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					A Watershed Plan
For Thorn Creek
                     in Southern Cook County &
                     Eastern Will County, Illinois




Part One
Goals, Objectives and Strategies
December 2000


                    The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership
  A Watershed Plan for Thorn Creek
  in Southern Cook County and Eastern Will County, Illinois


In 1994, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR), through its
Critical Trends Assessment Program (CTAP) determined the Thorn Creek
sub-basin, located in northeastern Illinois, to be a Resource Rich Area (RRA).
The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership was formed in 1997 as part of the
IDNR’s Conservation 2000 program to protect the area’s natural resources.
Its mission is to coordinate and work cooperatively to improve ecosystem
conditions and thus the services a healthy ecosystem affords to the
watershed’s communities and partnership members. The Partnership is a
public-private cooperative concerned with preserving, protecting and
enhancing the local natural systems, and integrating these natural resources
into the life and future of the community. Concerns are typical of any rapidly
urbanizing area: fragmentation of remaining open space; degraded
habitat; monitoring and improving water quality, hydrology and hydraulics;
and improving recreational opportunities.

Thorn Creek and its tributaries: Deer Creek,
Butterfield Creek, Third Creek, and North Creek
occupy approximately 107 square miles of the Little
Calumet River watershed. In addition, the
partnership’s boundaries extend southeast to the
Indiana border to include the headwaters of Plum
Creek, another tributary of the Little Calumet. The
headwaters of Thorn Creek are located in
northeastern Will County near the Village of
University Park and together with its tributary
streams, flows northward into southern Cook
County to reach the Little Calumet River in South
Holland.
        For More Information Contact:

        Professor Karen D’Arcy
        College of Arts and Science
        Governors State University
        University Park, IL 60466
        Phone (708) 534-4526
        Fax    (708) 534-1641
        e-mail k-darcy@govst.edu
                       Participants
Lyz Ashe - Irons Oaks Environmental Learning Center
Steve Aultz - Forest Preserve District of Will County
Diane Banta - National Park Service , RTCA
Mindy Barrett - South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association
David Bier - Futurity, Inc.
Fred Block - Village of South Holland
Lily Bormet - Thorn Creek Nature Center
Christing Casiello - Crete-Monee High School
Ralph Conglianese - Village of Matteson
Karen D’Arcy - Governors State University
Jim Daugherty - Thorn Creek Basin Sanitary District
Kristi Delaurentis - Governors State University
Carolyn Dennis - Governors State University
Rose Marie DeWitt - Will/So Cook Soil and Water Conservation District
Charles Dieringer - Chicago Heights Resident
Judy Dolan-Mendelson - Friends of Thorn Creek Woods
Gina Gericke - Natural Resource Conservation Service
Peggy Glassford - Village of Flossmoor
Mike Gruberman - Village of University Park
Dave Guritz - Irons Oaks Environmental Learning Center
Andrew Hawkins - Illinois Department of Natural Resources
Bob Jankowski - Natural Resource Conservation Service
Kyle Jonker - Crete-Monee High Scool
John Joyce - Village of Park Forest
Bill Koenig - Forest Preserve District of Cook County
Hildy Kingma - Village of Matteson
Ken Kramer - Village of Park Forest
Al Marconi - Village of Chicago Heights
Richard Mariner - Butterfield Creek Steering Committee
Debby Martch- Thorn Creek Basin Sanitary District
David Mauger - Forest Preserve District of Will County
Larry McClellan - South Metropolitan Regional Leadership Center
Jon Mendelson - Governors State University
George Milner - S.D.I. Consultants
Robert Munz - Forest Preserve District of Cook County, Sandridge Nature Center
Michelle O’Connor - Irons Oaks Environmental Learning Center
John Rzymski - Crete Resident
Suellen Saller - Thorn Creek Management Commission
Marcia Taylor - Crete-Monee Middle School
Lindsay Toban, AICP - Cook County Planning and Development
Wayne Vanderploge - Forest Preserve District of Cook County
French Wetmore - French and Associates
Mary Lu Wetmore - French and Associates
Bill White - Illinois Department of Natural Resources
Mark Wojtczak - S.D.I. Consultants
                      Table of Contents


Introduction………………………………………………………...............................4

About the Watershed………………………………………….............................……6

Areas of Concern…………………………………………………..............................8

Mission and Goals of Plan…………………………………………............................9

Objectives and Strategies…………………………………………...........................10

Next Steps…………………………………………………………..........................16

Bibliography………………………………………………………...........................17




APPENDIX

     Appendix I -     Specific LA Sites, AOC & Strategies...............................18
                      identified by partners
     Appendix II -    Financial Sources/Resources Available.............................19
     Appendix III -   Criteria for Evaluating Partnership Projects......................26
     Appendix IV -    IDNR Fish Survey ..........................................................27
     Appendix V -     Complementary Initiatives................................................28
     Appendix VI -    Municipal Population Projections.....................................29
     Appendix VII -   Maps................................................................................30
                          INTRODUCTION
In February, 2000, volunteer stakeholders representing a broad cross-section of people
living and working within the Thorn Creek Watershed came together to participate in
a two day planning workshop (Appendix I). The purpose of developing this watershed
plan was to identify ecosystem problems and concerns, determine causes, develop
solutions and goals.

The planning process relied upon the services of a professional facilitator who led
workshop participants through a series of planning exercises in which ecosystem
problems and concerns were identified. These concerns ranged from broadly phrased
issues of water quality to very specific concerns about the management of particular
natural areas. Once these concerns were identified, participants were engaged in a
consensus-building planning process to prioritize these concerns and determine how
each should be addressed. This process resulted in the development of goals for the
Thorn Creek Watershed and a series of specific objectives and actions related to each.


These goals and strategies were organized and developed into the following plan with
the help of a technical writer hired by the partnership for this purpose and reflects the
consensus thoughts of the local stakeholders, both public and private. Additional
background materials were added along with process descriptions, maps, and
appendices to      complete the document. Draft versions were presented to the
partnership for review and further development of their shared vision.

                                         The document itself is organized into four main
                                         parts. The first section is descriptive and
                                         includes information about the watershed and
                                         the stakeholders’ areas of concern. The
                                         primary environmental concerns of the Thorn
                                         Creek Ecosystem Partnership are typical of any
                                         rapidly urbanizing area; fragmentation of
                                         emaining open space and degraded habitat
                                         The Partnership is also concerned with
                                         maintaining positive trends in water quality,
                                         hydrology and hydraulics. In addition to this
                                         there are concerns about the need for more
                                         recreational opportunities; interagency,
                                         intergovernmental and private sector
                                         cooperation; and the level of public
                                         engagement.The Thorn Creek Ecosystem
                                         Partnership was formed in order to address
                                         these areas of concern.


