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									 www.scip.org                          Tuesday, January 13, 2004                                  ISSUE 46

                                         In This Issue

                                          Melanie Wing elected SCIP President for 2004.
                                          Multiple membership savings now available.
                                          Informatics and knowledge management at the Novartis
                                          Institutes for BioMedical Research.
                                          Building CI using talent intelligence.
                                          CI101/202 sold out for the second time.
                                          SCIP04 collaboration and networking track.
                                          Liz Reed-Martinez: SCIP Director of Learning.
                                          Minimizing action distance.
                                          Lifetime SCIP memberships.
                                          CI Partner Program update.

          SCIP04 Boston                   Meetings 101: was that a good or bad one?
           March 22-25                    FYI: new and notable.


Melanie Wing elected SCIP President for 2004.
by Bill Weber

At the January 9th meeting, the SCIP Board elected Melanie Wing President and Ruth Stanat Secretary Treasurer for
2004. The group also welcomed new Board members Tim Kindler and Craig Fleisher. A report of Board actions will appear
in the next SCIP.online.

Multiple membership savings now available.
by Dale Fehringer

SCIP has developed a multiple membership category to continue to reach out to professionals engaged in competitive
intelligence and related disciplines, as well as to enhance relationships with the business community. Individuals who join
SCIP as employees of a business and provide a single point of contact with SCIP will receive multiple membership savings.
These savings are:

1. The membership initiation fee ($50 per new member) will be waived when two or more new members from the same
business sign up simultaneously.
2. Individuals of a business organization that simultaneously signs up two to nine new members will pay a member fee
of $275 per member per year.
3. Individuals of a business organization that simultaneously signs up ten or more new members will pay a member fee
of $220 per member per year.

For further membership information, please contact Carolina Olivieri.




Scip.online issue 46                               January 13, 2004                                                 1
Informatics and knowledge management at the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research.
by Manuel Peitsch et. al.

While the hype around the Human Genome Project is receding into the background, drug discovery and development are
faced with increased pressures to reduce costs and cycle times, while increasing output and success rates. The following
fundamental challenges have remained largely unchanged over the last 3 years, yet, the need to resolving them has
become increasingly acute. At Novartis, the integrated management of classical IT, knowledge management, and
informatics in a single department in Research has allowed us to leverage novel technologies across all aspects of
informatics and knowledge management. [full story p3 ]

Building CI using talent intelligence.
by Rachael Garrity

At SCIP04 Paul Houston and Sandra Wheatley, both long time SCIP members, will share their CI expertise in a new area
that only a handful of companies have embraced -- talent intelligence. It is the process of applying competitive
intelligence tools to determine where to find the best talent in a particular industry and to get a broad understanding of
the competitors human capital management strategy. [full story p6 ]

CI101/202 sold out for the second time.
by Nikki Wells

CI101/202 in New Orleans this week is sold out for the second straight time. If you are planning on attending this popular
learning seminar at SCIP04, make your reservations now.

SCIP04 collaboration and networking track.
by Craig Curran-Morton

Competitive intelligence is all about communication. The information and intelligence you develop often comes from a
source, a person. This year, SCIP has designed a Collaboration and Networking track that is intended to provide CI
practitioners with two things: an understanding of how they can build, maintain and effectively utilize the networks that
they have built with the people around them; and an idea of the tools and technologies they can use to collaborate with
those same people to provide an avenue to generate and discuss the intelligence being gathered. Come and listen to
speakers from Microsoft, Sun Microsystems, Groove Networks, MASS MoCA, and other organizations. [full story p6 ]

Liz Reed-Martinez: SCIP Director of Learning.
by Bill Weber

Elizabeth Reed-Martinez has joined SCIP as Director of Learning. She is a seasoned higher education and learning
professional, with experience in the planning and implementation of online learning initiatives for various audiences. Liz
will lead the continued development of quality professional development opportunities for SCIP members. She will be
actively soliciting ideas and suggestions from SCIP's members. Liz can be contacted at ekrm@scip.org or at the SCIP
office 703-739-0696, extension 110. [full story p7 ]

Minimizing action distance.
by Richard Hackathorn

The heart of Active Business Intelligence (BI) is the challenge of making information 'actionable.' When information is
displayed by BI systems, users should understand the information within their business context and take the appropriate
action based on that information. Simply put, if there is no action, then there is no business benefit derived from the
information or the system generating the information. [full story p8 ]

Lifetime SCIP memberships.
by Carolina Olivieri

SCIP Lifetime Members illustrate a life-long dedication to building CI within the business community. We would like to take
this opportunity to recognize the SCIP Lifetime Members and their commitment to SCIP: Dale Fehringer, Diane Giese,
Doug House, Marc Limacher, Sandya Malur, Rainer Michaeli, Jay Paap, Thomas Parker, Kirk Tyson, Mark Wasserman, and
Melanie Wing. For more information about SCIP lifetime memberships, please contact Carolina Olivieri.

CI Partner Program update.
by Jon Lowder

Fuld & Company Inc. is the world's preeminent research and consulting firm in the field of business and competitive
intelligence, with offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts USA and London, England UK. Founded by Leonard Fuld, a pioneer
and recognized leading authority in the field, Fuld & Company is a full-service business intelligence firm, providing
research and analysis, strategic consulting, business intelligence process consulting, and training to help clients
understand the external competitive environment. Our ultimate goal is to help our clients improve their performance by


Scip.online issue 46                                January 13, 2004                                                  2
making better decisions through the application of solid intelligence on their markets and competitors. Since 1979, the
firm has served many public and private companies, including over half the U.S. Fortune 500, as well as numerous
international clients, and our client roster continues to grow. Within those companies, we serve the business intelligence
needs of many functional areas.

