate  clearly  where  the  fisheries  take  place  in 
                     relation to known sensitive habitats, especially within the Dogger Bank SCI.  
                     Use  resulting  information  in  enhance  management  strategy  of  the  impacts  of  the  fishery  to 
                     seabed  habitats  at  least  to  a  point  where  measures  combine  into  a  cohesive,  reactive  and 
                     documented  strategy  that  shows  an  understanding  of  how  the  management  measures  work 
                     together  to  achieve  the  objective  of  minimising  impacts  to  seabed  habitats.  Undertake  to 
                     explore technical measures and management options to reduce unacceptable impacts where 
                     identified.  
 
8.2.3  Principle 3 Conditions 
There are no conditions associated with Principle 3. 
 

8.3 Recommendations 
In addition to the above Conditions, it is also considered that there are areas of performance that 
the  team  would  like  to  see  improvements  in,  despite  the  fact  that  they  relate  to  Performance 
Indicators where the client vessels scored 80 or better.   
The assessment team has made a number of recommendations. These are not required to maintain 
certification  but  would  improve  the  performance  of  the  fishery  against  the  MSC  Principles  and 
Criteria.  Accordingly, the action taken and timescales are at the discretion of the client.  
 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                      March 2011          64
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Recommendations are made in respect of: 
1.1.2 – Reference Points 
The  value  of  the  target  fishing  mortality  rate  (F0.3)  was  determined  by  the  ICES  ad  hoc  Group  on 
Long  Term  Management  Advice  (AGLTA)  and  was  adopted  by  the  EU  in  its  multi‐annual  plan  for 
plaice and sole.  The STECF specifies that F0.3 is consistent with exploitation of the plaice stock “on 
achieving maximum sustainable yields”. 
However  there  appear  to  be  some  discrepancies  between  the  STECF  advice  and  the  ICES  Working 
Group advice on Fmsy, which is based on the yield per recruit analysis (Fmax=0.17 years ‐1) (Ages 2‐
6)).  
The client fishery should ask the relevant scientific bodies for clear guidance on the fishing mortality 
target  that  will  maintain  the  stock  at  BMSY”.    Guidance  on  this  issue  could  inform  ongoing 
management of the fishery and future surveillance audits to ensure MSC criteria continue to be met 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           65
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
9 Limit of Identification of Landings   
This assessment relates only to the fishery defined in Section 2.1 up to the point of landing in Danish 
registered ports or registered ports in the EU and Norway, by Danish registered vessels to processing 
plants,  auctions,  or  storage  facilities  that  have  been  approved  to  the  MSC  Chain  of  Custody 
Standard.  
Within this the only eligible vessels will be those which: 
»            have signed up to the DFPO expanded Code of Conduct; 
»            undertake  to  comply  with  the  associated  reporting  requirements  as  part  of  the  Code  of 
             Conduct; 
»            are fully compliant with the requirements of the code; 
»            are listed on the live online vessel register at:  
             http://www.msc‐fiskere.dk/default.asp?id=35450 10 
As  a  result  of  the  ongoing  MSC  Objection  Procedure  ONLY  plaice  caught  and  landed  by  eligible 
Danish vessels using DANISH SEINE OR SET NET GEAR is eligible currently to enter MSC Chain  of 
Custody. 

9.1 Traceability 
Although  landings  are  mostly  into  Danish  ports,  certified  vessels  may  also  land  into  other  EU 
countries.  All  landings  made  to  non‐Danish  ports  are  subject  to  the  same  scrutiny  and  reporting 
procedures and there is a well established mechanism to enable port‐of‐landing authorities to report 
the landing to the relevant Danish authorities in a timely fashion. 
Traceability up to the point of first landing has been scrutinised as part of this assessment and the 
positive results reflect that the systems in place are deemed adequate to ensure fish is caught in a 
legal manner and is accurately recorded. The report and assessment trees describe these systems in 
more detail, but briefly traceability can be verified by: 
»            no transhipment; 
»            a geographically restricted fishery enabling concentrated inspection effort; 
»            accurate  reporting  –  log  books  and  sales  notes  (regularly  inspected  and  cross‐checked), 
             including increasing compulsory use of electronic log books; 
»            verified  landings  data  (including  data  on  other  retained  species)  are  used  for  official 
             monitoring of quota up‐take and national statistics; 
»            a  high  level  and  sophisticated  system  of  at  sea  monitoring,  control  and  surveillance,  in  EU 
             waters,  including  routine  boarding  and  inspection,  spotter  planes,  reporting  to  checkpoints 
             when crossing international boundaries, VMS; 
»            close  cooperation  between  EU  regulatory  and  enforcement  authorities  and  no  immunity 
             from prosecution in other jurisdictions; 
»            reporting prior to landing with limited tolerance – in event of high level of cod bycatches;  
»            a  high  level  of  inspection  of  landings  prior  to  unloading.  Officially  calibrated  weighing 
             systems of landing. Routine inspection of entire factory process. 
                                                            
10
   The  DFPO  undertake  to  ensure  that  this  web  address  remains  unchanged.  In  event  of  this  web  address 
changing, contact should be made direct to the DFPO at the address at the front of this report. 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                            March 2011           66
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
The  above  is  considered  sufficient  to  ensure  fish  and  fish  products  invoiced  as  such  by  the  fishery 
originate from within the evaluated fishery and no specific risk factors have been identified.  

9.2. Processing at sea etc  
There is no at sea processing of Danish North Sea Plaice, with the exception of gutting. Fish is landed 
chilled in ice in boxes or held in ice in the vessel hold and landed in tubs. 
 

9.3 Point of Landing 
Plaice covered in this assessment may only be landed to Danish registered ports, or other registered 
ports in Norway, or EU countries of the UK or the Netherlands. Table 2.9 shows landings ports and 
percentage from the total landed. Plaice is landed almost exclusively in Danish ports. Within these 
restrictions, there is no requirement for the vessels to land at ports named in this report.  There are 
no specific risk factors after the point of landing which need to be highlighted or that may influence 
chain of custody assessments. 
 

9.4 Eligibility to Enter Chains of Custody 
Only  North  Sea  plaice  caught  by  Danish  registered  vessels  using  Set  Nets  or  Danish  Seine  in  the 
manner  defined  in  the  respective  Units  of  Certification  (section  2.1)  shall  be  eligible  to  enter  the 
chain  of  custody,  and  only  where  fish  is  landed  to  a  MSC  chain  of  custody  certified  business.  Any 
bycatch species caught by the vessels covered by this certificate are not eligible to enter the chain of 
custody. Chain of Custody should commence following the first point of landing at which point the 
product  shall  be  eligible  to  carry  the  MSC  logo.  There  are  no  restrictions  on  the  certified  product 
entering further chains of custody. DFPO does not require its own chain of custody certificate. 
As  a  result  of  the  ongoing  Objection  procedure  and  to  address  any  potential  risk  for  currently 
uncertified DFPO demersal trawl caught plaice to enter the MSC Chain of Custody alongside certified 
Danish seine and set net caught fish, it should be noted that the copy of the fisherman’s EU logbook 
supplied  with  the  landed  fish  will  identify  the  fishing  gear  used  thus  enabling  the  first  point  of 
landing,  whether  through  auctions  or  at  primary  processors  to  document  the  source  of  the  plaice 
entering MSC Chain of Custody.  
The actual Eligibility Date for this fishery will be the 1st September 2010.  This means that any fish 
caught by the certified fleet (as defined above) following that date will be eligible to enter the chain 
of custody as certified product. The rationale for this date is that it meets with the client’s wish, for 
commercial reasons, for target eligibility to be set on this date, which falls well within the guidelines 
and requirements of the MSC certification process as defined in TAB Directive 21(v2).  The measures 
taken  by  the  client  to  account  for  risks  within  the  traceability  of  the  fishery  –  and  therefore 
generating confidence in the use of this date for target eligibility – can be found in the Traceability 
subdivision of this section of the report (Section 9.1). 

 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                        March 2011            67
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
10. Client Agreement to the Conditions 
The agreed and signed client Action Plan to meet the Conditions of Certification outlined in Section 8 
serves as a client agreement to those conditions, as detailed below: 

10.1 Client Action Plan 
The  Danish  Fishermen’s  Producers’  Organisation  is  actively  committed  to  sustainable  and  rational 
exploitation of marine living resources, through continually improving our knowledge of the sea, the 
management of our fisheries and minimising the environmental impact of what we do – all the while 
delivering  seafood  of  the  highest  quality.  Accordingly,  and  arising  from  the  conditions  of 
certification,  the  DFPO  will  undertake  to  implement  the  following  action  plan  in  relation  to  the 
conditions of certification. 
 
»       Condition 1: Stock Status  
The fishing mortality in the North Sea plaice fishery is well below the agreed target reference point. 
It is to be expected that such a fishing mortality will lead to a rising spawning stock biomass over the 
coming  years.  How  high  it  will  reach  depends  upon  natural  processes  which  are  outside  the 
influence  of  the  DFPO.  We  do  however  have  a  degree  of  influence  upon  the  fishing  mortality 
through the NSRAC and other channels available to us, and we will use these to make sure that the 
positive development in the plaice stock is not jeopardized by over fishing.  
Action: If the fishing mortality is at risk of becoming too high. 
Documented: At the subsequent audit. 
At  the  time  of  certification,  there  is  some  scientific  uncertainty  regarding  the  exact  value  for  F 
associated with fishing at MSY. Recent simulations done by ICES and STECF suggest a range between 
0.2 and 0.23, while more extended simulations prior to the current management plan suggested that 
a range of 0.3 to 0.4 would bring “high long term yields”. 
This uncertainty around the appropriateness of the target value is unfortunate. In the context of a 
future  revision  of  the  management  plan  for  plaice  (and  sole),  the  DFPO  will  therefore  through  its 
channels of influence – notably the NSRAC – work with other stakeholders to ensure that a thorough 
management  strategy  evaluation  is  performed  in  order  to  arrive  at  a  target  reference  point 
consistent with the maximum sustainable yield. 
Note: This action also relates to Recommendation 1. 
Action: When the current management plan is reviewed. 
Documented: At the subsequent audit. 
 
»       Condition 2: Harvest Control Rules  
When the Commission sends the current management plan in review, the DFPO will work, through 
the NSRAC and other available channels, to ensure the harvest control rule is explicitly designed to 
reduce the exploitation rate as the limit reference point is approached, and that the trigger point for 
this  reduction  appropriately  takes  into  account  the  uncertainties  associated  with  the  stock 
assessment outcomes. 
Action: When the current management plan is reviewed. 
Documented: At the subsequent audit. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           68
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
»        Condition 3: Information & Monitoring  
The  level  of  discarding  in  Danish  plaice  fisheries  is  very  low  because  plaice  is  targeted  with  mesh 
sizes corresponding to the plaice minimum landing size. ICES estimates of plaice discards from the 
entire  North  Sea  fleet  are  however  very  high  and  uncertain,  primarily  because  the  gear  used  to 
target sole in the southern North Sea catches a high proportion of undersized plaice. The DFPO will 
work with our colleagues through the NSRAC and other channels to minimize the discards, as well as 
support a level of monitoring which makes it possible to estimate their impact upon the plaice stock 
with sufficient accuracy for the functioning of the harvest control rule. 
Action: When the current management plan is sent in review and/or when new technical rules are 
set forth – timing thus depending upon the Commission. 
Documented: At the subsequent audit. 
The  DFPO  already  cooperates  closely  with  DTU  Aqua  regarding  the  national  discard  sampling 
program  under  the  Data  Collection  Framework.  We  will  continue  to  do  so,  to  ensure  that  the 
sampling frequency is sufficient for robust estimates of discard in the plaice fisheries. 
In  the  event  that  the  national  program  is  not,  or  cannot  be  adjusted  to  be,  sufficient,  we  will 
undertake to ensure that the coverage is extended through an additional DFPO‐initiated program. 
Action:  National  program  coverage  verified  and  possible  additional  effort  initiated  within  the  first 
half year of certification. The first full year of data analysed within two years of certification. 
Documented: At second audit and onwards. 
 
Demersal Trawl Unit of Certification 
 
                                              PLEASE NOTE 
  Demersal  Trawl  is  subject  to  an  official  Objection  and  therefore  a  decision  to  recommend 
  certification is currently ON HOLD pending the outcome of the MSC Objection procedure.  
  DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice landed using Demersal trawl is not considered to be eligible 
  for  MSC  Chain  of  Custody  until  a  decision  can  be  made  following  completion  of  the  MSC 
    Objections procedure.  
 
    All  information  contained  in  this  report  referring  to  Demersal  Trawl  should  therefore  be 
 
    read in light of the above statement. 
 
    For  further  details  on  the  Objection  currently  under  consideration  please  refer  to  the 
  following  MSC  web  page:  http://www.msc.org/track‐a‐fishery/in‐assessment/north‐east‐
  atlantic/Denmark‐North‐Sea‐plaice 
 
»        Condition DT 1: Endangered, Threatened and Protected Species  
Since the MSC assessment process brought to light the issue of skate and spurdog in EU‐waters, the 
DFPO has been using all its means of communication to ensure that Danish fishermen are aware of 
the requirement to immediately release these species. We will continue to do so until there are no 
longer any landings. 
Action: Ongoing, as long as required. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                        March 2011            69
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Documented: At first audit (and subsequent if necessary). 
Regarding  ETP  species  in  general  the  DFPO  has  already  created  an  operational  expansion  of  its 
current  Code  of  Conduct.  Any  member  wishing  to  use  the  DFPO  MSC  certificate  must  sign  and 
comply  with  this  expanded  Code.  The  Code  includes  a  requirement  to  record  all  interactions  with 
ETP‐species  and  send  them  to  the  DFPO.  To  this  end  each  vessel  will  be  equipped  with  a  wheel‐
house guide clearly identifying each relevant species and how to handle and record them. The guide 
and recording requirements is designed in cooperation with relevant scientific institutions. 
Compliance  with  the  recording  requirements  will  be  enforced  by  the  PO  and  non‐compliant 
members will be taken of the list of MSC‐vessels. 
Action: Signing and recording is mandatory from the first day of entering the MSC‐vessel list for each 
member. The list has been open from September 2010 and onwards, along with recording template 
and a preliminary guide. The full wheel‐house guide with species identification will be published and 
distributed within the first months of certification. 
Documented: At first audit. 
After each year of recording, data will be analysed in cooperation with the scientific institutions. On 
the  basis  of  this  analysis,  existing  scientific  information  and  results  from  e.g.  observer  and  CCTV 
monitoring projects, the DFPO will identify additional targeted measures to be included in the Code 
of Conduct as a coherent plan to minimize the level of interactions and mortality of ETP species. The 
plan  will  focus  on  those  combinations  of  fisheries,  gears,  species,  seasons  and  areas  where  the 
available  knowledge  indicates  specific  problems  or  the  highest  potential  for  minimizing  the  ETP 
interaction/mortality. Measures in the plan may be technical developments, gear restrictions, closed 
areas/seasons,  handling  requirements,  targeted  research  etc.  The  plan  will  be  evaluated  and 
adjusted accordingly after each full year of monitoring. 
Action: Analysis, immediately after the first full year of records – and subsequently every year. ETP 
plan  developed  and  implemented  after  analysis  –  duration  depending  on  the  complexity  of  the 
issues, but at the very least before the next audit. 
Documented: At second audit and onwards. 
 
»       Condition DT 2: Habitats  
Detailed  integrated  habitat  maps  for  the  North  Sea  are  currently  being  created  through  the 
EUSeaMap  project  which  includes  the  Danish  Agency  for  Spatial  and  Environmental  Planning.  The 
DFPO  will  cooperate  with  this  agency  and  DTU  Aqua  to  provide  overlays  of  fishing  activities  and 
habitat maps to identify potential impacts on vulnerable areas. 
Action: Overlays produced within the first year of certification. 
Documented: At first audit 
Indicator catches of vulnerable habitats will be identified in cooperation with  scientific institutions 
and included in the recording requirements under the expanded Code of Conduct. 
The DFPO has already created an operational expansion of its current Code of Conduct. Any member 
wishing to use the DFPO MSC certificate must sign and comply with this expanded Code. The Code 
includes a requirement to record all indicator catches of vulnerable habitats (corals etc.) and send 
these records to the DFPO.  
Action: Ongoing. Reporting requirements included from the first day of using the certificate. 
Documented: At first audit. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           70
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
On  the  basis  of  the  monitoring  as  well  potential  impacts  identified  through  the  overlays,  and  in 
cooperation with the institutions and authorities, the DFPO will adopt a habitat strategy aiming to 
reduce the impacts on vulnerable habitats. The strategy will make use of measures such as closed 
areas  or  other  avoidance  measures,  gear  restrictions,  technical  developments  and/or  targeted 
research. The strategy will be evaluated and adjusted accordingly after each full year of monitoring. 
As the EIAs and corresponding management measures for marine Natura 2000 SACs are developed 
by  the  national  authorities,  these  results  and  measures  will  also  be  incorporated  into  the  DFPO 
habitat  strategy.  The  DFPO  (and/or  DFA)  already  contributes  very  actively  to  the  Natura  2000  SAC 
and other marine spatial planning initiatives in the North Sea, directly in site‐specific consultations 
and  MPA  projects,  as  well  as  indirectly  through  the  North  Sea  RAC,  and  will  continue  to  play  a 
constructive role in this development. 
Action:  Analysis  of  monitoring  after  each  full  year.  The  timing  of  the  development  and 
implementation  of  further  measures  will  depend  greatly  on  complexity  of  the  issues  and  whether 
further research or gear development is necessary. Natura 2000 SAC related measures will depend 
upon  the  timing  of  the  public  processes.  It  is  intended  that  the  monitoring  and  measures  should 
form a cohesive and reactive strategy at least by the fourth audit. 
Documented: At second audit and onwards. 
 
Set net Unit of Certification  
»       Condition SN 1: Discard Species 
The DFPO has already created an operational expansion of its current Code of Conduct. Any member 
wishing to use the DFPO MSC certificate must sign and comply with this expanded Code. The Code 
includes a requirement to record all interactions with sea‐birds, and send them to the DFPO. To this 
end  each  vessel  will  be  equipped  with  a  wheel‐house  guide  clearly  identifying  the  relevant  bird 
species and how to handle and record them. The guide and recording requirements is designed in 
cooperation with relevant scientific institutions. 
Compliance  with  the  recording  requirements  will  be  enforced  by  the  PO  and  non‐compliant 
members will be taken of the list of MSC‐vessels. 
Action: Signing and recording is mandatory from the first day of entering the MSC‐vessel list for each 
member. The list has been open from September 2010 and onwards, along with recording template 
and a preliminary guide. The full wheel‐house guide with species identification will be published and 
distributed within the first months of certification. 
Documented: At first audit. 
After each year of recording, data will be analysed in cooperation with the scientific institutions. On 
the basis of this analysis, existing scientific information and other monitoring projects the DFPO will 
identify additional targeted measures to be included in the Code of Conduct as a coherent plan to 
minimize  the  level  of  interactions  with  sea‐birds.  The  plan  will  focus  on  those  combinations  of 
fisheries,  gears,  species,  seasons  and  areas  where  the  available  knowledge  indicates  specific 
problems  or  the  highest  potential  for  minimizing  sea‐bird  interaction/mortality.  Measures  in  the 
plan  may  be  technical  developments,  gear  restrictions,  closed  areas/seasons,  gear  handling 
requirements, targeted research etc. The plan will be evaluated and adjusted accordingly after each 
full year of monitoring. 
Action: Analysis, immediately after the first full year of records – and subsequently every year. Plan 
developed and implemented after analysis – duration depending on the complexity of the issues, but 
at the very least before the next audit. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                     March 2011           71
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Documented: At second audit and onwards. 
 
»       Condition SN 2: Endangered, Threatened and Protected Species 
The DFPO has already created an operational expansion of its current Code of Conduct. Any member 
wishing to use the DFPO MSC certificate must sign and comply with this expanded Code. The Code 
includes a requirement to record all interactions with  ETP‐species, including  harbour porpoise and 
sea‐birds, and send them to the DFPO. To this end each vessel will be equipped with a wheel‐house 
guide clearly identifying each relevant species and how to handle and record them. The guide and 
recording requirements is designed in cooperation with relevant scientific institutions. 
Compliance  with  the  recording  requirements  will  be  enforced  by  the  PO  and  non‐compliant 
members will be taken of the list of MSC‐vessels. 
Action: Signing and recording is mandatory from the first day of entering the MSC‐vessel list for each 
member. The list has been open from September 2010 and onwards, along with recording template 
and a preliminary guide. The full wheel‐house guide with species identification will be published and 
distributed within the first months of certification. 
Documented: At first audit. 
After each year of recording, data will be analysed in cooperation with the scientific institutions. On 
the basis of this analysis, existing scientific information and other monitoring projects (such as the 
current  CCTV  coverage  of  incidental  harbour  porpoise  by‐catch  in  set  net  fisheries)  the  DFPO  will 
identify additional targeted measures to be included in the Code of Conduct as a coherent plan to 
minimize  the  level  of  interactions  and  mortality  of  ETP  species.  The  plan  will  focus  on  those 
combinations of fisheries, gears, species, seasons and areas where the available knowledge indicates 
specific problems or the highest potential for minimizing the ETP interaction/mortality. Measures in 
the  plan  may  be  technical  developments,  gear  restrictions,  closed  areas/seasons,  handling 
requirements, targeted research etc. The plan will be evaluated and adjusted accordingly after each 
full year of monitoring. 
Action: Analysis, immediately after the first full year of records – and subsequently every year. ETP 
plan  developed  and  implemented  after  analysis  –  duration  depending  on  the  complexity  of  the 
issues, but at the very least before the next audit. 
Documented: At second audit and onwards. 
 
Danish Seine Unit of Certification 
»       Condition DS 1: Endangered, Threatened and Protected Species 
Since the MSC assessment process brought to light the issue of skate and spurdog in EU‐waters, the 
DFPO has been using all its means of communication to ensure that Danish fishermen are aware of 
the requirement to immediately release these species. We will continue to do so until there are no 
longer any landings. 
Action: Ongoing, as long as required. 
Documented: At first audit (and subsequent if necessary). 
Regarding  ETP  species  in  general  the  DFPO  has  already  created  an  operational  expansion  of  its 
current  Code  of  Conduct.  Any  member  wishing  to  use  the  DFPO  MSC  certificate  must  sign  and 
comply  with  this  expanded  Code.  The  Code  includes  a  requirement  to  record  all  interactions  with 
ETP‐species  and  send  them  to  the  DFPO.  To  this  end  each  vessel  will  be  equipped  with  a  wheel‐


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                     March 2011           72
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
house guide clearly identifying each relevant species and how to handle and record them. The guide 
and recording requirements is designed in cooperation with relevant scientific institutions. 
Compliance  with  the  recording  requirements  will  be  enforced  by  the  PO  and  non‐compliant 
members will be taken of the list of MSC‐vessels. 
Action: Signing and recording is mandatory from the first day of entering the MSC‐vessel list for each 
member. The list has been open from September 2010 and onwards, along with recording template 
and a preliminary guide. The full wheel‐house guide with species identification will be published and 
distributed within the first months of certification. 
Documented: At first audit. 
After each year of recording, data will be analysed in cooperation with the scientific institutions. On 
the  basis  of  this  analysis,  existing  scientific  information  and  results  from  e.g.  observer  and  CCTV 
monitoring projects, the DFPO will identify additional targeted measures to be included in the Code 
of Conduct as a coherent plan to minimize the level of interactions and mortality of ETP species. The 
plan  will  focus  on  those  combinations  of  fisheries,  gears,  species,  seasons  and  areas  where  the 
available  knowledge  indicates  specific  problems  or  the  highest  potential  for  minimizing  the  ETP 
interaction/mortality. Measures in the plan may be technical developments, gear restrictions, closed 
areas/seasons,  handling  requirements,  targeted  research  etc.  The  plan  will  be  evaluated  and 
adjusted accordingly after each full year of monitoring. 
Action: Analysis, immediately after the first full year of records – and subsequently every year. ETP 
plan  developed  and  implemented  after  analysis  –  duration  depending  on  the  complexity  of  the 
issues, but at the very least before the next audit. 
Documented: At second audit and onwards. 
 
»       Condition DS 2: Habitats  
Detailed  integrated  habitat  maps  for  the  North  Sea  are  currently  being  created  through  the 
EUSeaMap  project  which  includes  the  Danish  Agency  for  Spatial  and  Environmental  Planning.  The 
DFPO  will  cooperate  with  this  agency  and  DTU  Aqua  to  provide  overlays  of  fishing  activities  and 
habitat maps to identify potential impacts on vulnerable areas. 
Action: Overlays produced within the first year of certification. 
Documented: At first audit 
Indicator catches of vulnerable habitats will be identified in cooperation with  scientific institutions 
and included in the recording requirements under the expanded Code of Conduct. 
The DFPO has already created an operational expansion of its current Code of Conduct. Any member 
wishing to use the DFPO MSC certificate must sign and comply with this expanded Code. The Code 
includes a requirement to record all indicator catches of vulnerable habitats (corals etc.) and send 
these records to the DFPO.  
Action: Ongoing. Reporting requirements included from the first day of using the certificate. 
Documented: At first audit. 
On  the  basis  of  the  monitoring  as  well  potential  impacts  identified  through  the  overlays,  and  in 
cooperation with the institutions and authorities, the DFPO will adopt a habitat strategy aiming to 
reduce the impacts on vulnerable habitats. The strategy will make use of measures such as closed 
areas  or  other  avoidance  measures,  gear  restrictions,  technical  developments  and/or  targeted 
research. The strategy will be evaluated and adjusted accordingly after each full year of monitoring. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011           73
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Specifically for the Dogger Bank, the national authorities (UK, NL and D) are required to conduct EIAs 
of  their  designated  Natura  2000  SACs  (covering  more  or  less  the  whole  bank).  Once  available,  the 
DFPO  will  use  overlays  with  the  expected  high  resolution  habitat  maps  from  the  EIAs  to  further 
refine the analysis of the potential impacts as well as possible mitigation or avoidance measures on 
the Dogger Bank to be included in the habitat strategy. 
The DFPO (and/or DFA) already contributes actively to the Natura 2000 SAC and other marine spatial 
planning initiatives on the Dogger Bank, directly in site‐specific consultations and MPA projects, as 
well  as  indirectly  through  the  North  Sea  RAC,  and  will  continue  to  play  a  constructive  role  in  this 
development. 
Action:  Analysis  of  monitoring  after  each  full  year.  The  timing  of  the  development  and 
implementation  of  further  measures  will  depend  greatly  on  complexity  of  the  issues  and  whether 
further research or gear development is necessary. The timing of Dogger Bank measures will depend 
upon  the  availability  of  the  EIAs.    It  is  intended  that  the  monitoring  and  measures  should  form  a 
cohesive and reactive strategy at least by the fourth audit. 
Documented: At second audit and onwards. 

 
 
 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011            74
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Appendix 1 – MSC Ps & Cs 




 
Below  is  a  much‐simplified  summary  of  the  MSC  Principles  and  Criteria,  to  be  used  for  over‐view 
purposes  only.  For  a  fuller  description,  including  scoring  guideposts  under  each  Performance 
Indicator,  reference  should  be  made  to  the  full  assessment  tree,  complete  with  scores  and 

MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                    March 2011           75
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
justification,  contained  in  Appendix  3  of  this  report.  Alternately  a  fuller  description  of  the  MSC 
Principles and Criteria can be obtained from the MSC website (www.msc.org).  

Principle 1 
    A fishery must be conducted in a manner that does not lead to over‐fishing or depletion of the 
    exploited  populations  and,  for  those  populations  that  are  depleted,  the  fishery  must  be 
    conducted in a manner that demonstrably leads to their recovery. 
Intent:  
The intent of this Principle is to ensure that the productive capacities of resources are maintained at 
high  levels  and  are  not  sacrificed  in  favour  of  short‐term  interests.    Thus,  exploited  populations 
would  be  maintained  at  high  levels  of  abundance  designed  to  retain  their  productivity,  provide 
margins of safety for error and uncertainty, and restore and retain their capacities for yields over the 
long term.  
Status 
»      The stock is at a level that maintains high productivity and has a low probability of recruitment 
       overfishing.  
»      Limit and target reference points are appropriate for the stock (or some measure or surrogate 
       with similar intent or outcome).  
»      Where the stock is depleted, there is evidence of stock rebuilding and rebuilding strategies are 
       in place with reasonable expectation that they will succeed. 
Harvest strategy / management 
»      There is a robust and precautionary harvest strategy in place, which is responsive to the state 
       of the stock and is designed to achieve stock management objectives.   
»      There are well defined and effective harvest control rules in place that endeavour to maintain 
       stocks at target levels.   
»      Sufficient relevant information related to stock structure, stock productivity, fleet composition 
       and other data is available to support the harvest strategy. 
»      The stock assessment is appropriate for the stock and for the harvest control rule, takes into 
       account uncertainty, and is evaluating stock status relative to reference points.   

Principle 2   
    Fishing  operations  should  allow  for  the  maintenance  of  the  structure,  productivity,  function 
    and  diversity  of  the  ecosystem  (including  habitat  and  associated  dependent  and  ecologically 
    related species) on which the fishery depends 
Intent:  
The  intent  of  this  Principle  is  to  encourage  the  management  of  fisheries  from  an  ecosystem 
perspective  under  a  system  designed  to  assess  and  restrain  the  impacts  of  the  fishery  on  the 
ecosystem. 
Retained species / Bycatch / ETP species 
»      Main species are highly likely to be within biologically based limits or if outside the limits there 
       is a full strategy of demonstrably effective management measures.   



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                      March 2011           76
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
»     There is a strategy in place for managing these species that is designed to ensure the fishery 
      does not pose a risk of serious or irreversible harm to retained species.  
»     Information is sufficient to quantitatively estimate outcome status and support a full strategy 
      to manage main retained / bycatch and ETP species.  
Habitat & Ecosystem 
»     The fishery does not cause serious or irreversible harm to habitat or ecosystem structure and 
      function, considered on a regional or bioregional basis.  
»     There is a strategy and measures in place that is designed to ensure the fishery does not pose 
      a risk of serious or irreversible harm to habitat types.   
»     The nature, distribution and vulnerability of all main habitat types and ecosystem functions in 
      the fishery area are known at a level of detail relevant to the scale and intensity of the fishery 
      and there is reliable information on the spatial extent, timing and location of use of the fishing 
      gear. 