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The second portion of the plan outlines the mission and goals of the partnership, and
the strategies that will be implemented to reach those goals. This represents the
stakeholders’ collective vision for the future of the Thorn Creek watershed and their
plan to realize that vision.

                                                              The third section outlines
                                                              the process needed to
                                                              carry the work forward. It
                                                              includes the possible next
                                                              steps and organizational
                                                              structure to be developed
                                                              within the partnership.
                                                              Those responsible for the
                                                              implementation of the
                                                              plan need to be engaged
                                                              and empowered.

The fourth and final section consists of supporting information and appendices. Here
you will find information about the municipalities associated with the Thorn Creek
watershed along with supporting documentation and a collection of maps. There is
also a list of financial sources and resources available for implementation of the plan.


The plan’s intent is to promote the development and use of sound management
principles, guidelines and techniques that will provide ecological, recreational,
scientific and cultural benefits to the Partnership. These benefits include the
preservation, protection and restoration of natural landscapes to promote watershed
wide improvements in water quality, hydrology, and hydraulics, including flood
mitigation. It is hoped that this plan will help to integrate the watershed’s natural
resources into the life and future of the community by enhancing property values, and
providing community identity and activity areas, habitat for native flora and fauna,
educational opportunities, and areas for scientific research. It is also hoped that the
plan will serve as a focus for increased private sector, intergovernmental and
interagency cooperation within the Thorn Creek watershed. It will ultimately serve to
guide the partnership in its decision-making processes concerning the coordination,
support and prioritization of watershed projects (Appendix III)

This plan has been developed by and for everyone who lives works and plays in the
Thorn Creek watershed. It is intended for use by landowners, educators, decision
makers and managers at all levels, public and private. It will be widely disseminated
throughout the watershed and will be made available for use by individuals,
organizations, business, and governmental entities interested in protecting and en-
hancing natural resources within the region.

                                                                                      5
                      About the Watershed
The Thorn Creek watershed is a tapestry of diverse natural and cultural resources. The area
has always been one of the most important crossroads in America, from pre-settlement times
to the present. Some of the earliest transportation routes included the Sauk Trail and Vincennes
Trace, then the Lincoln and Dixie Highways, and finally the hub of Interstates I-57, I-94, and
I-80. This watershed is also where the eastern forests meet the prairie.

The land surface of the watershed planning area is made up of two distinct landscapes: a lake
plain in the northeastern third and a gently rolling morainal/intermorainal area in the
southwestern two thirds. The lake plain was formed when the Wisconsonian glacier retreated
into the Lake Michigan basin and a glacial lake, known as Lake Chicago existed for a time in
front of the retreating ice. The moraines, part of the Valporaiso Morainal system, are
composed primarily of till and indicate that the glacial margin advanced and melted back
several times. Today the climate of the area is typically continental with precipitation
normally being heaviest during the growing season and lightest in midwinter.

The principal land cover of the Thorn Creek watershed is classified as urban or built up land
(47.1%), followed by agricultural land (29.9%), forest and woodland (17.1%), wetland (3.6%),
lakes and streams (1.5%) and other (2.3%).

Within the Thorn Creek watershed there are nine lakes between 20 and 50 acres in size, and
well over a hundred other small lakes and ponds, most have surface area less than two acres.
About 3.6 percent of the watershed is classified as wetlands.

There are seven nature preserves in the Thorn Creek watershed; the Dewey Helmick Nature
Preserve (2.5 acres), Jurgensens Woods (125 acres), the Old Plank Road Prairie (1.5 acres),
Thorn Creek Woods (877 acres), the Thornton-Lansing Road Nature Preserve (331 acres), the
Plum Creek Nature Preserve and Goodenow Grove (700 acres). Four nature centers provide
educational and interpretive programming; the Sandridge Nature Center, the Thorn Creek
Nature Center, the Plum Creek Nature Center and Irons Oaks Environmental Learning Center.
Although recreational facilities such as campsites, trails, and nature centers are concentrated
in the Will and Cook County Forest Preserve holdings, additional recreational opportunities
provided by village park districts are found throughout the watershed. The Old Plank Road
Trail, a part of the Grand Illinois Trail, passes through the watershed. There are numerous
neighborhood parks, ponds, and playgrounds. Several area stables, golf courses, and
swimming pools also provide recreational opportunities.

                         Almost 83% (or 13,130 acres) of the landscape that was forested in
                         pre-settlement times remains as forest. This is remarkable
                         considering that only about 30% of the original forest cover remains
                         statewide. The species richness of vascular plants within the Thorn
                         Creek watershed is also notable with 30% of the 2,200 native taxa
                         occurring in an area that covers only 0.18% of the state. Of the
                         native plants found here, 21 are presently listed by the Illinois
                         Endangered Species Protection Board as threatened or endangered.


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Thorn Creek is notable primarily for
its forest bird communities. It also
includes smaller areas of wetlands and
grasslands. This diversity of habitat
allows 260 of the 308 species of
Illinois birds to be found here. The
population status of many mammal
species is unknown, however, some
mammal species are generalists and
have adapted to living in landscapes
altered by human activity.

One of the rare mammal species known to reside in the watershed is the river otter.

Thorn Creek and its tributaries provide homes for a diverse community of aquatic species
including fish, mussels, crayfish and macroinvertebrates (Appendix IV). Several species of
salamanders and regionally rare frog species make their home in the Thorn Creek watershed
along with Kirtland’s snake and the massasuaga rattlesnake.

Several areas in the Thorn Creek Watershed contain features of geologic interest, including
the outstanding example of the Lake Chicago plain found near Glenwood, and the Thornton
Quarry. The southern border of Thorn Creek is the historic mid-continental divide between
the Great Lakes/North Atlantic and Mississippi/Gulf of Mexico watersheds. In terms of
archeological resources, over 174 sites have been identified. These sites range in age from
the Paleo-Indian though the Historic Post War periods.

In many ways, the people of the Thorn Creek watershed are typical Illinoisans. Four out of
five adults have completed high school and one in five have completed college. The
population is also racially and ethnically diverse with minorities representing about 1/3 of the
total. Since the 1970’s, the regional economy has been steadily changing from a
manufacturing base to a more service-oriented base.