Meetings 101: was that a good or bad one?
by Jamie Walters

Many organizations have been swamped by information overload. One reason for perceptions of information overload (and
there are several reasons0 is the epidemic of unnecessary or inefficient meetings. What distinguishes an effective meeting
from one that is a complete waste of time? Here are five factors that help ensure a good meeting. [full article p10]

FYI: new and notable.
by Bonnie Hohhof

    •    Search engines: news and updates.
    •    Internet sites with information you can use.
    •    Software and products.
    •    Searching reviews and tips.
    •    General readings of interest.
    •    Articles mentioning competitive intelligence. [full story p11]




 Sign up for SCIP04 before the early bird deadline on January
 31st, 2004 and receive a special booklet of coupons for
 discounts in Boston!




Informatics and knowledge management at the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical
Research

Manuel C. Peitsch, George E. Morris, Jürgen Basse-Welker, Geoff Cartwright, Deborah Juterbock,
Kurt O. Marti, Stephan Lorban, Geoff O’Dell and Thérèse Vachon

Novartis Institutes of BioMedical Research, 4002 Basel, Switzerland

Corresponding author Manuel.Peitsch@pharma.novartis.com

While the hype around the Human Genome Project is receding into the background, drug discovery and development are
faced with increased pressures to reduce costs and cycle times, while increasing output and success rates. The following
fundamental challenges have remained largely unchanged over the last 3 years, yet, the need to resolving them has
become increasingly acute.



Scientific

While the sequence of the human genome is known, our knowledge of the function and physiological role of each gene
and translation products has grown only modestly. Linking genomic information to the true biological role of each
molecular entity is a vital means to achieve this understanding. This, combined with increased knowledge of disease
pathways will allow us to link diseases to genetic variations and defects. Based on this knowledge, medicinal chemistry in


Scip.online issue 46                                January 13, 2004                                                 3
its broadest sense will look for chemical compounds or biologicals which can influence the course of disease and design
novel therapeutical approaches.

Organizational

The structure of large pharmaceutical companies, often resulting from mergers and acquisitions, find themselves
managing an organization which is spread across several countries and continents with a diverse portfolio of therapeutic
areas, expertise, and knowledge.

Data and information

The constant evolution in discovery technology has caused an ever increasing scope and complexity of data produced by
individual research scientists and teams of scientists. Data production has become so prolific, that the number of data
points increase exponentially. Understanding and using this data is complicated further by the addition of new data types
emerging on a regular basis from various disciplines.

Taken together these emerging challenges in drug discovery and development call for a comprehensive yet balanced
approach in life science informatics and knowledge management.

The increasing impact of In Silico approaches on drug discovery.

Although computers have been incorporated into the biology area, creating significant breakthroughs in drug discovery by
applying computer technology has been slowed by the complexity of natural biological systems and drug discovery
technology. Emerging technologies in large scale biology and chemistry large now call for a concerted effort in data and
information management as well as data mining, mathematical modeling, and simulation.

Coherent data, information and knowledge management approaches have become essential and crucial components of
modern drug discovery approaches to enable modeling and simulation of biomedical processes. The demands for such
approaches will be increasing dramatically in the years to come, providing Drug Discovery with a new way to plan and
design experiments.

At Novartis, the integrated management of classical IT, knowledge management, and informatics in a single department in
Research has allowed us to leverage novel technologies across all aspects of informatics and knowledge management.

Strategic themes

To address these challenges and long term objectives, we have defined four major strategic themes which we use to guide
our portfolio of activities and investment. These include:

Coherent global data, information and knowledge management the knowledge space.
Capturing, storing, managing, searching, retrieving and archiving data, information and knowledge are a fundamental
cornerstone of any knowledge-driven organization. Successful management of these assets relies on a shared
architecture, which guides the establishment of databases and associated processes. Furthermore, each data, information
or knowledge source must be described (meta data and content descriptors) and placed on a knowledge map. The
knowledge space is the sum of all types of data and information within the scope of our interest and is composed of
relevant databases, information sources, document/knowledge bases, meta data and a knowledge map.

Seamless access and navigation in the knowledge space as the portal to the knowledge space.
Exploiting the database and information source collection through the meta data layer and the knowledge map, we need a
layer of components implementing specific algorithms, methods and rules. An easy to use Web-based user interface
together with the component layer form the knowledge space portal. This portal thus allows the navigation of the
knowledge space, using a collection of coherent software components, addressing a relevant collection of data,
information and knowledge bases.

In Silico science, modeling, simulation and data mining.
The unprecedented amount of expensive research data calls increasingly for more efficient data mining and visualization,
to make the most of our investment in physical experiments. Furthermore, the planning of such experiments can be
greatly helped by early insights into possible outcomes and their boundary conditions. This is where mathematical
simulation of biological and molecular processes will prove increasingly valuable.

Collaborative environment.
Knowledge-based organizations are more efficient if their associated exhibit a high level of information sharing maturity.
This behavior has to be supported and facilitated on both local and international settings. Consequently the emphasis is to
build locations within each site, that foster and encourage social gatherings and knowledge exchange. Furthermore, large,
scattered organizations need to foster more collaboration and interactions between their associates. However, the
practicalities of international physical meetings are becoming increasingly difficult and time consuming. Consequently, a e-
collaboration environment is the right way to encourage these exchanges.




Scip.online issue 46                               January 13, 2004                                                  4
Implementation

Over the past two years, several key initiatives were undertaken as part of this core informatics strategy at Novartis
Institutes for BioMedical Research. Some key examples include:

Unstructured information integration:
Historically, a very large portion of research information is provided in a non-structured manner. We have placed a strong
emphasis on implementing generic software tools and components used in text mining, information retrieval and analysis,
terminology, and knowledge representation. This technology and approach allows us to efficiently integrate literature and
internal reports with experimental data repositories.