Principle 3   
    The  fishery  is  subject  to  an  effective  management  system  that  respects  local,  national  and 
    international  laws  and  standards  and  incorporates  institutional  and  operational  frameworks 
    that require use of the resource to be responsible and sustainable. 
Intent:  
The intent of this principle is to ensure that there is an institutional and operational framework for 
implementing Principles 1 and 2, appropriate to the size and scale of the fishery. 
Governance and policy 
»     The  management  system  exists  within  an  appropriate  and  effective  legal  and/or  customary 
      framework  that  is  capable  of  delivering  sustainable  fisheries  and  observes  the  legal  & 
      customary rights of people and incorporates an appropriate dispute resolution framework. 
»     Functions,  roles  and  responsibilities  of  organisations  and  individuals  involved  in  the 
      management  process  are  explicitly  defined  and  well  understood.  The  management  system 
      includes consultation processes. 
»     The  management  policy  has  clear  long‐term  objectives,  incorporates  the  precautionary 
      approach and does not operate with subsidies that contribute to unsustainable fishing. 
Fishery specific management system 
»     Short and long term objectives are explicit within the fishery’s management system. 
»     Decision‐making  processes  respond  to  relevant  research,  monitoring,  evaluation  and 
      consultation, in a transparent, timely and adaptive manner.  
»     A monitoring, control and surveillance system has been implemented. Sanctions to deal with 
      non‐compliance exist and there is no evidence of systematic non‐ compliance. 
»     A  research  plan  provides  the  management  system  with  reliable  and  timely  information  and 
      results are disseminated to all interested parties in a timely fashion. 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                  March 2011          77
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Appendix 2a – Report text References 
»       EC (2002) Council Regulation No 2371/2002 of 20 December 2002 on the conservation and 
        sustainable  exploitation  of  fisheries  resources  under  the  Common  Fisheries  Policy.  Official 
        Journal L 358 , 31/12/2002 P. 0059 – 0080 
»       EC  (2004)  Council  Regulation  No.  812/2004  of  24/04/2004.  Laying  down  measures 
        concerning  incidental  catches  of  cetaceans  in  fisheries  and  amending  Regulation  (EC)  No 
        88/98. 
»       EC (2006) Council Regulation No 1198/2006 of 27 July 2006 on the European Fisheries Fund 
        Official Journal L 223/1, 15/08/2006 
»       EC  (2007)  Council  regulation  No  676/2007  of  11  June  2007  establishing  a  multiannual  plan 
        for fisheries exploiting stocks of plaice and sole in the North Sea 
»       EC (2009). Green Paper on the reform of the Common Fisheries Policy. Brussels, 22/4/2009 
        COM(2009)163 final. 
»       CEC  (2009)  Annual  Report  From  The  Commission  To  The  European  Parliament  And  The 
        Council On Member States’ Efforts During 2007 To Achieve A Sustainable Balance Between 
        Fishing Capacity And Fishing Opportunities. Brussels, 12.1.2009. COM (2008) 902 final. 
»       Galbraith  R.  D.,  &  Rice  A.  after  Strange  E.  S.(2004).  An  Introduction  to  Commercial  Fishing 
        Gear  and  Methods  Used  in  Scotland.  FRS  Marine  Laboratory,  Aberdeen.  Scottish  Fisheries 
        Information Pamphlet No. 25 2004ISSN: 0309 9105 
»       Grift, R. E., Tulp, I., Clarke, L., Damm, U., McLay, A., Reeves, S., Vigneau, J., and Weber, W. 
        (2004)  Assessment  of  the  ecological  effects  of  the  Plaice  Box.  Report  of  the  European 
        Commission Expert Working Group to evaluate the Shetland and Plaice boxes. Brussels. 121 
        pp. 
»       Hoarau,  G.,  Rijnsdorp,  A.D.,  Van  der  Veer,  H.W.,  Stam,  W.T.  &  Olsen,  J.L.  2002  Population 
        structure  of  plaice  (Pleuronectes  platessa  L.)  in  Northern  Europe:  microsatellites  revealed 
        large scale spatial and temporal homogeneity. Mol. Ecol. 11, 1165‐1176. 
»       ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
»       Kaiser,  M.  J.,  Ramsay,  K.,  Richardson,  C.  A.,  Spence,  F.  E.,  and  Brand,  A.  R.  (2000)  Chronic 
        fishing  disturbance  has  changed  shelf  sea  benthic  community  structure.  Journal  of  Animal 
        Ecology, 69: 494–503. 
»       Lindebo, E. (2005) Multi‐national Industry Capacity in the North Sea Flatfish Fishery Marine 
        Resource Economics, 20: 385–406.  
»       Machiels, M.A.M., Kraak, S.B.M. and Poos, J.J. (2008) Biological evaluation of the first stage 
        of the management plan for fisheries exploiting the stocks of plaice and sole in the North Sea 
        according to Council Regulation (EC) No. 676/2007. Report C031/08. Wageningen IMARES. 
»       Miller,  D.  C.  M.  and  Shelton,  P.  A.  (2007)  A  nonparametric  bootstrap  of  the  2006  XSA 
        assessment  for  Greenland  Halibut  (Reinhardtius  hippoglossoides)  in  NAFO  Subarea  2  + 
        Divisions 3KLMNO using Fisheries Libraries in R (FLR). NAFO SCR Doc. 07/59 Serial No. N5411 
»       Pascoe,  S.,  Andersen,  L.  and  de  Wilde,  J‐W  (2001)  Technical  efficiency,  Dutch  beam  trawl 
        fleet,  Common  Fisheries  Policy,  stochastic  production  frontier.  European  Review  of 
        Agriculture Economics 28(2): 187‐206 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011            78
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
»       Rijnsdorp, A. D., Daan, N., and Dekker, W. (2006) Partial fishing mortality per fishing trip: a 
        useful indicator of effective fishing effort in mixed demersal fisheries. ICES Journal of Marine 
        Science, 63:556–566. 
»       SGBYC  (2008).  Report  of  the  study  group  for  bycatch  of  protected  species  (SGBYC).  29–31 
        JANUARY 2008. ICES CM 2008/ACOM:48 
»       WGECO  (2008).  Report  of  the  Working  Group  on  Ecosystem  Effects  of  Fishing  Activities 
        (WGECO). May 6–13 2008 Copenhagen, Denmark 
»       WGNSSK (2009). Report of the Working Group on the Assessment of Demersal Stocks in the 
        North  Sea  and  Skagerrak  ‐  Combined  Spring  and  Autumn,  6  ‐  12  May  2009,  ICES 
        Headquarters, Copenhagen.. 1028 pp. 
»       WGRED  (2008).  Report  of  the  Working  Group  for  Regional  Ecosystem  Description,  25–29 
        February 2008, ICES, Copenhagen, Denmark. ICES CM 2008/ACOM:47. 203 pp. 
»       WGSAM  (2008).  Report  of  the  Working  Group  on  Multi‐species  Assessment  Methods 
        (WGSAM). 6–10 October 2008. ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen. ICES CM 2008/RMC:06 
»       WKFMMPA (2008). Report of the Workshop on Fisheries Management in Marine Protected 
        Areas 2‐4 June 2008. ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen, Denmark. 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                  March 2011           79
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
Appendix 2b – Assessment Tree Principle 2 References 
(1)      ICES Advice 2009, Book 6,  Section 6.4.3 pp 9‐31. ICES Copenhagen. 
(2)      ICES WGNEW Report for 2006. ICES Advisory Committee on Fishery Management, CM 
         2006/ACFM:11 
(3)      ICES Advice 2009, Book 6,  Section 6.4.14 pp 120‐156 
(4)      Council Regulation (EC) 1342/2008, European Commission 
(5)      EU, 2007. European Parliament resolution of 31 January 2008 on a policy to reduce 
         unwanted by‐catches and eliminate discards in European fisheries (2007/2112(INI))C 68 E/26 
         Official Journal of the European Union. 
(6)      Bergstad, O.A. 1990. Ecology of the fishes of the Norwegian deep: distribution and species 
         assemblages. Netherland Journal of Sea Research 25: 237‐266. 
(7)      Ellis, J.R., Dulvy, N.K., Jennings, S., Parker‐Humphreys, M. and Rogers, S.I. 2005. Assessing the 
         status of demersal elasmobranchs in UK waters: A review. Journal of the Marine Biological 
         Association of the United Kingdom 85: 1025‐1047. 
(8)      Sparholt H. And Vinther M. 1991. The biomass of starry ray, Raja radiata, in the North Sea. 
         Journal du Conseil International pour l’Exploration de la Mer 41: 11‐120. 
(9)       ICES Advice 2009, Book 2 Section 2.4.7 pp 47‐53. ICES Copenhagen              
(10a)   Moody  Marine,  2009.  Public  Certification  report,  Ekofish  North  Sea  twin  rigged  otter  trawl 
        Plaice fishery.  
(10b)   Moody Marine, 2008. Public Certification report, German Saithe fishery 
(10c)   MacAllister Eliott, Public Certification report, Euronor Saithe trawl fishery. 
(11)     International Union for the Conservation of Nature Redlist, 2010 www.iucnredlist.org 
(12)     Council Regulation no 23/2010, European Commission 
(13)     CITES Appendix II www.cites.org 
(14)     Council Directive 92/43/EEC – on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna 
         and flora  
(15)     Iglesias, S., Telhout, L. & Sellos, D., 2009. Taxonomic confusion and market mislabelling of 
         threatened skates: important consequences for their conservation status. AQUATIC 
         CONSERVATION: MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS, Wiley Interscience. 
(16)    http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Document.aspx?Document=MB5201_8326_INF.pdf 
(17)     Parker‐Humphreys, M., Velterop, R. and Bush, R. 2006. Report of fisheries Science 
         Partnership. Final Report 11: North Sea Lemon Sole and Plaice, CEFAS 
         http://www.cefas.co.uk/media/40271/fsp200607prog11nsealemonsolefinal.pdf 
(18)     ICES Advice 2007 Book 6. Report of the ICES Advisory Committee on Fishery Management, 
         Advisory Committee on the Marine Environment and Advisory Committee on Ecosystems, 
         2007. ICES Advice Book 6, 249 pp. 
(19)     Humborstad, O.‐B., Nøttestad, L., Løkkeborg, S., and Rapp, H. T. 2004. RoxAnn bottom 
         classification system, sidescan sonar and video‐sledge: spatial resolution and their use in 
         assessing trawling impacts. ICES Journal of Marine Science 61, 53‐63. 



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                    March 2011           80
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
(20)     Jennings,  S.,  Dinmore,  T.A.,  Duplisea,  D.E.,  Warr,  K.J.,  Lancaster,  J.E.,  2001.  Trawling 
         disturbance can modify benthic production processes. J. Animal Ecol. 70, 459‐475. 
(21)      Trimmer, M., Petersen, J., Sivyer, D.B., Mills, C., Young, E., Parker, E.R., 2005. Impact of long‐
         term  benthic  trawl  disturbance  on  sediment  sorting  and  biogeochemistry  in  the  southern 
         North Sea. Marine Ecology Progress Series 298, 79‐94. 
(22)    Hiddink, J. G., Jennings, S., Kaiser, M. J., Queirós, A. M., Duplisea, D. E., and Piet, G. J. 2006a. 
        Cumulative impacts of seabed trawl disturbance on benthic biomass, production and species 
        richness  in  different  habitats.  Canadian  Journal  of  Fisheries  and  Aquatic  Sciences,  63:  721‐
        736. 
(23)     Bergmann,  M.J.N.,  van  Santbrink,  J.W.,  2000.  Mortality  in  megafaunal  benthic  populations 
         caused by trawl fisheries on the Dutch continental shelf in the North Sea in 1994. ICES J. Mar. 
         Sci. 57 (5) (5), 1321‐1331. 
(24)     A. Dinmore, D. E. Duplisea, B. D. Rackham, D. L. Maxwell, and S. Jennings 2004. Impact of a 
         large‐scale area closure on patterns of fishing disturbance and the consequences for benthic 
         communitiesT. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 60: 371–380. 2003 
(25)     Kaiser, M.J & B.E. Spencer 1994. Fish scavenging behaviour in recently trawled areas. Marine 
         Ecology Progress Series 112: 41‐49. 
(26)     Kenchington,  E.L.R.,  K.D.  Gilkinson,  K.G.  MacIsaac,  C.  Bourbonnais‐Boyce,  T.J.  Kenchington, 
         S.J.  Smith  &  D.C.  Gordon  Jr.  2006.  Effects  of  experimental  otter  trawling  on  benthic 
         assemblages on Western Bank, northwest Atlantic Ocean. Jopurnal Of Sea Research 56: 249‐
         270. 
(27)     Callaway, R., Engelhard, G.H., Daan, J., Cotter, J., Rumohr, H., 2007. A century of North Sea 
         epibenthos  and  trawling:  comparison  between  1902‐1912,  1982‐1985  and  2000  Marine 
         Ecology Progress Series 346, 27‐43. 
(28)     Kaiser,  M.  J.,  Edwards,  D.  B.,  Armstrong,  P.  J.,  Radford,  K.,  Lough,  N.  E.  L.,  Flatt,  R.  P.,  and 
         Jones,  H.  D.  1998  Changes  in  megafaunal  benthic  communities  in  different  habitats  after 
         trawling disturbance. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 55: 353–361. 
(29)     OSPAR – see www.ospar.org 
(30)     COUNCIL REGULATION (EU) No 23/2010 fixing for 2010 the fishing opportunities for certain 
         fish stocks and groups of fish stocks, applicable in EU waters and, for EU vessels, in waters 
         where catch limitations are required 
(31)     COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 2371/2002 on the conservation and sustainable exploitation 
         of fisheries resources under the Common Fisheries Policy 
(32)     Greenstreet,  S.P.R.,  A.D.  Bryant,  N.  Broekhuizen,  S.J.  Hall  &  M.R.  Heath.  1997.  Seasonal 
         variation in the consumption of food by fish in the North Sea and implications for food web 
         dynamics. ICES Journal of Marine Science 54: 243‐266. 
(33)     Mackinson,  S.  2001.  Representing  trophic  interactions  in  the  North  Sea  in  the  1880s,  using 
         the Ecopath mass‐balance approach. Fisheries Centre Research Report 9:44: 35‐98.  
(34)     Mackinson, S. & G. Daskalov. 2007. An ecosystem model of the North Sea for use in fisheries 
         management and ecological research: description and parameterisation. 195 pp. 
(35)     ICES Advice 2009, Book 6. 12.10 
(36)     Garcia,  S.M.  &  K.L.  Cochrane.  2005.  Ecosystem  approach  to  fisheries:  a  review  of 
         implementation guidelines. ICES Journal of Marine Science 62: 311‐318. 


MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                              March 2011              81
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
(37)     Plagányi,  É.E.  2007.  Models  for  an  ecosystem  approach  to  fisheries.  Food  and  Agriculture 
         Organization of the United Nations, FAO Fisheries Technical Paper, 126 pp. 
(38)     Council  Directive  92/43/EEC  on  the  conservation  of  natural  habitats  and  of  wild  fauna  and 
         flora. European Commission 
(39)     Council Directive 2000/60/EC (Water Framework Directive). European Commission 
(40)     Council Directive 2008/56/EC (Marine Strategy Framework Directive). European Commission 
(41)     Council  Regulation  (EU)  No  23/2010  fixing  fishing  opportunities  for  community  vessels  and 
         community waters for 2010. 
(42)     ICES Working Group on Marine Habitat Mapping (WGMHM) Report for 2008. 
(43)     High  density  areas  for  harbour  porpoises  in  Danish  waters.  National  Institute  for 
         Environmental Research. Technical report no 657, 2008. 
(44)     Vinther,  M.  (1999).  Bycatches  of  harbour  porpoises  (Phocoena  phocoena)  in  Danish  set‐net 
         fisheries.  Journal of Cetacean Research and Management. 1: 123 – 135. 
(45)     Vinther, M. & Larsen, F. (2002). Updated estimates of harbour porpoise bycatch in the Danish 
         North  Sea  bottom  set  gillnet  fishery.  Paper  SC/54/SM31  presented  to  the  Scientific 
         Committee of the International Whaling Commission, Shimonoseki. May 2002. (unpublished). 
         16 pp. 
(46)     Kindt‐Larsen,  L.    &  Dalskov,  J.  2010.    Pilot  study  of  marine  mammal  bycatch  by  use  of  an 
         Electronic Monitoring System. Report by DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, 
         Mfisheries, Agriculture and Food. 
(47)     Hammond, P. S. & Mcleod, K. (2006). Progress report on the SCANS‐II project. Paper 
         prepared for the 13th Advisory Committee to ASCOBANS, Tampere, Finland, 25 – 27 April. 
         6pp. 
(48)     Handlingsplan for beskyttelse af marsvin 2005. Miljøministeriet, Skov‐ og Naturstyrelsen (J.nr. 
         SN 2001‐402‐0006) og Ministeriet for Fødevarer, Landbrug og Fiskeri (J.nr. 97‐1185‐4), 2005 
(49)     Council  Regulation  (EC)  No  2371/2002  of  20  December  2002  on  the  conservation  and 
         sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources under the Common Fisheries Policy. European 
         Union 
(50)     COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 812/2004 laying down measures concerning incidental 
         catches of cetaceans in fisheries and amending Regulation (EC) No 88/98. European Union 
(51)     Council  Regulation  (EC)  No.  2187/2005  for  the  conservation  of  fishery  resources  through 
         technical measures in the Baltic Sea, the Belts and the Sound. European Union 
(53)     Commission Regulation (EC) No 356/2005 of 1 March 2005 laying down detailed rules for the 
         marking and identification of passive fishing gear and beam trawls, European Commission 
(54)     Henk J. L. H. & Daan, N. 1996. Long‐term trends in ten non‐target North Sea fish species. ICES 
         Journal of Marine Science, 53: 1063–1078. 1996 
(55)     ICES Advice 2009, Book 6 Section 6.4.10 Sole in Subarea IV (North Sea) pp88‐98 
(56)     COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 676/2007 establishing a multiannual plan for fisheries 
         exploiting stocks of plaice and sole in the North Sea. 
(57)     Millner, R.S. 1985. The use of anchored gill and tanglenets in the sea fisheries of England and 
         Wales. MAFF Laboratory Leaflet no. 57. MAFF, Lowestoft. 



MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                       March 2011            82
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
(58)     Beek,  F.  A.  van.  1990.  Discard  sampling  programme  for  the  North  Sea.  Dutch  participation. 
         Netherlands Institute for Fishery Investigations, internal report DEMVIS 90‐303. 85 pp. 
(59)     Zydelis, R., Bellebaum, J., Österblom H., Vetemaa M., Schirmeister B., Stipniece A., Dagys, 
         M., van Eerden, M. & Garthe, S. 2009. Bycatch in gillnet fisheries – An overlooked threat to 
         waterbird populations. Biological Conservation. In press. 
(60)     Hovgard, H. & Lewy, P. 1996. Selectivity of gillnets in the North Sea, English Channel and Bay 
         of Biscay. AIR‐project AIR2‐93‐1122. Project final report. Danish Institute for Fisheries 
         Research, Charlottenlund. 
(61)     Council Directive 79/409/EEC of 2 April 1979 on the conservation of wild birds 
(62)     Floeter,  J.,  Kempf,  A.,  Vinther,  M.,  Schrum,  C.  and    Temming,  A.  2005  Grey  gurnard 
         (Eutrigla  gurnadus)  in  the  North  Sea:  an  emerging  key  predator?  Can.  J.  Fish.  Aquat. 
         Sci. 62(8): 1853–1864 (2005)  
(63)     ICES  Fish Map data sheet for Grey gurnard. 
         http://www.ices.dk/marineworld/fishmap/ices/pdf/greygurnard.pdf 

 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                    March 2011            83
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
 Appendix 3 – Assessment Tree / Scoring sheets  
 The  following  Assessment  Tree  includes  description  of  the  Scoring  Guideposts  (SGs)  and 
 Performance  Indicators  (PIs)  used  to  score  the  fishery.    The  Assessment  Tree  provides  detailed 
 justification  for  all  scores  attributed  to  the  fishery,  in  a  way  which  is  clearly  auditable  by  future 
 assessors.   

 Principle 1 – All Units of Certification 
 1  A fishery must be conducted in  a manner that does not lead  to over‐fishing or depletion  of the 
    exploited  populations  and,  for  those  populations  that  are  depleted,  the  fishery  must  be 
    conducted in a manner that demonstrably leads to their recovery. 
  


 1.1           Management Outcomes 
  

                        Criteria                      60 Guideposts                           80 Guideposts                       100 Guideposts 

 1.1.1         Stock Status                  It  is  likely  that  the  stock  is    It is highly likely that the stock    There  is  a  high  degree  of 
               The  stock  is  at  a  level  above  the  point  where                is  above  the  point  where          certainty  that  the  stock  is 
               which  maintains  high  recruitment  would  be                        recruitment         would       be    above  the  point  where 
               productivity  and  has  a  impaired.                                  impaired.                             recruitment      would      be 
               low  probability  of                                                                                        impaired. 
               recruitment                                                           The  stock  is  at  or  fluctuating  There  is  a  high  degree  of 
               overfishing                                                           around  its  target  reference  certainty  that  the  stock  has 
                                                                                     point.                               been  fluctuating  around  its 
                                                                                                                          target  reference  point,  or  has 
                                                                                                                          been  above  its  target 
                                                                                                                          reference  point,  over  recent 
                                                                                                                          years. 
  


     Score:                 70                 
It is likely that the stock is above the point where recruitment would be impaired.  Fishing mortality is at a level below the target 
fishing mortality set by management, which will maintain biomass stock at level consistent with BMSY.  However did not reach 
this level yet.  
Justification 

It is highly likely that the stock is above the point where recruitment would be impaired. 
The position of the Spawning Stock Biomass in relation to the precautionary biomass reference point (Bpa) is the main indicator 
used to score likelihood of the stock being above the point where recruitment would be impaired.  The ICES WGNSSK 2009 stock 
assessment estimated SSB (2009) to be well above Bpa (338 MT compared to 230 MT).  SSB estimates are above Bpa since year 
2006 and as a result of the position of SSB compared to Bpa for the last number of years the rebuilding phase of the long term 
management plan has been completed successfully.   
The increase in  the Stock Spawning Biomass experienced from year 2007 has occurred under average recruitment conditions 
(see  Figure  3)  and  is  not  caused  by  a  higher  productivity  of  the  stock.    Instead,  increasing  SSB  levels  are  mainly  due  to  the 
reduction of fishing mortality under the present management plan.   
There are two main reasons that caused the fishery not to score higher than 80 on Issue 1:  
       1.   The assessment is considered highly uncertain, partly because discards from substantial part of the total catch 
       2.   The definition of precautionary reference points Bpa (higher than Blim) takes into account uncertainty related to the 
            estimation  of  fishing  mortality  rates  and  spawning  stock  biomass  in  order  to  ensure  a  high  probability  of  avoiding 
            recruitment failure.  ICES considered that Bpa could be set at 230,000 t using the default multiplier of 1.4.  However, 
            the  ICES  Working  Group  acknowledges  that,  since  noisy  discards  estimates  were  included,  the  uncertainty  of  the 
            estimates of stock status is much greater than the multiplier applied.   
The stock is NOT at or fluctuating around its target reference point.  
There is no explicit biomass target reference point for this fishery.  Instead a target fishing mortality‐based reference point of 
        ‐1
0.3 year  is used by management with the objective of achieving the maximum sustainable yield (MSY).  Based on a spawning 
                                                                                                                                 ‐
biomass per recruit (SSB/R) analysis (where recruitment is assumed to be at the long term geometric mean), a target of F = 0.3 y

 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                         March 2011                   84
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
1
  would give a BMSY of around 500 MT.  SSB was estimated in 2009 at 338MT and is estimated to increase to around 442 MT in 
2010.  Therefore the stock is NOT yet at levels consistent with BMSY.  
References 

        •   ICES.  2009a.  Report  of  the  Working  Group  on  the  Assessment  of  Demersal  Stocks  in  the  North  Sea  and  Skagerrak  ‐ 
            Combined Spring and Autumn (WGNSSK), 6 ‐ 12 May 2009, ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen.. 1028 pp 
        •   ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                       March 2011                   85
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
                       Criteria                 60 Guideposts                    80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

 1.1.2   Reference Points              Generic  limit  and  target     Reference        points       are   
               Limit  and  target  reference  points  are              appropriate  for  the  stock  and 
               reference  points  are  based  on  justifiable  and     can be estimated. 
               appropriate  for  the  reasonable          practice 
                                                                       The  limit  reference  point  is  set    The limit reference point is set 
               stock.                  appropriate  for  the 
                                       species category.               above the level at which there is        above the level at which there 
                                                                       an  appreciable  risk  of  impairing     is  an  appreciable  risk  of 
                                                                       reproductive capacity.                   impairing         reproductive 
                                                                                                                capacity             following 
                                                                                                                consideration  of  relevant 
                                                                                                                precautionary issues.  

                                                                       The  target  reference  point  is   The  target  reference  point  is 
                                                                       such that the stock is maintained   such  that  the  stock  is 
                                                                       at a level consistent with BMSY or  maintained  at  a  level 
                                                                       some measure or surrogate with      consistent  with  BMSY  or  some 
                                                                       similar intent or outcome.          measure  or  surrogate  with 
                                                                                                           similar intent or outcome, or a 
                                                                       For low trophic level species, the  higher  level,  and  takes  into 
                                                                       target reference point takes into  account                  relevant 
                                                                       account  the  ecological  role  of  precautionary  issues  such  as 
                                                                       the stock.                          the  ecological  role  of  the 
                                                                                                           stock  with  a  high  degree  of 
                                                                                                           certainty. 
  


     Score:              80                  
Reference points are appropriate for the stock and can be estimated.  The limit reference point is set above the level at which 
there  is  an  appreciable  risk  of  impairing  reproductive  capacity.    There  is  an  implicit  biomass  target  reference  point  that  is 
consistent with achieving the maximum sustainable yield.   
Justification 

Reference points are appropriate for the stock and can be estimated. 
Reference points are appropriate for the stock.  They have been estimated for this specific stock by the ICES Working Group on 
the Assessment of Demersal Stocks in the North Sea and Skagerrak (WGNSSK) taking uncertainty into account.  Therefore SG 80 
Issue 1 was met.  
The limit reference point is set above the level at which there is an appreciable risk of impairing reproductive capacity 
The limit reference point is set at Blim and is defined as the smallest spawning biomass observed in the series of annual values 
of the spawning biomass.  Blim was set at 106,000 t.  There is a certain amount of subjective opinion in setting this level, but 160 
000 tonnes would seem to be a safe level, based on the history of the fishery which has been sustained despite relatively high 
sustained fishing mortalities.  
There is also a limit fishing mortality reference point (Flim), defined as the fishing mortality that leads the stock biomass to fall 
below Blim in the long term.  Flim was estimated at 0.74 year‐1 as the highest observed fishing mortality for ages 2‐6. 
The target reference point is such that the stock is maintained at a level consistent with BMSY or some measure or surrogate with 
similar intent or outcome 
There is an implicit biomass target reference (Ftarget = 0.3 year ‐1), which is consistent with achieving BMSY in the long term.  
The value of 0.3 was determined by the ICES ad hoc Group on Long Term Management Advice (AGLTA) and was adopted by the 
EU in its multi‐annual plan for plaice and sole.  The STECF specifies that F0.3 is consistent with exploitation of the plaice stock 
“on achieving maximum sustainable yields” .  Therefore the assessment team determined that Issue 3 SG 80 was met  
However there appear to be some discrepancies between the STECF advice and the ICES Working Group advice on Fmsy, which 
is based on the yield per recruit analysis (Fmax). This discrepancy determined that a score of 100 was not awarded to Issue 3 
and a recommendation was raised: “The client fishery should ask the relevant scientific bodies for clear guidance on the fishing 
mortality target that will maintain the stock at BMSY”.  Guidance on this issue could inform ongoing management of the fishery 
and future surveillance audits to ensure MSC criteria continue to be met”.  
References 

       •   ICES. 2005. Report of the ad hoc Group on Long Term Advice (AGLTA), 12–13 April 2005, ICES Headquarters. ICES CM 
           2005/ACFM:25. 126 pp. 


 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                              March 2011                  86
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
 
 
FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
 
    •   ICES.  2009a.  Report  of  the  Working  Group  on  the  Assessment  of  Demersal  Stocks  in  the  North  Sea  and  Skagerrak  ‐ 
        Combined Spring and Autumn (WGNSSK), 6 ‐ 12 May 2009, ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen.. 1028 pp 
    •   ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
 




MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                       March 2011                   87
Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                         Criteria                  60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                     100 Guideposts 

    1.1.3   Stock Rebuilding             Where       stocks     are         Where  stocks  are  depleted  Where  stocks  are  depleted, 
                  Where  the  stock  is  depleted        rebuilding         rebuilding  strategies  are  in  strategies  are  demonstrated 
                  depleted,  there  is  strategies  which  have  a          place.                           to  be  rebuilding  stocks 
                  evidence  of  stock  reasonable  expectation                                               continuously  and  there  is 
                  rebuilding.            of success are in place.                                            strong      evidence       that 
                                                                                                             rebuilding  will  be  complete 
                                                                                                             within       the       shortest 
                                                                                                             practicable timeframe.  
                                           Monitoring  is  in  place  to    There  is  evidence  that  they  are   
                                           determine  whether  they         rebuilding  stocks,  or  it  is  highly 
                                           are effective in rebuilding      likely  based  on  simulation 
                                           the  stock  within  a            modelling        or          previous 
                                           specified timeframe.             performance  that  they  will  be 
                                                                            able to rebuild the stock within a 
                                                                            specified timeframe. 
     

        Score:             100                  
Rebuilding strategies are in place and there is evidence that they are rebuilding stocks continuously and there is strong evidence 
that rebuilding will be complete within the shortest practicable timeframe.  Therefore an score of 100 was awarded.  
    Justification 

Where stocks are depleted rebuilding strategies are in place 
Rebuilding strategies are in place.  The plaice fishery is implementing an explicit long term management plan with two defined 
stages, in which the first stage aims to rebuild the stock above precautionary level (Bpa).  The second stage aims to is reduce the 
exploitation rate to a target level that will allow the stock to be harvested at MSY. 
There is evidence that they are rebuilding stocks.   
SSB  trends  show  that  biomass  levels  have  been  above  the  precautionary  reference  point  since  2006  (based  on  ICES  2009 
assessment) and significant increases in SSB have occurred in years 2008‐2009 and is predicted to occur for the year 2010 on the 
basis of applying the long term management plan (Figure 1).   
Where stocks are depleted, strategies are demonstrated to be rebuilding stocks continuously and there is strong evidence that 
rebuilding will be complete within the shortest practicable timeframe 
The  management  plan  has  shown  evidence  that  rebuilding  will  be  complete  within  the  shortest  practicable  timeframe.    The 
plaice fishery is implementing an explicit long term management plan with two defined stages, in which the first stage aims to 
rebuild the stock above precautionary level (Bpa).  The second stage aims to reduce the exploitation rate to a target level that 
will  allow  the  stock  to  be  harvested  at  MSY.    After  a  continuous  increase  in  SSB  in  successive  years,  the  first  stage  of  the 
management plan has been completed successfully.  The increase in the Stock Spawning Biomass experienced from year 2007 
has occurred under average recruitment conditions and is not caused by a higher productivity of the stock.  Instead, increasing 
SSB levels are mainly due to the reduction of fishing mortality under the present management plan.  The management plan has 
entered the second stage which sets targets for the fishing mortality (F = 0.3 y‐1) based on the principle of maximum sustainable 
yield.    The  target  fishing  mortality  has  been  already  achieved  and  temporal  trends  in  SSB  shows  that  the  stock  biomass  is 
increasing toward target long term yields within the shortest practicable timeframe.  Therefore the SG 100 is met  
 
    References 

          •   ICES.  2009a.  Report  of  the  Working  Group  on  the  Assessment  of  Demersal  Stocks  in  the  North  Sea  and  Skagerrak  ‐ 
              Combined Spring and Autumn (WGNSSK), 6 ‐ 12 May 2009, ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen.. 1028 pp 
          •   ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
          •   Council regulation (EC) No 676/2007 of 11 June 2007 establishing a multiannual plan for fisheries exploiting stocks of 
              plaice and sole in the North Sea 
          •   Machiels, M.A.M., Kraak, S.B.M. and Poos, J.J. (2008) Biological evaluation of the first stage of the management plan 
              for  fisheries  exploiting  the  stocks  of  plaice  and  sole  in  the  North  Sea  according  to  Council  Regulation  (EC)  No. 
              676/2007. Report C031/08. Wageningen IMARES. 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                            March 2011                    88
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
 1.2            Harvest Strategy (management) 
  

                        Criteria                   60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                     100 Guideposts 

 1.2.1   Harvest Strategy                  The  harvest  strategy  is         The  harvest  strategy  is         The  harvest  strategy  is 
                There  is  a  robust  and  expected  to  achieve  stock       responsive to the state of the     responsive to the state of the 
                precautionary  harvest  management              objectives    stock and the elements of the      stock  and  is  designed  to 
                strategy in place          reflected  in  the  target  and    harvest      strategy      work    achieve  stock  management 
                                           limit reference points.            together  towards  achieving       objectives  reflected  in  the 
                                                                              management           objectives    target  and  limit  reference 
                                                                              reflected  in  the  target  and    points.  
                                                                              limit reference points.             
                                           The  harvest  strategy  is  The  harvest  strategy  may  not          The  performance  of  the 
                                           likely  to  work  based  on  have  been  fully  tested  but           harvest strategy has been fully 
                                           prior      experience    or  monitoring  is  in  place  and           evaluated and evidence exists 
                                           plausible argument.          evidence  exists  that  it  is           to show that it is achieving its 
                                                                        achieving its objectives.                objectives  including  being 
                                                                                                                 clearly able to maintain stocks 
                                                                                                                 at target levels. 
                                           Monitoring  is  in  place  that                                       The  harvest  strategy  is 
                                           is  expected  to  determine                                           periodically  reviewed  and 
                                           whether      the       harvest                                        improved as necessary. 
                                           strategy is working. 
  