The political landscape of the watershed is one of the most complex in the state as evidenced
by the multiple layers of government that exist. These layers include 2 counties (Cook and
Will), 6 townships (Bloom, Rich, Crete, Monee, Thornton, and Bremen), 19 Municipalities, and
a multitude of other jurisdictions such as school districts, drainage districts, library systems,
state and federal legislative districts, and park districts.

Within this complicated political landscape, a number of interagency agreements and
regional organizations have developed. These include: the Old Plank Road Trail, South
Suburban Mayors and Managers Association, the Butterfield Creek Steering Committee, Chicago
Wilderness, the Thorn Creek Nature Preserve Management Commission, the Open Space
Alliance at Governors State University, the Lincoln-Lansing Drainage District the Eastern WIll
County Regional Council, and the Thorn Creek Sanitary Basin. Many of these have developed
plans relevant to all or part of the Thorn Creek watershed. (Appendix V)

                                                                                              7
                          Areas of Concern:
The primary concerns of the Thorn Creek watershed are typical of any rapidly urbanizing
area. The challenges of ecosystem management include: habitat loss and degradation,
fragmentation, exotic species invasions, fire absence, and altered hydrology. In addition to
these problems, terrestrial communities are threatened by siltation in the floodplain,
insensitive development, overgrazing by white-tailed deer, and an increasing beaver
population.    Ecological problems with streams, ponds and lakes are associated with point
and non-point source pollution. Examples of these include degradation from industrial
discharge, direct and indirect livestock use, municipal runoff, poorly maintained septic
systems, and other sewage inputs. There are also concerns associated with volume, siltation,
impoundment, channelization, and fluctuating water temperatures.

                                                     Historic, current and projected land uses
                                                     are also an area of concern. The
                                                     frequency of damaging floods has
                                                     increased over the last 50 years, mostly
                                                     as a product of urban growth. The Thorn
                                                     Creek and Butterfield Creek sub-basins
                                                     are already more than 50% urban or
                                                     built up land. Rapid and high volume
municipal runoff, mostly due to increasing amounts of impervious surface, is diverting large
volumes of water into drainages, causing extensive erosion problems through channel
widening and bank failure along some streams. Slightly over one half of the land use within
the Deer Creek sub-basin is currently devoted to agricultural cover. This represents a
potential for non-point runoff that could adversely impact downstream. This sub-watershed
is also experiencing increasing development pressure that would further impact the natural
hydrology of the area. (Appendix VI)

Until recently, public officials, developers, and the
public were not adequately informed about the
importance of protecting our natural resources. While
improvements have been made in this direction,
additional measures should be taken to ensure that
the problems associated with past development
practices are corrected.

A number of intergovernmental and interagency agreements have been developed, however,
there is still a limited amount of communication and cooperation between and within the
various governmental units and agencies at work in the watershed. Currently, there is no
coordinating body or list of relevant stakeholders and organizations. Watersheds link
communities, and decision-making requires the participation of many communities, agencies,
organizations and individuals. Without coordination, the activities of one community or agency
can adversely affect others and watershed wide efforts will be nearly impossible to
implement.


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                 (socio) economic benefit to local communities
              6. To encourage the use of natural resources to create an
                 sustainable development
              5. To improve conservation/environmental practices related to
                 research
              4. To improve environmental education, public outreach and scientific
                lakes and wetlands
             3. To improve water quality, hydrology and hydraulics in watershed streams,
                    2. To restore, enhance, and maintain open spaces and natural areas
                                1. To protect critical open space remaining in the watershed
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                The objectives of the Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership are to:
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                      Thorn Creek watershed.
                    · To foster and facilitate increased citizen involvement within the
                      and private sector cooperation within the Thorn Creek watershed.
                    · To foster and facilitate increased intergovernmental, interagency
                      future of the community.
                    · To integrate the watershed’s natural resources into the life and
                      landscapes and enhance ecosystem processes.
                    · To ensure the preservation, protection and restoration of natural
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  As part of this mission, specific goals include:
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  ecosystem affords to the watershed’s communities and partnership members.
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  cooperatively to improve ecosystem conditions and thus the services a healthy
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  The mission of the Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership is to coordinate and work
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                             Mission and Goals of Plan
                    OBJECTIVES and STRATEGIES

1.)     The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership seeks to protect critical open space remaining
in the watershed in order to preserve and protect natural landscapes and ecosystem
processes. The benefits of protecting open space in the watershed include: ensuring healthy
habitat for native flora and fauna, enhancing property values, mitigating flood damage,
providing recreational activity areas, providing educational opportunities and areas for
scientific research.

                     The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership will:

A.    Develop a complete inventory and method for evaluating all resource rich areas, and open
      spaces, both protected and unprotected that will:

      1.     Establish baseline information
      2.     Establish a basis for prioritizing land targeted for acquisition

B.    Support land acquisition

      1.     Develop a comprehensive resource protection strategy including goals, standards and
             methods of prioritization
      2.     Create more contiguous natural areas and linkages
      3.     Enlarge existing natural areas and create buffers
      4.     Provide access points so the community can discover and appreciate the richness of our
             natural resources

C.    Explore, develop and publicize innovative methods for land protection besides fee simple
      acquisition such as land trusts, easements and long-term leases, model ordinances and the
      sound ecological management of private property by:

      1.     Working to improve interagency and intergovernmental cooperation
      2.     Hosting a series of workshops to educate public and private landowners
      3.     Exploring the creation of a Thorn Creek Watershed Land Trust

D.    Develop criteria for assessing the success of the Partnership’s resource protection strategy




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2.)     The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership will strive to restore, enhance, and maintain
open spaces and natural areas such as our forests, wetlands, prairies and savannas, in order
to preserve and protect natural landscapes. The benefits of restoring, enhancing and
maintaining the open spaces and natural areas in the watershed include: providing healthy
habitat for native flora and fauna, enhancing property values, mitigating flood damage,
providing recreational activity areas, and providing educational opportunities and areas for
scientific research.