Knowledge space portal:
We are developing a web-based portal allowing access and seamless navigation across our data and information layer.
Initial emphasis was put on the interconnectivity between literature, bioinformatics and chemoinformatics data. The portal
links very different data types using a meta data layer as well as a knowledge map on Novartis Research. In addition, this
portal provides a customized view of data and information that is suited to the individual scientists needs.

e-Collaboration
We are putting together a toolbox of e-collaboration tools to be applied in a variety of settings. This approach allows
Novartis to take advantage of the best features of commercially available systems in a technological landscape that is
dynamic and ever changing. This toolbox approach is the best way to provide collaborative functionality to our user
community, both within NIBR and with our external collaborators globally.

Medical information
We regularly screen and analyze scientific literature with respect to marketed Novartis drugs to provide our medical
advisors with relevant information through an appropriate portal. This information is an important component of our drug
discovery process.

Literature acquisition
Acquisition of delivery of external scientific, technical and medical literature (journals and databases) is globally managed
to align with business needs and IT strategy (e.g. portal use and text mining). It also complies with copyright policy and
provider license terms.

In Silico predictions
We have placed a major emphasis on modeling and simulation processes and are developing a comprehensive in silico
toxicology toolbox as well as molecular simulation environment. This requires a powerful computing infrastructure which
has been addressed with a high performance computing strategy, of which a PC-GRID (1-3) is a key element.

Acknowledgements

We thank all members of the Informatics and Knowledge Management (IK@N) team at the Novartis Institutes for
BioMedical research for turning this vision and strategy into reality. We are indebted to M. Fishman, P. Herrling and PT.
Sany for their continuing support and constructive suggestions over the last two years.

References

1.Rowell J. (2003) 'Distributed desktop grid, PC refresh, help Novartis enhance innovation.' Pharmaceutical R&D: Grid
Computing. Intel Business Centre Case Study.
http://www.intel.com/ebusiness/pdf/cs/cs_Novartis.pdf.

2.Salamone S. (2003) 'Gridlock is a good thing at Novartis.' Bio-IT World, Oct 10, 2003.
http://www.bio-itworld.com/news/101003_report3473.html

3.Settele, C. (2003) 'Schlafende PC mutieren zum Supercomputer - bei Novartis ist Grid-Computing im industriellen
Einsatz.' Neue Zürcher Zeitung (NZZ), Nov 7, 2003.
http://www.nzz.ch/2003/11/07/em/page-article97JEJ.html.




Scip.online issue 46                                January 13, 2004                                                   5
Building CI using Talent Intelligence (TI)

Rachael Garrity

In March of 2004, SCIP will hold its 19th Annual Conference. This year, Paul Houston and Sandra Wheatley, both long time
SCIP members, will share their CI expertise in a new area that only a handful of companies have embraced -- talent
intelligence, also known as TI.

TI is the process of applying competitive intelligence tools to determine where to find the best talent in a particular
industry and to get a broad understanding of the competitors human capital management strategy. Sandra, who is a
certified intelligence professional (CIP), built a TI function at tech giant SAP Americas after many years of CI success at
telecom giant SBC.

"When the concept of talent intelligence was first introduced and I was asked to apply my knowledge of the intelligence
function in the human capital management arena, I knew the value of the application and was able to develop a
comprehensive program. I found that companies already have this knowledge -- it's all about how to capture it, organize it
and make decisions with it."

Sandra adds, "I knew TI was important, but even I didn't realize HOW important until I combined TI with other
intelligence.......making all of the information much richer and informative."

Paul Houston attended his first SCIP conference exactly ten years ago in (where else?) Boston. A Russian-speaking
Annapolis graduate and former Naval Intelligence officer, he added executive recruiting in the CI world as a unique niche
to his management consulting practice in
1997.

"I love the people side of CI, and executive recruiting is all about people. So I have the best of both worlds...I get to use
my CI skills to find great people, and I get to deal with the very best people in CI in the process. This is how I met
Sandra." Paul said. "I'm a CI professional in my own right, but I will also bring the recruiter perspective to this important
new subject of building Talent Intelligence," he added.

Sandra said, "One of the takeaways we plan is a draft job description for either a full time TI job, or a few paragraphs that
a CI manager can add to their own job description as they add TI to their function. The bottom line is that we're working
hard to make sure that when people walk out at the end of our session, that the ideas they pick up on this topic alone will
be worth the price of coming to Boston, even if they don't learn anything else."

[Editor's note: Paul Houston and Sandra Wheatley will present “Applying CI to HR recruitment and executive search,” on
Wednesday, March 24, 2004 in Boston at SCIP04]




SCIP 04 collaboration and networking track

Craig Curran-Morton craig.curranmorton@interthink.ca

Competitive intelligence is all about communication. The information and intelligence you develop often comes from a
source, a person. This year, SCIP has designed a Collaboration & Networking track that is intended to provide CI
practitioners with two things: an understanding of how they can build, maintain and effectively utilize the networks that
they have built with the people around them; and an idea of the tools and technologies they can use to collaborate with
those same people to provide an avenue to generate and discuss the intelligence being gathered.

Michelle Settecase of Kent State University

Using the local university as a CI resource? Michelle believes that this is an untapped source of ideas and information for
CI practitioners. She should know as she has been working in the university environment for sometime while also owning
her own CI consulting practice. Having the need to access this information avenue on countless occasions, Michelle has
built up a long list of things you could be doing to access and take advantage of the countless opportunities available to
your CI efforts.

