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Dave Lockman - Certification Manager_ Pro-Cert Organic

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					The Organic Certification Process

       Dave Lockman, MBA, P.Ag.
     Certification Manager, Eastern Branch Office
                    March 23, 2011




    Pro-Cert Organic Systems Ltd.
    Celebrating 21 years of Service!
            Overview

• Who is Pro-Cert?
• The Canadian Organic Products
  Regulations.
• Equivalency Agreements and Organic
  Trade.
• 8 Steps of the Certification Process.
• Key Compliance Issues and Questions.
                 Who is Pro-Cert?
• Pro-Cert is the main Canadian Organic Certifier with over
  1700 certified clients (producers and processors) in
  Canada and the United-States.
• Pro-Cert is owned by the Hamm family located near
  Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The Hamm’s are also
  producers of organic crops such as wheat, alfalfa, peas,
  oats and flax.
• Pro-Cert operates out of two offices: Head Office in
  Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and an Eastern Branch Office
  in Cambray, Ontario.
• Pro-Cert is celebrating 21 years of Organic Service.
                   Who is Pro-Cert?
Pro-Cert is Accredited (licensed) to certify operators to the
following Standards and Regulations:
     • the Canadian Organic Product Regulations (COR);
     • the EC Regulation 834/07 and 889/08;
     • the USDA National Organic Program (NOP);
     • the Quebec Organic Reference Standards (CARTV);
     • MAFF Japanese Regulations (JAS).
     • Bio-Suisse Document Completion.
     • Inspection to the Brazillian Organic Regulations.
               Who is Pro-Cert?


Pro-Cert is Accredited by the Canadian Food Inspection
Agency as an official Certifying Body under the
Canadian Organic Products Regulations. Pro-Cert’s
activities under this regulation are monitored by the
Standards Council of Canada.
     The Canadian Organic Products
             Regulations
Came into effect on June 30, 2009 and includes the
following:
  • Applies to food and drink intended for human
    consumption, livestock feed and the cultivation of plants.
  • Applies to products sold or traded inter-provincially.
  • All products claiming “Organic” must be certified and
    compliant to CAN.CGSB-32.310. 311 (Canadian Organic
    Standards).
  • All imported organic products must be certified by a CFIA
    approved certifier, to the Canadian Standards or to the
    terms of an equivalency agreement with that country.
     The Canadian Organic Products
             Regulations
Came into effect on June 30, 2009 and includes the
following:
    • A Stream of Commerce is in effect until June 30,
      2011. Full enforcement by CFIA after June 30,
      2011. (The Stream of Commerce is NOT a period
      of “rule bending”, it is the period of time to
      convert from your existing standard (NOP, EEC)
      … to the COR.
    • Claims of “organic” and “contains x % organic
      ingredients (between 70 and 95%)”.
     The Canadian Organic Products
             Regulations
Came into effect on June 30, 2009 and does NOT
include the following:
   • Certification of Aquaculture, fertilizers, cosmetics,
     natural health products and pet food.
   • Organic products sold intra-provincially.
   • Claims of « 100% organic », « Made with Organic
     Ingredients » and products under 70% organic
     ingredients.
 Equivalency Agreements and Organic
               Trade
Few trade agreements are currently in place for
organic trade:
  • Canada - USA Equivalency Arrangement.
  • Canada - Quebec Agreement.
  • Canada - Taiwan Import Agreement.
Equivalency Agreements and Organic
              Trade
Canada - USA Equivalency Agreements:
  • Products certified as “organic”, imported into
    Canada, certified by a USDA-NOP accredited
    certifier, which was not produced with sodium
    nitrate, hydroponics or products from livestock not
    in accordance with COS stocking rates.
  • Products certified as “organic”, imported into the
    USA, certified by a CFIA accredited certifier,
    which is not an agricultural product derived from
    livestock treated with antibiotics (milk).
Equivalency Agreements and Organic
              Trade
Canada - Quebec Equivalency Agreements:
  • Products certified as “organic” or “contains x%
    organic” certified under the terms of the Canadian
    Organic Products Regulations 2009 may be sold in
    Quebec without additional certification.
  • Products certified as “organic”or “contains x%
    organic” certified in Quebec under the terms of the
    Quebec Organic Reference Standards may be sold
    in the rest of Canada without additional
    certification.
Equivalency Agreements and Organic
              Trade
Canada-Taiwan Import Agreement:
  • Taiwan Organic Regulations allows agricultural
    products produced in a third country to be sold in
    Taiwan as organic, when they are certified in
    accordance with the Canadian Organic Standards
    (COS), by an organization included on the list of
    accredited certification bodies published by the
    CFIA.
Equivalency Agreements and Organic
              Trade
 • Currently no agreements with Europe (coming?).
 • Organic Products certified to the Canadian Organic
   Products Regulations are approved in South Korea
   until December 31, 2010.
 • No trade agreement with Switzerland. Producers
   require a Bio-Suisse certification.
 • Products Exported to Brazil must be compliant to
   the Brazilian Organic Regulations.
   8 Steps of the Certification Process
Step #1: Information Transmittal.
Step #2: Application & Contract.
Step #3: Registration & Preliminary Evaluation of
Conformity.
Step #4: On-site Inspection.
Step #5: File Completion & Fee Collection.
Step #6: Final Evaluation of Conformity.
Step #7: Certification Decision & Reporting.
Step # 8: Surveillance.
  8 Steps of the Certification Process