                        The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership will:

A.    Identify restoration opportunities and needs in order to facilitate sound restoration planning
      and decision making by:

      1.     Assessing the condition of the watershed’s natural resources
      2.     Reviewing current maintenance and management practices
      3.     Determining causes of degradation
      4.     Identifying barriers and potential sources of conflict

B.    Develop and establish comprehensive guidelines, strategies and practices for maintenance,
      restoration and enhancement of the natural areas and open spaces in the watershed
      including:

      1.     Researching, evaluating and publicizing available best management practices (BMP’s)
      2.     Establishing management free zones for monitoring and research
      3.     Supporting demonstration projects
      4.     Developing a comprehensive restoration manual
      5.     Documenting restoration activities and results


C.    Develop and establish an information and monitoring network to evaluate projects, organize
      resources, identify potential resources and provide information about the benefits of
      environmental enhancement including:

      1.     Creating a network of area resource people to assist in restoration projects
      2.     Recruiting community volunteers to become actively involved in restoration projects
      3.     Encouraging student research activities in the watershed
      4.     Developing and maintaining an information clearinghouse, possibly on-line
      5.     Encouraging private landowners to employ sound management practices

D.    Encourage private sector, intergovernmental and interagency coordination, cooperation and
      informed decision making by:

      1.     Participating in regional planning activities
      2.     Maintaining relationships with neighboring organizations


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3.)     The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership will work to improve water quality, hydrology
and hydraulics in watershed streams, lakes and wetlands. The benefits of improved water
quality, hydrology and hydrolics include: healthy habitat for native flora and fauna and those
who work, live, and play in the watershed, flood mitigation, increased property values,    im-
proved recreational activity areas, educational opportunities and areas for scientific      re-
search.

                        The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership will:


                          A.     Develop and promote education materials for private and public
                                 audiences to encourage watershed awareness such as:

                                 1.     Informational brochures
                                 2.     Informational videos
                                 3.     Interpretive signage
                                 4.     Press releases
                                 5.     Watershed based classroom materials
                                 6.     Model ordinances

                          B.     Develop and promote sound land management measures,
                                 innovative design techniques and demonstration projects that posi-
                                 tively impact water quality such as:

                                 1.     Improving base flow and water quality
                                 2.     Utilizing native plantings
                                 3.     Increasing infiltration and/or decreasing impervious surfaces
                                 4.     Including buffer zones
                                 5.     Restoring natural channels, wetlands and other natural areas

                          C.     Encourage a reduction in the use of salts, fertilizers and
                                 herbicides by public agencies and private landowners

                          D.     Develop systematic methods of monitoring, data collection and
                                 dissemination to evaluate progress




12
4.)     The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership seeks to improve environmental education,
public outreach and scientific research. The benefits of improved education, outreach and
research include: adding to our knowledge base of the watershed and the integration of the
watershed’s natural resources into the life and future of the community.

                        The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership will:

A.    Assess and inventory current environmental education programs and:

      1.     Clearly define environmental education and outreach goals
      2.     Create a resource manual
      3.     Work to ensure that quality environmental programs are available and accessible throughout
             the watershed
      4.     Provide professional development opportunities and classroom materials for area teaching
             professionals and youth activity directors

B.    Seek ways to actively involve citizens and the private sector in partnership projects and
      integrate the watershed’s natural resources into the life and future of the community such as:

      1.     Ensuring public engagement and discovery through an interconnected interpretive system of
             signs and other media
      2.     Developing and making accessible information, including multi-media approaches for
             communicating to residents the importance of preserving, protecting and enhancing our
             natural resources
      3.     Ensuring that all partnership projects encompass an educational and outreach component

C..   Seek to coordinate and communicate the partnership’s mission and projects, internally and
      with groups outside the watershed through:

      1.     Informational brochures
      2.     Informational videos
      3.     Interpretive signage
      4.     Press releases
      5.     Watershed based classroom materials
      6.     Hiring a watershed coordinator

D.    Seek to improve opportunities for scientific research and monitoring and the dissemination of
      information gathered by:

      1.     Ensuring that suitable areas are available for research activities
      2.     Supporting projects that contain an assessment component and provide baseline information
      3.     Developing an information clearinghouse




                                                                                                     13
5.)    The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership will work to improve conservation/
environmental practices related to sustainable development. The benefits of sustainable
development practices include: the integration of the watershed’s natural resources into the
life and future of the community, increased private sector, intergovernmental, and
interagency cooperation, flood mitigation and improved water quality, hydrology and hydrolics.

                        The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership will:

A.    Encourage projects that demonstrate the principles of conservation design and sustainable
      development such as the:

      1.     Development of recreational opportunities in cooperation with public agencies
      2.     Integration of open spaces that provide a variety of experiences
      3.     Use of innovative stormwater management techniques
      4.     Integration of native landscaping
      5.     Minimization of impervious surfaces

B.    Create incentives and/or facilitate to resolve existing problems to promote conservation design
      as in:

      1.     Financial assistance with infrastructure installation
      2.     Reducing requirements for street width, lot size, and densities
      3.     Streamlining permit and approval processes
      4.     Encouraging interagency and intergovernmental cooperation and coordination
      5.     Providing information and assistance related to native plantings and naturalized stormwater
             management infrastructure

C.    Create educational programs for municipalities, public agencies, and developers and the private
      sector to:

      1.     Explain conservation development principles
      2.     Promote sustainable development
      3.     Encourage the incorporation of sound ecosystem management into comprehensive planning

D.    Promote the adoption of ordinances that incorporate conservation design and sustainable
      development principles.

E.    Monitor the management and maintenance of conservation designs and naturalized plantings
      to ensure their success and study long term effects.




14
6.)     The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Parnership will encourage the use of natural resources to
create a socio-economic benefit to local communities. The socio-economic benefits of a
healthy ecosystem include: the enhancement of property values, the mitigation of flood
damage, the provision of recreational activity areas, educational opportunities, and areas for
scientific research and will further serve to integrate the watershed’s natural resources into
the life and future of the community.

                        The Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership will:

A.    Develop and promote methods to quantify the benefits of sound ecosystem management such
      as cost/benefit analysis in terms of:

      1.     Enhanced property values
      2.     Sustainable economic development
      3.     Increased educational opportunities
      4.     Increased recreational opportunities
      5.     Reduced infrastructure and maintenance costs
      6.     Mitigation of flood damage

B.    Support the expansion and enhancement of the regional trail system

C.    Support multi benefit projects that may include land acquisition, restoration, education,
      recreation and flood control components.

D.    Support the development of research and interpretive centers on both the natural and cultural
      landscape

E.    Hire staff to support watershed activities

                                                                                                15
                                 NEXT STEPS

     The stakeholders of the Thorn Creek watershed have reached a consensus vision.
     In order to reach their goals as outlined in this plan, steps need to be taken that
     will lead to implementation. The first step is to develop an effective
     organizational structure.