     Score:                85                   
The  harvest  strategy  is  responsive  to  the  state  of  the  stock  and  the  elements  of  the  harvest  strategy  work  together  towards 
achieving management objectives reflected in the target and limit reference points.  Although the Harvest Strategy has not been 
fully,  the  stock  assessment  gives  annual  feedback  to  management  on  how  well  they  are  achieving  their  objectives  tested.  
Evidence exists, that the harvest strategy is achieving its objectives.  Also, the harvest strategy is periodically reviewed.  
Justification 

The  harvest  strategy  is  responsive  to  the  state  of  the  stock  and  the  elements  of  the  harvest  strategy  work  together  towards 
achieving management objectives reflected in the target and limit reference points
Management is applying controls mainly through a plaice TAC and a limit to the days at‐ sea (> 10m length). The TAC is set to 
limit  the  fishing  mortality  to  the  desired  level.    The  TAC  is  evaluated  annually  and  recommendations  are  made  by  the 
management authority based on the decision rules and state of the stock.  
The elements of the Harvest Strategy, represented by the countries exploiting this stock, are working together to achieve stock 
management objectives reflected in the target and limit reference points: 
              Annual landings (including unallocated landings) calculated as the sum of individual states’ members landings have 
               not exceed the TAC since 2004 (year of the introduction of the cod recovery plan) 
              Technical measures are adopted by each country.  Technical measures include: 
                    o    Limits on days‐at‐sea:  Measure designed mostly to enhance the recovery of North Sea cod 
                    o    Mesh size regulations and gear restrictions 
                    o    Closed area (Plaice Box and inshore waters).  
              Monitoring programs for the collection of information needed to assess the stock status.  Those include: 
                    o    Collection of catch data through the use of logbooks.  Landings data is reported by each of the countries 
                         exploiting the plaice stock.  
                    o    Biological sampling programs: Age compositions are available for countries landing most of the catch, which 
                         include:  Netherlands, Germany, Belgium, Denmark and France 
                    o    The production of abundance Index trough the use of: 
                                    Abundance surveys: Beam Trawl Survey RV Isis (BTS‐Isis), Beam Trawl Survey RV Tridens (BTS‐
                                    Tridens) and a Sole Net Survey in September‐October (SNS). An additional survey index 
                                   Commercial LPUE series produced using the Dutch beam trawl fleet and UK beam trawl fleet 
The assessment team considered that Issue 1 scoring guidepost 100 was not met due to the following: 
One of the main weaknesses of the plaice harvest strategy is the use of a mesh size designed for the sole fishery.  It produces 


 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                               March 2011                  89
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
high level of plaice discarding. 
The  harvest  strategy  may  not  have  been  fully  tested  but  monitoring  is  in  place  and  evidence  exists  that  it  is  achieving  its 
objectives. 
The performance of the harvest strategy has not been fully evaluated yet (Issue 2 SG 100 not met).  The partial management 
plan  evaluation  carried  out  is  not  yet  conclusive  with  regards  to  consistency  with  the  precautionary  approach.    However, 
evidence  exists  that  shows  that  it  should  achieve  its  objectives.    Stock  assessment  gives  annual  feedback  to  management  on 
how  well  they  are  achieving  their  objectives.    Information  provided  by  the  stock  assessment  include:  1.  Levels  of  fishing 
mortality compared to the Target Fishing Mortality, 2. Levels of SSB compared to the biomass reference points (Bpa and Blim).  
Monitoring is in place as a tool for the collection of information needed for the assessment of the stock (see 1.2.3).  Evidence 
exists, in the form of ICES advice, that the harvest strategy is achieving its objectives.  Therefore the assessment team awarded 
an 80 score to Issue 2. 
The harvest strategy is periodically reviewed and improved as necessary 
As  part  of  the  multiannual  management  plan  the  harvest  strategy  is  due  to  be  reviewed  in  2010.    Article  17  “Evaluation  of 
management  measures”  establish  that  scientific  advice  on  the  performance  of  the  plan  toward  achieving  management 
objectives will be provided in the third year of application of the management plan and each third successive year of application 
of management plan.   
References 

          ICES. 2009a. Report of the Working Group on the Assessment of Demersal Stocks in the North Sea and Skagerrak ‐ 
           Combined Spring and Autumn (WGNSSK), 6 ‐ 12 May 2009, ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen.. 1028 pp 
          ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
          Council regulation (EC) No 676/2007 of 11 June 2007 establishing a multiannual plan for fisheries exploiting stocks of 
           plaice and sole in the North Sea 
          Machiels, M.A.M., Kraak, S.B.M. and Poos, J.J. (2008) Biological evaluation of the first stage of the management plan 
           for  fisheries  exploiting  the  stocks  of  plaice  and  sole  in  the  North  Sea  according  to  Council  Regulation  (EC)  No. 
           676/2007. Report C031/08. Wageningen IMARES. 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                            March 2011                    90
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
                       Criteria                  60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                       100 Guideposts 

 1.2.2   Harvest  control  rules  Generally                understood        Well  defined  harvest  control   
               and tools                 harvest  control  rules  are  in    rules  are  in  place  that  are 
               There  are  well defined  place  that  are  consistent        consistent  with  the  harvest 
               and  effective  harvest  with  the  harvest  strategy         strategy  and  ensure  that  the 
               control rules in place  and which act to reduce the           exploitation rate is reduced as 
                                         exploitation  rate  as  limit       limit  reference  points  are 
                                         reference     points        are     approached.  
                                         approached. 
                                          There is some evidence that        The  selection  of  the  harvest    The  design  of  the  harvest 
                                          tools  used  to  implement         control  rules  takes  into         control  rules  take  into 
                                          harvest  control  rules  are       account          the       main     account  a  wide  range  of 
                                          appropriate and effective in       uncertainties.                      uncertainties.  
                                          controlling exploitation. 
                                                                             Available  evidence  indicates      Evidence  clearly  shows  that 
                                                                             that  the  tools  in  use  are      the  tools  in  use  are  effective 
                                                                             appropriate  and  effective  in     in  achieving  the  exploitation 
                                                                             achieving  the  exploitation        levels  required  under  the 
                                                                             levels  required  under  the        harvest control rules. 
                                                                             harvest control rules. 
  

     Score:                 75              
There are harvest control rules in place and the management plan allows for a  reduction in the exploitation rate as the limit 
reference point is approached.  However, .current decision rules are NOT well defined to ensure that exploitation rates will be 
reduced as the limit reference point is approached. Therefore issue 1 scoring guidepost 80 is not met.  Main uncertainties are 
accounted  for  and  there  is  evidence  that  indicates  that  the  tools  in  use  are  appropriate  and  effective  in  achieving  the 
exploitation levels required under the harvest Control Rules.  Therefore issues 2&3 scoring guidepost 80 are met.  
Justification 

Harvest control rules (HCR) are in place that are consistent with the harvest strategy and which act to reduce the exploitation 
rate as limit reference points are approached 
ICES evaluated the current decisions rules set out in the EU multiannual management plan.  The management plan evaluation is 
not yet conclusive with regards to consistency with the precautionary approach. 
Current decision rules are not well defined regarding ensuring that an exploitation rate is reduced as limit reference points are 
approached.  However,  under  article  18  the  management  plan  allows  for  a  reduction  of  the  exploitation  rate  below  that 
provided by the current decision rules.  Article 18 of the EU management plan states: ‘In the event that STECF advises that the 
spawning stock size of...plaice... is suffering reduced reproductive capacity, the Council shall decide by qualified majority on the 
basis of a proposal from the Commission on a TAC for plaice that is lower than that provided for in Article 7, ...and on levels of 
fishing effort that are lower than those provided for in Article 9’. 
The  assessment  team  considered  that  current  decision  rules  are  NOT  well  defined  to  ensure  that  exploitation  rate  will  be 
reduced as the limit reference point is approached.  Therefore issue 1 scoring guidepost 80 is not met.   
Issue 1 scoring guidepost 60 is met on the basis that HRCs are in place and article 18 allows for a reduction of the exploitation 
rate as the limit reference point is approached.  
The selection of the harvest control rules takes into account the main uncertainties. 
Simulation testing of the management plan (MSE) considered how robust the harvest control rule was to some uncertainties.  
The working group overall concludes that the harvest control rules are expected to give benefits in terms of long‐term yield and 
low risk to the stock compared to the application of Fpa 
Available evidence indicates that the tools in use are appropriate and effective in achieving the exploitation levels required under 
the harvest control rules. 
The primary tool is the TAC, which is used to achieve the exploitation levels required under the harvest control rule. The TAC is 
set  as  follows:  (1)  ICES  provide scientific  advice  on  the  status  of  the stock.    (2)  The  ICES Advisory  Committee  proposes  a  TAC 
consistent with the requirements of the HCR, (3) and a TAC is adopted by management.  This is done in an annual basis.  
Since the introduction of the management plan, the TAC has been set at levels consistent with the level proposed by ICES and 
official  landings  have  not  exceeded  the  set  TAC.    Hence,  available  evidence  indicates  that  the  TAC  as  a  management  tool  is 
appropriate and effective in achieving the exploitation levels under the HCR.  
The design of the harvest control rules DO NOT take into account a wide range of uncertainties. 
The plan was adopted before it was fully evaluated and despite some evaluations, there remains uncertainty over how well the 


 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                March 2011                    91
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
plan will perform. While the simulation testing of the management plan (MSE) considered how robust the harvest control rule 
was  to  some  uncertainties,  it  was  not  exhaustive.  Estimations  of  plaice  stock  status  appear  to  have  a  retrospective  pattern, 
underestimating fishing mortality and overestimating SSB, which was not taken into account. In addition, there is no accepted 
stock recruitment relationship, and while two stock‐recruitment models were considered, it was hard to account for all possible 
effects. The working group concluded that additional evaluations of the management plan are necessary to take account fully of 
these uncertainties on the precautionary nature of the plan in the long term.  
References 

         ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
         Council regulation (EC) No 676/2007 of 11 June 2007 establishing a multiannual plan for fisheries exploiting stocks of 
          plaice and sole in the North Sea 
         Machiels, M.A.M., Kraak, S.B.M. and Poos, J.J. (2008) Biological evaluation of the first stage of the management plan 
          for  fisheries  exploiting  the  stocks  of  plaice  and  sole  in  the  North  Sea  according  to  Council  Regulation  (EC)  No. 
          676/2007. Report C031/08. Wageningen IMARES. 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                           March 2011                   92
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
                       Criteria                   60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

 1.2.3         Information              /  Some  relevant  information        Sufficient              relevant     A  comprehensive  range  of 
               monitoring                  related  to  stock  structure,     information  related  to  stock      information       (on     stock 
               Relevant  information       stock  productivity  and  fleet    structure,  stock  productivity,     structure,  stock  productivity, 
               is  collected  to  support  composition  is  available  to     fleet  composition  and  other       fleet  composition,  stock 
               the harvest strategy        support       the      harvest     data  is  available  to  support     abundance,  fishery  removals 
                                           strategy.                          the harvest strategy.                and other information such as 
                                                                                                                   environmental  information), 
                                                                                                                   including  some  that  may  not 
                                                                                                                   be  directly  relevant  to  the 
                                                                                                                   current  harvest  strategy,  is 
                                                                                                                   available.   
                                          Stock  abundance  and               Stock  abundance  and  fishery       All  information  required  by 
                                          fishery     removals      are       removals       are      regularly    the  harvest  control  rule  is 
                                          monitored and  at least one         monitored  at  a  level  of          monitored        with       high 
                                          indicator  is  available  and       accuracy      and      coverage      frequency  and  a  high  degree 
                                          monitored  with  sufficient         consistent  with  the  harvest       of  certainty,  and  there  is  a 
                                          frequency  to  support  the         control rule, and one or more        good  understanding  of  the 
                                          harvest control rule.               indicators  are  available  and      inherent  uncertainties  in  the 
                                                                              monitored  with  sufficient          information  [data]  and  the 
                                                                              frequency  to  support  the          robustness of assessment and 
                                                                              harvest control rule.                management          to       this 
                                                                                                                   uncertainty.  
                                                                              There  is  good  information  on   
                                                                              all  other  fishery  removals 
                                                                              from the stock. 
  

     Score:               75                   
The fishery meets all 60. However one of the 80 guidepost is not met.  This is mainly due to lack of information in relation to 
discard data. 
Justification 

Sufficient  relevant  information  related  to  stock  structure,  stock  productivity,  fleet  composition  and  other  data  is  available  to 
support the harvest strategy. 
Sufficient  relevant  information  related  to  stock  structure,  stock  productivity,  fleet  composition  and  other  data  is  available  to 
support the harvest strategy.   
Stock Structure: The life history is clearly documented and well understood from eggs to spawning.  The geographic distribution 
of plaice is sufficiently understood.  However, there are several uncertainties on the distribution and distributional changes of 
plaice ‐ juveniles as well as adults – due to big regional changes in abundance  
Information  on  population  age  structure  is  significantly  relevant  in  the  assessment  of  the  stock  status,  as  age  structure 
methodology (Virtual population analysis) is used in assessing the stock.  Landing at age data by fleet are supplied by countries 
holding the majority of the TAC, including:  Netherlands, Germany, Belgium, Denmark and France 
Stock  productivity:  Information  on  the  productivity  of  the  stock  is  collected  through  sampling  programs.    Age  compositions 
were  available  for  Netherlands,  Germany,  Belgium,  Denmark  and  France.  Landings  from  countries  that  do  not  provide  age 
compositions were raised to the international age composition.  
Fleet Structure: North Sea plaice is taken mainly in a mixed flatfish fishery by beams trawlers in the southern and south‐eastern 
North Sea.  The Fleet effort distribution is well monitored through the use of the VMS. 
Other information such gear fleet design (type of gear used and mesh size) and gear selectivity is well understood and used in 
the assessment of the stock.  
Stock abundance and fishery removals are monitored  
The data required by the harvest control rule are monitored.  The main information required to support the stock assessment 
are  the  total  landings,  age  and  weight  composition  of  the  landings,  abundance  surveys  together  with  age  and  weight 
composition of the survey catch. 
Stock  abundance  and  fishery  removals  are  NOT  regularly  monitored  at  a  level  of  accuracy  and  coverage  consistent  with  the 
harvest control rule,   
Discarding is not well monitored.  The low number of sampling trips brings significant uncertainty to the estimation of discarding 


 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                 March 2011                   93
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
and subsequent estimation of total catch.   
One or more indicators are available and monitored with sufficient frequency to support the harvest control rule. 
Abundance  indices  are  available  and  monitored  through  the  use  of  dependent  (commercial  fleet)  and  independent  (surveys) 
data.  Dependent  abundance  indices  (LPUE)  are  available  from  the  Dutch  beam  trawl  fleet  and  the  UK  beam  trawl  fleet.  
However  they  are  not  used  in  the  assessment  of  the  stock  because  of  potential  inconsistencies  and  unreliability  of  the  data 
related to quota restrictions, fleet changes in fishing patterns.  Stock assessment uses three time series of fishery independent 
tuning indices.  
Apart from the uncertainty in discards estimates there is good information on all other fishery removals from the stock.  
References 

         ICES.  2009a.  Report  of  the  Working  Group  on  the  Assessment  of  Demersal  Stocks  in  the  North  Sea  and  Skagerrak  ‐ 
          Combined Spring and Autumn (WGNSSK), 6 ‐ 12 May 2009, ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen.. 1028 pp 
         ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
         Machiels, M.A.M., Kraak, S.B.M. and Poos, J.J. (2008) Biological evaluation of the first stage of the management plan 
          for  fisheries  exploiting  the  stocks  of  plaice  and  sole  in  the  North  Sea  according  to  Council  Regulation  (EC)  No. 
          676/2007. Report C031/08. Wageningen IMARES. 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                          March 2011                    94
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
                         Criteria               60 Guideposts                     80 Guideposts                     100 Guideposts 

 1.2.4   Assessment  of  stock  The  assessment  estimates  The assessment is appropriate  The assessment is appropriate 
               status                   stock  status  relative  to  for  the  stock  and  for  the         for  the  stock  and  for  the 
               There  is  an  adequate  reference points.            harvest  control  rule,  and  is       harvest control rule and takes 
               assessment  of  the                                   evaluating      stock     status       into  account  the  major 
               stock status                                          relative to reference points.          features  relevant  to  the 
                                                                                                            biology of the species and the 
                                                                                                            nature of the fishery.  
                                        The  major  sources  of  The         assessment       takes  The  assessment  takes  into 
                                        uncertainty are identified.  uncertainty into account.       account  uncertainty  and  is 
                                                                                                     evaluating      stock   status 
                                                                                                     relative to reference points in 
                                                                                                     a probabilistic way.  
                                                                                                            The  assessment  has  been 
                                                                                                            tested  and  shown  to  be 
                                                                                                            robust.            Alternative 
                                                                                                            hypotheses  and  assessment 
                                                                                                            approaches      have     been 
                                                                                                            rigorously explored.  
                                                                         The  stock  assessment  is  The  assessment  has  been 
                                                                         subject to peer review.     internally  and  externally  peer 
                                                                                                     reviewed. 
  


     Score:                80                
All issues at scoring guidepost 80 are met. The assessment is appropriate for the stock and for the harvest control rule, and is 
evaluating stock status relative to reference points.  In addition, the assessment takes into account some uncertainties and is 
subject to peer review.  Therefore all issues at scoring guidepost 80 are met.   
The  assessment  does  not  account  for  some  features  of  the  biology  of  the  species  and  the  fishery  and  does  not  include  an 
integrated  approach  for  probabilistic  outputs.    In  addition  strong  retrospective  analysis  of  the  assessment  shows  lack  of 
robustness.    However,  exploratory  catch‐age‐age‐based  analyses  have  been  carried  out  to  investigate  assessment  bias 
(uncertainty)  and  reassure  interpretations  on  stock  assessment  outputs.    External  review  is  conducted  on  ICES  stock 
assessments, although these reviews are not routine.  
Justification 

The assessment is appropriate for the stock and for the harvest control rule, and is evaluating stock status relative to reference 
points 
The assessment is appropriate for the stock and for the harvest control rule, and is evaluating stock status relative to reference 
points.  The model captures major features of the fishery, including stock structure, age, growth and maturity. The estimates of 
biomass and fishing mortality are currently made annually and directly compared to target, trigger and limit reference points. 
However, uncertainty related to some features of the fishery (i.e. total catch (discarding), natural mortality and maturity data) 
determined that Issue 1 Scoring guidepost 100 was not met.   
The assessment takes uncertainty into account. 
Structural  uncertainties  in  the  model  are  discussed.    However,  The  XSA  method  does  not  include  an  integrated  approach  for 
probabilistic outputs, such as standard errors, confidence intervals or probability profiles for statistics of interest and therefore 
Issue 2 Scoring guidepost 100 was not met  
The stock assessment is subject to peer review. 
The  stock  assessment  is  subject  to  peer  review  through  the  working  group  process.  A  review  is  undertaken  by  the  Scientific, 
Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF).  While external review is conducted on ICES stock assessments, these 
reviews are not routine.  Therefore Issue 4 Scoring guidepost 100 was only partially met and cannot be awarded (MSC Policy 
Advisory 18 do not allow partial scoring) 
The assessment has been tested and DO NOT show to be robust. Alternative assessment approaches have been explored 
A strong retrospective analysis of the assessment shows some recurring bias.  SSB is underestimated in five of the six years, The 
current  estimates  of  the  biomass  over  the  last  three  years  are  considerably  higher  than  the  previous  assessments.  This  is 
thought  to  be  due  to  changing  interactions  between  the  survey  indices  and  age  structure,  and  generally  increases  the 
uncertainty.   
Exploratory  catch‐age‐age‐based  analyses  have  been  carried  out  to  investigate  assessment  bias  (uncertainty)  and  reassure 

 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                           March 2011                   95
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
interpretations  on  stock  assessment  outputs.  Therefore  this  issue  was  partially  met  and  therefore  cannot  be  awarded  (MSC 
Policy Advisory 18).  
References 

         ICES.  2009a.  Report  of  the  Working  Group  on  the  Assessment  of  Demersal  Stocks  in  the  North  Sea  and  Skagerrak  ‐ 
          Combined Spring and Autumn (WGNSSK), 6 ‐ 12 May 2009, ICES Headquarters, Copenhagen.. 1028 pp 
         ICES 2009b.  6.4.7. Plaice in subarea IV (North Sea). Book 6.  ICES Advice 2009 
         Machiels, M.A.M., Kraak, S.B.M. and Poos, J.J. (2008) Biological evaluation of the first stage of the management plan 
          for  fisheries  exploiting  the  stocks  of  plaice  and  sole  in  the  North  Sea  according  to  Council  Regulation  (EC)  No. 
          676/2007. Report C031/08. Wageningen IMARES. 
  
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                         March 2011                   96
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
  Principle 2 – Demersal Trawl 
  
  
                                                           PLEASE NOTE 
  Demersal  Trawl  is  subject  to  an  official  Objection  and  therefore  a  decision  to  recommend 
     certification is currently ON HOLD pending the outcome of the MSC Objection procedure.  
  
  DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice landed using Demersal trawl is not considered to be eligible 
  
  for  MSC  Chain  of  Custody  until  a  decision  can  be  made  following  completion  of  the  MSC 
  Objections procedure.  
  All  information  contained  in  this  report  referring  to  Demersal  Trawl  should  therefore  be 
  read in light of the above statement. 
  For  further  details  on  the  Objection  currently  under  consideration  please  refer  to  the 
  following  MSC  web  page:  http://www.msc.org/track‐a‐fishery/in‐assessment/north‐east‐
  atlantic/Denmark‐North‐Sea‐plaice 
  
 2             Fishing operations should allow for the maintenance of the structure, productivity, function 
               and diversity of the ecosystem (including habitat and associated dependent and ecologically 
               related species) on which the fishery depends. 
 2.1           Retained non‐target species 
  

                       Criteria                     60 Guideposts                        80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

 2.1.1   Status                              Main  retained  species  are       Main  retained  species  are            There  is  a  high  degree  of 
               The  fishery  does  not       likely  to  be  within             highly  likely  to  be  within          certainty that retained species 
               pose  a  risk  of  serious    biologically  based  limits  or    biologically  based  limits,  or  if    are  within  biologically  based 
               or irreversible harm to       if  outside  the  limits  there    outside  the  limits  there  is  a      limits.  
               the  retained  species        are  measures  in  place  that     partial        strategy          of 
               and  does  not  hinder        are expected to ensure that        demonstrably            effective 
               recovery  of  depleted        the  fishery  does  not  hinder    management  measures  in 
               retained species.             recovery  and  rebuilding  of      place  such  that  the  fishery 
                                             the depleted species.              does  not  hinder  recovery  and 
                                                                                rebuilding.  
                                             If  the  status  is  poorly                                                Target  reference  points  are 
                                             known  there  are  measures                                                defined  and  retained  species 
                                             or  practices  in  place  that                                             are  at  or  fluctuating  around 
                                             are  expected  to  result  in                                              their target reference points. 
                                             the  fishery  not  causing  the 
                                             retained  species  to  be 
                                             outside  biologically  based 
                                             limits      or       hindering 
                                             recovery. 
  


     Score:               80                  
Justification 

Main retained species are highly likely to be within biologically based limits,  or if outside the limits there is a partial strategy of 
demonstrably effective management measures in place such that the fishery does not hinder recovery and rebuilding.  
An analysis of the 2008 official landings data for Danish vessels targeting plaice in the North Sea using demersal trawls reveals 
that the main species landed in the demersal trawl fishery along with 4,666 tonnes of plaice were North Sea Cod Gadus morhua 
(614t) , Lemon sole Microstomus kitt (798t) and Norwegian lobster Nephrops norvegicus (401t).  
 



 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                      March 2011                  97
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
                                                                SPECIES        Tonnes       % 
                                                      European Plaice            4,665        56% 
                                                      Atlantic Cod (MAIN)          614      7.35% 
                                                      Lemon sole (MAIN)            798      9.55% 
                                                      Norway lobster (MAIN)        401       4.8% 
                                                      Turbot                       239      2.86% 
                                                      Saithe                       304      3.64% 
                                                      Common dab                   370      4.44% 

When considering retained species, it is also important to recognise the element of the bycatch taken during fishing for plaice 
and which may not be landed – i.e. the discarded bycatch. It is recognised that not all marketable fish that is captured will be 
landed, either as a result of being undersized or once the available quota has been exhausted. Data from the Danish discard 
monitoring programme estimates that for 2008, a total of 890 tonnes of Cod, 115 tonnes of Norway Lobster and 9.2 tonnes of 
lemon sole were discarded by Danish demersal trawling vessels operating in the North Sea. These discard estimates form part 
of the basis for ICES stock assessment and resulting management proposals, as required. 
ICES advice for 2010 (1) for NS Cod indicates that the stock is suffering reduced reproductive capacity and is in danger of being 
harvested unsustainably. SSB has increased since its historical low in 2006, but remains below Blim. Despite this there is in place 
a  strategy  comprising  management  measures  that  are  considered  effective  in  ensuring  that  the  Danish  North  Sea  mixed 
demersal trawl fishery does not hinder recovery and rebuilding of NS Cod. The EU–Norway agreement on a management plan 
for NS Cod, as updated in December 2008, aims to be consistent with the precautionary approach and is intended to provide for 
sustainable fisheries and high yield leading to a target fishing mortality to 0.4.  The EU has adopted a long‐term plan for this 
stock with the same aims (4).  The 2008 advice from ICES for NS Cod was for a zero catch in 2009 because ICES did not consider 
the former recovery plan precautionary. However the ICES advice for 2010 indicates that catches of cod can be allowed under 
the  new  management  agreement.  This  change  in  advice  is  because  the  new  management  agreement  is  considered  to  be 
consistent with the precautionary approach.  In December 2008 the European Commission and Norway agreed on a new cod 
management plan implementing a new system of linked effort management with a target fishing mortality of 0.4 (1). ICES has 
evaluated  the  EC  management  plan  in  March  2009  and  concluded  that  this  management  plan  is  in  accordance  with  the 
precautionary approach only if implemented and enforced adequately.  The management plan is seen to be effective and recent 
landings have been within the agreed TAC for the stock. 
According  to  the  ICES  Working  Group  on  Assessment  of  New  MoU  Species  (WGNEW)  (2),  the  North  Sea  (ICES  IVa,  b  and  c) 
Lemon sole abundance index has increased substantially in recent years, but this has not reflected in actual catch levels to date. 
Nephrops are limited to a muddy habitat. This means that the distribution of suitable sediment defines the species distribution. 
ICES advice considers eight separate functional units of North Sea Nephrops.  2009 landings data reveal that Nephrops landed in 
Danish North Sea mixed trawl fisheries are known to originate from the Norwegian Deep ( |Area IVa) and Horn’s Reef (Area IVb) 
functional units. ICES advice for 2009 (3) indicates that the exploitation rate of Nephrops in the Norwegian deep is sustainable 
and the stock is not overexploited. For Nephrops off Horn’s Reef, the advice recommends no increase in the current exploitation 
rate.  While  there  has  been  no  decrease  in  abundance  over  time,  the  state  of  the  stock  remains  unknown  and  landings  are 
currently well below advice.  
All main retained species are subject to at least a partial strategy that is designed to ensure the fishery does not pose a risk of 
serious or irreversible harm to other retained species. The strategy includes measure such as TAC’s, minimum mesh sizes and 
minimum landing sizes (except for Lemon sole which is subject to a Minimum Marketing Standard11).  
Smaller  amounts  (defined  as  <5%  by  weight  of  total  Danish  NS  demersal  trawl  landings)  of  other  species  are  also  landed, 
including  Common  dab  Limanda  limanda,  Saithe  Pollachius  virens,  Turbot  Scopthalmus  maximus  and  Anglerfish  Lophius 
piscatorius.  
There is not a high degree of certainty that all retained species are within biologically based limits and target reference points 
have not been defined for all retained species. 
References 
(5)   ICES Advice 2009, Book 6,  Section 6.4.3 pp 9‐31 
(6)   ICES WGNEW Report for 2006. ICES Advisory Committee on Fishery Management, CM 2006/ACFM:11 
(7)   ICES Advice 2009, Book 6,  Section 6.4.14 pp 120‐156 
(8)   Council Regulation (EC) 1342/2008, European Commission 
  




                                                             
 11
   For Lemon sole, the Minimum Marketing standard specifies that fish  destined for human consumption must 
 be at least 25cm and 180gr 

 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                        March 2011                  98
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                      60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

    2.1.2   Management strategy  There  are  measures  in  There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  There is a strategy in place for 
                  There  is  a  strategy  in    place, if necessary, that are       place,  if  necessary  that  is  managing retained species.  
                  place  for  managing          expected  to  maintain  the         expected  to  maintain  the 
                  retained species that is      main  retained  species  at         main  retained  species  at 
                  designed to ensure the        levels  which  are  highly          levels  which  are  highly  likely 
                  fishery does not pose a       likely  to  be  within              to be within biologically based 
                  risk  of  serious  or         biologically  based  limits,  or    limits, or to ensure the fishery 
                  irreversible  harm  to        to  ensure  the  fishery  does      does not hinder their recovery 
                  retained species.             not  hinder  their  recovery        and rebuilding. 
                                                and rebuilding.  
                                                The       measures          are     There  is  some  objective  basis    The  strategy  is  mainly  based 
                                                considered  likely  to  work,       for confidence that the partial      on  information  directly  about 
                                                based       on        plausible     strategy  will  work,  based  on     the  fishery  and/or  species 
                                                argument  (e.g.,  general           some  information  directly          involved, and testing supports 
                                                experience,  theory  or             about  the  fishery  and/or          high  confidence  that  the 
                                                comparison  with  similar           species involved.                    strategy will work.  
                                                fisheries/species).  
                                                                                                                         There  is  clear  evidence  that 
                                                                                                                         the  strategy  is  being 
                                                                                                                         implemented         successfully, 
                                                                                                                         and  intended  changes  are 
                                                                                                                         occurring.  
                                                                                    There  is  some  evidence  that  There  is  some  evidence  that 
                                                                                    the  partial  strategy  is  being  the  strategy  is  achieving  its 
                                                                                    implemented successfully.          overall objective. 
     