Lee Dirks & Kimberly Engelkes from Microsoft

Microsoft is a recognized leader in the CI community. They have a keen understanding of the their competitors, trends in
the marketplace and closely watch the activities of newly emerging technologies and the companies that are developing
them. Lee & Kimberly have worked closely together on developing and maintaining a CI intranet portal to help the


Scip.online issue 46                                January 13, 2004                                                    6
company facilitate its CI practices. Discussing the rational behind the portal, it’s successes and failures, the co-presenters
will bring you their perspectives on the implementation of a CI collaboration portal.

Scott Brown of Sun Microsystems

Large companies are often so large that you will never know everyone working for your company for nor the knowledge
they possess. In this presentation, Scott will be looking at his experience within Sun Microsystems leveraging knowledge
from these unknown information specialists working in all areas of the company. Better still, he will provide you with a
step-by-step process that you can use to build a networking relationship with the people in your company that you
really need to be in contact with.

Donna Horrigan of Insights Learning & Development Personality

Everyone has got one; some have more than others, some less. For a CI practitioner, understanding personality opens the
networking door wide. To fully understand and utilize you’re the diverse personalities that make up your network, it is
important to have a feel for what really drives them. Donna has been working with the Insights Discovery personality tool
for a number of years and will bring tremendous ideas and insights (no pun here) on how you can utilize the power of
personality in to build, maintain a successful network.

Dave Fowler of Groove Networks, Inc.

Collaboration. The term seems to have become the keyword of the 21st century. It seems that if you aren’t collaborating
with someone right now, you are probably dead. Dave will bring his experience of working for Groove Networks, Inc., a
company created by the key developers of IBM’s Lotus Notes collaboration product. The presentation will provide us with a
foundation on the future of collaboration, the direction it is taking, and how we can tap into some existing tools to make
our CI efforts more productive.

Joe Thompson of MASS MoCA

Competitive intelligence in the Arts community? What’s up with that? Joe brings a fresh perspective to the CI
community by looking at CI through the lens of someone in the non-profit sector. In his role as Director of the
Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, Joe has been responsible for selecting which exhibits and shows will be
coming into the museum. His lead-time is 3 years so he has to have a pretty good idea of what people are going to want
to see years in advance. The presentation will be a fascinating look at how a non-traditional CI industry uses CI.




Liz Reed-Martinez, SCIP Director of Learning.

Bill Weber

Elizabeth Reed-Martinez has joined SCIP as Director of Learning. She is a seasoned higher education and learning
professional, with experience in the planning and implementation of online learning initiatives for various audiences. Liz’s
background also includes training needs identification and educational program development. She has consulted in
strategic human resource planning, and has a background in marketing and advertising. Liz will lead the continued
development of quality professional development opportunities for SCIP members.

Liz has been an admissions representative and academic advisor for a variety of Colleges and Universities including
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida and University of Maryland University College at Schwäbisch Gmünd,
Germany. Her university experiences have taken her all over the US, Puerto Rico, and Europe, providing a solid
understanding of the professional learning needs of a global audience. Liz holds a B.S. in Business Administration from
Bay Path College and is a graduate student of The George Washington University, receiving her M.A. in Human Resource
Development in December.

Through a mix of specialized training programs, on-line, and peer-to-peer learning experiences, Liz will implement
programs that enhance the skills and techniques of CI practitioners. She has a strong fascination with how and why things
work and was drawn to this position because of its focus on providing current, efficient, and interactive professional
development. Liz will be actively soliciting ideas and suggestions from SCIP’s members. She can be contacted at
ekrm@scip.org or at the SCIP office 703-739-0696, extension 110.

Michael Reed, who has been Director of Learning, will be remaining on staff through the International Conference in
Boston to facilitate a transition and to engage in special projects relating to the further implementation of SCIP University.




Scip.online issue 46                                 January 13, 2004                                                   7
Minimizing action distance.

Richard Hackathorn, Bolder Technology

The heart of Active Business Intelligence (BI) is the challenge of making information 'actionable.' When information is
displayed by BI systems, users should understand the information within their business context and take the appropriate
action based on that information. Simply put, if there is no action, then there is no business benefit derived from the
information or the system generating the information.

Action distance defined

What are the factors in making information actionable? The answer involves the concept of action distance. It is the
distance (latency, space, or gap) between the set of information generated by the BI system and the set of actions
appropriate to a specific business situation. In other words, action distance is the measure of the effort required to
understand information and to affect action based on that information. By reducing action distance, the information
becomes more ‘actionable’.

Action distance could be the physical distance between information displayed and action controlled. Or it could be the time
between information available and action taken. Or it could be the social gap between the person having the information
and the person taking action. Action distance involves a complex mixture of technological (dashboard design), behavioral
(motivation), and organizational (authority) factors.

Consider a simple analogy. In an airplane, the instruments (gauges, dials) and controls (switches, levers) are intermixed
in the cockpit. Over decades of evolution, the design of an airplane cockpit has systematically placed instruments and
controls so as to ‘minimize action distance.’ Information about unusual situations is quickly displayed to the pilot, and the
pilot can quickly take the appropriate action. The next time you fly, thank the aircraft designers for minimizing action
distance for the pilot.

What if we place the instruments in the rear of the airplane, leaving the controls in the front? The pilot would have to walk
to the back to determine where the airplane was heading, and then walk back to the front to take corrective action. Or the
copilot could sit in the rear, telling the pilot over the intercom what was happening. Would you be willing to be a
passenger on such an airplane?

Yet, this is often the way that we design and manage our businesses. The people who have the information are not the
ones who must take action based on that information. We often place a committee or several managers in between to
‘enhance’ the information flow.