     The Thorn Creek Partnership Council was established in 1997 when the Thorn
     Creek Ecosystem Partnership was established. The Council’s role will be revised
     to that of Executive Committee to the Partnership. This Executive Committee will
     provide leadership and direction, assess the success of activities and foster the
     necessary communication and collaboration between partners. The Partnership
     will continue to develop its formal organizational structure, including the
     development of advisory committees, technical committees and task forces.

 Outreach efforts will be undertaken to encourage stakeholders to become
 members of the Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership.

 A regular meeting schedule will be established so that reports concerning the
 various progress of projects and annual process of the Partnership can be shared.
 These meetings will include an annual review of the goals and objectives of this
 plan, reports on project progress, and the solicitation, review and critique of
 Partnership projects and proposals.

 In order to ensure the long-term sustainability of the Thorn Creek Ecosystem
 Partnership a long-term funding strategy will be developed.

 In the future, a strategic planning process will be undertaken. The resulting
 strategic planning document will be an extension of the ideas contained here
 and will include specific actions, projects and partners along with more detailed
 strategies and timelines.




16
                                                  Bibliography

A Watershed Plan for the Upper Dupage River in Dupage County, IL (Part One) 1997. The Conservation Foundation
and Dupage River Coalition.

Handbook of Sustainable Site Design Techniques. April 2000 (DRAFT). prepared for Butterfield Creek Steering
Committee.

Inventory of Resource Rich Areas in Illinois, An Evaluation of Ecological Resources. 1996. Critical Trends Assess-
ment Project Phase II. Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

Land Acquisition Plan. June 1994. Forest Preserve District of Cook County.

Nature and Local Government - A Guidebook for Protecting and Enhancing Nature in Northeastern Illinois (Second
Draft), December 1999. Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission.

Profiles II: Economic and Demographic Factbook of Chicago Southland. December 1993. Published by Star Newspa-
pers in cooperation with The Institute for Public Policy and Administration, Governors State University, and Southland
Development Corporation.

South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association. December 1998. South Suburban Stormwater Strategy: A Plan for
Watershed Management, prepared by Eubanks and Associates, Inc. and French and Associates, Ltd.

South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association. January 2000. Stormwater Management Public Information Guide.
prepared by French and Associates, Ltd.

Thorn Creek Area Assessment. 1999. Volumes 1-5. Illinois Department of Natural Resources.




                                                                                                                     17
 Appendix I
                   Specific Acquisition Sites, Areas of Concern and Strategies as
                      Identified by Strategic Planning Workshop Participants
                               on February 24 and February 25, 2000

     Acquisition
              Camp Pompei:
                     for resident environmental education experiences
                     for day camp/resource/research center
                     to connect Thorn Creek Nature Preserves to Hidden Meadows and Urban Hills Golf
                     Courses
             Acquire natural flood storage areas in Butterfield Creek watershed
             Acquire land in Deer Creek watershed:
                     near Ford Heights
             Encourage Forest Preserve District of Cook County to approve and implement their 1994
             land acquisition plan
     Connections-
             Old Plank Road Extension
                     through Chicago Heights
                     connect to Cook County bike trail system
             Connect existing open space along Thorn Creek for passage of wildlife and people
             Constant trail along Thorn Creek from mouth to headwaters for recreation and
             Maintenance
             Create a GSU, Thorn Creek, Sauk Trail connection
     Protect headwaters of:
             Thorn Creek
             Butterfield Creek
             particularly Deer Creek Marsh and the Deer Creek/Black Walnut divide
     Remove Thorn Creek Dam at 26th Street to connect upper Thorn Creek to lower Thorn
             Creek
     Support Deer Creek/Ford Heights USACE habitat/recreation project
     Complete funding of Park Forest Central Park wetland restoration
     Workshops-To outline easement opportunities
     Community Projects-
             Neighborhood “green projects”
             “Adopt a stream”
             “save-a-lot” projects
             hands-on learning experiences
     Create a stormwater management/detention district similar to MWRD of Chicago
     Examine the “living History Farm” concept
     Urban Fishing
     Create pre-treatment wetlands
     Watershed-wide taxing district for land acquisition
     Have GSU be repository of maps
     Remove drainage tiles from agricultural lands to restore hydrology
     Videotape projects to show result
     Promote Illinois EcoWatch program
     Create lobbying group
18
                                                                                                 Appendix 11
                          Some Potential Funding Sources
Federal Aid
*Some programs and descriptions are listed below. A complete alphabetical listing of Federal
Domestic Assistance, eligibility requirements, program descriptions and application information is
available at http://aspe.os.dhhs.gov/cfda/ialphall.htm

11.405 Anadromous Fish Conservation Act Program
       Objectives: To cooperate with the States and other nonfederal interests in the conservation, development, and
       enhancement of the nation’s Anadromous fish stocks and the fish in the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain that
       ascend streams to spawn, and for the control of sea lamprey.

10.069 Conservation Reserve Program
       Objectives: To protect the Nation’s long-term capability to produce food and fiber; to reduce soil erosion and
       sedimentation, improve water quality, and create a better habitat for wildlife.

10.664 Cooperative Forestry Assistance
       Objectives: With respect to nonfederal forest and other rural lands to assist in the advancement of forest
       resources management; the encouragement of the production of timber; the control of insects and diseases
       affecting trees and forests; the control of rural fires; the efficient utilization of wood and wood residues,
       including the recycling of wood fiber; the improvement and maintenance of fish and wildlife habitat; and the
       planning and conduct of urban and community forestry programs.

15.918: Disposal of Federal Surplus Real Property for Parks, Recreation, and Historic
       Monuments
       Objectives: To transfer surplus Federal real property for public park and recreation use, or for use of historic
       real property.

66.951 Environmental Education Grants
       Objectives: To support projects to design, demonstrate, or disseminate practices, methods, or techniques
       related to environmental education and training

66.950 Environmental Education and Training Program
       Objectives: To train educational professionals in the development and delivery of environmental education
       programs.

66.710 Environmental Justice Community/University Partnership Grants Program
       Objectives: To link community residence/organizations and tribes with their neighboring or affiliated aca-
       demic institutions to forge partnerships to address local environmental and public health concerns.

66.604 Environmental Justice Grants to Small Community Groups
       Objectives: To provide financial assistance to grassroots community-based groups to support projects to
       design, demonstrate or disseminate practices, methods or techniques related to environmental justice. Specifi-
       cally, EPA will grant funding assistance to be used for: 1. environmental justice education and awareness
       programs; 2. environmental Justice Programs (for example, river monitoring and pollution prevention pro-
       grams); 3. technical assistance in gathering and interpreting existing environmental justice data; and 4.
       technical assistance to access available public information.