        Score:               90                      
 
    Justification 

There is a strategy in place for managing main retained species. All retained species are subject to management provision of the 
Common Fisheries Policy. Accordingly, management strategies encompass a broad range of measures that include mandatory 
landings  reporting  for  all  species,  minimum  landing  size  regulations  for  Nephrops,  cod,  anglerfish,  turbot,  hake,  haddock  and 
saithe.  Most  retained  species  are  subject  to  a  Total  Allowable  Catch  (TAC)  of  which  Denmark  receives  a  national  allocation 
(quota). There are minimum mesh size regulations in place (110mm in the EU zone of the North Sea, 120mm in the Norwegian 
sector). There is a System of Real Time Closure that is designed to provide an effective means for closing off areas of seabed 
where recent catches reveal the presence of high levels of juvenile cod and an increased risk of discarding. The Plaice Box in the 
southeastern  North  Sea  limits  trawling  by  vessels  of  greater  than  300Hp  and  is  designed  to protect  juvenile  plaice  in  shallow 
waters. The EU have adopted a Long Term Management Plan for cod (4) within which catches of cod from the North Sea stock 
are permitted within a well defined and closely monitored quota. Within the cod management plan, reduction in discarding is 
encouraged  through  allowing  extra  days  at  sea  for  vessels  using  highly  selective  gears.  The  plan  also  prohibits  transhipment, 
makes  notification  of  landing  mandatory  and  limits  effort  through  days  at  sea  restrictions.  In  Denmark  there  have  been 
significant developments with respect to the full documentation of fisheries through the Fully Documented Fishery project. The 
aims of this are to account for all removals of cod using video surveillance onboard participating vessels. By providing full data in 
relation to all removals of cod, including discards, participating vessels have an opportunity to receive additional Individual cod 
quota allowance.  
There is clear evidence that the strategy is being implemented successfully, and intended changes are occurring. Danish vessels 
have recorded a high degree of compliance with respect to landings quotas, in particular since the introduction of the FKA or 
rights based management regime in 2007. There is no overshoot on quota and all landings are recorded and reported.   
There  is  some  evidence  that  the  strategy  is  achieving  its  overall  objective.  None  of  the  main  retained  species  stocks  are 
overexploited.  Exploitation  rates  for  cod  have  decreased and  the  species  is  now  being harvested  sustainably. Accordingly  the 
management  measures  appear  to  have  stabilised  cod  stocks  and  facilitated  some  rebuilding  of  SSB,  while  Lemon  sole  and 
Nephrops stocks affected by the fishery are stable or increasing. 
Despite the foregoing positive aspects, all elements of the management strategy do not apply to all of the retained species, with 
some retained species subject to a higher level of management than others. Furthermore, while the strategy is mainly based on 
information directly about the fishery and/or species involved and there is some confidence that it will work, it has not been 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                    March 2011                   99
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
tested and there is no basis for a high degree of confidence that the strategy will work. For these reasons a score of 100 is not 
appropriate. 
References 

(4) Council Regulation (EC) 1342/2008, European Commission 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                March 2011                 100
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                 60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                           100 Guideposts 

    2.1.3         Information           /  Qualitative  information  is      Qualitative  information  and            Accurate       and     verifiable 
                  monitoring               available  on  the  amount  of    some               quantitative          information is available on the 
                  Information  on  the  main retained species taken          information  are  available  on          catch  of  all  retained  species 
                  nature  and  extent  of  by the fishery.                   the  amount  of  main  retained          and the consequences for the 
                  retained  species  is                                      species taken by the fishery.            status of affected populations.
                  adequate             to  Information  is  adequate  to     Information  is  sufficient  to          Information  is  sufficient  to 
                  determine  the  risk  qualitatively             assess     estimate  outcome  status  with          quantitatively         estimate 
                  posed  by  the  fishery  outcome        status    with     respect  to  biologically  based         outcome  status  with  a  high 
                  and  the  effectiveness  respect  to  biologically         limits.                                  degree of certainty.  
                  of  the  strategy  to  based limits.  
                  manage         retained 
                  species.                 Information  is  adequate  to     Information  is  adequate  to            Information  is  adequate  to 
                                           support      measures       to    support  a  partial  strategy  to        support  a  comprehensive 
                                           manage  main  retained            manage       main       retained         strategy  to  manage  retained 
                                           species.                          species.                                 species,  and  evaluate  with  a 
                                                                                                                      high  degree  of  certainty 
                                                                                                                      whether  the  strategy  is 
                                                                              
                                                                                                                      achieving its objective.  
                                                                             Sufficient  data  continue  to  be       Monitoring      of    retained 
                                                                             collected  to  detect  any               species  is  conducted  in 
                                                                             increase  in  risk  level  (e.g.  due    sufficient  detail  to  assess 
                                                                             to  changes  in  the  outcome            ongoing  mortalities  to  all 
                                                                             indicator  scores  or  the               retained species. 
                                                                             operation of the fishery or the 
                                                                             effectiveness of the strategy). 
     

        Score:              80                  
 
    Justification 

Qualitative information and some quantitative information are available on the amount of main retained species taken by the 
fishery.  Information  is  recorded  within  a  5%  tolerance  on  onboard  logbooks  for  all  retained  species.  Information  is  collected 
centrally by the Ministry and is adequate to determine the risk posed by the fishery as well as the effectiveness of the strategy 
to manage retained species. Information on retained species catch and can be verified from source log sheets and can be cross 
referenced with landings inspection reports and at sea inspection reports.  
Information  is  sufficient  to  estimate  outcome  status  with  respect  to  biologically  based  limits.  Landings  of  all  main  retained 
species are recorded at a level of frequency and detail that is considered adequate for the purpose of estimating outcome status 
with  reference  to  biologically  based  limits.  However,  biologically  based  limits  do  not  exist  for  all  of  the  retained  species.  For 
those  species  for  which  there  are  no  clear  biologically  based  limits  (reference  points)  in  place,  there  is  however  a  TAC  and 
national quota system in operation and collectively these are likely to reduce the risk that fishery may present to other species 
that  are  retained.  Information  on  the  level  of  discarding  of  retained  species  is  also  collected  through  an  at  sea  observer 
programme  that  regularly  updates  the  discard  profile  for  different  gear  types.  Data  generated  are  used  to  estimate  total 
volumes of retained (and all other species) that are discarded in each fishery and ICES Area. 
Information is adequate to support a partial strategy to manage main retained species. Information on catches, landings, fishing 
equipment and area of capture are collected in sufficient detail to support measures that are designed to manage impacts of 
the fishery on retained species populations. 
Sufficient data continue to be collected to detect any increase in risk level (e.g. due to changes in the outcome indicator scores 
or  the  operation  of  the  fishery  or  the  effectiveness  of  the  strategy).Landings  data  for  all  species  are  collected  via  the  EU 
logbooks scheme on an ongoing basis and these are collated centrally for the entire Danish North Sea trawling fleet. Accordingly 
it is possible to determine landings for all retained species. However of concern is the fact that it is not possible to determine 
total removals for NS cod due to unrecorded discarding of both juvenile and  adult cod. 
All of the SG 80 have been met, a score of 80 is justified. 
    References 

 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                 March 2011                   101
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
    2.2           Discarded species (also known as “bycatch” or “discards”) 
     

                          Criteria                      60 Guideposts                        80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

    2.2.1   Status                              Main  bycatch  species  are         Main  bycatch  species  are            There  is  a  high  degree  of 
                  The  fishery  does  not       likely  to  be  within              highly  likely  to  be  within         certainty  that  bycatch  species 
                  pose  a  risk  of  serious    biologically  based  limits,  or    biologically  based  limits  or  if    are  within  biologically  based 
                  or irreversible harm to       if  outside  such  limits  there    outside  such  limits  there  is  a    limits.  
                  the  bycatch  species  or     are  mitigation  measures  in       partial        strategy         of 
                  species  groups  and          place  that  are  expected  to      demonstrably            effective 
                  does      not  hinder         ensure that the fishery does        mitigation  measures  in  place 
                  recovery  of  depleted        not  hinder  recovery  and          such that the fishery does not 
                  bycatch  species  or          rebuilding.                         hinder        recovery        and 
                  species groups.                                                   rebuilding.  
                                                If  the  status  is  poorly                                                 
                                                known  there  are  measures 
                                                or  practices  in  place  that 
                                                are  expected  result  in  the 
                                                fishery  not  causing  the 
                                                bycatch  species  to  be 
                                                biologically  based  limits  or 
                                                hindering recovery. 
                                                 
     

        Score:               80                      
 
    Justification 

Main bycatch species are highly likely to be within biologically based limits or if outside such limits there is a partial strategy of 
demonstrably effective mitigation measures in place such that the fishery does not hinder recovery and rebuilding. Summary 
statistics based on observer coverage for the Danish North Sea trawl fleet provided to the assessment team suggest that a broad 
range of species are taken in North Sea mixed trawl fisheries, which are then discarded once the retained catch has been sorted 
from the bulk catch.  
The overall impact of North Sea mixed trawl fisheries on discards were estimated to be 1,731 tonnes of Starry Ray, 257 tonnes 
of Saithe, 115 tonnes of Common dab, 100 tonnes of plaice and 115 tonnes of Norway lobster in 2008. Relatively large volumes 
(>1,000t per annum) of Redfish were captured and discarded in the period 2000‐2004, however this species has not featured in 
recent discard data estimates. 
However, of these, only species that are discarded 100% of the time i.e. they are never retained in the fishery, are considered 
under  this  performance  indicator  ‐  meaning  that  species  such  as  Norway  lobster  and  dab  are  considered  under  retained  and 
plaice  is  considered  under  P1.  Species  that  are  even  occasionally  retained  are  already  considered  under  the  retained  species 
performance indicator. 
Starry ray is not considered a commercial species in the North Sea due its relatively small size. This species is very common and 
is the most abundant ray species in the NE Atlantic area (6). It is the most abundant skate in the North Sea, and has shown a 
marked increase between 1970 and 1983 in the Central North Sea and from 1982–1991 in English groundfish surveys. Although 
a survey of this species indicated a decline recently in the North Sea, this is believed to be a result of a change in survey gear (7).  
Estimates of total biomass of this species in the North Sea are of the order of 100,000 t (8).Starry ray has a relatively low length 
at first maturity (44 cm) and demographic modelling suggests this species is less susceptible to fishing mortality in this region 
than other larger‐bodied skate species.  
Many other demersal and pelagic species are taken in very low numbers as bycatch in Danish mixed fishery trawling. Volumes 
taken  are  not  significant  and  the  fishery  is  highly  unlikely  to  present  a  significant  risk  to  these  bycatch  species.  No  marine 
mammal or seabird species that may be taken occasionally are considered as main retained species The trawl fishery does not 
catch  any  marine  mammal  species  that  are  not  considered  under  the  Endangered,  Threatened  or  Protected  species 
Performance  Indicator.  Similarly,  bycatch  of  seabirds  is  considered  to  occur  only  at  a  very  low  level  and  does  not  present  a 
known significant risk to any bird population. 
    References 

(6) Bergstad, O.A. 1990. Ecology of the fishes of the Norwegian deep: distribution and species assemblages. Netherland Journal 
of Sea Research 25: 237‐266. 



    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                      March 2011                   102
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
(7)  Ellis,  J.R.,  Dulvy,  N.K.,  Jennings,  S.,  Parker‐Humphreys,  M.  and  Rogers,  S.I.  2005.  Assessing  the  status  of  demersal 
elasmobranchs in UK waters: A review. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 85: 1025‐1047. 
(8) Sparholt H. And Vinther M. 1991. The biomass of starry ray, Raja radiata, in the North Sea. Journal du Conseil International 
pour l’Exploration de la Mer 41: 11‐120. 
(9) ICES Advice 2009, Book 2 Section 2.4.7 pp 47‐53 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                       March 2011                  103
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                  60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                      100 Guideposts 

    2.2.2         Management strategy  There  are  measures  in                There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  There is a strategy in place for 
                  There  is  a  strategy  in  place,  if  necessary,  which    place,  if  necessary,  for  managing  and  minimising 
                  place  for  managing  are  expected  to  maintain            managing  bycatch  that  is  bycatch.  
                  bycatch        that      is  main  bycatch  species  at      expected  to  maintain  main 
                  designed to ensure the  levels  which  are  highly           bycatch  species  at  levels 
                  fishery does not pose a  likely  to  be  within              which  are  highly  likely  to  be 
                  risk  of  serious  or  biologically  based  limits  or       within biologically based limits 
                  irreversible  harm  to  to  ensure  that  the  fishery       or  to  ensure  that  the  fishery 
                  bycatch populations.  does  not  hinder  their               does  not  hinder  their 
                                               recovery.                       recovery. 
                                            The       measures          are    There  is  some  objective  basis    The  strategy  is  mainly  based 
                                            considered  likely  to  work,      for confidence that the partial      on  information  directly  about 
                                            based       on        plausible    strategy  will  work,  based  on     the  fishery  and/or  species 
                                            argument  (e.g.  general           some  information  directly          involved, and testing supports 
                                            experience,  theory  or            about  the  fishery  and/or  the     high  confidence  that  the 
                                            comparison  with  similar          species involved.                    strategy will work.  
                                            fisheries/species).  
                                                                               There  is  some  evidence  that  There  is  clear  evidence  that 
                                                                               the  partial  strategy  is  being  the  strategy  is  being 
                                                                               implemented successfully.          implemented        successfully, 
                                                                                                                  and  intended  changes  are 
                                                                                                                  occurring.  There  is  some 
                                                                                                                  evidence  that  the  strategy  is 
                                                                                                                  achieving its objective. 
     


        Score:               80                  
 
    Justification 

There is a partial strategy in place, if necessary, for managing bycatch that is expected to maintain main bycatch species at levels 
which  are  highly  likely  to  be  within  biologically  based  limits  or  to  ensure  that  the  fishery  does  not  hinder  their  recovery.  The 
fishery is managed under the overarching European Union Common Fisheries Policy, under which many measures are in place 
that are designed to ensure that the impacts of all fisheries in relation to bycatch species are minimised on an ongoing basis. 
The recent policy statement by the EU in relation to A policy to reduce unwanted by‐catches and eliminate discards in European 
fisheries  (5)  sets  out  clear  objectives  and  means  by  which  the  EU  Commission  proposes  reduce  and  eliminate  discards  in 
European fisheries. Denmark has shown ongoing commitment to the CFP since its inception and has led the way in recent years 
by introducing the FKA (transferable quota rights based management regime) amongst the Danish fleet. It is expected that this 
system will lead to a reduction in discarding by easing or eliminating some of the commercial pressures that are believed to give 
rise  to  discarding.  Other  elements  of  the  Danish  strategy  include  a  comprehensive  regime  of  technical  control  measures  that 
includes a ban on high grading, closed areas e.g. the Plaice box, real time temporal closures, Minimum Landing Sizes, Minimum 
Mesh  Sizes  as  well  as  an  enforced  ban  on  discarding  in  the  Norwegian  sector  of  the  North  Sea.    Data  on  actual  catches  and 
discards  using  a  120mm  codend  mesh  size  fished  in  twin  rig  trawls  are  available  from  a  recent  fisheries  science  partnership 
project in the North Sea (17). The study concludes that the overall level of discarding was low for a 120mm codend mesh size. 
The  study  also  clearly  showed  that  there  was  a  beneficial  effect  of  using  110  mm  over  80mm  in  terms  of  plaice  and  whiting 
discard levels. 
 
In addition, Denmark’s pioneering programme to create a fully documented fishery in which all removals of cod are accounted 
for  through  the  use  of  onboard  video  surveillance  of  vessels  is  expected  to  yield  significant  benefits  in  the  area  of  discard 
reduction  and  elimination  based  on  rewarding  fishers  for  using  gears  with  enhanced  selectivity  profiles.  It  is  hoped  that  the 
initiative will eventually be rolled out, albeit still on a voluntary basis, to all vessels including <15m vessels, however the medium 
term  objective  is  to  achieve  coverage  in  the  15‐24m  vessel  category.  Many  of  the  mixed  trawl  fleet  vessels  belong  to  this 
category. 
There is some objective basis for confidence that the partial strategy will work, based on some information directly about the 
fishery and/or the species involved. The Danish bycatch management strategy is mainly based on information directly about the 
fishery and/or species involved. The partial strategy is commensurate with information in relation to the discard and bycatch 
profiles of North Sea fisheries and in particular the mixed fisheries using trawl gears. While there is some basis for confidence 
that the strategy will work, aspects of it are quite general in approach (comprising general measures rather than focused and 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                               March 2011                   104
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
targeted initiatives) and does not have clearly stated objectives against which its performance can be measured. The strategy 
has not been tested and shown to work (other than the fully documented fishery).  
There is some evidence that the strategy is being implemented successfully. This is evidenced by the industry support for the  to 
the  Fully  Documented  Fishery,  enforcement  of  technical  control  measures  as  well  as  a  general  and  voluntary  shift  to  use  of 
larger  mesh  sizes  than  the  minimum  required  in  certain  fisheries.  Some  Danish  North  Sea  trawl  vessels  use  the  120mm 
minimum  mesh  that  is  required  for  fishing  in  Norwegian  waters  while  fishing  in  the  EU  sector  (where  the  minimum  size 
permitted  is  110mm).  However  as  overall  objectives  are  not  well  defined  it  has  not  been  possible  to  say  that  the  strategy  is 
achieving  its  objective  (SG100).  Furthermore,  although  much  of  the  plaice  fishery  occurs  in  the  Norwegian  sector  where  a 
discard  ban  is  in  force,  Danish  vessels  continue  to  discard  after  fishing  in  the  Norwegian  sector,  albeit  only  once  they  have 
crossed back into EU waters.  
The  DFPO  have  recently  agreed  on  terms  for  a  Code  of  Conduct  to  be  introduced  to  the  fleet.  The  CoC  provides  some 
background  in  relation  to  DFPO  policy  with  respect  to  reducing  and  minimising  bycatch  and  discarding.  The  CoC  is  a  positive 
development however no credit is given in the scoring as it has not yet been implemented in the fleet and no evidence of its 
operation was observed during the site visit.   
Scoring of this Performance Indicator met all requirements of SG80. A score of 80 is therefore appropriate. 
References 

(5) EU, 2007. European Parliament resolution of 31 January 2008 on a policy to reduce unwanted by‐catches and 
eliminate discards in European fisheries (2007/2112(INI))C 68 E/26 Official Journal of the European Union  
(17)  Cotter  et  al.  2004.  Report  of  fisheries  Science  Partnership.  Final  Report  11:  North  Sea  Lemon  Sole  and  Plaice,  CEFAS 
http://www.cefas.co.uk/media/40271/fsp200607prog11nsealemonsolefinal.pdf 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                             March 2011                    105
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                   60 Guideposts                     80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

    2.2.3   Information                 /  Qualitative  information  is       Qualitative  information  and         Accurate     and      verifiable 
                  monitoring               available  on  the  amount  of     some               quantitative       information is available on the 
                  Information  on  the  main  bycatch  species                information  are  available  on       amount of all bycatch and the 
                  nature  and  amount  of  affected by the fishery.           the  amount  of  main  bycatch        consequences  for  the  status 
                  bycatch is adequate to                                      species  affected  by  the            of affected populations. 
                  determine  the  risk                                        fishery. 
                  posed  by  the  fishery    Information  is  adequate  to    Information  is  sufficient  to       Information  is  sufficient  to 
                  and  the  effectiveness    broadly           understand     estimate  outcome  status  with       quantitatively        estimate 
                  of  the  strategy  to      outcome       status    with     respect  to  biologically  based      outcome  status  with  respect 
                  manage bycatch.            respect  to  biologically        limits.                               to  biologically  based  limits 
                                             based limits.                                                          with  a  high  degree  of 
                                                                                                                    certainty.  

                                             Information  is  adequate  to  Information  is  adequate  to  Information  is  adequate  to 
                                             support    measures        to  support  a  partial  strategy  to  support  a  comprehensive 
                                             manage bycatch.                manage main bycatch species. strategy  to  manage  bycatch, 
                                                                                                               and  evaluate  with  a  high 
                                                                                                               degree of certainty whether a 
                                                                                                               strategy  is  achieving  its 
                                                                                                               objective. 
                                                                              Sufficient  data  continue  to  be    Monitoring  of  bycatch  data  is 
                                                                              collected  to  detect  any            conducted  in  sufficient  detail 
                                                                              increase  in  risk  to  main          to  assess  ongoing  mortalities 
                                                                              bycatch  species  (e.g.  due  to      to all bycatch species. 
                                                                              changes  in  the  outcome 
                                                                              indicator  scores  or  the 
                                                                              operation of the fishery or the 
                                                                              effectiveness of the strategy). 
     


        Score:              85                    
 
    Justification 

Qualitative information and some quantitative information are available on the amount of main bycatch species affected by the 
fishery. Ongoing fishing fleet discard sampling programmes provide accurate and verifiable data in relation to the nature and 
scale  of  discarding  in  the  North  Sea  Plaice  mixed  trawl  fisheries.  Data  provided  by  DTU  is  based  on  observer  reporting  and 
reported discard levels broadly correspond with those observed in other MSC certified North Sea fisheries (10 a,b,c). The level of 
information  that  is  available  in relation  to  discarding  is  adequate  to  determine the  risk  posed  by  the fishery for  the status  of 
affected populations, as well the effectiveness of the management strategy. 
Information  is  sufficient  to  estimate  outcome  status  with  respect  to  biologically  based  limits.  Little  discarding  of  commercial 
species (other than those considered under Retained Species) takes place in the mixed trawl fishery. Accordingly while there is 
significant  discarding  of  both  Starry  ray  and  Redfish,  neither  species  populations  are  considered  vulnerable  to  the  effects  of 
bycatch and estimates of the trawl fishery’s impacts suggest that it is not causing Starry ray to decline (there are no biologically 
based limits in place for Starry ray as it is not a commercial species). Available information suggests that Starry ray is the most 
abundant ray species in the North Sea (6), (7), (8).  It is likely that Redfish is captured in anglerfish and nephrops trawling, which 
take place in deeper waters and which have little overlap with the main plaice trawling areas. Redfish is not considered to be a 
large resource within the North Sea and it is not the subject of a commercial fishery. Incidental capture and discarding of Redfish 
by the trawl fishery at the levels reported are unlikely to have negative implications for Redfish populations.  
Information  is  adequate  to  support  a  partial  strategy  to  manage  main  bycatch  species.  Available  qualitative  and  quantitative 
information in relation to bycatch for mixed demersal trawl fisheries and is deemed sufficient to support measures that serve to 
limit the implications of bycatch levels for affected species. Routine monitoring of bycatch data is conducted in sufficient detail 
to assess ongoing mortalities to all bycatch species. Bycatch sampling is conducted on an ongoing basis and records quantify all 
species  captured  and  not  retained.  Data  collected  are  adequate  for  monitoring  bycatch  rates  and  are  used  by  DTU  Aqua  to 
evaluate ongoing mortalities to bycatch species. 
Scoring the fishery against this Performance Indicator considered that all parameters at SG 80 were fulfilled and one at SG100. A 
score of 85 was therefore applied. 



    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                               March 2011                   106
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
References 

(6) Bergstad, O.A. 1990. Ecology of the fishes of the Norwegian deep: distribution and species assemblages. Netherland Journal 
of Sea Research 25: 237‐266. 
(7)  Ellis,  J.R.,  Dulvy,  N.K.,  Jennings,  S.,  Parker‐Humphreys,  M.  and  Rogers,  S.I.  2005.  Assessing  the  status  of  demersal 
elasmobranchs in UK waters: A review. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 85: 1025‐1047. 
(8) Sparholt H. And Vinther M. 1991. The biomass of starry ray, Raja radiata, in the North Sea. Journal du Conseil International 
pour l’Exploration de la Mer 41: 11‐120. 
 (10a) Moody Marine, 2009. Public Certification report,  Ekofish North Sea twin rigged otter trawl Plaice fishery.  
(10b) Moody Marine, 2008. Public Certification report, German Saithe fishery 
(10c) MacAllister Eliott, Public Certification report, Euronor Saithe trawl fishery 
All MSC Reports available at: http://www.msc.org/track‐a‐fishery 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                       March 2011                  107
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
    2.3           Endangered, Threatened and Protected (ETP) species 
     

                          Criteria                      60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

    2.3.1   Status                              Known effects of the fishery      The  effects  of  the  fishery  are    There  is  a  high  degree  of 
                  The  fishery  meets           are likely to be within limits    known and are highly likely to         certainty  that  the  effects  of 
                                                of        national        and     be  within  limits  of  national       the fishery are within limits of 
                  national        and 
                  international                 international  requirements       and                 international      national  and  international 
                  requirements     for          for  protection  of  ETP          requirements  for  protection          requirements  for  protection 
                  protection  of  ETP           species.                          of ETP species.                        of ETP species. 
                  species.                      Known  direct  effects  are       Direct  effects  are  highly           There  is  a  high  degree  of 
                  The  fishery  does  not       unlikely      to     create       unlikely      to        create         confidence  that  there  are  no 
                  pose  a  risk  of  serious    unacceptable  impacts  to         unacceptable  impacts  to  ETP         significant  detrimental  effects 
                  or irreversible harm to       ETP species.                      species.                               (direct  and  indirect)  of  the 
                  ETP  species  and  does                                                                                fishery on ETP species. 
                  not  hinder  recovery  of 
                  ETP species.                                                    Indirect  effects  have  been   
                                                                                  considered and are thought to 
                                                                                  be  unlikely  to  create 
                                                                                  unacceptable impacts.  
     


        Score:               75                      
 
    Justification 

Three ETP species, as defined by the MSC Fisheries Assessment Methodology v.2 and which occur in the North Sea are known to 
feature  as  occasional  bycatch  in  North  Sea  trawl  fisheries  ‐  Common  skate,  Spurdog  and  Allis  shad.  Seals  are  also  known  to 
deliberately  enter  trawl  nets  from  time  to  time  and  may  occasionally  become  entrapped.  While  other  ETP  species  are  seen 
during fishing trips, there are no indications that Basking shark or Harbour porpoise are ever taken or captured during demersal 
trawling operations.  
The known effects of the fishery are likely to be within limits of national and international requirements for protection of ETP 
species. Danish fisheries landing data reveal that Common skate and Spurdog were landed during 2009 and previous years by 
vessels fishing with demersal trawls in the North Sea. For 2010, there is a ban on landing of Common skate (12) by EU vessels 
from  the  European  sector  of  the  North  Sea.    However,  Danish  vessels  may  still  legally  land  Common  skate  taken  in  the 
Norwegian sector of area IV (North Sea). Fisheries landings data for 2009 and 2010 reveal that small volumes of Common skate 
are still being landed by demersal trawling vessels from the European sector of the North Sea. Spurdog, for which Denmark had 
a  quota  of  26.1  tonnes  in  2009,  no  longer  has  a  Total  Allowable  Catch  (set  at  0  tonnes).  However,  Denmark  is  permitted  to 
report a maximum landing during 2010 of 10% of the 2009 Danish quota, equivalent to 2.61 tonnes, from ICES areas IIa and IV. 
Discard data for the Danish North Sea trawl fleet confirm that Allis shad may occasionally taken as bycatch. DTU Aqua estimated 
a total capture of Allis shad by Danish demersal trawling vessels operating in the North Sea of 0.13 t in 2005, with some bycatch 
also recorded in previous years. However, no bycatch of Allis shad is shown in the DTU for years since 2005, based on discard 
observer reports for 2005‐2008.  
Seals are known to occasionally attempt to enter mobile gears where they may become entrapped and drown, however this is a 
rare event and anecdotal information from the fishery suggests that numbers killed or injured in this way are low and the fishery 
is  not  believed  to  present  a  significant  risk  to  either  Harbour  or  Grey  seal  populations.  Angel  shark  would  potentially  be  a 
significant  ETP  species  in  the  North  Sea,  however  it  is  considered  extinct  in  the  North  Sea  (11)  and  the  trawl  fishery  is  not 
expected to interact with this species, although it has been implicated in the extinction of Angel shark within the North Sea. 
Direct effects are highly unlikely to create unacceptable impacts to ETP species.  While observance of the ban on landings of 
Common skate and Spurdog from the European sector of Area IV (apart from the 26.1 tonne allowance for Spurdog) will ensure 
compliance with the international requirements, it is highly likely that some fishery related mortality of both Common skate and 
Spurdog  will  continue  in  the  future  as  a  result  of  post  release  mortality  of  captured  specimens.  The  elimination  of  landings 
therefore will not guarantee zero fishery mortality for these species in the future. The precise level of threat that the fishery 
poses  to  Common  skate  and  Spurdog  is  uncertain  and  warrants  specific  investigation.  Nevertheless  it  is  considered  that  the 
fishery  is  highly  unlikely  to  create  unacceptable  impacts  to  these  species.  An  analysis  of  the  reporting  for  Common  skate 
landings in 2009 reveals that practically all Common skate are taken in deeper waters of the Norwegian trench, outside of EU 
waters. These areas do not coincide with the areas from which plaice is taken by demersal trawl, which clearly tends to be in 
much shallower water, as evidenced by VMS data for North Sea demersal trawling provided by DTU Aqua. Spurdog must not be 
landed with a  Total Length of <100cm and the lack of a TAC means that no targeted fishing for this species is undertaken and 
catches must be returned alive in so far as this is possible. Incidental capture of Allis shad – a mainly coastal pelagic species is 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                    March 2011                   108
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
minimal and impacts of the fishery are highly unlikely to be unacceptable. 
Indirect  effects  have  been  considered  and  are  thought  to  be  unlikely  to  create  unacceptable  impacts.  No  significant  indirect 
effects of the fishery on ETP species have been identified or are thought likely given the present level of knowledge in relation 
to the life history of potentially impacted species. 
In scoring this Performance Indicator, two of SG80 have been satisfied, therefore a score of 75 is justified.  
References 

(11) International Union for the Conservation of Nature Redlist, 2010 www.iucnredlist.org 
 (12) European Commission. Council regulation no. 23/2010 
 (13) CITES Appendix II www.cites.org 
(14) Council Directive 92/43/EEC – the abitats Directive 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                          March 2011                   109
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                         Criteria                    60 Guideposts                    80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

    2.3.2   Management strategy  There are measures in place  There is a strategy in place for  There  is  a  comprehensive 
                  The  fishery  has  in      that  minimise  mortality,      managing the fishery’s impact         strategy in place for managing 
                  place  precautionary       and  are  expected  to  be      on  ETP  species,  including          the  fishery’s  impact  on  ETP 
                  management                 highly  likely  to  achieve     measures        to       minimise     species, including measures to 
                  strategies designed to:    national  and  international    mortality,  that  is  designed  to    minimise  mortality,  that  is 
                                             requirements  for  the          be  highly  likely  to  achieve       designed  to  achieve  above 
                  - meet national and 
                                             protection of ETP species.      national  and  international          national  and  international 
                    international 
                                                                             requirements          for     the     requirements        for      the 
                    requirements; 
                                                                             protection of ETP species.            protection of ETP species.  
                  - ensure the fishery 
                                                                              
                    does not pose a risk 
                    of serious or         The       measures          are    There is an objective basis for       The  strategy  is  mainly  based 
                    irreversible harm to  considered  likely  to  work,      confidence  that  the  strategy       on  information  directly  about 
                    ETP species;          based       on        plausible    will  work,  based  on  some          the  fishery  and/or  species 
                  - ensure the fishery  argument  (eg.  general              information directly about the        involved,  and  a  quantitative 
                    does not hinder       experience,  theory  or            fishery  and/or  the  species         analysis     supports       high 
                    recovery of ETP       comparison  with  similar          involved.                             confidence  that  the  strategy 
                    species; and          fisheries/species).                                                      will work. 
                  - minimise mortality                                       There  is  evidence  that  the  There  is  clear  evidence  that 
                    of ETP species.                                          strategy is being implemented  the  strategy  is  being 
                                                                             successfully.                   implemented         successfully, 
                                                                                                             and  intended  changes  are 
                                                                                                             occurring.  There  is  evidence 
                                                                                                             that  the  strategy  is  achieving 
                                                                                                             its objective. 
     