Ways of reducing action distance

There are two ways of reducing action distance: adjust the action set so that it is more relevant to the information set,
and adjust the information set so that it is more relevant to the action set. The first way is the approach of traditional BI.
The typical sequence of questions is:


    •    What information do we have?
    •    How can we extract, transform, and load that data?
    •    How can we analyze the data so that it is of use to a specific user?

And so on.

The second way is the suggested approach of Active BI. The typical sequence is:


    •    What is the business process that needs improvement?
    •    Who has the responsibility and authority for the critical points in the process?
    •    What are the possible actions that this person could take?
    •    What information is required to discern and guide those actions?
    •    How can we obtain and organize that information?

The second approach is preferred if we are serious about making information from our BI system truly actionable. This
implies that BI professionals must radically change their thinking from a left-to-right data flow to a right-to-left decision
flow. We need to be more concerned about the effectiveness of business processes than the efficiency of query workloads.

Action distance and time

Most discussions about Active BI wander to Real-Time Data Warehousing. The assumption is that, by reducing the data
latency within the warehouse, the information will be more actionable. For example, companies have boasted that, by the


Scip.online issue 46                                January 13, 2004                                                    8
time the customer leaves the parking lot, their point-of-sales data is ready for analysis in their enterprise warehouse, thus
implying some benefit to the company. This may be true; however, there are other factors to consider.

Consider the Value-Time Curve, as shown below.




Most people consider the relationship as a simple decay function. A business event happens; then an action is taken. Since
the business value of taking that action decays rapidly after the event happens, the objective should be to ‘push up’ the
value curve by minimizing the latency between event and action.

The actual situation is more complex, as shown below.




A business transaction occurs over some time duration and then ends with a commit (or abort). At a later time, the data
about that transaction is stored within the warehouse environment. At a later time, the data is analyzed, packaged, and
delivered to the proper person. At a later time, the person takes an action based on the analysis.

Action distance (from a time perspective) is the end-to-end time required to respond to the business transaction in an
intelligent manner. Note that there are three different factors involved with action distance:


    •    data latency, the time between the business transaction and when the data is ready for analysis.
    •    analysis latency, the time of initiating the analysis, packaging its results, and delivering it to the appropriate
         person.
    •    decision latency, the time required to understand the information and respond in an appropriate manner.

Reducing decision latency

It is important to realize that only the last one—decision latency—actually counts on the bottom line. The first two are
overhead, simply infrastructure supporting the third. Technology advances are significantly reducing data and analysis
latencies. Thus, decision latency will increasingly become the limiting variable.



Scip.online issue 46                                January 13, 2004                                                   9
There are three requirements for reducing decision latency.

    1.   The person should be alerted. The system should recognize an unusual business situation. For example, a
         profitable customer is unhappy; the bank is at fault; and the customer is engaged in subsequent transaction.
         Some bells and whistles should sound. The normal workflow of the person should be interrupted.
    2.   The person should be informed. The system should display a situational-specific analysis so that the person
         quickly understands the business situation. The person needs to judge the priority of this situation relative to
         current demands and the precedence of similar situations.
    3.   The person should be guided. The system should suggest the appropriate actions for the situation. For example,
         walk over to teller #6 and introduce yourself to the customer standing there.

In summary, business value of BI systems is determined by the degree to which information generated is actionable.
Action distance is a measure of the effort required by the person responsible for a specific business situation to
understand that information and to take proper action.

We need to design our BI systems by understanding the decision situation and tailoring the information to this. We also
need to focus on decision latency by alerting, informing, and guiding the person through the decision situation. Thus, the
goal of minimizing action distance enables BI systems to maximize their business value.
[This article originally appeared in The Data Administration Newsletter, February 25, 2003.
http://www.tdan.com/i025fe04.htm

Background

Dr. Richard Hackathorn is president and founder of Bolder Technology, Inc., a twelve-year old consultancy in Boulder,
Colorado. Richard has over 30 years of experience in the IT industry and is a well-known technology innovator and
international educator, conducting professional seminars in 18 countries. He has written three textbooks entitled
Enterprise Database Connectivity, Using the Data Warehouse (with W.H. Inmon), and Web Farming for the Data
Warehouse. He earned his B.S. degree from the California Institute of Technology and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from
the University of California, Irvine. Contact him at: richardh@bolder.com.




Meetings 101: was that a good or bad one?

Jamie Walters, jwalters@ivysea.com

Many organizations have been swamped by information overload. Contrary to popular opinion, you can indeed have too
much of an otherwise good thing. Information is good, particularly when you have the right information, in the right
quantities, at the right time.

Alas, in too many organizations, directives for urgency and quantity have replaced deliberateness and quality. As a result,
surveys show, people within the organization feel overwhelmed by the non-stop avalanche of information that seems to
careen their way.

One reason for perceptions of information overload -- and there are several reasons -- is the epidemic of unnecessary or
inefficient meetings. Take any large organization, in particular, and you're likely to see employees who spend the majority
of their time going from one meeting to another. At a fair share of these meetings, attendees arrive ill-prepared and the
conversation meanders along for hours in a meeting that could take 15 or 30 minutes, if it needs to occur at all. If you
add this to less-than-optimal organizational skills that can make remaining non-meeting time efficient and productive, it's
easy to see where the flood of information can become overwhelming.

What distinguishes an effective meeting from one that is a complete waste of time? Here are five factors that help ensure
a good meeting:

(1) Having a good reason to meet in the first place.

(2) Having an agenda that clearly states the purpose of the meeting and key steps to satisfying that purpose by the end
of the meeting.

(3) Stating a timeframe at the beginning of the meeting and sticking to it, with few exceptions.