66.711 Environmental Justice through Pollution Prevention Grants
       Objectives: To provide financial assistance to a variety of environmental, environmental justice, academic,
       tribal, community-based, and grass-roots groups for projects that address environmental justice concerns and
       use pollution prevention as the proposed solution. This grant program is designed to fund projects that have a
       direct impact on affected communities.
                                                                                                                          19
66.500: Environmental Protection: Consolidated Research
       Objectives: To (1) Support research to determine the environmental effects and therefore the control require-
       ments associated with air quality, drinking water, water quality, hazardous waste, toxic substances and
       pesticides; (2) identify, develop and demonstrate necessary pollution control techniques; and (3) support
       research to explore and develop strategies and mechanisms for those in the economic, social, governmental
       and environmental systems to use in environmental management.

10.913: Farmland Protection Program
       Objectives: To purchase conservation easements or other interests on lands to limit conversion to non-
       agricultural uses of farmland with prime, unique, or other productive soils.

12.106 Flood Control Projects
       Objectives: To reduce flood damages through projects not specifically authorized by Congress

83.536 Flood Mitigation Assistance
       Objectives: To assist States and communities in implementing measures to reduce or eliminate the long-term
       risk of flood damage to buildings, manufactured homes, and other structures insurable under the National
       Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)

12.104 Flood Plain Management Services
       Objectives: To promote appropriate recognition of flood hazards in land and water use planning and develop-
       ment through the provision of flood and flood plain related data, technical services, and guidance.

84.116: Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education
       Objectives: To provide assistance for innovative programs that improve access to and the quality of
       postsecondary education.

94.005: Learn and Serve America: Higher Education
       Objectives: This grant program has two main objectives: (1) To support high quality service learning projects
       that engage students in meeting community needs with demonstrable results, while enhancing students’
       academic and civic learning; and (2) to support efforts to build capacity and strengthen the service infrastruc-
       ture with institutions of higher education.

94.004: Learn and Serve America: School and Community Based Programs
       Objectives: To encourage elementary and secondary schools and community-based agencies to create, develop,
       and offer service-learning opportunities for school-age youth; educate teachers about service-learning and
       incorporate service-learning opportunities into classrooms to enhance academic learning; coordinate adult
       volunteers in schools; and introduce young people to a broad range of careers and encourage them to pursue
       further education and training.

15.916: Outdoor Recreation: Acquisition, Development and Planning
       Objectives: To provide financial assistance to the States and their political subdivisions for the preparation of
       Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plans (SCORPs) and acquisition and development of outdoor
       recreation areas and facilities for the general public, to meet current and future needs

10.901: Resource Conservation and Development
       Objectives: To encourage and improve the capability of State and local units of government and local non-
       profit organizations in rural areas to plan, develop and carry out programs for resource conservation and
       development.

5.921: Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance
       Objectives: To provide staff assistance to support partnerships between government and citizens to increase
       the number of rivers and landscapes protected and trails established nationwide.

66.508: Senior Environmental Employment Program
       Objectives: To use the talents of Americans 55 years of age or older to provide technical assistance to Federal,
       State, and local environmental agencies for projects of pollution prevention, abatement and control.
20
15.605: Sport Fish Restoration
        Objectives: To support projects designed to restore and manage sport fish populations for the preservation and
        improvement of sport fishing and related uses of these fisheries resources.

66.606: Surveys, Studies, Investigations and Special Purpose Grants
        Objectives: (1) To support Surveys, Studies and Investigations and Special Purpose assistance associated with
        Air Quality, Acid Deposition, Drinking Water,         Water Quality, Hazardous Waste, Toxic Substances, and
        Pesticides; (2) to identify, develop and demonstrate necessary pollution control techniques; to prevent, reduce,
        and eliminate pollution; and (3) to evaluate the economic and social consequences of alternative strategies and
        mechanisms for use by those in economic, social, governmental, and environmental management positions.

66.651: Sustainable Development Challenge Grants
        Objectives: To (1) Catalyze community-based projects that promote sustainable development; (2) leverage
        private and public investments to enhance environmental quality by enabling community sustainability efforts
        to continue past EPA funding; and (3) build partnerships that increase a community’s capacity to ensure long-
        term ecosystem and human health, economic vitality, and community well-being.

10.904 Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention
        Objectives: To provide technical and financial assistance in carrying out works of improvement to protect,
        develop, and utilize the land and water resources in small watersheds.

66.461: Wetlands Protection: Development Grants
        Objectives: To assist States, Tribes, and local governments in developing new or enhancing existing wetlands
        protection management and restoration programs.

10.072 Wetlands Reserve Program
        Objectives: To restore and protect farmed wetlands, prior converted wetlands, wetlands farmed under natural
        condition, riparian areas, and eligible buffer areas for landowners who have eligible land on which they agree
        to enter into a permanent or long-term easement or restoration agreement contract with the Secretary. The
        goal of WRP is to have 975,000 acres enrolled by the year 2002 with one-third as permanent easements, one-
        third as 30-year easements and one-third as restoration agreement acres.

914: Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program
        Objectives: This program was created to develop upland wildlife habitat, wetland wildlife habitat, threatened
        and endangered species habitat, fish habitat and other types of wildlife habitat.




Some useful websites:
                                                             United States Geological Survey (USGS)
                                                             http://www.usgs.gov

Department of Agriculture (USDA)                             Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
http://www.usda.gov                                          http://www.hud.gov

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Wetlands
http://www.fema.gov                                          http://www.erols.com/wetlands/dollars.htm

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)                        Department of Transportation (DOT)
http://www.epa.gov                                           http://www.dot.gov

Department of Interior (USDI)                                Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)
http://www.doi.gov                                           http://www.fws.gov
                                                                                                                      21
State Funding Sources
Some state funding sources and contacts are listed below

Illinois Emergency Management Agency
217-782-8719
        Hazard Mitigation Assistance Program- eligible initiatives for funding include planning, project and technical
        assistance. Projects include land acquisition and removal of insured structures, acquisition of structures and
        underlying real property for open space uses

Illinois Environmental Protection Agency
http://www.epa.state.il.us/assistance.html - 217-782-3362
         Non-point Source Management Program (Section 319 grants) - eligible projects include controlling of elimi-
         nating non-point pollution sources.

        Illinois Clean Lakes Program - financial assistance available for lakes over 20 acres with public access.

        Priority Lake and Watershed Implementation Program - eligible projects include funding to implement
        protection/restoration practices that improve water quality.