        Score:              60                    
 
    Justification 

There are measures in place that minimise mortality, and are expected to be highly likely to achieve national and international 
requirements for the protection of ETP species. The key ETP species that may be encountered in this fishery is Common skate. 
Through Council Regulation 23/2010 (12), the European Union have raised the protection level of Common skate by requiring 
that all captures of the species in Areas IIa and IV be promptly returned to the sea alive. In doing so it has become illegal to land 
skate  that  are  taken  from  the  European  sector  of  the  North  Sea.    Furthermore,  under  the  regulation,  catches  of  Cuckoo  ray, 
Blonde  ray  ,  Thornback  ray,  Starry  ray  and  Spotted  ray  must  be  reported  separately.  The  DFPO  have  recently  run  a  publicity 
campaign to highlight the implications of the regulation to its member vessels and to ensure that members do not land skate 
that are taken from the EU sector of the North Sea. Spurdog continue to be landed where they are taken as bycatch, however 
there  was  no  indication  at  the  time  of  the  site  visit  that  volumes  would  exceed  the  10%  of  2008  quota  rule  (2.6t).  Other 
measures, such as VMS monitoring of vessels in the North Sea demersal trawl fishery are useful in estimating the potential risk 
that the fishery may present to Common skate populations.  
The  DFPO  have  recently  agreed  on  terms  for  a  Code  of  Conduct  to  be  introduced  to  the  fleet.  The  CoC  provides  some 
background in relation to DFPO policy with respect to ETP interactions. The CoC is a positive development however no credit is 
given in the scoring as it has not yet been implemented in the fleet and no evidence of its operation was observed during the 
site visit.   
The measures are considered likely to work, based on plausible argument (eg. general experience, theory or comparison with 
similar fisheries/species). The restriction on landing both Common skate and Spurdog are considered likely to work. Spurdog are 
a  relatively  low  value  species  that  is  not  targeted  directly.  It  is  easily  identified  and  is  thought  to  have  a  greater  chance  of 
survival once returned to the sea than most teleost fish, although it is likely that a significant proportion of returned Spurdog 
will not survive. There are projects underway in Europe that seek to evaluate post capture survival of Spurdog (16). At smaller 
sizes,  Common  skate  may  be  more  difficult  to  distinguish  from  other  ray  and  skate  species  and  there  is  scope  that  Common 
skate could be retained as a result of misidentification (15). However as mentioned under 2.3.1, there is little overlap between 
the areas fished using demersal trawls and the generally preferred deeper water habitat of the Common skate. Accordingly it is 
considered likely that the measures in place are likely to be effective in limiting the extent of interaction between the demersal 
trawl fishery and Common skate. 
All Scoring Guides at SG60 are satisfied and a score of 60 has been awarded. 




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                              March 2011                     110
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
References 

(12) European Commission. Council regulation no. 23/2010 
(15) Iglesias et al. 2009 Taxonomic confusion and market mislabelling of threatened skates: 
important  consequences  for  their  conservation  status.  AQUATIC  CONSERVATION:  MARINE  AND  FRESHWATER  ECOSYSTEMS, 
Wiley Interscience. 
(16)  http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Document.aspx?Document=MB5201_8326_INF.pdf 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                         March 2011               111
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                  60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

    2.3.3   Information                    /  Information  is  adequate  to    Information  is  sufficient  to         Information  is  sufficient  to 
                  monitoring                  broadly  understand  the         determine  whether  the                 quantitatively         estimate 
                  Relevant  information       impact of the fishery on ETP     fishery  may  be  a  threat  to         outcome  status  with  a  high 
                  is  collected  to  support  species.                         protection  and  recovery  of           degree of certainty.  
                  the  management  of                                          the  ETP  species,  and  if  so,  to 
                  fishery impacts on ETP                                       measure trends and support a 
                  species, including:                                          full  strategy  to  manage 
                                                                               impacts. 
                  - information for the 
                    development of the  Information  is  adequate  to          Sufficient data are available to        Information  is  adequate  to 
                    management           support   measures        to          allow fishery related mortality         support  a  comprehensive 
                    strategy;            manage the impacts on ETP             and the impact of fishing to be         strategy  to  manage  impacts, 
                  - information to       species                               quantitatively  estimated  for          minimize  mortality  and  injury 
                    assess the                                                 ETP species.                            of  ETP  species,  and  evaluate 
                    effectiveness of the                                                                               with  a  high  degree  of 
                    management                                                                                         certainty whether a strategy is 
                    strategy; and                                                                                      achieving its objectives.  
                  - information to          Information  is  sufficient  to                                            Accurate      and     verifiable 
                    determine the           qualitatively  estimate  the                                               information is available on the 
                    outcome status of       fishery  related  mortality  of                                            magnitude  of  all  impacts, 
                    ETP species.            ETP species.                                                               mortalities  and  injuries  and 
                                                                                                                       the  consequences  for  the 
                                                                                                                       status of ETP species. 
     


        Score:               70                  
 
    Justification 

Information is sufficient to determine whether the fishery may be a threat to protection and recovery of the ETP species, and if 
so,  to  measure  trends  and  support  a  full  strategy  to  manage  impacts.  Information  in  relation  to  the  distribution  of  Common 
skate suggests that the species is restricted to deeper waters and softer sediments in the North Sea, close to and along the edge 
of the Norwegian Deep, it is a species that is uncommon in the area where the demersal trawl plaice fishery is concentrated. 
There is mandatory reporting in Denmark for all commercial catches. The assessment team have been able to use official Danish 
landings data for the purposes developing an understanding of how the fishery may affect populations of Common skate and 
Spurdog,  both  of  which  could  be  legally  landed  up  until  2008.  The  reporting  system  is  based  on  EU  logbooks  and  vessels  are 
subject to at sea and landings inspections. In addition, data in relation to estimated quantities of discard species extrapolated to 
fleet level from observer data has been of assistance on developing a general understanding of the scale of bycatch of the main 
affected ETP species. . 
Information is adequate to support measures to manage the impacts on ETP species. Data are collected on an ongoing basis for 
the demersal trawl fleet through the operation of EU logbooks. Data are sufficiently detailed to support measures such as eg. EU 
Council Reg 23/2010 (12), that are designed to reduce impacts as well as allow the fishery related mortality of ETP species to be 
assessed. Information in relation where the fishery takes place is available through logbook data. Catches are recorded by ICES 
Area and statistical rectangles and logbook data can be cross referenced with VMS data. Changes in demersal trawling areas and 
fleet fishing patterns in the North Sea can be observed and the data supports measures to manage impacts on ETP. 
Information is sufficient to qualitatively estimate the fishery related mortality of ETP species. 
All scoring guides at SG60 are met and one at SG80. Accordingly a score of 70 is justified. 
    References 

(12) European Commission. Council regulation no. 23/2010 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                  March 2011                  112
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
    2.4                    Habitat  
     

                                          Criteria                                            60 Guideposts                                                      80 Guideposts                                               100 Guideposts 

    2.4.1   Status                                                             The  fishery  is  unlikely  to                                   The  fishery  is  highly  unlikely                                   There  is  evidence  that  the 
                         The  fishery  does  not                               reduce  habitat  structure                                       to  reduce  habitat  structure                                       fishery  is  highly  unlikely  to 
                         cause  serious  or                                    and  function  to  a  point                                      and function to a point where                                        reduce  habitat  structure  and 
                         irreversible  harm  to                                where  there  would  be                                          there  would  be  serious  or                                        function  to  a  point  where 
                         habitat        structure,                             serious  or  irreversible                                        irreversible harm.                                                   there  would  be  serious  or 
                         considered  on  a                                     harm.                                                                                                                                 irreversible harm.  
                         regional  or  bioregional 
                         basis, and function. 
     

        Score:                                  75                                
 
    Justification 

The fishery is unlikely to reduce habitat structure and function to a point where there would be serious or irreversible harm. 
Data from the Danish Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) which shows the spatial location of the fishery has been provided to the 
assessment team. Aggregated bottom trawling effort in the North Sea by Danish >15m vessels in 2009, where catches of plaice 
constituted  at  least  25%  of  the  retained  catch,  is  presented  in  Map  1  below.  Map  2  presents  all  bottom  trawling  effort  for 
vessels using mesh sizes greater than 32mm in relation to the Dogger Bank Special Are of Conservation. 




                                                              Map 1                                                                                                                                                 Map 2 
Map 1 VMS, Danish >15m vessels bottom trawling for Plaice, 2009 where plaice comprised at least 25% of the catch                           
Map 2 All bottom trawling effort 2009, Danish vessels with mesh sizes greater  than 32mm 
                                                                                                                                             
ICES (18) provides a broad description of the bottom topography of the North Sea. The North Sea can broadly be described as 
having  a  shallow  (<50  m)  southeastern  part,  which  is  sharply  separated  by  the  Doggerbank  from  a  much  deeper  (50–100  m) 
central part running north along the British coast. The central northern part of the shelf gradually slopes down to 200 m before 
reaching the shelf edge. Another main feature is the Norwegian Trench running in the east along the Norwegian coast into the 
Skagerrak  with  depths  up  to  500  m.  Further  to  the  east,  the  Norwegian  Trench  ends  abruptly,  and  the  Kattegat  is  of  similar 
depth as the main part of the North Sea. The substrates are dominated by sands in the southern and coastal regions and by fine 
muds  in  deeper  and  more  central  parts.  Sands  become  generally  coarser  to  the  east  and  west,  interspersed  with  patches  of 
gravel and stones as well. Local concentrations of boulders are found in the shallow southern part. This specific hard‐bottom 
habitat  has  become  scarcer,  because  boulders  caught  in  beam  trawls  are  often  brought  ashore.  The  deep  areas  of  the 
Norwegian  Trench  are  covered  with  extensive  layers  of  fine  muds,  while  some  of  the  slopes  have  rocky  bottoms.  Several 
underwater canyons extend further towards the coasts of Norway and Sweden. A number of sand banks across the North Sea 
qualify  for  protection  under  the  EU  habitats  directive,  mainly  along  the  UK  coast,  eastern  Channel,  the  approaches  to  the 
Skagerrak, and the Dogger Bank. Extensive biogenic reefs of Lophelia have recently been mapped along the Norwegian coastline 
in the eastern Skagerrak, while Sabellaria reefs have been reported in the south, although their distribution and extent is not 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                                                                                                                March 2011                   113
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
known. Gravels also qualify for protection, but comprehensive maps at a total North Sea scale are not readily available.  
A  review  of  habitat  distribution  information  provided  in  section  4.4  and  fishing  effort  location  information  suggests  that  the 
majority of bottom trawling for plaice and other demersal species occurs over sandy sediments in the eastern central North Sea, 
in water depths of less than 100 meters. There is only a small apparent overlap between Danish demersal trawl fisheries and the 
Dogger Bank SAC.  Some fishing also occurs on muddy areas, while areas of gravel and stones appear to be fished much less 
intensively or are avoided altogether by bottom trawling vessels. 
The  gear  used  in  the  demersal  trawl  mixed  fishery  typically  comprises  a  twin  rig  arrangement,  whereby  two  trawls  are 
simultaneously towed in parallel behind the vessel. The net is kept open by steel otter boards (trawl doors) that may weigh up 
to 1,000kg each. A single ‘clump’ weight or roller, which may weigh up to 800kg, is deployed between the two nets and serves 
to keep the inner wing ends of the net close to the seabed. The ground rope of the nets typically hold 100mm diameter rubber 
rollers,  while  each  net  has  a  tickler  chain  (typically  comprising  12mm  steel  chain)  spanning  between  the  wing ends.  Codends 
may have chaffing gear fitted for protection on the underside. Being a demersal species living on the seabed, trawls gears used 
to fish for plaice can reasonably expected to have an impact on benthic habitats, as the gear must establish close contact with 
the seabed in order to work efficiently. The greatest physical impact however results from contact with the seabed that is made 
by trawl doors as well as the centre weight or roller; as these are pulled across the seabed they leave behind them a furrow (19) 
which may be detected for some time afterwards using side scan sonar. 
(20); (21) and (22) all refer to the alteration of the structure and function of seabed habitats and effects on benthic communities 
caused  by  trawling.  Trawling  tends  to  reduce  the  seabed  to  a  flat  homogenous  plain.    By  directly  or  indirectly  removing  and 
flattening any relief, the seabed may lose much or its entire three dimensional structure. Benthic communities of larger, slow 
growing and long lived species are removed and replaced by less diverse communities of smaller, short lived and fast growing 
species. Hiddink et al. (22) suggest that negative impacts of trawling are greatest in those areas where seabed habitats are not 
subject to high levels of natural disturbance. Benthic macrofauna are most affected by trawling activity; whereas burrowing and 
other  smaller  seabed  infauna  are  less  vulnerable  (23);  (24).  Where  trawling  does  not  cause  direct  mortality  to  species  or 
individual  specimens,  indirect  consequences  may  arise  whereby  fauna  is  damaged  or  injured,  making  it  more  susceptible  to 
being  preyed  upon  by  scavenging  fauna  (25),  (26).  Repeated  trawling  of  the  seabed  may  also  modify  benthic  production 
processes (19). 
The rate at which the seabed may recover from trawling impacts is difficult to estimate as most areas are fished on an ongoing 
basis.  Nevertheless,  communities  dominated  by  long‐lived,  slow  growing  and  late  maturing  faunal  species  that  may  also  be 
characterised by irregular recruitment and poor potential for rapid re‐colonisation of areas through asexual reproduction can be 
expected to be less resilient to the effects of trawling disturbance. This fact remains even though some species will be faster to 
recover and hence less vulnerable, than the community of which they are components (25). Such communities are more typical 
of hard seabeds such as cobble. (27) suggests that recovery of benthic communities from trawling over hard seabeds probably 
takes  in  the  region  of  5  to  10  years.  In  sandy  sediments,  recovery  is  likely  to  be  faster  since  the  associated  communities  are 
accustomed to higher levels of natural disturbance (28). 
OSPAR (29) list a number of sensitive habitats in the northeast Atlantic, including the North Sea. A series of maps showing the 
location and distribution of sensitive habitats in the OSPAR area are available on the OSPAR web portal. The assessment team 
have  consulted  these  maps  in  the  context  of  potential  interaction  with  NS  Plaice  demersal  trawl  fisheries.  The  habitats 
examined included Lophelia pertusa deep water coral reefs, carbonate mounds, deep sea sponge aggregations and seapens and 
burrowing  megafauna  communities.  The  team  have  concluded  that  there  is  no  evidence  that  the  fishery  is  likely  to  have 
significant interactions with any of these habitats, considering that the fishery takes place mainly on sandy seabed environments 
and in waters that are generally less than 100m meters deep.  
Despite  the foregoing,  maps  providing  a suitably  high  level  of detail  in  relation  to  seabed habitat  types and  their  distribution 
within  all  the  areas  fished  by  Danish  vessels  trawling  for  North  Sea  plaice  have  not  been  provided  to  the  team  during  the 
assessment.  While  the  team  were  satisfied  that  the  fishery  meets  SG60,  it  was  felt  that  there  was  insufficient  evidence 
presented  to  consider  the  fishery  at  SG80.The  level  of  detail  provided  did  not  allow  for  the  risks  to  all  potentially  affected 
seabed  habitats  for  all  Danish  North  Sea  plaice  trawl  landings  to  be  considered.  No  specific  investigations  of  the  impact  of 
demersal trawl gears used by the fleet have been available, and the assessment team were reliant on inferring likely outcome 
status from more general studies carried in other parts of the North Sea and elsewhere. 
A score of 75 was therefore deemed appropriate.  
References 
(18) ICES Advice 2007 Book 6.  Report of the ICES Advisory Committee on Fishery Management, Advisory Committee on the 
Marine Environment and Advisory Committee on Ecosystems, 2007. ICES Advice Book 6, 249 pp. 
(19) Humborstad, O.‐B., Nøttestad, L., Løkkeborg, S., and Rapp, H. T. 2004. RoxAnn 
bottom classification system, sidescan sonar and video‐sledge: spatial resolution and 
their use in assessing trawling impacts. ICES Journal of Marine Science 61, 53‐63. 
(20)  Jennings,  S.,  Dinmore,  T.A.,  Duplisea,  D.E.,  Warr,  K.J.,  Lancaster,  J.E.,  2001.  Trawling  disturbance  can  modify  benthic 
production processes. J. Animal Ecol. 70, 459‐475. 


 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                March 2011                    114
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
 (21) Trimmer, M., Petersen, J., Sivyer, D.B., Mills, C., Young, E., Parker, E.R., 2005. Impact of long‐term benthic trawl disturbance 
on sediment sorting and biogeochemistry in the southern North Sea. Marine Ecology Progress Series 298, 79‐94. 
(22)    Hiddink,  J.  G.,  Jennings,  S.,  Kaiser,  M.  J.,  Queirós,  A.  M.,  Duplisea,  D.  E.,  and  Piet,  G.  J.  2006a.  Cumulative  impacts  of 
seabed  trawl  disturbance  on  benthic  biomass,  production  and  species  richness  in  different  habitats.  Canadian  Journal  of 
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 63: 721‐736. 
 (23) Bergmann, M.J.N., van Santbrink, J.W., 2000. Mortality in megafaunal benthic populations caused by trawl fisheries on the 
Dutch continental shelf in the North Sea in 1994. ICES J. Mar. Sci. 57 (5) (5), 1321‐1331. 
(24) A. Dinmore, D. E. Duplisea, B. D. Rackham, D. L. Maxwell, and S. Jennings 2004. Impact of a large‐scale area closure on 
patterns of fishing disturbance and the consequences for benthic communities. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 60: 371–380. 
2003 
(25) Kaiser, M.J & B.E. Spencer 1994. Fish scavenging behaviour in recently trawled areas. Marine Ecology Progress Series 112: 
41‐49. 
(26)  Kenchington,  E.L.R.,  K.D.  Gilkinson,  K.G.  MacIsaac,  C.  Bourbonnais‐Boyce,  T.J.  Kenchington,  S.J.  Smith  &  D.C.  Gordon  Jr. 
2006. Effects of experimental otter trawling on benthic assemblages on Western Bank, northwest Atlantic Ocean. Journal Of 
Sea Research 56: 249‐270. 
(27)  Callaway,  R.,  Engelhard,  G.H.,  Daan,  J.,  Cotter,  J.,  Rumohr,  H.,  2007.  A  century  of  North  Sea  epibenthos  and  trawling: 
comparison between 1902‐1912, 1982‐1985 and 2000 Marine Ecology Progress Series 346, 27‐43. 
(28) Kaiser, M. J., Edwards, D. B., Armstrong, P. J., Radford, K., Lough, N. E. L., Flatt, R. P., and Jones, H. D. 1998 Changes in 
megafaunal benthic communities in different habitats after trawling disturbance. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 55: 353–
361. 
 (29) OSPAR – see www.ospar.org 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                   March 2011                    115
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                  60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                      100 Guideposts 

    2.4.2         Management strategy  There  are  measures  in                There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  There is a strategy in place for 
                  There  is  a  strategy  in  place, if necessary, that are    place,  if  necessary,  that  is  managing  the  impact  of  the 
                  place  that  is  designed  expected  to  achieve  the        expected  to  achieve  the  fishery on habitat types.  
                  to  ensure  the  fishery  Habitat Outcome 80 level of        Habitat  Outcome  80  level  of 
                  does not pose a risk of  performance.                        performance or above.  
                  serious  or  irreversible  The       measures         are    There  is  some  objective  basis    The  strategy  is  mainly  based 
                  harm to habitat types.  considered  likely  to  work,        for confidence that the partial      on  information  directly  about 
                                             based       on       plausible    strategy  will  work,  based  on     the  fishery  and/or  habitats 
                                             argument  (eg.  general           some  information  directly          involved, and testing supports 
                                             experience,  theory  or           about  the  fishery  and/or          high  confidence  that  the 
                                             comparison  with  similar         habitats involved.                   strategy will work.  
                                             fisheries/habitats).  
                                                                               There  is  some  evidence  that  There  is  clear  evidence  that 
                                                                               the  partial  strategy  is  being  the  strategy  is  being 
                                                                               implemented successfully.          implemented        successfully, 
                                                                                                                  and  intended  changes  are 
                                                                                                                  occurring.  There  is  some 
                                                                                                                  evidence  that  the  strategy  is 
                                                                                                                  achieving its objective. 
     

        Score:               70                  
 
    Justification 

There  are  measures  in  place,  if  necessary,  that  are  expected  to  achieve  the  Habitat  Outcome  80  level  of  performance.  The 
fishery  is  subject  to  and  managed  under  the  provisions  of  the  Common  Fisheries  Policy  which  apply  to  Danish  vessels  that 
prosecute  the  fishery  for  North Sea  plaice  using  demersal  trawls  (30).  Article  2  of  Council  Regulation  (EC)  No  2371/2002  (31) 
provides that the CFP is to apply the precautionary approach in taking measures to minimise the impact of fishing activities on 
marine ecosystems. The CFP implements a range of measures that are expected to ensure the fishery does not pose a risk of 
serious  or  irreversible  harm  to  seabed  habitat  types.  The  potential  for  the  fishery  to  have  serious  or  long  term    impacts  on 
seabed habitats is limited in accordance with restrictions on landings (TAC’s and national quotas), fishing effort (days at sea), 
vessel size and power (kw) and fleet size. Outside of the CFP, changes to the management of Danish fishing entitlements since 
2007 have seen a reduction on the number of vessels fishing in the North Sea. This trend of fewer vessels is likely to continue. 
With the reduction in vessel numbers, it is reasonable to expect that the intensity of demersal trawling will decrease further in 
time, thereby reducing trawling pressure on seabed habitats.  
The measures are considered likely to work, based on plausible argument (eg. general experience, theory or comparison with 
similar  fisheries/habitats).  Knowledge  in  relation  to  the  spatial  distribution  of  the  demersal  trawl  fisheries  and  the  seabed 
habitats  where  these  occur,  along  with  knowledge    relating  to  the  distribution  and  extent  of  OSPAR  listed  sensitive  seabed 
habitats in the North Sea leads to confidence that the measures are likely to work. 
There  is  some  evidence  that  the  measures  are being  implemented  successfully.    TAC’s  for  North  Sea  plaice  as  well  as  Danish 
national quotas are rarely exceeded. The Danish North Sea trawling fleet is continuing to contract in response to the new rights 
based management regime. However, the measures need to be brought together under an overall strategy to manage seabed 
impacts of demersal trawling. A suitable strategy needs to have and be driven by clear objectives, propose means by which it 
will be implemented as well as have clear targets by which its  performance can be evaluated. Lack of a clear strategy means 
there  is  insufficient  evidence  at  this  point  in  time  to  confirm  that  measures  are  effective  in  maintaining  impacts  on  seabed 
habitats by the demersal trawl fishery within acceptable limits. 
The assessment team took note that the DFPO have recently agreed on terms for a Code of Conduct to be introduced to the 
fleet. The CoC provides some background in relation to DFPO policy with respect to reducing environmental impacts of fishing 
operations. The CoC is a positive development however no credit is given in the scoring as it has not yet been implemented in 
the fleet and no evidence of its operation was observed during the site visit.   
All scoring guides at SG60 have been met and one at SG80. Accordingly a score of 75 has been recorded. 
    References 

(30) Council Regulation (EC) 23 of 2010 
(31) Council Regulation (EC) 2371 of 2002 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                               March 2011                  116
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                           Criteria                   60 Guideposts                        80 Guideposts                       100 Guideposts 

    2.4.3   Information                     /  There      is      a     basic     The  nature,  distribution  and       The  distribution  of  habitat 
                  monitoring                   understanding  of  the  types      vulnerability  of  all  main          types  is  known  over  their 
                  Information              is  and  distribution  of  main        habitat  types  in  the  fishery      range,      with     particular 
                  adequate                to  habitats  in  the  area  of  the    area  are  known  at  a  level  of    attention to the occurrence of 
                  determine  the  risk  fishery.                                  detail  relevant  to  the  scale      vulnerable habitat types.  
                  posed  to  habitat  types                                       and intensity of the fishery.  
                  by  the  fishery  and  the  Information  is  adequate  to       Sufficient data are available to  Changes   in       habitat 
                  effectiveness  of  the  broadly  understand  the                allow  the  nature  of  the  distributions  over  time  are 
                  strategy  to  manage  main  impacts  of  gear  use              impacts  of  the  fishery  on  measured.  
                  impacts  on  habitat  on  the  main  habitats,                  habitat  types  to  be  identified 
                  types.                       including  spatial  extent  of     and  there  is  reliable 
                                              interaction.                        information  on  the  spatial 
                                                                                  extent,  timing  and  location  of 
                                                                                  use of the fishing gear. 
                                                                                  Sufficient  data  continue  to  be    The  physical  impacts  of  the 
                                                                                  collected  to  detect  any            gear on the habitat types have 
                                                                                  increase in risk to habitat (e.g.     been quantified fully. 
                                                                                  due  to  changes  in  the              
                                                                                  outcome  indicator  scores  or 
                                                                                  the operation of the fishery or 
                                                                                  the  effectiveness  of  the 
                                                                                  measures). 
     


        Score:               85                    
 
    Justification 

The  distribution  of  habitat  types  is  known  over  their  range,  with  particular  attention  to  the  occurrence  of  vulnerable  habitat 
types. The main habitat types affected by the fishery are known from information collected directly for the fishery during the 
site visit and a review of some general as well as more specific material in relation to North Sea habitats. Scientific literature in 
relation to the sensitivity of different seabed habitats as well as the vulnerability of communities and species to trawl fisheries 
impacts are sufficient to allow the nature of the impacts of the fishery on habitat types to be identified.  
Sufficient  data  are  available  to  allow  the  nature  of  the  impacts  of  the  fishery  on  habitat  types  to  be  identified  and  there  is 
reliable information on the spatial extent, timing and location of use of the fishing gear. VMS data are considered reliable and 
has been provided to the assessment team on a quarterly basis for 2009. The data gives good information on the spatial extent 
and location of the major component of the fishery.  
Sufficient data continue to be collected to detect any increase in risk to habitat (e.g. due to changes in the outcome indicator 
scores or the operation of the fishery or the effectiveness of the measures). VMS data and spatially referenced landings data 
continue  to  be  collected  and  are  adequate  for  the  purposes  of  detecting  any  changes  within  the  fishery  that  may  have 
implications for the outcome status. 
The distribution of all habitats affected by the fishery – with particular reference to sensitive communities or vulnerable species 
is not known, nor are changes over time monitored. 
Al scoring guides at SG80 have been met and one scoring guide at SG100. Score 85.  
    References 

 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                   March 2011                 117
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
    2.5           Ecosystem 
     

                             Criteria               60 Guideposts                        80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

    2.5.1         Status                     The  fishery  is  unlikely  to     The  fishery  is  highly  unlikely    There  is  evidence  that  the 
                  The  fishery  does  not    disrupt  the  key  elements        to  disrupt  the  key  elements       fishery  is  highly  unlikely  to 
                  cause  serious  or         underlying         ecosystem       underlying            ecosystem       disrupt  the  key  elements 
                  irreversible  harm  to     structure  and  function  to  a    structure  and  function  to  a       underlying            ecosystem 
                  the  key  elements  of     point where there would be         point where there would be a          structure  and  function  to  a 
                  ecosystem  structure       a  serious  or  irreversible       serious or irreversible harm.         point where there would be a 
                  and function.              harm.                                                                    serious or irreversible harm.  
     


        Score:                 90             
 
    Justification 
    The fishery is highly unlikely to disrupt the key elements underlying ecosystem structure and function to a point where there 
    would be a serious or irreversible harm. The role of Plaice in the North Sea ecosystem is relatively well understood. Plaice is 
    dominantly benthivorous, feeding mainly on polychaetes and crustaceans, with bivalves and small demersal fish featuring in 
    the diet of larger plaice. Food‐web studies suggest that post‐juvenile plaice function mainly as an energy sink in the North Sea 
    ecosystem and that relatively small proportions of plaice biomass are passed onto the demersal piscivore guild and an even 
    smaller proportion to the pelagic piscivore guild (32; 33; 34). This clearly suggests that removal of plaice at sustainable levels 
    should not give rise to significant impacts on the wider foodweb of the North Sea.  
    Serious depletion of the spawning stock could give rise to reduced availability of juvenile plaice on inshore nursery grounds 
    where  they  are  likely  to  form  an  important  prey  item  for  other  species.  There  is  potential  that  this  could  have  negative 
    consequences for dependent species, especially in circumstances where no alternative prey species was available. There is no 
    evidence however to suggest that the removal of plaice at current levels is likely to have such a consequence,  based on the 
    most  recent  estimate  of  SSB  (in  2009)  and  fishing  mortality  (in  2008),  ICES  classifies  the  stock  as  having  full  reproductive 
    capacity and as being harvested sustainably. SSB is estimated to have increased above the Bpa. Fishing mortality is estimated 
    to have decreased to below Fpa and Ftarget (35).  
    The team concluded that at present rates of exploitation for NS plaice, the demersal trawl fishery was highly unlikely to disrupt 
             key elements underlying ecosystem structure and function. Accordingly the SG 80 has been met. While no conclusive 
             evidence  that  the  fishery  is  highly  unlikely  to  disrupt  the  key  elements  of  ecosystem  structure  and  function  was 
             presented to the assessment team, the team were of the opinion that the observed increase in SSB and the fact the 
             North Sea plaice stock is now considered to have full reproductive capacity provides some evidence that the fishery 
             was highly unlikely to cause serious disruption to key elements underlying ecosystem structure and function. 
    SG80 has been fulfilled and the SG100 has been partially fulfilled. A score of 90 is appropriate. 

    References 
    (32) Greenstreet, S.P.R., A.D. Bryant, N. Broekhuizen, S.J. Hall & M.R. Heath. 1997. Seasonal variation in the consumption of 
    food by fish in the North Sea and implications for food web dynamics. ICES Journal of Marine Science 54: 243‐266. 
    (33) Mackinson, S. 2001. Representing trophic interactions in the North Sea in the 1880s, using the 
    Ecopath mass‐balance approach. Fisheries Centre Research Report 9:44: 35‐98.  
    (34) Mackinson, S. & G. Daskalov. 2007. An ecosystem model of the North Sea for use in fisheries 
    management and ecological research: description and parameterisation. 195 pp. 
(35) ICES Advice 2009, Book 6 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                 March 2011                   118
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                    60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

    2.5.2   Management strategy  There  are  measures  in  There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  There  is  a  strategy  that 
                  There  are  measures  in    place,  if  necessary,  that      place,  if  necessary,  that  takes    consists  of  a  plan,  containing 
                  place  to  ensure  the      take  into  account  potential    into        account      available     measures  to  address  all  main 
                  fishery does not pose a     impacts  of  the  fishery  on     information  and  is  expected         impacts  of  the  fishery  on  the 
                  risk  of  serious  or       key  elements  of  the            to  restrain  impacts  of  the         ecosystem,  and  at  least  some 
                  irreversible  harm  to      ecosystem.                        fishery on the ecosystem so as         of  these  measures  are  in 
                  ecosystem  structure                                          to  achieve  the  Ecosystem            place.  The  plan and  measures 
                  and function.                                                 Outcome  80  level  of                 are based on well‐understood 
                                                                                performance.                           functional          relationships 
                                                                                                                       between  the  fishery  and  the 
                                                                                                                       Components  and  elements  of 
                                                                                                                       the ecosystem.  
                                              The       measures        are     The  partial  strategy  is             This  plan  provides  for 
                                              considered  likely  to  work,     considered  likely  to  work,          development of a full strategy 
                                              based       on      plausible     based  on  plausible  argument         that  restrains  impacts  on  the 
                                              argument  (eg.,  general          (eg.,  general  experience,            ecosystem  to  ensure  the 
                                              experience,  theory  or           theory  or  comparison  with           fishery does not cause serious 
                                              comparison  with  similar         similar fisheries/ ecosystems).        or irreversible harm.  
                                              fisheries/ ecosystems).  
                                                                                There  is  some  evidence  that        The  measures  are  considered 
                                                                                the  measures  comprising  the         likely  to  work  based  on  prior 
                                                                                partial  strategy  are  being          experience,             plausible 
                                                                                implemented successfully.              argument  or  information 
                                                                                                                       directly         from         the 
                                                                                                                       fishery/ecosystems involved.  
                                                                                                                       There  is  evidence  that  the 
                                                                                                                       measures        are     being 
                                                                                                                       implemented successfully. 
     