(4) Requiring that participants come prepared to discuss the topics on the agenda, meaning that participants have
received the agenda and have been told what's expected from them personally.



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(5) Having some degree of skilled facilitation -- someone who can keep participants focused on the agenda items and can
navigate prickly interpersonal issues so that the meeting is effective instead of dysfunctional.

Most workplace meetings are just disorganized and go well beyond a necessary timeframe, if they need to happen at all --
and many do not. Often, such meetings show the confusion that exists in many organizations between a business meeting
and a social function.

Business meetings occur to define and move a business strategy forward, to ensure that the group is on the same page,
to share vital information needed to keep various activities moving along in a way that is aligned with the bigger-picture
strategy or goals. A social gathering allows people to get together to enjoy one another, share personal information, follow
a more relaxed timeline, and chat about various topics of shared interest.

Too many corporate -- and more than a few non-profit -- meetings are a murky hybrid, when they should be scheduled
and facilitated, clearly, as one or the other. Or they're infected by a bureaucratic malaise that eats away at
purposefulness, efficiency, and clarity.

Good meetings are more rare, but you know when you're attending one. The schedule and purpose are clear, participants
are prepared, conversation is dynamic, and the meeting ends promptly, with next steps defined and confirmed among all
participants. The meeting may be pleasant, and even fun, and there may exist an enjoyable cameraderie amongst
participants. But the meeting is clearly about moving forward the work of the day and is energized by the preparation and
clear-focus of its participants.

Background

Conscious communication, inspired leadership, personal-mastery, and visionary enterprise concepts are shared at length
in Big Vision, Small Business , a new book by Jamie S. Walters, as well as in Ivy Sea's organizational consulting and
entrepreneurial-coaching services and award-winning Web library. For more information, visit Ivy Sea Online

Article appeared in http://www.inc.com/articles/leadership_strat/leading_company/emp_management/25007.html
Reprinted with permission from author.




FYI: new and notable.

Bonnie Hohhof, bhohhof@scip.org


    •    Search engines: news and updates.
    •    Internet sites with information you can use.
    •    Software and products.
    •    Searching reviews and tips.
    •    General readings of interest.
    •    Articles mentioning competitive intelligence.

[Note: the Nexcerpt service was used to identify material on competitive intelligence. www.nexcerpt.com ]

Search engines: news and updates.

Comtex News Network, Inc., a leading wholesaler of electronic real-time news and content, today announced a new
expanded long-term agreement with one of its major distributors, Dialog. Under the new agreement, Comtex will provide
more than 45 news feeds to a number of Dialog product lines. With a specialization in the financial news and content
marketplace, Comtex receives, enhances, combines, filters and distributes news and content received from more than
10,000 national and international news bureaus, agencies and publications. The resulting news and content products -
with embedded stock tickers, key words, standardized metadata, uniform formatting and custom filters - are all designed
to meet the exacting standards required by investment professionals. Press release, Jan 7 http://www.comtex.com.

The success and popularity of Google's toolbar has spawned broad interest from other search engines and sites in
creating their own branded search toolbars. Google upgraded its toolbar last year, while AltaVista, Ask Jeeves, Teoma,
Dogpile, HotBot, Lycos, and many others hit the market. Greg Notess, “Toolbars, trash or treasures?’ Online, Jan/Feb04.
http://www.infotoday.com/online/jan04/OnTheNet.shtml

Groxis, Inc., a leader in visual information management software, today announced general availability of Grokker 2. The
new software can now organize and visually map thousands of search results in just a few seconds from multiple search
engines and content sources simultaneously. This also creates the opportunity to build Grokker plug-ins to virtually any


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content source, database, or search engine on the Net. Press release, Dec 15,
http://www.groxis.com/service/grok/g_co_pr14.html

Vivísimo, the leading provider of clustering and meta-search software for organizing search results, today announced the
immediate availability of a free browser utility, the MiniBar, that lets users view clustered search results from any web
page. Press release Dec 22. www.vivisimo.com

Internet sites with information you can use.

CasePlace.org, the interactive resource for business schools, is where business school faculty can find hundreds of
business case studies and supporting materials that incorporate Social Impact Management into business education.
New modules include international business challenges, AIDS and pharmaceuticals, and doing business in Europe.
CasePlace.org is a free service of the Aspen Institute’s Business and Society Program (BSP). http://www.caseplace.org/

With the cost of developing prescription medicines continuing to rise, drug developers will increasingly rely on joint
ventures and partnering opportunities to shorten new product development times and save R&D costs in the near term,
according to the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development. BusinessWire, Jan 6, http://csdd.tufts.edu

Infonation allows you to view and compare statistical data for all UN member states. You can select up to five countries
for comparison from the menu. http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/infonation/info.asp

Once found, how are things organized for re-access and re-use later on? What can be done to avoid the need to repeat
the process by which the information was found in the first place? (If, indeed, it is possible to repeat this process.) We
refer to this as the problem of Keeping Found Things Found or KFTF. Our current research project focuses on the KFTF
problem in the context of World Wide Web use. Follow-on projects will look at variations of the KFTF problem as these
occur for email, electronic files and paper files. Information School at the University of Washington.
http://kftf.ischool.washington.edu/

The NATO Open Source Intelligence Handbook is an authoritative international starting point for OSIN in the service
of government. Although V1.2 is dated January 2002, the handbook provides a good overview of ‘open source’
http://www.oss.net/extra/document/?module_instance=3&action_show_document.701.=1

The Poynter Institute is a school for journalists, future journalists, and teachers of journalists. It includes a section on
featured sites and expert advice for using the web as a reporting tool.
http://www.poynter.org/column.asp?id=32&aid=57548