Illinois Department of Natural Resources
http://www.dnr.state.il.us/finast.htm
         Open Space Lands Acquisition and Development Program (OSLAD) - eligible projects include money for
         acquisition and development of public parks and open space - 217-782-7481

        Illinois Trails Grand Program - eligible projects include acquiring or constructing non-motorized bicycle and
        snowmobile paths and facilities - 217-782-7481

        Urban and Community Forestry Program - purpose is to create or enhance local forestry programs in commu-
        nities with a local forestry ordinance - 217-782-2361

        Illinois Wildlife Preservation Fund (Small Project Program) - Eligible projects include those that deal with
        management, site inventories or on-going education programs - 217-785-8774

        Small Projects Fund - provides assistance to smaller communities for alleviating locally significant drainage
        and flood problems and funding for planning and mitigation projects in accordance with an adopted plan -
        217-782-4637

        Project WILD School Sites Grants - eligible projects include enhancement of wildlife habitat, with emphasis
        on youth involvement and education, project must involve a trained WILD educator of facilitator - 217-782-
        1434

        Conservation 2000 Ecosystems Program - eligible projects include habitat protection or improvement,
        technical assistance, and education - 217-782-7940

Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT)
1-800-493-3434
        Illinois Transportation Enhancement Program - eligible projects include those that support alternative modes
        of transportation and that preserve visual and cultural resources, including historic preservation and landscap-
        ing beautification.

Illinois Commission on Community Service
1-800-592-9896
        Illinois Community-based Learn and Serve Grants - eligible projects include those that combine community
        service with classroom learning

Illinois State Board of Education
http://www.isbs.state.il.us - 217-782-2826
         Science Literacy Grants - No Match Required
Illinois Historic Preservation Agency
http://www.state.il.us/hpa - 217-785-5042
         Certified Local Government Program - eligible programs include historical surveys, education, and historical
         preservation planning


Private and Corporate Foundations

*Some Private Foundations and descriptions are listed below. Additional information about eligibil-
ity, program requirements and application information is available at http://fdncenter.org/grantmaker/
gws_priv/priv.html or at the web addresses shown.



Captain Planet Foundation, Inc.
http://www.turner.com/cpf/
         The mission of the Captain Planet Foundation is to fund and support hands-on environmental projects for
         children and youths. Its objective is to encourage innovative programs that empower children and youth
         around the world to work individually and collectively to solve environmental problems in their neighbor-
         hoods and communities.

The Joyce Foundation
http://www.joycefdn.org/
         Currently, the Foundation’s program areas are education, employment, environment, gun violence prevention,
         money and politics, and culture. The Chicago-based foundation gives preference to organizations based in or
         who have a program in the Midwest, specifically the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan,
         Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin.

Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation
http://www.gddf.org/
         The grant program awards funding to organizations working in the following categories: the environment and
         conservation; education; the arts and culture; and community welfare.

Ford Motor Company
http://www2.ford.com/default.asp?pageid=238
         Environmental efforts work to “promote environmental and help maintain the Earth’s rich biodiversity,”
         including a strategic alliance with Conservation International. Arts and Humanities funding goes toward
         “projects that have a community interest, offer educational opportunities, are accessible to a wide audience and
         are not restricted to any person based on culture or physical limitations,”

WalMart Foundation
http://www.walmartfoundation.org/
         Environmental efforts include two grants available from stores, one for clean air and water and the other for
         schools. Ninety-seven percent of funding is distributed locally through Wal-Mart stores and SAMs Clubs.

BP Amoco
http://www.bpamoco.com/world.htm
         The company’s corporate philanthropy is extensive and far-reaching. Major topics of interest of the environ-
         ment, education and society, and world energy. A featured project in the first category is the BP Conservation
         Programme, which supports student-led conservation projects around the world.

General Motors
http://www.gm.com/about/info/world/philanthropy/home.html
         The Foundation focuses its giving in six areas: education, health, community relations, public policy, arts and
         culture, and environment and energy, with a strong commitment to diversity in all areas. Education receives
         the most funding; higher education and K-12 programs both receive support.
                                                                                                                         23
The Turner Foundation
http://www.turnerfoundation.org/
         The Turner Foundation supports activities directed toward preservation of the environment, conservation of
         natural resources, protection of wildlife, and sound population policies. The Foundation supports organizations
         that “provide education and activism on preservation activities and seek to instill in all citizens a sense of com-
         mon responsibility for the fate of life on Earth.”

The Chicago Community Trust
http://www.cct.org/
         The Trust focuses on five main areas: arts and humanities, civic affairs, education, health, and social services. All
         funding is restricted to organizations that serve Cook County, Illinois and its residents.

Dr Scholl Foundation
http://www.umanitoba.ca/vpresearch/ors/funding/pages/index_qt/rz0234b.htm
         Address: 11 South La Salle Street, Suite 2100 Chicago, IL 60603-1302 Telephone: 312-782-5210
         Applications for grants will be considered in the following areas: private education at all levels which includes
         elementary and secondary schools, colleges and universities, and medical and nursing institutions; general
         charitable programs, including grants to hospitals, and programs for children, developmentally disabled, and
         senior citizens; and civic, cultural, social welfare services, economic, and religious institutions.

Helen V.Brach Foundation
         Raymond F. Simon, President and Director, Helen Brach Foundation, 55 W. Wacker Drive, Ste. 701, Chicago, IL
         60601, (312) 372-4417, FAX (312) 372-7819.
         Areas of interest/typical recipients: arts & humanities; civic & public affairs; environment; religion; science;
         social services

Blum-Kovler Foundation
         CONTACT: H. Jonathan Kovler, Vice President and Treasurer, Blum-Kovler Foundation, 919 North Michigan
         Avenue, Suite 2800, Chicago, IL 60611, (312) 664-5050, FAX (312) 664-8983.
         Areas of interest/typical recipients: arts & humanities; civic & public affairs; environment; religion; science;
         social services

R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company
         Community Relations
         R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company
         77 West Wacker Drive
         Chicago, IL 60601-1696
         Phone: 312-326-8175

Richard H.Driehaus Foundation
         203 North Wabash Avenue, Suite 1800
         Chicago, Illinois 60601
         Phone: 1-312-641-5772

FMC Foundation
http://www.fmc.com/community/foundation/foundation.html
         “for charitable, scientific, educational and cultural purposes in furtherance of the public welfare and the well-
         being of mankind.”