        Score:              90                     
 
    Justification 

There is a partial strategy in place, if necessary, that takes into account available information and is expected to restrain impacts 
of the fishery on the ecosystem so as to achieve the Ecosystem Outcome 80 level of performance. 
    Sustainable  management  of  fisheries  within  the  waters  of  the  European  Union  are  facilitated  and  effected  under  the 
    framework of the Common Fisheries Policy. For the future, the CFP recognises the need to manage fisheries collectively on a 
    multispecies  basis  as  well  as  recognising  the  need  to  increasingly  take  into  account  ecosystem  aspects  and  influences  in 
    formulating future fishery management policy and in developing management plans. Significant advances are being made at 
    scientific  level  principally  through  ICES  e.g.  Working  Group  on  Multispecies  Assessment  Methods  (WGSAM),  in  order  to 
    support  the  development  of  multispecies  assessment  methodologies.  Denmark’s  commitment  to  the  CFP  supports  future 
    developments  with  respect  to  fisheries  management  at  European  level  and  forms  the  basis  of  a  partial  strategy  that  is 
    increasingly expected to take into account and restrain ecosystem impacts of the fishery in the future. 
    Implementation of a full ecosystem approach to fisheries management is still some way off and in depth scientific debate is 
    taking place at an international level as to the best ways to implement such a policy (36, 37). Some measures are in place in 
    the interim to identify and avoid or reduce ecosystem impacts of the fishery where possible. 
    The Danish North Sea demersal trawl fishery catches a mixture of mainly quota species including cod, plaice, whiting, Norway 
    lobster and Lemon sole (non‐quota). A full suite of management measures apply to quota species at fleet level including vessel 
    licensing, quota allocation and effort limitation; while a second tier of technical control measures adds to the partial strategy 
    to manage ecosystem impacts of the fishery. In addition, the EU promotes research into reducing ecosystem impacts of fishing 
    and has funded a number of important research projects designed to investigate fishing gear modifications in order to reduce 
    ecosystem impacts (such as the RECOVERY and REDUCE projects). 
    Further  provisions  of  European  law  designed  to  protect  the  environment  and  ecosystems,  such  as  the  Marine  Strategy 
    Framework Directive, Water Framework Directive and Habitats Directive (38,39,40) are likely to play a growing role in limiting 
    fishery  related  ecosystem  impacts  in  the  future.  In  particular,  the  Habitats  Directive  is  likely  to  play  a  much  greater  role  in 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                  March 2011                    119
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
protecting sensitive marine habitats, once clear conservation objectives and management regimes for Natura 2000 sites have 
been agreed and implemented. The Marine Strategy Framework Directive also aims to establish a global network of Marine 
Protected Areas by 2012. 
The measures are considered likely to work based on prior experience, plausible argument and information directly from the 
fishery/ecosystems involved. The partial strategy generally takes into account European environmental policy and also reflects 
current  international  scientific  thinking.  It  is  also  intended  to  be  both  adaptive  to  change  and  reactive.  Based  on  this  it  is 
considered  likely  that  the  partial  strategy  will  be  successful  in  ensuring  the  fishery  does  not  pose  a  risk  of  serious  or 
irreversible harm to ecosystem structure and function. 
There is evidence that the measures comprising the partial strategy are being implemented successfully. Denmark has shown 
clear  commitment  to  the  CFP  and  has  made  significant  advances  in  managing  its  national  fisheries  in  accordance  with  the 
aspirations and objectives of the Common Fisheries Policy to create long term sustainability in European Fisheries. Denmark has 
implemented the provisions of the Habitats Directive and a series of management plans for marine Natura 2000 sites are due to 
enter into public consultation stage during the first half of 2010. 
The assessment team were satisfied that all of the scoring guides at SG80 were met, along with two at SG 100. Accordingly a 
score of 90 was recorded. 
References 
(36) Garcia, S.M. & K.L. Cochrane. 2005. Ecosystem approach to fisheries: a review of implementation guidelines. ICES Journal 
of Marine Science 62: 311‐318. 
(37)  Plagányi,  É.E.  2007.  Models  for  an  ecosystem  approach  to  fisheries.  Food  and  Agriculture  Organization  of  the  United 
Nations, FAO Fisheries Technical Paper, 126 pp. 
(38) Council Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora 
(39) Council Directive 2000/60/EC (Water Framework Directive) 
(40) Council Directive 2008/56/EC (Marine Strategy Framework Directive) 
(41) Council Regulation (EU) No 23/2010 fixing fishing opportunities for community vessels and community waters for 2010. 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                               March 2011                   120
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                  60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                           100 Guideposts 

    2.5.3   Information                   /  Information  is  adequate  to    Information  is  adequate  to  Information  is  adequate  to 
                  monitoring                 identify the key elements of     broadly  understand  the  broadly  understand  the  key 
                  There  is  adequate  the  ecosystem  (e.g.  trophic         functions of the key elements  elements of the ecosystem. 
                  knowledge  of  the  structure  and  function,               of the ecosystem. 
                  impacts  of  the  fishery  community  composition, 
                  on the ecosystem.          productivity  pattern  and 
                                             biodiversity).  
                                            Main impacts of the fishery       Main impacts of the fishery on           Main  interactions  between 
                                            on  these  key  ecosystem         these key ecosystem elements             the  fishery  and  these 
                                            elements  can  be  inferred       can  be  inferred  from  existing        ecosystem  elements  can  be 
                                            from  existing  information,      information,  but  may  not              inferred     from     existing 
                                            but  have  not  been              have  been  investigated  in             information,  and  have  been 
                                            investigated in detail.           detail.                                  investigated. 
                                                                              The  main  functions  of  the            The  impacts  of  the  fishery  on 
                                                                              Components  (i.e.  target,               target,  Bycatch,  Retained  and 
                                                                              Bycatch,  Retained  and  ETP             ETP  species  and  Habitats  are 
                                                                              species  and  Habitats)  in  the         identified  and  the  main 
                                                                              ecosystem are known.                     functions         of        these 
                                                                                                                       Components in the ecosystem 
                                                                                                                       are understood. 
                                                                              Sufficient  information  is              Sufficient  information  is 
                                                                              available  on  the  impacts  of          available  on  the  impacts  of 
                                                                              the  fishery  on  these                  the      fishery     on    the 
                                                                              Components to allow some of              Components  and  elements  to 
                                                                              the  main  consequences  for             allow  the  main  consequences 
                                                                              the ecosystem to be inferred.            for  the  ecosystem  to  be 
                                                                                                                       inferred. 
                                                                              Sufficient  data  continue  to  be       Information  is  sufficient  to 
                                                                              collected  to  detect  any               support  the  development  of 
                                                                              increase  in  risk  level  (e.g.  due    strategies     to      manage 
                                                                              to  changes  in  the  outcome            ecosystem impacts. 
                                                                              indicator  scores  or  the 
                                                                              operation of the fishery or the 
                                                                              effectiveness          of         the 
                                                                              measures). 
     

        Score:               90                  
 
    Justification 
    Information is adequate to broadly understand the key elements of the ecosystem. Key elements include the trophic structure 
    of the North Sea ecosystem such as key prey, predators and competitors; community composition, productivity patterns and 
    characteristics  of  biodiversity.  Greenstreet  et  al.1997  describe  seasonal  variation  in  the  consumption  of  food  by  fish  in  the 
    North Sea and implications for food web dynamics.  
    Main  interactions  between  the  fishery  and  these  ecosystem  elements  can  be  inferred  from  existing  information,  and  have 
    been investigated. (33) describe the construction and calibration of an ecosystem model of the North Sea using the Ecopath 
    with Ecosim approach. Models of this type readily lend themselves to answering simple, ecosystem wide questions about the 
    dynamics  and  the  response  of  the  ecosystem  to  anthropogenic  changes.  Thus,  they  can  help  design  policies  aimed  at 
    implementing  ecosystem  management  principles,  and  can  provide  testable  insights  into  changes  that  have  occurred  in  the 
    ecosystem over time.  
The  main  functions  of  the  Components  (i.e.  target,  Bycatch,  Retained  and  ETP  species  and  Habitats)  in  the  ecosystem  are 
known. It is known that North Sea plaice act mainly as an energy sink (32, 34), while other retained species are mainly demersal 
species and as such comprise predators (Lemon sole, Cod) and scavengers (Nephrops). Bycatch species include juvenile Saithe, 
Cod, Haddock, Whiting and Starry Ray, the main functions for all of which is known. Direct and indirect impacts of the fishery on 
both ETP species and seabed habitats are known with a reasonable degree of accuracy. 
Sufficient information is available on the impacts of the fishery on these Components to allow some of the main consequences 

    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                  March 2011                    121
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
for the ecosystem to be inferred. Sections 2.1.3, 2.2.3, 2.3.3 and 2.4.3 outline the array of data that are collected in relation to 
the fishery. The range of data are sufficient to allow the main impacts on these components to be inferred directly. 
Sufficient data continue to be collected to detect any increase in risk level (e.g. due to changes in the outcome indicator scores 
or the operation of the fishery or the effectiveness of the measures). Data is routinely collected on an ongoing basis to allow for 
the  detection  of  any  change  or  increase  in  risk  level  to  the  main ecosystem  components.  Key data  collected  include  landings 
data for all species, discard data from observer trips and reports, spatial data in relation to fishing effort (via EU logbooks and 
VMS) and data in relation to fishing effort. 
All scoring guides at SG80 were met, along with two at SG100. A score of 90 was recorded. 
References 
(32) Greenstreet, S.P.R., A.D. Bryant, N. Broekhuizen, S.J. Hall & M.R. Heath. 1997. Seasonal variation in the consumption of 
food by fish in the North Sea and implications for food web dynamics. ICES Journal of Marine Science 54: 243‐266. 
(33)  Mackinson,  S.  2001.  Representing  trophic  interactions  in  the  North  Sea  in  the  1880s,  using  the  Ecopath  mass‐balance 
approach. Fisheries Centre Research Report 9:44: 35‐98.  
(34) Mackinson, S. & G. Daskalov. 2007. An ecosystem model of the North Sea for use in fisheries management and ecological 
research: description and parameterisation. 195 pp. 
  

  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                         March 2011                   122
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
    Principle 2 – Setnet  
    2              Fishing operations should allow for the maintenance of the structure, productivity, function 
                   and diversity of the ecosystem (including habitat and associated dependent and ecologically 
                   related species) on which the fishery depends. 
    2.1            Retained non‐target species 
     

                             Criteria                        60 Guideposts                            80 Guideposts                       100 Guideposts 

    2.1.1   Status                                 Main  retained  species  are            Main  retained  species  are            There  is  a  high  degree  of 
                  The  fishery  does  not          likely  to  be  within                  highly  likely  to  be  within          certainty that retained species 
                  pose  a  risk  of  serious       biologically  based  limits  or         biologically  based  limits,  or  if    are  within  biologically  based 
                  or irreversible harm to          if  outside  the  limits  there         outside  the  limits  there  is  a      limits.  
                  the  retained  species           are  measures  in  place  that          partial        strategy          of 
                  and  does  not  hinder           are expected to ensure that             demonstrably            effective 
                  recovery  of  depleted           the  fishery  does  not  hinder         management  measures  in 
                  retained species.                recovery  and  rebuilding  of           place  such  that  the  fishery 
                                                   the depleted species.                   does  not  hinder  recovery  and 
                                                                                           rebuilding.  
                                                   If  the  status  is  poorly                                                     Target  reference  points  are 
                                                   known  there  are  measures                                                     defined  and  retained  species 
                                                   or  practices  in  place  that                                                  are  at  or  fluctuating  around 
                                                   are  expected  to  result  in                                                   their target reference points. 
                                                   the  fishery  not  causing  the 
                                                   retained  species  to  be 
                                                   outside  biologically  based 
                                                   limits      or       hindering 
                                                   recovery. 
     

        Score:                  85                   
 
    Justification 

Main retained species are highly likely to be within biologically based limits,  or if outside the limits there is a partial strategy of 
demonstrably effective management measures in place such that the fishery does not hinder recovery and rebuilding. Official 
Danish landings data in relation to retained species taken in the North Sea demersal setnet fisheries, when targeting plaice, in 
2009 reveals that Plaice constituted the greater majority of the catch, considered by weight (1,261 t, or 62.5%). Other species 
taken along with plaice included Atlantic cod, Dab and Common sole (Solea solea), all of which are considered main retained 
species. Other species taken in lesser amounts (comprising less than 5% by weight of total NS setnet landings) included hake, 
lemon sole and turbot.  
                                                                       Table 1. Danish North Sea setnet landings, 2009 
                                                                  SPECIES                       Tonnes                % 
                                                    European Plaice                                1261.4           62.50% 
                                                    Atlantic Cod (MAIN)                              328.5          16.28% 
                                                    Common  Dab (MAIN)                               123.8            6.13% 
                                                    Common Sole (MAIN)                               105.5            5.23% 
                                                    European Hake                                     60.4            2.99% 
                                                    Lemon Sole                                        36.7            1.82% 
                                                    Turbot                                            28.4            1.41% 

ICES advice for 2010 (1) for NS Cod indicates that the stock is suffering reduced reproductive capacity and is in danger of being 
harvested unsustainably. SSB has increased since its historical low in 2006, but remains below Blim. Despite this there is in place 
a  strategy  comprising  management  measures  that  are  considered  effective  in  ensuring  that  the  Danish  North  Sea  demersal 
setnet  fishery  does  not  hinder  recovery  and  rebuilding  of  NS  Cod.  The  EU–Norway  agreement  on  a  management  plan  for  NS 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                              March 2011                  123
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
Cod,  as  updated  in  December  2008,  aims  to  be  consistent  with  the  precautionary  approach  and  is  intended  to  provide  for 
sustainable fisheries and high yield leading to a target fishing mortality to 0.4.  The EU has adopted a long‐term plan for this 
stock with the same aims (4).  The 2008 advice from ICES for NS Cod was for a zero catch in 2009 because ICES did not consider 
the former recovery plan precautionary. However the ICES advice for 2010 indicates that catches of cod can be allowed under 
the  new  management  agreement.  This  change  in  advice  is  because  the  new  management  agreement  is  considered  to  be 
consistent with the precautionary approach.  In December 2008 the European Commission and Norway agreed on a new cod 
management plan implementing a new system of linked effort management with a target fishing mortality of 0.4 (1). ICES has 
evaluated  the  EC  management  plan  in  March  2009  and  concluded  that  this  management  plan  is  in  accordance  with  the 
precautionary approach only if implemented and enforced adequately.  The management plan is seen to be effective and recent 
landings have been within the agreed TAC for the stock. 
According to (54), Dab is the most abundant species of 10 non target North Sea fish species taken in commercial fisheries.  Large 
quantities  are  caught  as  a  by‐catch  in  all  North  Sea  demersal  fisheries.  However,  a  very  large  proportion  of  the  catch  is 
considered  too  small  for  human  consumption  and  is  discarded  at  sea.  Dab  is  widely  distributed  over  the  entire  area  without 
major changes over the previous 10 years, from 1985. Population indices are reported to have been increasing since the early 
1980s, especially in the central areas of the North Sea. 
For North Sea Common sole, based on the most recent estimate of SSB (in 2009) and fishing mortality (in 2008), ICES classifies 
the  stock  as  having  full  reproductive  capacity  and  is  being  harvested  sustainably  (55).  SSB  has  fluctuated  around  the 
precautionary reference points for the last decade, but has increased since 2008 owing to a large incoming 2005 year class and 
reduced fishing mortality. Fishing mortality has shown a declining trend since 1995 and is currently estimated to be below Fpa. 
The assessment suggests that the 2006 year class was below average, and 2007 average. 
There is a degree of certainty associated with the ICES assessments in relation to North Sea cod and Common sole. Accordingly 
the  assessment  team  considered  that  some  inroad  to  the  SG100  for  retained  species  has  been  made.  A  score  of  85  is 
appropriate in the circumstances. 
References 

(9) ICES Advice 2009, Book 6,  Section 6.4.3 pp 9‐31 
(54) Henk J. L. H. & Daan, N. 1996. Long‐term trends in ten non‐target North Sea fish species. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 53: 
1063–1078. 1996 
(55) ICES Advice 2009, Book 6 Section 6.4.10 Sole in Subarea IV (North Sea) pp88‐98  
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                          March 2011                   124
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                      60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

    2.1.2   Management strategy  There  are  measures  in  There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  There is a strategy in place for 
                  There  is  a  strategy  in    place, if necessary, that are       place,  if  necessary  that  is  managing retained species.  
                  place  for  managing          expected  to  maintain  the         expected  to  maintain  the 
                  retained species that is      main  retained  species  at         main  retained  species  at 
                  designed to ensure the        levels  which  are  highly          levels  which  are  highly  likely 
                  fishery does not pose a       likely  to  be  within              to be within biologically based 
                  risk  of  serious  or         biologically  based  limits,  or    limits, or to ensure the fishery 
                  irreversible  harm  to        to  ensure  the  fishery  does      does not hinder their recovery 
                  retained species.             not  hinder  their  recovery        and rebuilding. 
                                                and rebuilding.  
                                                The       measures          are     There  is  some  objective  basis    The  strategy  is  mainly  based 
                                                considered  likely  to  work,       for confidence that the partial      on  information  directly  about 
                                                based       on        plausible     strategy  will  work,  based  on     the  fishery  and/or  species 
                                                argument  (e.g.,  general           some  information  directly          involved, and testing supports 
                                                experience,  theory  or             about  the  fishery  and/or          high  confidence  that  the 
                                                comparison  with  similar           species involved.                    strategy will work.  
                                                fisheries/species).  
                                                                                                                         There  is  clear  evidence  that 
                                                                                                                         the  strategy  is  being 
                                                                                                                         implemented         successfully, 
                                                                                                                         and  intended  changes  are 
                                                                                                                         occurring.  
                                                                                    There  is  some  evidence  that  There  is  some  evidence  that 
                                                                                    the  partial  strategy  is  being  the  strategy  is  achieving  its 
                                                                                    implemented successfully.          overall objective. 
     


        Score:               90                      
 
    Justification 

There is a strategy in place for managing main retained species. All retained species are subject to management provision of the 
Common Fisheries Policy. Accordingly, management strategies encompass a broad range of measures that include mandatory 
landings  reporting  for  all  species,  minimum  landing  size  regulations  for  cod,  common  sole,  turbot  and  hake.  Other  than  Dab, 
retained species are subject to a Total Allowable Catch (TAC) of which Denmark receives a national allocation (quota). There are 
minimum mesh size regulations in place (110mm in the EU zone of the North Sea, 120mm in the Norwegian sector). There is a 
System of Real Time Closure that is designed to provide an effective means for closing off areas of seabed where recent catches 
reveal the presence of high levels of juvenile cod and an increased risk of discarding. The Plaice Box in the southeastern North 
Sea limits trawling by vessels of greater than 300Hp and is designed to protect juvenile plaice in shallow waters. The EU have 
adopted Long Term Management Plans for cod (4) and common sole (56). Within the cod LTMP, catches of cod from the North 
Sea  stock  are  permitted  within  a  well  defined  and  closely  monitored  quota.  Within  the  cod  management  plan,  reduction  in 
discarding  is  encouraged  through  allowing  extra  days  at  sea  for  vessels  using  highly  selective  gears.  The  plan  also  prohibits 
transhipment, makes notification of landing mandatory and limits effort through days at sea restrictions. In Denmark there have 
been  significant  developments  with  respect  to  the  full  documentation  of  fisheries  through  the  Fully  Documented  Fishery 
project.  The  aims  of  this  are  to  account  for  all  removals  of  cod  using  video  surveillance  onboard  participating  vessels.  By 
providing  full  data  in  relation  to  all  removals  of  cod,  including  discards,  participating  vessels  have  an  opportunity  to  receive 
additional Individual cod quota allowance.  
There is clear evidence that the strategy is being implemented successfully, and intended changes are occurring. Danish vessels 
have recorded a high degree of compliance with respect to landings quotas, in particular since the introduction of the FKA or 
rights based management regime in 2007. There is no overshoot on quota and all landings are recorded and reported.   
There  is  some  evidence  that  the  strategy  is  achieving  its  overall  objective.  None  of  the  main  retained  species  stocks  are 
overexploited.  Exploitation  rates  for  cod  have  decreased and  the  species  is  now  being harvested  sustainably. Accordingly  the 
management measures appear to have stabilised cod stocks and facilitated some rebuilding of SSB, while common sole and Dab 
stocks affected by the fishery are stable or increasing. 
Despite the foregoing positive aspects, all elements of the management strategy do not apply to all of the retained species, with 
some retained species subject to a higher level of management than others. Furthermore, while the strategy is mainly based on 
information directly about the fishery and/or species involved and there is some confidence that it will work, it has not been 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                    March 2011                   125
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
tested and there is no basis for a high degree of confidence that the strategy will work. For these reasons a score of 100 is not 
appropriate. 
References 

(4) Council Regulation (EC) 1342/2008, European Commission 
(56) COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 676/2007 establishing a multiannual plan for fisheries exploiting stocks of plaice and sole in 
the North Sea. 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                March 2011                 126
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                 60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                           100 Guideposts 

    2.1.3         Information           /  Qualitative  information  is      Qualitative  information  and            Accurate       and     verifiable 
                  monitoring               available  on  the  amount  of    some               quantitative          information is available on the 
                  Information  on  the  main retained species taken          information  are  available  on          catch  of  all  retained  species 
                  nature  and  extent  of  by the fishery.                   the  amount  of  main  retained          and the consequences for the 
                  retained  species  is                                      species taken by the fishery.            status of affected populations.
                  adequate             to  Information  is  adequate  to     Information  is  sufficient  to          Information  is  sufficient  to 
                  determine  the  risk  qualitatively             assess     estimate  outcome  status  with          quantitatively         estimate 
                  posed  by  the  fishery  outcome        status    with     respect  to  biologically  based         outcome  status  with  a  high 
                  and  the  effectiveness  respect  to  biologically         limits.                                  degree of certainty.  
                  of  the  strategy  to  based limits.  
                  manage         retained 
                  species.                 Information  is  adequate  to     Information  is  adequate  to            Information  is  adequate  to 
                                           support      measures       to    support  a  partial  strategy  to        support  a  comprehensive 
                                           manage  main  retained            manage       main       retained         strategy  to  manage  retained 
                                           species.                          species.                                 species,  and  evaluate  with  a 
                                                                                                                      high  degree  of  certainty 
                                                                                                                      whether  the  strategy  is 
                                                                              
                                                                                                                      achieving its objective.  
                                                                             Sufficient  data  continue  to  be       Monitoring      of    retained 
                                                                             collected  to  detect  any               species  is  conducted  in 
                                                                             increase  in  risk  level  (e.g.  due    sufficient  detail  to  assess 
                                                                             to  changes  in  the  outcome            ongoing  mortalities  to  all 
                                                                             indicator  scores  or  the               retained species. 
                                                                             operation of the fishery or the 
                                                                             effectiveness of the strategy). 
     

        Score:              85                  
 
    Justification 

Qualitative information and some quantitative information are available on the amount of main retained species taken by the 
fishery.  Information  is  recorded  within  a  5%  tolerance  on  onboard  logbooks  for  all  retained  species.  Information  is  collected 
centrally by the Ministry and is adequate to determine the risk posed by the fishery as well as the effectiveness of the strategy 
to manage retained species. Information on retained species catch and can be verified from source log sheets and can be cross 
referenced with landings inspection reports and at sea inspection reports.  
Information  is  sufficient  to  estimate  outcome  status  with  respect  to  biologically  based  limits.  Landings  of  all  main  retained 
species are recorded at a level of frequency and detail that is considered adequate for the purpose of estimating outcome status 
with  reference  to  biologically  based  limits.  However,  biologically  based  limits  do  not  exist  for  all  of  the  retained  species.  For 
those  species  for  which  there  are  no  clear  biologically  based  limits  (reference  points)  in  place,  there  is  however  a  TAC  and 
national quota system in operation and these work to reduce the risk that fishery may present to other species that retained.  
Information is adequate to support a partial strategy to manage main retained species. Information on catches, landings, fishing 
equipment and area of capture are collected in sufficient detail to support measures that are designed to manage impacts of 
the fishery on retained species populations. 
Monitoring  of  retained  species is  conducted  in  sufficient  detail  to  assess  ongoing  mortalities  to  all  retained  species.  Landings 
data are collected via the EU logbooks scheme on an ongoing basis and these are collated centrally for the entire Danish North 
Sea fleet. Accordingly it is possible to determine the actual mortality for all retained species in the Danish NS demersal species 
setnet fishery. It remains a possibility that some adult cod are discarded as a consequence of the non availability of quota for NS 
cod. However, given the low overall volume of cod landed the amount of discarded cod and consequent unrecorded mortality is 
likely to be insignificant. 
Since all of the SG 80 have been met and one at SG 100, a score of 85 is justified. 
    References 

 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                 March 2011                   127
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
    2.2           Discarded species (also known as “bycatch” or “discards”) 
     

                          Criteria                      60 Guideposts                        80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

    2.2.1   Status                              Main  bycatch  species  are         Main  bycatch  species  are            There  is  a  high  degree  of 
                  The  fishery  does  not       likely  to  be  within              highly  likely  to  be  within         certainty  that  bycatch  species 
                  pose  a  risk  of  serious    biologically  based  limits,  or    biologically  based  limits  or  if    are  within  biologically  based 
                  or irreversible harm to       if  outside  such  limits  there    outside  such  limits  there  is  a    limits.  
                  the  bycatch  species  or     are  mitigation  measures  in       partial        strategy         of 
                  species  groups  and          place  that  are  expected  to      demonstrably            effective 
                  does      not  hinder         ensure that the fishery does        mitigation  measures  in  place 
                  recovery  of  depleted        not  hinder  recovery  and          such that the fishery does not 
                  bycatch  species  or          rebuilding.                         hinder        recovery        and 
                  species groups.                                                   rebuilding.  
                                                If  the  status  is  poorly                                                 
                                                known  there  are  measures 
                                                or  practices  in  place  that 
                                                are  expected  result  in  the 
                                                fishery  not  causing  the 
                                                bycatch  species  to  be 
                                                biologically  based  limits  or 
                                                hindering recovery. 
                                                 
     

        Score:               75                      
 
    Justification 

Main bycatch species are likely to be within biologically based limits,  or if outside such limits there are mitigation measures in 
place that are expected to ensure that the fishery does not hinder recovery and rebuilding. Setnet fisheries are known to be 
highly size selective, if the appropriate mesh sizes are employed for the target species (57). A detailed study of the selectivity of 
demersal species gillnets in the North Sea and adjacent areas was undertaken by (60). The 150mm minimum mesh size used in 
Danish North Sea demersal species setnet fisheries ensures that bycatch and discarding are minimal. DTU Aqua estimate overall 
discard rates for North Sea plaice setnet fisheries amounted to 9% by weight of total bulk catches during 2004 (64). The main 
discarded  species  encountered is  Dab  –  one  of  the  most  abundant  fish  species  in  the  North  Sea.  Dab  are  taken  in  significant 
volumes in most North Sea setnet fisheries, but mainly due to the small size and poor market conditions, most are discarded 
(58) 
Setnet fisheries are however associated with a significant bycatch of seabirds. (59) reviews 30 studies reporting bird bycatch in 
coastal gillnet fisheries in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea region in order to assess the magnitude of the problem and potential 
effects  on  bird  populations.  The  cumulative  bycatch  estimate  extracted  from  several  localized  studies  providing  such 
information,  suggests  that  about  90,000  birds  die  in  fishing  nets  annually,  a  quantity  that  the  research  suggests  is  almost 
certainly a substantial underestimate. It is concluded that it is likely that between 100,000 and 200,000 waterbirds are killed per 
year.  Unpublished  data  (DFPO  pers.  comms)  suggests  that  the  any  concerns  in  the  context  of  bird  bycatch  in  Danish  setnet 
fisheries  are  most  likely  to  relate  to  inner  Danish  Waters  of  the  Kattegat  and  Belt  seas.  These  areas  are  characterised  by 
extensive waterfowl and seabird populations and the large number of areas that have been designated as Natura 2000 sites  on 
account of birdlife supports this fact. Nevertheless setnet fisheries may interact with seabirds and waterfowl in the North Sea. 
Some important bird areas in the Danish North Sea are designated as Natura 2000 Special Protection Areas (61) (designated for 
seabirds  and/or  waterfowl).  Map  1  below  shows  the  distribution  of  Danish  setnet  fishing  effort  from  VMS  data;  while  Map  2 
shows the location of all Danish Natura 2000 sites. It is important to note that only the Sydlige Nordso (bottom left corner)site is 
designated as an SPA, in particular  because of the presence of Red‐throated divers and Black‐throated divers, amongst other 
species. In reviewing the status for bird bycatch, the assessment team were provided with very little data upon which to decide 
an appropriate score. However, by making inferences from other fisheries in the circumstances, it was felt that the fishery most 
likely did feature bird species as bycatch. It is likely that the extent of the bird bycatch issue is smaller than that of Inner Danish 
water setnet fisheries, on account of the distance from shore and water depth where the majority of North Sea demersal setnet 
fishing  takes  place.  Some  anecdotal  and  unpublished  data  were  presented  to  the  team  in  support  of  this  reasoning.  There  is 
potential for lost setnets to continue fishing for some time after they have become lost. This can lead to further instances of 
unaccounted  removals  or  in  effect  ‘discarded  bycatch’.  The  issue  has  been  considered  here  and  the  potential  scale  of  ghost 
netting is not considered to be likely to give rise to unacceptable impacts for affected species. 
On account of the uncertain status of the fishery with respect to bird bycatch, a score of 75 was appropriate.  


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                      March 2011                   128
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  




                                                                                                                                               
                  Map 1 Danish setnet fishing effort from VMS, 2009                               Map 2 Natura 2000 sites in Danish waters 
References 

(57)  Millner,  R.S.  1985.  The  use  of  anchored  gill  and  tangle  nets  in  the  sea  fisheries  of  England  and  Wales.  MAFF  Laboratory 
Leaflet no. 57. MAFF, Lowestoft. 
(58) Beek, F. A. van. 1990. Discard sampling programme for the North Sea. Dutch participation. Netherlands Institute for Fishery 
Investigations, internal report DEMVIS 90‐303. 85 pp. 
(59) Zydelis, R., Bellebaum, J., Österblom H., Vetemaa M., Schirmeister B., 
Stipniece  A.,  Dagys,  M.,  van  Eerden,  M.  &  Garthe,  S.  2009.  Bycatch  in  gillnet  fisheries  –  An  overlooked  threat  to  waterbird 
populations. Biological Conservation. In press. 
(60) Hovgard, H. & Lewy, P. 1996. Selectivity of gillnets in the North Sea, English Channel and Bay of Biscay. AIR‐project AIR2‐93‐
1122. Project final report. Danish Institute for Fisheries Research, Charlottenlund. 
(61) Council Directive 79/409/EEC of 2 April 1979 on the conservation of wild birds 
(64) Rapport om Discard i dansk fiskeri. Ministeriet for Fødevarer, Landbrug og Fiskeri. January 2006 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                March 2011                 129
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                  60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                      100 Guideposts 

    2.2.2         Management strategy  There  are  measures  in                There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  There is a strategy in place for 
                  There  is  a  strategy  in  place,  if  necessary,  which    place,  if  necessary,  for  managing  and  minimising 
                  place  for  managing  are  expected  to  maintain            managing  bycatch  that  is  bycatch.  
                  bycatch        that      is  main  bycatch  species  at      expected  to  maintain  main 
                  designed to ensure the  levels  which  are  highly           bycatch  species  at  levels 
                  fishery does not pose a  likely  to  be  within              which  are  highly  likely  to  be 
                  risk  of  serious  or  biologically  based  limits  or       within biologically based limits 
                  irreversible  harm  to  to  ensure  that  the  fishery       or  to  ensure  that  the  fishery 
                  bycatch populations.  does  not  hinder  their               does  not  hinder  their 
                                               recovery.                       recovery. 
                                            The       measures          are    There  is  some  objective  basis    The  strategy  is  mainly  based 
                                            considered  likely  to  work,      for confidence that the partial      on  information  directly  about 
                                            based       on        plausible    strategy  will  work,  based  on     the  fishery  and/or  species 
                                            argument  (eg.  general            some  information  directly          involved, and testing supports 
                                            experience,  theory  or            about  the  fishery  and/or  the     high  confidence  that  the 
                                            comparison  with  similar          species involved.                    strategy will work.  
                                            fisheries/species).  
                                                                               There  is  some  evidence  that  There  is  clear  evidence  that 
                                                                               the  partial  strategy  is  being  the  strategy  is  being 
                                                                               implemented successfully.          implemented        successfully, 
                                                                                                                  and  intended  changes  are 
                                                                                                                  occurring.  There  is  some 
                                                                                                                  evidence  that  the  strategy  is 
                                                                                                                  achieving its objective. 
     