Research and Markets, the World’s largest resource for market research information, currently has 83,258 reports
available, providing you with the latest data on international and regional markets, key industries, the top companies, new
products and the latest trends. Reports are organized by industry. http://www.researchandmarkets.com

Online resources from Super Searchers on Madison Avenue – 323 links.
http://www.infotoday.com/supersearchers/ssoma.htm

Technology/ market/ business/ competitive intelligence page has a good listing of internet sites that cover all
areas of intelligence. Last updated Nov 02. http://tralvex.com/pub/intel/

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office makes available this database of trademark assignments from 1955 to date.
Search by a variety of criteria, including assignor or assignee name, applicant name or registrant name.
http://assignments.uspto.gov/assignments/

The US-ASEAN Business Council is dedicated to effectively strengthening bilateral and US-ASEAN relations through
strong economic and commercial ties. The Council is committed to promoting U.S. competitiveness in the most dynamic
global growth market: ASEAN. Its web site includes country profiles, economic indicators, business guides, and
government and newspaper links. http://www.us-asean.org

Our mission at WatchingGoogleLikeAHawk.com is as clear as our domain name. We intend to watch those guys in
Mountain View very closely. The main news page lists links to current stories about Google from any of several hundred
news and technical sites. http://www.watchinggooglelikeahawk.com/

Software and products.

EDGAR® Online, Inc. announced the addition of a complete collection of conference call transcripts, company webcasts
and an events calendar to its flagship EDGAR Online Pro service. EDGAR Online, Inc. is a financial information company
specializing in making complex regulatory reporting by public companies actionable and easy to use. The conference call
content is provided in partnership with CallStreet LLC and OpenCompany.info. Press release Jan 5. http://www.edgar-
online.com/investor/news/010504.asp

Forrester Research expands on its insight into the highly competitive Enterprise Search platform market and
compares how each vendor fairs on current product offering by segmenting the market into three groups based on content


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use types and how well each product supports: multiple user types, structured versus unstructured content, and limited
versus unlimited topics. ‘The Future of Enterprise Search,’ http://endeca.com/products/forrester_future.shtml

NewspaperDirect, a digital delivery service for daily online editions of over 185 newspapers from around the world, will
introduce a service to deliver same-day editions of 160 out-of-state and international newspapers from 28 countries.
Barbara Quint. ‘NewsPaperDirect launches library service.’ Jan. 12. http://www.infotoday.com/newsbreaks/nb040112-
1.shtml

Taskbar search tools are similar to popular toolbar applications that have long been available as browser add-ons, but
there is an important difference: They reside in the system tray in Microsoft's Windows operating system, allowing queries
independently of the browser or any other applications running on the desktop. Stefanie Olsen. ‘Designs on desktop
search,’ CNET News.com Jan 12. http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1104_2-5138715.html

VisuaLinks is a Best of Breed pattern discovery and data visualization tool. VisuaLinks manages enormous amounts of
data, from a variety of sources, to expose hidden patterns, trends, associations and networks. VisuaLinks supports large
numbers of users to enable enterprise-wide, distributed analysis environments. www.visualanalytics.com

ZeroDegrees in early December launched the final beta of its social networking technology and plans a production
release in February. As it builds out the network, ZeroDegrees wants to offer add-on applications. The first, a sales
intelligence dashboard that will help users find qualified leads and warm referrals. Matt Hicks, ‘Social networking vendors
aim for the enterprise.’ EWeek, Dec 29 http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,4149,1423682,00.asp


Searching reviews and tips.

The Library of Congress has another extensive ‘global gateway’ for world culture and resources. Portals to the World
contain selective links providing authoritative, in-depth information about the nations and other areas of the world. They
are arranged by country or area with the links for each sorted into a wide range of broad categories. The links were
selected by Area Specialists and other Library staff using Library of Congress selection criteria.
http://www.loc.gov/rr/international/portals.html

Book: Business Statistics on the Web: Find them fast at little or no cost.’ Paula Berinstein. CyberAge Books, 2003.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/091096565X/qid=1074003783/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-3975157-
8800022?v=glance&s=books

References don't matter now that everybody's life is on the public record. Private detectives don't do legwork anymore.
They check their email, type in a few numbers, and--wham!--the data (more than you can imagine) is right there. Seth
Godin. ‘You are your references,’ Fast Company, Jan04. http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/78/sgodin.html

Search engine marketing efforts directly affect search results, in numerous ways. If you're not aware of the reasons
why, your searching isn't going to be as effective as it might be. Chris Sherman, ‘Search engine marketing resources from
SEMPO.’ SearchEngineWatch.com, Jan 12. http://www.searchenginewatch.com/searchday/article.php/3297971

Some intriguing technologies are getting better at bringing order to all that chaos, and could revolutionize how people
mine the Internet for information. Software now emerging analyzes search results and automatically sorts them into
categories that, at a glance, present far more information than the typical textual list.: Vivisimo, Grokker, TouchGraph,
Teoma. ‘Better search results than Google?’ CNN.com, Jan 5,04.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/internet/01/05/seeing.search1.ap/index.html

In the high pressure world of advertising, researchers need to be both good and fast. In the most recent addition to the
Super Searcher series, some of Madison Avenue's best information sleuths share their secrets. Chris Sherman. ‘Super
Searchers on Madison Avenue,’ SearchEngineWatch.com, Jan 6.
http://www.searchenginewatch.com/searchday/article.php/3295391

Don't install "free" software. Any product that doesn't appear to cost any money is somehow generating enough money to
support its developers, marketers, business owners, and all other elements that go along with the creation and
maintenance of any product within any business model. People don't work for free, so the money has to come from
somewhere. Unfortunately, in most cases this money comes through loads of unsolicited advertising vis a vis clandestine
spyware infection. System Mechanic, http://www.iolo.com/sm

In the high pressure world of advertising, researchers need to be both good and fast. In the most recent addition to the
Super Searcher series, some of Madison Avenue's best information sleuths share their secrets. Book review. The Super
Searchers Web Page http://www.infotoday.com/supersearchers/ Chris Sherman. ‘Super Searchers on Madison Avenue,’
SearchEngineWatch, Jan 6. http://www.searchenginewatch.com/searchday/article.php/3295391


General readings of interest.