Step #1: Information Transmittal:
  • Pro-Cert provides the applicant with all the
    information necessary to begin the certification
    process including; updates on standards &
    regulations, application forms, fee schedule,…
  • It is the responsibility of the applicant to be aware
    of and understand the regulations they are
    certifying to.
  8 Steps of the Certification Process
Step #2: Application & Contract:
  • The applicant must complete the Application &
    Contract and return to Pro-Cert along with the
    specified retainer fee.
  • The Application & Contract requests all
    information required to be verified under the
    Organic Regulations.
  • The Contract dictate the terms of the relations
    between the certifier and the legal authorities
    (CFIA, USDA,…).
  8 Steps of the Certification Process

Step #3: Registration & Preliminary
Evaluation of Conformity:
  • The applicant is registered with Pro-Cert.
  • The application & contract is reviewed during a
    preliminary evaluation.
  • The Applicant should prepare the facility for the
    annual inspection.
  8 Steps of the Certification Process

Step #4: On-site Inspection :
  • Review of application/contract.
  • Audit of the previous year’s production.
  • Inspection of buildings, equipment, grounds, crops
    (estimate potential yield),…
  • Collection of samples for forensic purposes (if
    applicable).
  • Completion of inspection report.
  8 Steps of the Certification Process

Step #5: File Completion & Fee Collection:
  • Copy of inspection report summary is provided to
    the applicant.
  • Collection of certification fees.
  • Collection of missing and additional information
    needed to evaluate conformity to the standards and
    regulations.
  8 Steps of the Certification Process

Step #6: Final Evaluation of Conformity:
  • Pro-Cert via its Certification/Evaluation
    Committee, will evaluate conformity of the
    applicant to the standards and regulations,
    specifying any non-conformities and will make a
    written recommendation regarding certification.
  8 Steps of the Certification Process

Step #7: Certification Decision & Reporting:
  • The certification decision is made by a consensus
    seeking mechanism within the committee. The
    nature of this certification decision varies with the
    program but in essence involves one of the
    following options:
     • Granting Certification;
     • Denial of Certification;
     • Suspension or withdrawal of certification.
  8 Steps of the Certification Process

Step #8: Surveillance:
  • Pro-Cert will monitor the conformity of the
    operation during the certification period by such
    procedures as:
     •   Follow-up on remediation requirements,
     •   Follow-up inspections,
     •   Unannounced inspections,
     •   Collection and review of labels and advertising material.
        Key Compliance Issues
Canadian Organic Products Regulations:
  • No prohibited substances may be used for 36
    months prior to harvesting an organic crop.
  • A new operator (maple products, field crops and
    crops grown in greenhouses with an in-ground
    permanent soil system) must submit an application
    15 months before the day on which the product is
    expected to be marketed.
        Key Compliance Issues
Canadian Organic Products Regulations:
  • The standard must be fully applied on a production
    unit for at least 12 month before the first harvest of
    products (inspection is required during the last
    year of the transition).
  • Parallel production (where the products of the
    organic and non-organic system are
    indistinguishable) is not allowed.
        Key Compliance Issues
Canadian Organic Products Regulations:
  • Cannot alternate fields in and out of organic
    productions.
  • Must use Organic Seed.
  • A non-organic, non-gmo, non-treated seed variety
    may be used IF that organically produced seed or
    planting stock variety is not available from the
    enterprise and not commercially available .
         Key Compliance Issues
Canadian Organic Products Regulations:
  • All substances in use must be listed on the
    permitted substances list.
  • Production, storage and marketing records must be
    maintained.
  • Lot #’s must be assigned to all sales and should be
    included on invoices and trade documents to
    ensure traceability.
        Key Compliance Issues
Who Makes Interpretations of the Canadian
Organic Standards?:
  • The Certifiers.
  • The Conformity Verification Bodies.
  • The Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
  • The Standards Interpretation Committee (SIC).
  When an interpretation on an issue is not possible, it
    is returned to the Committee on Organic
    Agriculture for a revision of the Standards.
The Organic Certification
        Process
 For Questions about Organic
       Certification in
   Eastern North America
        please contact:
       Dave Lockman
    Certification Manager
    Eastern Branch Office
       1-877-574-5604
 dave.lockman@pro-cert.org
     www.pro-cert.org

				
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