        Score:               75                  
 
    Justification 

 There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  place,  if  necessary,  for  managing  bycatch  that  is  expected  to  maintain  main  bycatch  species  at 
levels which are highly likely to be within biologically based limits or to ensure that the fishery does not hinder their recovery. It 
is has been well established that where appropriate mesh sizes are used to capture target species in North Sea demersal setnet 
fisheries, overall bycatch and discarding rates are likely to be very low. As a consequence the requirement for a management 
strategy to restrain the potential impacts of discarding may be lower for setnet fisheries than for many fisheries that use mobile 
gears. Nevertheless, the status with respect to bird bycatch in setnet fisheries remains uncertain. Accordingly, it is reasonable to 
expect  that  this  should  be  reflected  in  clear  management  measures  that  are  specifically  intended  to  address  areas  of 
uncertainty.  
 The  Danish  North  Sea  demersal  setnet  fishery  is  managed  under  the  overarching  European  Union  Common  Fisheries  Policy. 
Under the CFP a broad range of measures are in place that are designed to ensure that the impacts of fisheries in relation to 
bycatch  species  are  minimised  on  an  ongoing  basis.  The  recent  policy  statement  by  the  EU  in  relation  to  A  policy  to  reduce 
unwanted  by‐catches  and  eliminate  discards  in  European  fisheries  (5)  sets  out  clear  objectives  and  means  by  which  the  EU 
Commission proposes reduce and eliminate discards in European fisheries. As part of it strategy to reduce discarding,  
Annex III (9) of Council Regulation 43/2009 sets out a range of comprehensive measures that are applicable to Danish setnet 
fisheries operating in the North Sea. The effect of these requirements is to strictly contain the potential of the fishery to result in 
large discard rates or unaccounted mortality. The regulation limits the length of nets, soak times, total amount of gear that can 
be carried and disallows the use of setnets in waters deeper than 200 meters. Under the rules, skippers also must account for 
discrepancies between amounts of gear deployed and amounts brought back to shore. This aids in accounting for the scale of 
potential ghost net fishing problems associated with the fishery. Denmark has shown ongoing commitment to the CFP since its 
inception  and  has  led  the  way  in  recent  years  by  introducing  the  FKA  (transferable  quota  rights  based  management  regime) 
amongst the Danish fleet. Other elements of the Danish strategy include a comprehensive regime of technical control measures 
that  includes  a  ban  on  high  grading,  closed  areas  eg.  the  Plaice  box,  real  time  temporal  closures,  Minimum  Landing  Sizes, 
Minimum  Mesh  Sizes  as  well  as  an  enforced  ban  on  discarding  in  the  Norwegian  sector  of  the  North  Sea.  
In  addition,  Denmark’s  pioneering  programme  to  create  a  fully  documented  fishery  in  which  all  removals  are  accounted  for 
through the use of onboard video surveillance of vessels is expected to yield significant benefits in the area of discard reduction 
and elimination based on rewarding fishers for using gears with enhanced selectivity profiles. It is expected that the initiative 
will eventually be rolled out to all vessels >15 meters, however the medium term objective is to achieve coverage in the 15‐24m 
vessel category.  


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                               March 2011                  130
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
The measures are considered likely to work with respect to species of fish taken as bycatch, based on plausible argument (eg. 
general experience, theory or comparison with similar fisheries/species). Observations and information from DTU Aqua suggests 
that the present management regime for North Sea setnet fisheries is likely to be effective in minimising bycatch and discarding 
of fish within the demersal species setnet fleet. 
There is some evidence that the strategy is being implemented successfully. Overall discard and bycatch rates for the fishery are 
low,  suggesting  that  the  partial  management  strategy  is  effective  at  minimising  bycatch  of  unwanted  fish.  However,  the 
situation with respect to bird bycatch remains uncertain and while bycatch of fish in the setnet fishery is of least concern,  issues 
in relation to  the undetermined nature and scale of interaction with bird species has prevented this criteria from receiving a 
higher score. Scoring of this Performance Indicator met all requirements of SG60 and two at SG80. A score of 75 was therefore 
deemed appropriate.  
The  DFPO  have  recently  agreed  on  terms  for  a  Code  of  Conduct  to  be  introduced  to  the  fleet.  The  CoC  provides  some 
background  in  relation  to  DFPO  policy  with  respect  to  reducing  and  minimising  bycatch  and  discarding.  The  CoC  is  a  positive 
development however no credit is given in the scoring as it has not yet been implemented in the fleet and no evidence of its 
operation was observed during the site visit.   
References 

(5) EU, 2007. European Parliament resolution of 31 January 2008 on a policy to reduce unwanted by‐catches and 
eliminate discards in European fisheries (2007/2112(INI))C 68 E/26 Official Journal of the European Union EN. 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                           March 2011                   131
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                   60 Guideposts                     80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

    2.2.3   Information                 /  Qualitative  information  is       Qualitative  information  and         Accurate     and      verifiable 
                  monitoring               available  on  the  amount  of     some               quantitative       information is available on the 
                  Information  on  the  main  bycatch  species                information  are  available  on       amount of all bycatch and the 
                  nature  and  amount  of  affected by the fishery.           the  amount  of  main  bycatch        consequences  for  the  status 
                  bycatch is adequate to                                      species  affected  by  the            of affected populations. 
                  determine  the  risk                                        fishery. 
                  posed  by  the  fishery    Information  is  adequate  to    Information  is  sufficient  to       Information  is  sufficient  to 
                  and  the  effectiveness    broadly           understand     estimate  outcome  status  with       quantitatively        estimate 
                  of  the  strategy  to      outcome       status    with     respect  to  biologically  based      outcome  status  with  respect 
                  manage bycatch.            respect  to  biologically        limits.                               to  biologically  based  limits 
                                             based limits.                                                          with  a  high  degree  of 
                                                                                                                    certainty.  

                                             Information  is  adequate  to  Information  is  adequate  to  Information  is  adequate  to 
                                             support    measures        to  support  a  partial  strategy  to  support  a  comprehensive 
                                             manage bycatch.                manage main bycatch species. strategy  to  manage  bycatch, 
                                                                                                               and  evaluate  with  a  high 
                                                                                                               degree of certainty whether a 
                                                                                                               strategy  is  achieving  its 
                                                                                                               objective. 
                                                                              Sufficient  data  continue  to  be    Monitoring  of  bycatch  data  is 
                                                                              collected  to  detect  any            conducted  in  sufficient  detail 
                                                                              increase  in  risk  to  main          to  assess  ongoing  mortalities 
                                                                              bycatch  species  (e.g.  due  to      to all bycatch species. 
                                                                              changes  in  the  outcome 
                                                                              indicator  scores  or  the 
                                                                              operation of the fishery or the 
                                                                              effectiveness of the strategy). 
     


        Score:              75                    
 
    Justification 

Qualitative information and some quantitative information are available on the amount of main bycatch species affected by the 
fishery. DTU Aqua have discontinued the discard sampling programme for North Sea setnet fisheries on the basis of results from 
the period prior to 2000  which confirmed the exceptionally low levels of discarding in the fishery. The main species discarded is 
dab, which may occur in substantial quantities, although actual levels are not confirmed quantitatively. 
Information  is  adequate  to  broadly  understand  outcome  status  with  respect  to  biologically  based  limits.  There  is  sufficient 
information  available  in  order  to  estimate  outcome  status  with  respect  to  biologically  based  limits  for  fish  species  taken  as 
bycatch,  where  such  limits  are  in  existence.  There  are  no  biologically  based  limits  available  for  dab,  however  this  species  is 
amongst  the  most  abundant  species  of  fish  in  the  North  Sea  (see  2.2.1).  Information  is  not  sufficient  however  to  estimate 
outcome  status  with  respect  to  biologically  based  limits  for  bird  species  that  are  taken  as  bycatch,  the  relatively  low  level  of 
information  available  is  only  sufficient  for  the  purposes  of  broadly  understanding  outcome  status  with  respect  to  biologically 
based limits. 
Information is adequate to support a partial strategy to manage main bycatch species. The main bycatch species are dab and 
sufficient  information  is  available  in  relation  to  the  population  and  distribution  of  dab  in  the  North  Sea  to  support  a  partial 
strategy  to  manage  the  impacts  of  the  fishery  on  this  species.  With  respect  to  birds,  data  are  collected  on  a  regular  basis  in 
relation to the population status and distribution of most bird species which may be affected by the fishery in the southern and 
central North Sea. Information is adequate for supporting a partial strategy to manage the impacts of the fishery on birds. 
Sufficient  data  continue  to  be  collected  to  detect  any  increase  in  risk  to  main  bycatch  species  (e.g.  due  to  changes  in  the 
outcome indicator scores or the operation of the fishery or the effectiveness of the strategy). 
All scoring guides at SG60 have been satisfied while three at SG80 have been satisfied. A score of 75 is therefore appropriate. 
    References 

 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                               March 2011                   132
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
    2.3           Endangered, Threatened and Protected (ETP) species 
     

                          Criteria                      60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

    2.3.1   Status                              Known effects of the fishery      The  effects  of  the  fishery  are    There  is  a  high  degree  of 
                  The  fishery  meets           are likely to be within limits    known and are highly likely to         certainty  that  the  effects  of 
                                                of        national        and     be  within  limits  of  national       the fishery are within limits of 
                  national        and 
                  international                 international  requirements       and                 international      national  and  international 
                  requirements     for          for  protection  of  ETP          requirements  for  protection          requirements  for  protection 
                  protection  of  ETP           species.                          of ETP species.                        of ETP species. 
                  species.                      Known  direct  effects  are       Direct  effects  are  highly           There  is  a  high  degree  of 
                  The  fishery  does  not       unlikely      to     create       unlikely      to        create         confidence  that  there  are  no 
                  pose  a  risk  of  serious    unacceptable  impacts  to         unacceptable  impacts  to  ETP         significant  detrimental  effects 
                  or irreversible harm to       ETP species.                      species.                               (direct  and  indirect)  of  the 
                  ETP  species  and  does                                                                                fishery on ETP species. 
                  not  hinder  recovery  of 
                  ETP species.                                                    Indirect  effects  have  been   
                                                                                  considered and are thought to 
                                                                                  be  unlikely  to  create 
                                                                                  unacceptable impacts.  
     


        Score:               70                      
 
    Justification 

Known  effects  of  the  fishery  are  likely  to  be  within  limits  of  national  and  international  requirements  for  protection  of  ETP 
species.  
The fishery is known to interact with Harbour porpoise in particular, as well as with Grey seal and Harbour seal. Porpoises are 
protected under European and Danish Law. Harbour porpoise is listed in Annex II and IV of the Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC), 
annex II of the Bern convention, annex II of the Bonn convention and annex II of the Convention on the international Trade in 
Endangered Species (CITES). Under Article 12 section 4 of the Habitats Directive (14), member States are required to establish a 
system to monitor the incidental capture and killing of the animal species listed in Annex IV (a) (includes all cetacean species). In 
the  light  of  the  information  gathered,  Member  States  are  required  to  take  further  research  or  conservation  measures  as 
required to ensure that incidental capture and killing does not have a significant negative impact on the species concerned.  
Available  evidence  suggests  that  the  Harbour  porpoise  is  the  ETP  species  most  frequently  encountered  in  Danish  North  Sea 
setnet fisheries . (44, 45, 46). A pilot video surveillance programme conducted on a 14 meter Danish  gillnetter operating in the 
Skaggerak  found  that  bycatch  included  three  Harbour  porpoise  and  one  Harbour  seal  during  119  fishing  days  between 
              st                  st
September 1  2008 and July 31 , 2009. (45) suggests mean annual bycatch of Harbour porpoise may have been in the region of 
5,500  animals  per  annum  in  Danish  North  Sea  setnet  fisheries  between  1987  and  2001.  The  Plaice  fishery  accounted  for  an 
estimated average incidental capture of 820 Harbour porpoise the period, or approximately 15% of the total incidental take of 
porpoise by Danish setnet vessels. (43) reports on the findings of Danish research into high density areas for Harbour porpoise 
in Danish waters, including the North Sea. Using data from this study,  Map 1 below shows an area of relative high density off 
the south Jutland coast, close to the German border, while Map 2 shows high density areas of Harbour porpoise in the northern 
North Sea and Skaggerak. 




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                    March 2011                   133
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  




                                                                                                                                     
Map 1 – Kernel density plot, Harbour porpoise, Jutland               Map 2 – Kernel density plot, Harbour porpoise northern North  
l                                                                                                                Sea and Skaggerak 
                                                                              Source: NERI Technical Report 657, 2008 University of Aarhus
The  fishery  clearly  interacts  with  North  Sea  Harbour  porpoise  populations  and  there  is  a  confirmed  bycatch.  It  has also  been 
demonstrated that there is a bycatch of seals in the fishery. While the levels of bycatch within this fishery are considered likely 
to be within limits of international and national requirements, the assessment team have been unable to confirm that bycatch 
levels are highly likely to be within such limits .The assessment team also considered that the known direct effects of the fishery 
are  unlikely  to  create  unacceptable  impacts  to  ETP  species.    Harbour  porpoise  populations  for  the  northern  North  Sea  and 
Southern and Central North Sea were estimated to be in the region of 48,000 and 152,000 respectively in 2008 (47). According 
to the Danish Plan for the conservation of Harbour porpoise (48), the total by‐catch of harbour porpoises for all fisheries taking 
place  in  the  North  Sea  is  considered  unsustainable  however  and  the  present  fishery  clearly  contributes  to  this  unsustainable 
level of harbour porpoise bycatch. 
Indirect effects have been considered and are thought to be unlikely to create unacceptable impacts. The effects of removal of 
demersal  fish species  by  the  fishery  is  unlikely  pose  a  risk  of  serious  or  irreversible  harm  to  ETP  species  and  does  not  hinder 
recovery of ETP species. 
When scoring this criteria, all parameters t SG60 have been met and two at SG80. A score of 70 is appropriate. 
References 

(14) Council Directive 92/43/EEC – the abitats Directive 
(43) High density areas for harbour porpoises in Danish waters. National Institute for Environmental Research. Technical report 
no 657, 2008. 
(44) Vinther, M. (1999). Bycatches of harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) in Danish set‐net fisheries. 
Journal of Cetacean Research and Management. 1: 123 – 135. 
(45) Vinther, M. & Larsen, F. (2002). Updated estimates of harbour porpoise bycatch in the Danish North 
Sea  bottom  set  gillnet  fishery.  Paper  SC/54/SM31  presented  to  the  Scientific  Committee  of  the  International  Whaling 
Commission, Shimonoseki. May 2002. (unpublished). 16 pp. 
(46)  Kindt‐Larsen,  L.    &  Dalskov,  J.  2010.    Pilot  study  of  marine  mammal  bycatch  by  use  of  an  Electronic  Monitoring  System. 
Report by DTU Aqua, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Fisheries, Agriculture and Food. 
(47) Hammond, P. S. & Mcleod, K. (2006). Progress report on the SCANS‐II project. Paper prepared for the 
13th Advisory Committee to ASCOBANS, Tampere, Finland, 25 – 27 April. 6pp. 
(48)  Handlingsplan  for  beskyttelse  af  marsvin  2005.  Miljøministeriet,  Skov‐  og  Naturstyrelsen  (J.nr.  SN  2001‐402‐0006)  og 
Ministeriet for Fødevarer, Landbrug og Fiskeri (J.nr. 97‐1185‐4), 2005 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                March 2011                    134
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                         Criteria                    60 Guideposts                    80 Guideposts                       100 Guideposts 

    2.3.2   Management strategy  There are measures in place  There is a strategy in place for  There  is  a  comprehensive 
                  The  fishery  has  in      that  minimise  mortality,      managing the fishery’s impact         strategy in place for managing 
                  place  precautionary       and  are  expected  to  be      on  ETP  species,  including          the  fishery’s  impact  on  ETP 
                  management                 highly  likely  to  achieve     measures        to       minimise     species, including measures to 
                  strategies designed to:    national  and  international    mortality,  that  is  designed  to    minimise  mortality,  that  is 
                                             requirements  for  the          be  highly  likely  to  achieve       designed  to  achieve  above 
                  - meet national and 
                                             protection of ETP species.      national  and  international          national  and  international 
                    international 
                                                                             requirements          for     the     requirements        for      the 
                    requirements; 
                                                                             protection of ETP species.            protection of ETP species.  
                  - ensure the fishery 
                                                                              
                    does not pose a risk 
                    of serious or         The       measures          are    There is an objective basis for       The  strategy  is  mainly  based 
                    irreversible harm to  considered  likely  to  work,      confidence  that  the  strategy       on  information  directly  about 
                    ETP species;          based       on        plausible    will  work,  based  on  some          the  fishery  and/or  species 
                  - ensure the fishery  argument  (eg.  general              information directly about the        involved,  and  a  quantitative 
                    does not hinder       experience,  theory  or            fishery  and/or  the  species         analysis     supports       high 
                    recovery of ETP       comparison  with  similar          involved.                             confidence  that  the  strategy 
                    species; and          fisheries/species).                                                      will work. 
                  - minimise mortality                                       There  is  evidence  that  the  There  is  clear  evidence  that 
                    of ETP species.                                          strategy is being implemented  the  strategy  is  being 
                                                                             successfully.                   implemented         successfully, 
                                                                                                             and  intended  changes  are 
                                                                                                             occurring.  There  is  evidence 
                                                                                                             that  the  strategy  is  achieving 
                                                                                                             its objective. 
     


        Score:              60                    
 
    Justification 

There are measures in place that minimise mortality, and are expected to be highly likely to achieve national and international 
requirements for the protection of ETP species. 
Measures in place that work to minimise mortality of ETP species are associated with a broad range of means that are mainly 
intended to control the exploitation rate for target species in North Sea demersal fisheries. Such measures include the licensing 
of  fishing  vessels,  Individual  Transferable  Quotas,  species  TAC’s  and  national  quotas,  effort  limitations  as  well  as  technical 
control measures. 
The  following  policy  statements  and  instruments  apply  or  are  in  force  and  relate  to  varying  degrees  to  the  protection  of  ETP 
species affected by this fishery: 
             Danish Plan for the Conservation of Harbour Porpoise (48) 
             Council Directive 2371 of 2002 (Article 2) – requires the sustainable use of aquatic resources and stipulates the use of 
              an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (49) 
             COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 812/2004 laying down measures concerning incidental catches of cetaceans in 
              fisheries of European waters (50), specifying the use of acoustic deterrent devices in certain fisheries and requiring 
              some fisheries to be monitored on an ongoing basis. There is no requirement for cetacean bycatch to be monitored 
              and reported in the fishery under assessment according to the 812 regulation. 
             Council Directive 2187 of 2005 – under Article 27 by 1 January 2008, the Commission shall ensure that a scientific 
              assessment of the effects of using in particular gillnets, trammel nets and entangling nets on cetaceans is conducted 
              and its findings presented to the European Parliament and Council. (51) 
             Council Directive 92/43/EEC of 21 May 1992 on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora gives 
              strict protection status to cetaceans and requires Member States to undertake surveillance of the conservation status 
              of these species. Member States should also establish a system to monitor the incidental capture and killing of these 
              species, to take further research and conservation measures as required to ensure that incidental capture or killing 
              does not have a significant impact on the species concerned.(38) 
             COMMISSION REGULATION (EC) No 356/2005 laying down detailed rules for the marking and identification of passive 
              fishing gear and beam trawls 
The measures are considered likely to work, based on plausible argument (eg. general experience, theory or comparison with 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                              March 2011                  135
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
similar fisheries/species). The measures are considered likely to work in so far as that they prove to be effective at conserving 
fishery resources, the main aquatic resources that most of the measures are designed to protect.  
However the range of measures do not constitute a strategy for managing ETP impacts and there is a clear need for a robust and 
cohesive strategy to be put in place in relation to ETP for this fishery. The DFPO have recently agreed on terms for a Code of 
Conduct  to  be  introduced  to  the  fleet.  The  CoC  provides  some  background  in  relation  to  DFPO  policy  with  respect  to  ETP 
interactions. The CoC is a positive development however no credit is given in the scoring as it has not yet been implemented in 
the fleet and no evidence of its operation was observed during the site visit.   
Two scoring guides at SG60 have been met and a score of 60 is appropriate. 
References 

(48)Handlingsplan  for  beskyttelse  af  marsvin  2005.  Miljøministeriet,  Skov‐  og  Naturstyrelsen  (J.nr.  SN  2001‐402‐0006)  og 
Ministeriet for Fødevarer, Landbrug og Fiskeri (J.nr. 97‐1185‐4), 2005 
(49) Council Directive 2371 of 2002 
(50) COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 812/2004 
(51) Council Directive 2187 of 2005 
 (53) COMMISSION REGULATION (EC) No 356/2005 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                        March 2011                  136
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                  60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

    2.3.3   Information                    /  Information  is  adequate  to    Information  is  sufficient  to         Information  is  sufficient  to 
                  monitoring                  broadly  understand  the         determine  whether  the                 quantitatively         estimate 
                  Relevant  information       impact of the fishery on ETP     fishery  may  be  a  threat  to         outcome  status  with  a  high 
                  is  collected  to  support  species.                         protection  and  recovery  of           degree of certainty.  
                  the  management  of                                          the  ETP  species,  and  if  so,  to 
                  fishery impacts on ETP                                       measure trends and support a 
                  species, including:                                          full  strategy  to  manage 
                                                                               impacts. 
                  - information for the 
                    development of the  Information  is  adequate  to          Sufficient data are available to        Information  is  adequate  to 
                    management           support   measures        to          allow fishery related mortality         support  a  comprehensive 
                    strategy;            manage the impacts on ETP             and the impact of fishing to be         strategy  to  manage  impacts, 
                  - information to       species                               quantitatively  estimated  for          minimize  mortality  and  injury 
                    assess the                                                 ETP species.                            of  ETP  species,  and  evaluate 
                    effectiveness of the                                                                               with  a  high  degree  of 
                    management                                                                                         certainty whether a strategy is 
                    strategy; and                                                                                      achieving its objectives.  
                  - information to          Information  is  sufficient  to                                            Accurate      and     verifiable 
                    determine the           qualitatively  estimate  the                                               information is available on the 
                    outcome status of       fishery  related  mortality  of                                            magnitude  of  all  impacts, 
                    ETP species.            ETP species.                                                               mortalities  and  injuries  and 
                                                                                                                       the  consequences  for  the 
                                                                                                                       status of ETP species. 
     


        Score:               60                  
 
    Justification 

Information is adequate to broadly understand the impact of the fishery on ETP species. Several studies in relation to bycatch 
affected by the fishery are available and give a broad indication of the likely implications of the fisheries for Harbour porpoise. 
No similar data has been available in relation to seal bycatch, which is known to be a feature of the fishery. 
Information  is  adequate  to  support  measures  to  manage  the  impacts  on  ETP  species.  The  level  of  information  supports  the 
general nature of the measures that are in place however it does not support development of more detailed or sophisticated or 
focussed measures, such as would feature in a strategy to manage impacts on ETP. 
Information is sufficient to qualitatively estimate the fishery related mortality of ETP species. Sufficient data is available from 
the above mentioned sources to allow the ETP interaction to be qualitatively described. 
Two scoring guides at SG60 have been met and a score of 60 is appropriate. 
    References 

 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                  March 2011                  137
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
 2.4           Habitat  
  

                       Criteria                    60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

 2.4.1   Status                             The  fishery  is  unlikely  to    The  fishery  is  highly  unlikely    There  is  evidence  that  the 
               The  fishery  does  not      reduce  habitat  structure        to  reduce  habitat  structure        fishery  is  highly  unlikely  to 
               cause  serious  or           and  function  to  a  point       and function to a point where         reduce  habitat  structure  and 
               irreversible  harm  to       where  there  would  be           there  would  be  serious  or         function  to  a  point  where 
               habitat        structure,    serious  or  irreversible         irreversible harm.                    there  would  be  serious  or 
               considered  on  a            harm.                                                                   irreversible harm.  
               regional  or  bioregional 
               basis, and function. 
  

     Score:               90                 
 
Justification 

The fishery is highly unlikely to reduce habitat structure and function to a point where there would be serious or irreversible 
harm.  
The fleet uses both gill and trammel nets to catch demersal species. Collectively these gear types are referred to as setnets, as 
they are fixed in place on the seabed and are not reliant on moving across the seabed in order to catch target species.  
Setnets  are  lightweight,  the  netting  being  made of  nylon  filament  mounted  to  a  buoyant  head  rope  and  a ground  rope  that 
usually incorporates some weighted rope that serves to keep the bottom of the net on the seabed. Nets are kept in position 
through the use of anchors, typically weigh less than 100kg each, and which are located at either end of nets. Typically setnets 
are  deployed  in  configurations  or  ‘trains’  where  multiple  nets  are  joined  together.  In  such  circumstances  anchors  may  be 
deployed at intervals along the length of the net, perhaps every 200 meters or so, in addition to anchors at the start and end of 
trains.    Anchors,  once  set  do  not  move  and  are  not  associated  with  a  significant  footprint  on  the  seabed.  Setnets  work  by 
entangling fish species in a number of different manners.  
There is some evidence  
The  key  feature  of  setnets  in  the  context  of  seabed  habitats  is  that  they  have  a  minimal  impact  on  account  of  the  very 
lightweight nature of the gear and the fact that the gear remains stationary throughout the fishing operation (41, 42). 
While the impact of the fishery on seabed habitats is believed to be low based on knowledge of the gear characteristics, fishing 
operations and the type of ground that the fishery mainly takes place over, there is a shortage of evidence to confirm the level 
of impact. Accordingly it has not been possible to meet SG 100 and a score of 90 is considered appropriate. 
References 

http://www.fao.org/fishery/geartype/219/en 
http://www.fao.org/fishery/geartype/223/en 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                  March 2011                   138
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                  60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                      100 Guideposts 

    2.4.2         Management strategy  There  are  measures  in                There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  There is a strategy in place for 
                  There  is  a  strategy  in  place, if necessary, that are    place,  if  necessary,  that  is  managing  the  impact  of  the 
                  place  that  is  designed  expected  to  achieve  the        expected  to  achieve  the  fishery on habitat types.  
                  to  ensure  the  fishery  Habitat Outcome 80 level of        Habitat  Outcome  80  level  of 
                  does not pose a risk of  performance.                        performance or above.  
                  serious  or  irreversible  The       measures         are    There  is  some  objective  basis    The  strategy  is  mainly  based 
                  harm to habitat types.  considered  likely  to  work,        for confidence that the partial      on  information  directly  about 
                                             based       on       plausible    strategy  will  work,  based  on     the  fishery  and/or  habitats 
                                             argument  (eg.  general           some  information  directly          involved, and testing supports 
                                             experience,  theory  or           about  the  fishery  and/or          high  confidence  that  the 
                                             comparison  with  similar         habitats involved.                   strategy will work.  
                                             fisheries/habitats).  
                                                                               There  is  some  evidence  that  There  is  clear  evidence  that 
                                                                               the  partial  strategy  is  being  the  strategy  is  being 
                                                                               implemented successfully.          implemented        successfully, 
                                                                                                                  and  intended  changes  are 
                                                                                                                  occurring.  There  is  some 
                                                                                                                  evidence  that  the  strategy  is 
                                                                                                                  achieving its objective. 
     

        Score:               85                  
 
    Justification 

There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  place,  if  necessary,  that  is  expected  to  achieve  the  Habitat  Outcome  80  level  of  performance  or 
above. The known impacts of the fishery on seabed habitats are low. Accordingly, there is no specific requirement for a detailed 
strategy to manage the impacts at current levels of fishing intensity. However, there are measures in place that are expected to 
maintain  the  Habitat  Outcome  80  level  of  performance  should  there  be  a  change  in  the  outcome  status  for  the  impacts 
associated with static net gear types. The fishery is subject to and managed under the provisions of the Common Fisheries Policy 
which apply to Danish vessels that prosecute the fishery for North Sea plaice using setnets (30). Article 2 of Council Regulation 
(EC) No 2371/2002 (31) provides that the CFP is to apply the precautionary approach in taking measures to minimise the impact 
of  fishing  activities  on  marine  ecosystems.  The  CFP  implements  a  range  of  measures  that  are  expected  to  ensure  the  fishery 
does not pose a risk of serious or irreversible harm to seabed habitat types. The potential for the fishery to have serious or long 
term  impacts on seabed habitats is limited in accordance with restrictions on landings (TAC’s and national quotas), fishing effort 
(days  at  sea),  vessel  size  and  power  (kw)  and  fleet  size.  Outside  of  the  CFP,  changes  to  the  management  of  Danish  fishing 
entitlements since 2007 have seen a reduction on the number of vessels fishing in the North Sea. This trend of fewer vessels is 
likely to continue.  
The  strategy  is  mainly  based  on  information  directly  about  the  fishery  and/or  habitats  involved,  and  testing  supports  high 
confidence that the strategy will work. Knowledge in relation to the seabed impacts of setnets; spatial distribution of demersal 
setnet  fisheries  and  the  seabed  habitats  where  these  occur,  along  with  knowledge    of  the  distribution  and  extent  of  OSPAR 
listed sensitive seabed habitats in the North Sea leads to high confidence that the measures are likely to work. 
There is some evidence that the partial strategy is being implemented successfully. Outcome status for habitat impacts of the 
setnet fishery has scored 90, accordingly it is highly likely that the partial strategy is being implemented successfully. 
The assessment team took note that the DFPO have recently agreed on terms for a Code of Conduct to be introduced to the 
fleet. The CoC provides some background in relation to DFPO policy with respect to reducing environmental impacts of fishing 
operations. The CoC is a positive development however no credit is given in the scoring as it has not yet been implemented in 
the fleet and no evidence of its operation was observed during the site visit.   
All scoring guides at SG80 have been met along with one at SG100. Accordingly a score of 85 is appropriate. 
    References 

(30) Council Regulation (EC) 23 of 2010 
(31) Council Regulation (EC) 2371 of 2002 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                               March 2011                  139
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                           Criteria                   60 Guideposts                        80 Guideposts                       100 Guideposts 

    2.4.3   Information                     /  There      is      a     basic     The  nature,  distribution  and       The  distribution  of  habitat 
                  monitoring                   understanding  of  the  types      vulnerability  of  all  main          types  is  known  over  their 
                  Information              is  and  distribution  of  main        habitat  types  in  the  fishery      range,      with     particular 
                  adequate                to  habitats  in  the  area  of  the    area  are  known  at  a  level  of    attention to the occurrence of 
                  determine  the  risk  fishery.                                  detail  relevant  to  the  scale      vulnerable habitat types.  
                  posed  to  habitat  types                                       and intensity of the fishery.  
                  by  the  fishery  and  the  Information  is  adequate  to       Sufficient data are available to  Changes   in       habitat 
                  effectiveness  of  the  broadly  understand  the                allow  the  nature  of  the  distributions  over  time  are 
                  strategy  to  manage  main  impacts  of  gear  use              impacts  of  the  fishery  on  measured.  
                  impacts  on  habitat  on  the  main  habitats,                  habitat  types  to  be  identified 
                  types.                       including  spatial  extent  of     and  there  is  reliable 
                                              interaction.                        information  on  the  spatial 
                                                                                  extent,  timing  and  location  of 
                                                                                  use of the fishing gear. 
                                                                                  Sufficient  data  continue  to  be    The  physical  impacts  of  the 
                                                                                  collected  to  detect  any            gear on the habitat types have 
                                                                                  increase in risk to habitat (e.g.     been quantified fully. 
                                                                                  due  to  changes  in  the              
                                                                                  outcome  indicator  scores  or 
                                                                                  the operation of the fishery or 
                                                                                  the  effectiveness  of  the 
                                                                                  measures). 
     