Most companies that benchmark, use conferences and seminars for evaluating improvement areas and metrics. The


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challenge with conferences and seminars is distinguishing what is real and what is hopeful. What we mean by this
statement is that quite a few presentations are not necessarily what the speaker’s company is doing, but what he is
hopeful of doing in the future. That is fine, unfortunately, benchmarking should be gathering information on applied
practices, which you can apply or adapt into your organization with confidence that you will have a greater chance for
success. Petrash Williamson. IP Best Practices Newsletter, Dec. http://www.ipambestpractices.com/index.html

Economist Lester Thurow says globalization can have long-term benefits for all Americans, but only if we move to shape
what happens during the next few years. In this interview with CIO, Thurow tells us how the United States routinely fails
in economic negotiations and why President Bush may not be returning to the White House in 2004. Art Jahnke. ‘We can
shape the global economy.’ CIO magazine, Dec 15. http://www.cio.com/archive/121503/interview.html

The House now has before it H.R. 3261, the "Database and Collections of Information Misappropriation Act." This
article provides an extensive review of the act and it potential consequences: Most of the interested parties note the
tightrope walk between protecting the investments of businesses creating databases and the unconstitutional protection of
facts in the public domain. Commentators want to be sure that members of the public, liberated by the increasing flow of
information meeting their personal research needs and the ability to weed out the irrelevant and keep needed information,
will not be prosecuted when they share it with like-minded people. Carol Ebbinghouse, ‘If at first you don’t succeed, stop.’
Searcher, Jan 04, http://www.infotoday.com/searcher/jan04/ebbinghouse.shtml

Most job search candidates are aware of the common mistakes, such as typos and grammatical errors, which can make a
big difference in getting called for an interview. However, most candidates are unaware of the subtle mistakes they are
making, including placing personalized or company email addresses and company or cell phone numbers, on their resume.
When a potential employer wants to contact a candidate, they are usually ready to either interview them by telephone in a
screening phase or want to set up a formal meeting. They do not want to be put off by a job seeker who needs to call
them back or cannot talk at the time. Including a cell phone number on their resume can cause just as many problems.
The candidate should control the timing of the potential screening interview. Press release, the Writers Resume,
www.awriteresume.com

Worried about possible government reaction to the movement of U.S. technology jobs overseas, leading American
computer companies are defending recent shifts in employment to Asia and elsewhere as necessary for future profits and
warning policy makers against restrictions. Ted Bridis, ‘Tech firms defend moving jobs overseas.’ BizReport, Jan 7,
http://www.bizreport.com/article.php?art_id=5880


Articles mentioning competitive intelligence.

In July, I wrote a two-part series on the tools in our toolbox, from ratings services to competitive intelligence. A
tremendous amount of energy has been devoted to this topic in the past six months, and the press is giving substantial
space to some of the underlying issues. Most refreshing is we’re starting to apply the same level of accountability to some
of the traditional industry monoliths (read: Nielsen) as we have in the digital space from the very beginning. This will be a
juicy topic that will continue to unfold in the coming months. David Cohen. ‘2003: the year in review.’ ClickZ Dec. 24.
http://www.clickz.com/mkt/emkt_strat/article.php/3292011

Job posting for director of market and competitive intelligence, 3com. Overall Purpose of Job: Working with field,
customers, partners and segment specialist, determine solutions to the key business issues which are being experienced
by companies in our target markets and create detailed solutions to these problems using 3Com and 3rd party products,
applications and services leading to sustained competitive advantage.
http://w3n.3com.com/hr/extpost.nsf/0/447fb0626b8b042588256e150068911b?OpenDocument

Another use for early warning: OK, but will the Red Sox win the World Series next fall? After all, when it comes to
baseball in Boston, the long-term trend seems to be high hopes followed by broken hearts. According to Itzkan, that's
only the "mythological trend." For more realistic baseball trends, he turned to his research. He had peered into the next
Red Sox season with a method futurists call "environmental scanning," in which media is scoured for indicators of
upcoming change. So, rather than assessing the capabilities of new manager Terry Francona or the right arm of Curt
Schilling, he brought up the new Red Sox academy in the Dominican Republic. Itzkan believes that soon, possibly in 2004,
the academy will produce the next Pedro Martinez or David Ortiz, a high-impact player brought into the organization from
an increasingly international talent pool, a chance to "out Yankee the Yankees" who last year had 10 players from Latin
America on their roster. Chris Berdick, ‘The local forecast.’ Boston Globe, Dec 28,
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2003/12/28/the_local_forecast/

Your company's intellectual property -- whether that's patents, trade secrets or just employee know-how -- may be
more valuable than its physical assets. This primer, compiled from CSO articles, covers basic and overlooked steps for
keeping your secrets secret. ‘The ABCs of intellectual property protection.’
http://www.csoonline.com/fundamentals/abc_ip.html

President George W. Bush quietly signed into law a new bill that gives the FBI increased surveillance powers and
dramatically expands the reach of the USA Patriot Act. The Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 grants the
FBI unprecedented power to obtain records from financial institutions without requiring permission from a judge. Kim
Zetter. ‘Bush grabs new power for FBI,’ Wired News, Jan 6. http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,61792,00.html


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