Using Critical Thinking as a Tool for Teaching Concepts

Document Sample
Using Critical Thinking as a Tool for Teaching Concepts Powered By Docstoc
					Using Critical Thinking as a Tool
    for Teaching Concepts: The
                Engaged Lecture

                           TACT
                        Fall 2004
Workshop Purpose
   To demonstrate the “engaged lecture”—one
    way CT can be used on a day-to-day basis to
    deepen students‟ understanding of a
    discipline‟s key concepts.
   Today‟s engaged lecture will focus on three
    mathematical concepts: mean, median, and
    mode.
Our Topic: Measures of Central
Tendency
 Mean
 Median

 Mode

Read about the concepts in the handouts
provided. Feel free to annotate your copy.
(Students would do this as homework before
class.)
The Engaged Lecture: Instructor’s
Role
   The instructor models his/her understanding
    of the concepts, the relationship between the
    terms.
   The instructor briefly discusses the goals and
    purposes underpinning the key concept.
The Engaged Lecture: Instructor’s
Role
   The instructor models the moves he makes in
    thinking through the content (e.g., he
    questions how authors he is reading may be
    using/misusing the concepts; he clarifies his
    purpose and the precise question he is trying
    to answer in problems involving these
    concepts; he gives examples of how he uses
    his deep knowledge of these concepts to
    solve problems; etc.).
The Engaged Lecture:
Questioning Students
The instructor randomly questions students in the class
about their understanding of the thinking being
demonstrated. Questions typically require students to do
the following:
 Explain their understanding of the concepts
 Make connections between the concepts
 Evaluate the quality of their peers‟ understanding
 Put their thinking into action, to apply—e.g., Why do most
   instructors base final grades on students‟ average (mean) in the
   course?
Reading, Writing, and Rethinking
Concepts into Our Thinking: Processing
the Engaged Lecture

 Spend approximately five minutes processing
 the engaged lecture. You may review your
 handout and your notes. An evaluation
 component will follow.
Reading, Writing, and Rethinking Concepts
into Our Thinking: Checking Students’
Understanding

 Spend approximately 10-15 minutes writing your
 understanding of mean, median, and mode. Be
 sure that your definitions involve
    Stating,
    Elaborating,
    Exemplifying, and
    Illustrating (NOTE: create an analogy or metaphor that
     demonstrates your understanding of the concept).
Reading, Writing, and Rethinking Concepts
into Our Thinking: Evaluating Students’
Understanding

 Working in your group, evaluate the writings
 of your peers. Select the writing that best
 defines the concepts. Use the intellectual
 standards (e.g., clarity, precision, depth) in
 reaching your decision. You will be asked to
 share one of your best definitions and to
 explain why it was chosen.
Online Resources: Engaged
Lecture and Active Learning
   Featured Article: “The „Change-Up‟ in
    Lectures” by Joan Middendorf and Alan
    Kalish (1996)
   Active Learning: Guidelines on Learning that
    Inform Teaching at University of New South
    Wales (2004)

				
DOCUMENT INFO