        Score:               85                    
 
    Justification 

The  distribution  of  habitat  types  is  known  over  their  range,  with  particular  attention  to  the  occurrence  of  vulnerable  habitat 
types.  A  series  of  maps  indicating  the  location  of  the  main  vulnerable  habitats  in  the  North  Sea  is  available  on  the  OSPAR 
website (29). The report of the ICES marine habitat working group for 2008 (42) provides a useful summary of marine habitat 
mapping  work  that  is  presently  underway  in  the  European  context.  Broadscale  habitat  maps  that  have  been  available  to  the 
assessment  team  during  the  scoring  of  the  fishery  do  not  indicate  the  presence  of  any  habitats  that  would  be  considered 
sensitive in the context of the known effects of the gear type. 
Sufficient  data  are  available  to  allow  the  nature  of  the  impacts  of  the  fishery  on  habitat  types  to  be  identified  and  there  is 
reliable information on the spatial extent, timing and location of use of the fishing gear. Although mainly anecdotal in nature, 
available  information  in  relation  to  the  impacts  of  setnet  fisheries  on  seabed  habitats  suggests  that  the  level  of  impact  is 
minimal. This is supported by observations and reports in relation to the low levels of gear damage suffered by setnet fishing 
vessels. There is adequate information available on the spatial extent, timing and location of use of the fishing gear. EU logbooks 
and VMS data confirm the location of Danish demersal setnet fisheries. 
Sufficient data continue to be collected to detect any increase in risk to habitat (e.g. due to changes in the outcome indicator 
scores or the operation of the fishery or the effectiveness of the measures). However, the physical impacts of the gear on the 
habitat types has not been investigated in detail and quantified fully for the seabed habitats associated with the fishery. 
Two criteria at SG 80 have been satisfied and one at SG100. Accordingly a score of 85 is appropriate. 
    References 

(29) OSPAR – see www.ospar.org 
(42) ICES Working Group on Marine Habitat Mapping (WGMHM) Report for 2008. 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                   March 2011                 140
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
    2.5           Ecosystem 
     

                             Criteria               60 Guideposts                        80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

    2.5.1         Status                     The  fishery  is  unlikely  to     The  fishery  is  highly  unlikely    There  is  evidence  that  the 
                  The  fishery  does  not    disrupt  the  key  elements        to  disrupt  the  key  elements       fishery  is  highly  unlikely  to 
                  cause  serious  or         underlying         ecosystem       underlying            ecosystem       disrupt  the  key  elements 
                  irreversible  harm  to     structure  and  function  to  a    structure  and  function  to  a       underlying            ecosystem 
                  the  key  elements  of     point where there would be         point where there would be a          structure  and  function  to  a 
                  ecosystem  structure       a  serious  or  irreversible       serious or irreversible harm.         point where there would be a 
                  and function.              harm.                                                                    serious or irreversible harm.  
     


        Score:                 90             
 
    Justification 
    The fishery is highly unlikely to disrupt the key elements underlying ecosystem structure and function to a point where there 
    would be a serious or irreversible harm. The role of Plaice in the North Sea ecosystem is relatively well understood. Plaice is 
    dominantly benthivorous, feeding mainly on polychaetes and crustaceans, with bivalves and small demersal fish featuring in 
    the diet of larger plaice. Food‐web studies suggest that post‐juvenile plaice function mainly as an energy sink in the North Sea 
    ecosystem and that relatively small proportions of plaice biomass are passed onto the demersal piscivore guild and an even 
    smaller proportion to the pelagic piscivore guild (32; 33; 34). This clearly suggests that removal of plaice at sustainable levels 
    should not give rise to significant impacts on the wider foodweb of the North Sea.  
    Serious depletion of the spawning stock could give rise to reduced availability of juvenile plaice on inshore nursery grounds 
    where  they  are  likely  to  form  an  important  prey  item  for  other  species.  There  is  potential  that  this  could  have  negative 
    consequences for dependent species, especially in  circumstances where no alternative prey species is available. There is no 
    evidence to suggest that current levels of removal of plaice is likely to have such a consequence,  based on the most recent 
    estimate of SSB (in 2009) and fishing mortality (in 2008), ICES classifies the stock as having full reproductive capacity and as 
    being  harvested  sustainably.  SSB  is  estimated  to  have  increased  above  the  Bpa.  Fishing  mortality  is  estimated  to  have 
    decreased to below Fpa and Ftarget (35).  
    The team concluded that at present rates of exploitation for NS plaice, the plaice setnet fishery was highly unlikely to disrupt 
             key elements underlying ecosystem structure and function. Accordingly the SG 80 has been met. While no conclusive 
             evidence  that  the  fishery  is  highly  unlikely  to  disrupt  the  key  elements  of  ecosystem  structure  and  function  was 
             presented to the assessment team, the team were of the opinion that the observed increase in SSB and the fact the 
             North Sea plaice stock is now considered to have full reproductive capacity provides some evidence that the fishery 
             was highly unlikely to cause serious disruption to key elements underlying ecosystem structure and function. 
SG80 has been fulfilled and the SG100 has been partially fulfilled. A score of 90 is appropriate. 
    References 

(32)  Greenstreet,  S.P.R.,  A.D.  Bryant,  N.  Broekhuizen,  S.J.  Hall  &  M.R.  Heath.  1997.  Seasonal  variation  in  the  consumption  of 
food by fish in the North Sea and implications for food web dynamics. ICES Journal of Marine Science 54: 243‐266. 
(33) Mackinson, S. 2001. Representing trophic interactions in the North Sea in the 1880s, using the 
Ecopath mass‐balance approach. Fisheries Centre Research Report 9:44: 35‐98.  
(34) Mackinson, S. & G. Daskalov. 2007. An ecosystem model of the North Sea for use in fisheries 
management and ecological research: description and parameterisation. 195 pp. 
(35) ICES Advice 2009, Book 6 
     




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                 March 2011                   141
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                    60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

    2.5.2   Management strategy  There  are  measures  in  There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  There  is  a  strategy  that 
                  There  are  measures  in    place,  if  necessary,  that      place,  if  necessary,  that  takes    consists  of  a  plan,  containing 
                  place  to  ensure  the      take  into  account  potential    into        account      available     measures  to  address  all  main 
                  fishery does not pose a     impacts  of  the  fishery  on     information  and  is  expected         impacts  of  the  fishery  on  the 
                  risk  of  serious  or       key  elements  of  the            to  restrain  impacts  of  the         ecosystem,  and  at  least  some 
                  irreversible  harm  to      ecosystem.                        fishery on the ecosystem so as         of  these  measures  are  in 
                  ecosystem  structure                                          to  achieve  the  Ecosystem            place.  The  plan and  measures 
                  and function.                                                 Outcome  80  level  of                 are based on well‐understood 
                                                                                performance.                           functional          relationships 
                                                                                                                       between  the  fishery  and  the 
                                                                                                                       Components  and  elements  of 
                                                                                                                       the ecosystem.  
                                              The       measures        are     The  partial  strategy  is             This  plan  provides  for 
                                              considered  likely  to  work,     considered  likely  to  work,          development of a full strategy 
                                              based       on      plausible     based  on  plausible  argument         that  restrains  impacts  on  the 
                                              argument  (eg.,  general          (eg.,  general  experience,            ecosystem  to  ensure  the 
                                              experience,  theory  or           theory  or  comparison  with           fishery does not cause serious 
                                              comparison  with  similar         similar fisheries/ ecosystems).        or irreversible harm.  
                                              fisheries/ ecosystems).  
                                                                                There  is  some  evidence  that        The  measures  are  considered 
                                                                                the  measures  comprising  the         likely  to  work  based  on  prior 
                                                                                partial  strategy  are  being          experience,             plausible 
                                                                                implemented successfully.              argument  or  information 
                                                                                                                       directly         from         the 
                                                                                                                       fishery/ecosystems involved.  
                                                                                                                       There  is  evidence  that  the 
                                                                                                                       measures        are     being 
                                                                                                                       implemented successfully. 
     


        Score:              90                     
 
    Justification 

 There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  place,  if  necessary,  that  takes  into  account  available  information  and  is  expected  to  restrain 
impacts of the fishery on the ecosystem so as to achieve the Ecosystem Outcome 80 level of performance. 
Sustainable management of fisheries within the waters of the European Union are facilitated and effected under the framework 
of the Common Fisheries Policy. For the future, the CFP recognises the need to manage fisheries collectively on a multispecies 
basis as well as recognising the need to increasingly take into account ecosystem aspects and influences in formulating future 
fishery  management  policy  and  in  developing  management  plans.  Significant  advances  are  being  made  at  scientific  level 
principally  through  ICES  e.g.  Working  Group  on  Multispecies  Assessment  Methods  (WGSAM),  in  order  to  support  the 
development  of  multispecies  assessment  methodologies.  Denmark’s  commitment  to  the  CFP  supports  future  developments 
with respect to fisheries management at European level and forms the basis of a partial strategy that is increasingly expected to 
take into account and restrain ecosystem impacts of the fishery in the future. 
While implementation of a full ecosystem approach to fisheries management is still some way off and in depth scientific debate 
is taking place at an international level as to the best ways to implement such a policy (36, 37), some measures are in place in 
the interim to identify and avoid or reduce ecosystem impacts of the fishery where possible.  The Danish North Sea demersal 
setnet fishery catches a mixture of mainly quota species including plaice, cod, dab, sole and hake.  A full suite of management 
measures apply to quota species at fleet level including vessel licensing, quota allocation and effort limitation; while a second 
tier of technical control measures adds to the partial strategy to manage ecosystem impacts of the fishery. In addition, the EU 
promotes  research  into  reducing  ecosystem  impacts  of  fishing  and  has  funded  a  number  of  important  research  projects 
designed  to  investigate  fishing gear  modifications  in  order  to  reduce  ecosystem  impacts  (such  as  the  RECOVERY  and  REDUCE 
projects). 
Further  provisions  of  European  law  designed  to  protect  the  environment  and  ecosystems,  such  as  the  Marine  Strategy 
Framework Directive, Water Framework Directive and Habitats Directive (38,39,40) are likely to play a growing role in limiting 
fishery  related  ecosystem  impacts  in  the  future.  In  particular,  the  Habitats  Directive  is  likely  to  play  a  much  greater  role  in 
protecting sensitive marine habitats, once clear conservation objectives and management regimes for Natura 2000 sites have 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                  March 2011                    142
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
been  agreed  and  implemented.  The  Marine  Strategy  Framework  Directive  also  aims  to  establish  a  global  network  of  Marine 
Protected Areas by 2012. 
The measures are considered likely to work based on prior experience, plausible argument and information directly from the 
fishery/ecosystems involved. The partial strategy generally takes into account European environmental policy and also reflects 
current  international  scientific  thinking.  It  is  also  intended  to  be  both  adaptive  to  change  and  reactive.  Based  on  this  it  is 
considered likely that the partial strategy will be successful in ensuring the fishery does not pose a risk of serious or irreversible 
harm to ecosystem structure and function. 
There is evidence that the measures comprising the partial strategy are being implemented successfully. Denmark has shown 
clear  commitment  to  the  CFP  and  has  made  significant  advances  in  managing  its  national  fisheries  in  accordance  with  the 
aspirations and objectives of the Common Fisheries Policy to create long term sustainability in European Fisheries. Denmark has 
implemented the provisions of the Habitats Directive and a series of management plans for marine Natura 2000 sites are due to 
enter into public consultation stage during the first half of 2010. 
The assessment team were satisfied that all of the scoring guides at SG80 were met, along with two at SG 100. Accordingly a 
score of 90 was recorded. 
References 

(36) Garcia, S.M. & K.L. Cochrane. 2005. Ecosystem approach to fisheries: a review of implementation guidelines. ICES Journal of 
Marine Science 62: 311‐318. 
(37)  Plagányi,  É.E.  2007.  Models  for  an  ecosystem  approach  to  fisheries.  Food  and  Agriculture  Organization  of  the  United 
Nations, FAO Fisheries Technical Paper, 126 pp. 
(38) Council Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora 
(39) Council Directive 2000/60/EC (Water Framework Directive) 
(40) Council Directive 2008/56/EC (Marine Strategy Framework Directive) 
(41) Council Regulation (EU) No 23/2010 fixing fishing opportunities for community vessels and community waters for 2010. 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                              March 2011                    143
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                  60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                           100 Guideposts 

    2.5.3   Information                   /  Information  is  adequate  to    Information  is  adequate  to  Information  is  adequate  to 
                  monitoring                 identify the key elements of     broadly  understand  the  broadly  understand  the  key 
                  There  is  adequate  the  ecosystem  (e.g.  trophic         functions of the key elements  elements of the ecosystem. 
                  knowledge  of  the  structure  and  function,               of the ecosystem. 
                  impacts  of  the  fishery  community  composition, 
                  on the ecosystem.          productivity  pattern  and 
                                             biodiversity).  
                                            Main impacts of the fishery       Main impacts of the fishery on           Main  interactions  between 
                                            on  these  key  ecosystem         these key ecosystem elements             the  fishery  and  these 
                                            elements  can  be  inferred       can  be  inferred  from  existing        ecosystem  elements  can  be 
                                            from  existing  information,      information,  but  may  not              inferred     from     existing 
                                            but  have  not  been              have  been  investigated  in             information,  and  have  been 
                                            investigated in detail.           detail.                                  investigated. 
                                                                              The  main  functions  of  the            The  impacts  of  the  fishery  on 
                                                                              Components  (i.e.  target,               target,  Bycatch,  Retained  and 
                                                                              Bycatch,  Retained  and  ETP             ETP  species  and  Habitats  are 
                                                                              species  and  Habitats)  in  the         identified  and  the  main 
                                                                              ecosystem are known.                     functions         of        these 
                                                                                                                       Components in the ecosystem 
                                                                                                                       are understood. 
                                                                              Sufficient  information  is              Sufficient  information  is 
                                                                              available  on  the  impacts  of          available  on  the  impacts  of 
                                                                              the  fishery  on  these                  the      fishery     on    the 
                                                                              Components to allow some of              Components  and  elements  to 
                                                                              the  main  consequences  for             allow  the  main  consequences 
                                                                              the ecosystem to be inferred.            for  the  ecosystem  to  be 
                                                                                                                       inferred. 
                                                                              Sufficient  data  continue  to  be       Information  is  sufficient  to 
                                                                              collected  to  detect  any               support  the  development  of 
                                                                              increase  in  risk  level  (e.g.  due    strategies     to      manage 
                                                                              to  changes  in  the  outcome            ecosystem impacts. 
                                                                              indicator  scores  or  the 
                                                                              operation of the fishery or the 
                                                                              effectiveness          of         the 
                                                                              measures). 
     

        Score:               90                  
 
    Justification 

Information is adequate to broadly understand the key elements of the ecosystem. Key elements include the trophic structure 
of  the  North  Sea  ecosystem  such  as  key  prey,  predators  and  competitors;  community  composition,  productivity  patterns  and 
characteristics of biodiversity. Greenstreet et al.1997 describe seasonal variation in the consumption of food by fish in the North 
Sea and implications for food web dynamics.  
Main interactions between the fishery and these ecosystem elements can be inferred from existing information, and have been 
investigated.  (33)  describe  the  construction  and  calibration  of  an  ecosystem  model  of  the  North  Sea  using  the  Ecopath  with 
Ecosim  approach.  Models  of  this  type  readily  lend  themselves  to  answering  simple,  ecosystem  wide  questions  about  the 
dynamics  and  the  response  of  the  ecosystem  to  anthropogenic  changes.  Thus,  they  can  help  design  policies  aimed  at 
implementing  ecosystem  management  principles,  and  can  provide  testable  insights  into  changes  that  have  occurred  in  the 
ecosystem over time.  
The  main  functions  of  the  Components  (i.e.  target,  Bycatch,  Retained  and  ETP  species  and  Habitats)  in  the  ecosystem  are 
known. It is known that North Sea plaice act mainly as an energy sink (32, 34), while other retained species are mainly demersal 
predator species  such as cod, dab and hake. The setnet fishery has minimal levels of bycatch and discarding, other than dab and 
bycatch  of  seabirds,  the  main  functions  for  both  of  which  are  known.  Direct  and  indirect  impacts  of  the  fishery  on  both  ETP 
species and seabed habitats are known with a reasonable degree of accuracy. 
Sufficient information is available on the impacts of the fishery on these Components to allow some of the main consequences 


    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                  March 2011                    144
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
for the ecosystem to be inferred. Sections 2.1.3, 2.2.3, 2.3.3 and 2.4.3 outline the array of data that are collected in relation to 
the fishery. The range of data are sufficient to allow the main impacts on these components to be inferred directly. 
Sufficient data continue to be collected to detect any increase in risk level (e.g. due to changes in the outcome indicator scores 
or the operation of the fishery or the effectiveness of the measures). Data is routinely collected on an ongoing basis to allow for 
the  detection  of  any  change  or  increase  in  risk  level  to  the  main ecosystem  components.  Key data  collected  include  landings 
data for all species,  spatial data in relation to fishing effort (via EU logbooks and VMS) and data in relation to fishing effort. 
All scoring guides at SG80 were met, along with two at SG100. A score of 90 was recorded. 
References 

(32)  Greenstreet,  S.P.R.,  A.D.  Bryant,  N.  Broekhuizen,  S.J.  Hall  &  M.R.  Heath.  1997.  Seasonal  variation  in  the  consumption  of 
food by fish in the North Sea and implications for food web dynamics. ICES Journal of Marine Science 54: 243‐266. 
(33)  Mackinson,  S.  2001.  Representing  trophic  interactions  in  the  North  Sea  in  the  1880s,  using  the  Ecopath  mass‐balance 
approach. Fisheries Centre Research Report 9:44: 35‐98.  
(34) Mackinson, S. & G. Daskalov. 2007. An ecosystem model of the North Sea for use in fisheries management and ecological 
research: description and parameterisation. 195 pp. 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                            March 2011                   145
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
    Principle 2 – Danish Seine 
    2             Fishing operations should allow for the maintenance of the structure, productivity, function 
                  and diversity of the ecosystem (including habitat and associated dependent and ecologically 
                  related species) on which the fishery depends. 
    2.1           Retained non‐target species 
     

                          Criteria                     60 Guideposts                        80 Guideposts                         100 Guideposts 

    2.1.1   Status                              Main  retained  species  are       Main  retained  species  are            There  is  a  high  degree  of 
                  The  fishery  does  not       likely  to  be  within             highly  likely  to  be  within          certainty that retained species 
                  pose  a  risk  of  serious    biologically  based  limits  or    biologically  based  limits,  or  if    are  within  biologically  based 
                  or irreversible harm to       if  outside  the  limits  there    outside  the  limits  there  is  a      limits.  
                  the  retained  species        are  measures  in  place  that     partial        strategy          of 
                  and  does  not  hinder        are expected to ensure that        demonstrably            effective 
                  recovery  of  depleted        the  fishery  does  not  hinder    management  measures  in 
                  retained species.             recovery  and  rebuilding  of      place  such  that  the  fishery 
                                                the depleted species.              does  not  hinder  recovery  and 
                                                                                   rebuilding.  
                                                If  the  status  is  poorly                                                Target  reference  points  are 
                                                known  there  are  measures                                                defined  and  retained  species 
                                                or  practices  in  place  that                                             are  at  or  fluctuating  around 
                                                are  expected  to  result  in                                              their target reference points. 
                                                the  fishery  not  causing  the 
                                                retained  species  to  be 
                                                outside  biologically  based 
                                                limits      or       hindering 
                                                recovery. 
     

        Score:               80                  
 
    Justification 

Main retained species are highly likely to be within biologically based limits,  or if outside the limits there is a partial strategy of 
demonstrably effective management measures in place such that the fishery does not hinder recovery and rebuilding.  
An analysis of the 2008 official landings data for Danish vessels targeting plaice in the North Sea using Danish seines reveals that 
the main species landed in the fishery along with 1339 tonnes of plaice were North Sea Cod Gadus morhua (290t) , along with 
much smaller volumes of hake (66t), Dab (58t) and haddock (45t). Danish fleet sampling programmes estimate that a total of 17 
tonnes of North Sea cod were discarded from Danish trawling vessels in the North Sea during 2008. 
ICES advice for 2010 (1) for NS Cod indicates that the stock is suffering reduced reproductive capacity and is in danger of being 
harvested unsustainably. SSB has increased since its historical low in 2006, but remains below Blim. Despite this there is in place 
a strategy comprising management measures that are considered effective in ensuring that the North Sea Danish seine fishery 
does not hinder recovery and rebuilding of NS Cod. The EU–Norway agreement on a management plan for NS Cod, as updated 
in December 2008, aims to be consistent with the precautionary approach and is intended to provide for sustainable fisheries 
and high yield leading to a target fishing mortality to 0.4.  The EU has adopted a long‐term plan for this stock with the same aims 
(4).  The 2008 advice from ICES for NS Cod was for a zero catch in 2009 because ICES did not consider the former recovery plan 
precautionary.  However  the  ICES  advice  for  2010  indicates  that  catches  of  cod  can  be  allowed  under  the  new  management 
agreement.  This  change  in  advice  is  because  the  new  management  agreement  is  considered  to  be  consistent  with  the 
precautionary  approach.    In  December  2008  the  European  Commission  and  Norway  agreed  on  a  new  cod  management  plan 
implementing a new system of linked effort management with a target fishing mortality of 0.4 (1). ICES has evaluated the EC 
management plan in March 2009 and concluded that this management plan is in accordance with the precautionary approach 
only  if  implemented  and  enforced  adequately.    The  management  plan  is  seen  to  be  effective  and  recent  landings  have  been 
within the agreed TAC for the stock. 
There is not a high degree of certainty that North Sea Cod are within biologically based limits and target reference points have 
not been defined for all retained species. Accordingly, the scoring guide at SG80 is satisfied. 




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                      March 2011                  146
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
References 

(10) ICES Advice 2009, Book 6,  Section 6.4.3 pp 9‐31 
(4) Council Regulation (EC) 1342/2008, European Commission 




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                      March 2011    147
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                      60 Guideposts                       80 Guideposts                        100 Guideposts 

    2.1.2   Management strategy  There  are  measures  in  There  is  a  partial  strategy  in  There is a strategy in place for 
                  There  is  a  strategy  in    place, if necessary, that are       place,  if  necessary  that  is  managing retained species.  
                  place  for  managing          expected  to  maintain  the         expected  to  maintain  the 
                  retained species that is      main  retained  species  at         main  retained  species  at 
                  designed to ensure the        levels  which  are  highly          levels  which  are  highly  likely 
                  fishery does not pose a       likely  to  be  within              to be within biologically based 
                  risk  of  serious  or         biologically  based  limits,  or    limits, or to ensure the fishery 
                  irreversible  harm  to        to  ensure  the  fishery  does      does not hinder their recovery 
                  retained species.             not  hinder  their  recovery        and rebuilding. 
                                                and rebuilding.  
                                                The       measures          are     There  is  some  objective  basis    The  strategy  is  mainly  based 
                                                considered  likely  to  work,       for confidence that the partial      on  information  directly  about 
                                                based       on        plausible     strategy  will  work,  based  on     the  fishery  and/or  species 
                                                argument  (e.g.,  general           some  information  directly          involved, and testing supports 
                                                experience,  theory  or             about  the  fishery  and/or          high  confidence  that  the 
                                                comparison  with  similar           species involved.                    strategy will work.  
                                                fisheries/species).  
                                                                                                                         There  is  clear  evidence  that 
                                                                                                                         the  strategy  is  being 
                                                                                                                         implemented         successfully, 
                                                                                                                         and  intended  changes  are 
                                                                                                                         occurring.  
                                                                                    There  is  some  evidence  that  There  is  some  evidence  that 
                                                                                    the  partial  strategy  is  being  the  strategy  is  achieving  its 
                                                                                    implemented successfully.          overall objective. 
     


        Score:               90                      
 
    Justification 

 There is a strategy in place for managing main retained species. All retained species are subject to management provision of 
the  Common  Fisheries  Policy.  Accordingly,  management  strategies  encompass  a  broad  range  of  measures  that  include 
mandatory  landings  reporting  for  all  species,  minimum  landing  size  regulations  for  Nephrops,  cod,  anglerfish,  turbot,  hake, 
haddock and saithe. Most retained species are subject to a Total Allowable Catch (TAC) of which Denmark receives a national 
allocation (quota). There are minimum mesh size regulations in place (110mm in the EU zone of the North Sea, 120mm in the 
Norwegian sector). There is a System of Real Time Closure that is designed to provide an effective means for closing off areas of 
seabed where recent catches reveal the presence of high levels of juvenile cod and an increased risk of discarding. The EU have 
adopted a Long Term Management Plan for cod (4) within which catches of cod from the North Sea stock are permitted within a 
well  defined  and  closely  monitored  quota.  Within  the  cod  management  plan,  reduction  in  discarding  is  encouraged  through 
allowing extra days at sea for vessels using highly selective gears. The plan also prohibits transhipment, makes notification of 
landing mandatory and limits effort through days at sea restrictions. In Denmark there have been significant developments with 
respect to the full documentation of fisheries through the Fully Documented Fishery project. The aims of this are to account for 
all removals of  cod using video  surveillance onboard participating vessels. By providing full data in relation to  all removals  of 
cod, including discards, participating vessels have an opportunity to receive additional Individual cod quota allowance.  
There is clear evidence that the strategy is being implemented successfully, and intended changes are occurring. Danish vessels 
have recorded a high degree of compliance with respect to landings quotas, in particular since the introduction of the FKA or 
rights based management regime in 2007. There is no overshoot on quota and all landings are recorded and reported.   
There  is  some  evidence  that  the  strategy  is  achieving  its  overall  objective.  Exploitation  rates  for  cod  have  decreased  and  the 
species  is  now  being  harvested  sustainably.  Accordingly  the  management  measures  appear  to  have  stabilised  cod  stocks  and 
facilitated some rebuilding of SSB. 
Despite the foregoing positive aspects, all elements of the management strategy do not apply to all of the retained species, with 
some  retained  species  subject  to  a  higher  level  of  management  than  others  (for  example,  there  is  no  quota  for  Dab  and  the 
species  status  is  known  only  in  very  general  terms).  Furthermore,  while  the  strategy  is  mainly  based  on  information  directly 
about the fishery and/or species involved and there is some confidence that it will work, it has not been tested and there is no 
basis for a high degree of confidence that the strategy will work. For these reasons a score of 100 is not appropriate. 




    MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                                                                                    March 2011                   148
    Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
  
  
 FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
  
References 

(4) Council Regulation (EC) 1342/2008, European Commission 
  




 MSC SUSTAINABLE FISHERIES                                      March 2011    149
 Public Certification Report – DFPO Denmark North Sea Plaice 
     
     
    FOOD CERTIFICATION INTERNATIONAL LTD 
     
                          Criteria                 60 Guideposts                      80 Guideposts                           100 Guideposts 

    2.1.3         Information           /  Qualitative  information  is      Qualitative  information  and            Accurate       and     verifiable 
                  monitoring               available  on  the  amount  of    some               quantitative          information is available on the 
                  Information  on  the  main retained species taken          information  are  available  on          catch  of  all  retained  species 
                  nature  and  extent  of  by the fishery.                   the  amount  of  main  retained          and the consequences for the 
                  retained  species  is                                      species taken by the fishery.            status of affected populations.
                  adequate             to  Information  is  adequate  to     Information  is  sufficient  to          Information  is  sufficient  to 
                  determine  the  risk  qualitatively             assess     estimate  outcome  status  with          quantitatively         estimate 
                  posed  by  the  fishery  outcome        status    with     respect  to  biologically  based         outcome  status  with  a  high 
                  and  the  effectiveness  respect  to  biologically         limits.                                  degree of certainty.  
                  of  the  strategy  to  based limits.  
                  manage         retained 
                  species.                 Information  is  adequate  to     Information  is  adequate  to            Information  is  adequate  to 
                                           support      measures       to    support  a  partial  strategy  to        support  a  comprehensive 
                                           manage  main  retained            manage       main       retained         strategy  to  manage  retained 
                                           species.                          species.                                 species,  and  evaluate  with  a 
                                                                                                                      high  degree  of  certainty 
                                                                                                                      whether  the  strategy  is 
                                                                              
                                                                                                                      achieving its objective.  
                                                                             Sufficient  data  continue  to  be       Monitoring      of    retained 
                                                                             collected  to  detect  any               species  is  conducted  in 
                                                                             increase  in  risk  level  (e.g.  due    sufficient  detail  to  assess 
                                                                             to  changes  in  the  outcome            ongoing  mortalities  to  all 
                                                                             indicator  scores  or  the               retained species. 
                                                                             operation of the fishery or the 
                                                                             effectiveness of the strategy). 
     

        Score:              90                  
 
    Justification 

 Accurate  and  verifiable  information  is  available  on  the  catch  of  all  retained  species  and  the  consequences  for  the  status  of 
affected populations. Information is recorded within a 5% tolerance on onboard logbooks for all retained species. Information is 
collected centrally by the Ministry and is adequate to determine the risk posed by the fishery as well as the effectiveness of the 
strategy to manage retained species. Information on retained species catch and can be verified from source log sheets and can 
be cross referenced with landings inspection reports and at sea inspection reports. In 2008, the Danish Inspectorate carried out 
35 at sea inspection of North Sea Danish seine vessels. All vessels are also subject to in port landings control and inspections in 
an ongoing effort to verify logbook entries. National legislation requires mandatory inspection of all vessels in instances where 1 
tonne or more of NS cod is being landed. Further random inspections may also occur from time to time by Inspectors from the 
EU  fisheries  Inspectorate.  At  sea  inspections  are  thorough  by  nature  and  focus  on  overall  compliance,  technical  measures  as 
well as logbook entry verification. Information on the level of discarding of retained species is also collected through an at sea 
observer  programme  that  regularly  updates  the  discard  profile  for  different  gear  types.  Data  generated  are  used  to  estimate 
total volumes of retained (and all other species) that are discarded in each fishery and ICES Area. 
Information  is  sufficient  to  estimate  outcome  status  with  respect  to  biologically  based  limits.  Landings  of  all  main  retained 
species are recorded at a level of frequency and detail that is considered adequate for the purpose of estimating outcome status 
with reference to biologically based limits. However, biologically based limits do not exist for all of the retained species.  
Information is adequate to support a partial strategy to manage main retained species. Information on catches, landings, fishing 
equipment and area of capture are collected in sufficient detail to support measures that are designed to manage impacts of 
the fishery on retained species populations. 
Monitoring  of  retained  species is  conducted  in  sufficient  detail  to  assess  ongoing  mortalities  to  all  retained  species.  Landings 
data for all species are collected via the EU logbooks scheme on an ongoing basis and these are collated centrally for the entire 
Danish&#