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
http://www.macfdn.org/index.htm
         The Foundation makes grants through two major integrated programs —Human and Community Development
         and Global Security and Sustainability

         Motorola Foundation
http://www.mot.com/motorola
         Eligible projects include environmental efforts
Polk Bros. Foundation
http://www.polkbrosfdn.org/
         Grants are made for both new and ongoing initiatives in four programs areas: social service, education, culture
         and health care. In all areas, should address increased access to services and improvement of the quality of life
         for area residents. Grants are seldom made for capital support.

Grand Victoria Foundation
        Grand Victoria Foundation 60 South Grove Avenue Elgin, Illinois 60120 Phone: (847) 289-8575
        The foundation’s mission is to serve as a catalyst for progress in strengthening communities through efforts in
        the following: education, economic development, environment.

Motorola Foundation
http://www.mot.com/motorola
         Eligible projects include environmental efforts


Other Sources
National Wildlife Foundation
http://www.nfwf.org
         Wildlife Links Project includes management and education projects for conservation on golf courses

North American Wetlands Conservation Council
http://northamerican.fws.gov/nawcc.html - 703-358-1784
          Small Grants Program - eligible projects include long-term acquisition, restoration, and/or enhancement of
          natural wetlands

Chicago Wilderness
http://www.chiwild.org - 312-486-8166 ex. 30
         Eligible projects include natural areas enhancement, education, and research that focus on biological diversity
         of northeastern Illinois, northwestern Indiana, and the southeastern Wisconsin region.

Wetland Restoration Fund
Contact Openlands at 312-427-4256 ex. 241
        Eligible projects include wetlands and other aquatic ecosystem restorations, projects must either have a conser-
        vation easement or be owned by a government agency.

River Network
http://www.rivernetwork.org - 503-241-3506
         Watershed Assistance Grants Program - eligible projects include community-based partnerships that conserve
         or restore watersheds

National Tree Trust
http://www.treetures.com/TreTrust.htm - 202-628-8733
         Community Tree Planting and Partnership Enhancement Monetary Grant Programs - eligible projects include
         tree plantings with donated seedlings and grants to organizations for urban areas

The Conservation Fund
dswol@conservationfund.org
               Eligible projects include greenway and trail projects

Resources for Global Sustainability
http://www.environmentalgrants.com
         RGS publishes a yearly catalog called “Environmental Grantmaking Foundations”
         PO Box 3665, Cary. NC. 27519 1-800-724-1857
Appendix III

Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership
Grant Evaluation Form

 Project Title ______________________________       Principle Investigator _______________________
 Grant Program ____________________________         Reviewed By ________________ Date ________



                                        CRITERIA                 Ex(3)   Good(2)    Fair (1)   Poor/ n/a   (0)
Project application is complete
Project narrative is clear and concise
Project budget figures are accurate
There is a clear explanation of what funds will be used for
Project includes matching funds
There is a clear explanation of match
Project land owner/manager signature included
Project maps are accurate
      NOTES
                                                                 Sub Total Application (A)

This project meets objectives of the watershed plan
Project includes multiple partners
Project does not duplicate current efforts
This project has a local focus
This project has a regional focus
This project provides baseline information
This project includes an assessment component
This project includes an outreach component
This is a multibenefit project
This is an acquisition project
This is a restoration/maintenance project
This project will improve water quality
This project will create a soceo-economic benefit
This project will improve environmental education
This project will result in increased recreational activity
This project will improve development practices
This project will result in increased knowledge
       NOTES
                                                                    Sub Total Project (P)


OVERALL EVALUATION = (Sub Total A + Sub Total (P)/75

NOTES



26
                                                                                 Appendix IV
I Summary of fish collection data for Thorn Creek biological survey, 1998 (source   IDNR)



COMMON NAME        SCIENTIFIC NAME           TC-1   TC-2   TC-3   TC-4    TC-5      TOTAL
Grass pickerel     Esox americanus           0      0      0      0       1         1
Carp               Cyprinus carpio           1      0      0      0       6         7
Golden shiner      Notemigonus crysoleucas   0      0      0      2       0         2
Creek chub         Semolitus atromaculatus   140    10     88     66      7         311
Fathead minnow     Pimephales promelas       19     1      15     7       0         42
Bluntnose minnow   Pimephales notatus        0      0      0      40      3         43
Emerald shiner     Notropis atherinoides     0      0      0      5       0         5
White sucker       Catostomus commersoni     4      9      3      6       0         22
Black bullhead     Ameiurus melas            0      9      0      0       0         9
Largemouth bass    Micropterus salmoides     1      3      1      5       0         10
Green sunfish      Lepmis cyanelius          29     40     239    35      15        358
Sunfish hybrid     Lepmis spp.               1      0      0      0       0         1
Bluegill           Lepomis macrochirus       1      2      1      2       2         4
Johnny darter      Etheostoma nigrum         0      0      0      7       0         7
                   TOTAL                     196    74     347    179     26        822
                   no. species               7      7      6      10      4
                   IBI                       32     32     30     32      28

TC-1Thorn Creek Forest Preserve
TC-2 Sauk Trail Forest Preserve
TC-3 Joe Orr Forest Preserve
TC-4 Glenwood Road
TC-5 Maria Road



II Summary of fish collection data for Deer Creek biological survey, 1999 (source   IDNR)



COMMON NAME        SCIENTIFIC NAME           D-1    DC-2   DC-3   TOTAL
Goldfish           Carassius auratus         8      0      0      8
Green sunfish      Leopmis cyanellus         19     119    78     216
Creek chub         Semotilus artomaculatus   57     17     9      83
Bluntnose minnow   Pimephales notatus        0      2      1      3
Sunfish hybrid     Lepmis spp.               0      8      1      9
Bluegill           Lepomis macrochirus       0      25     1      26
Golden shiner      Notemigonus crysoleucas   0      13     0      13
Black bullhead     Ameiurus melas            0      2      1      3
Carp               Cyprinus carpio           0      11     12     23
Gizzard shad       Dorosoma cepedianum       0      2      0      2
White sucker       Catostomus commersoni     0      26     10     36
Largemouth bass    Micropterus salmoides     0      4      3      7
Horneyhead chub    Nocornis biguttatus       0      0      1      1
Johnny darter      Etheostoma nigrum         0      0      1      5
Grass pickerel     Esox americanus           0      0      5      5
                   TOTAL                     84     231    128    440

DC-1 Western N of University Parkway
DC-2 Steger Road Bridge
DC-3 Cottage Grove at Glenwood Dyer Road
                                                                                               27
Appendix V



                             COMPLEMENTARY INITIATIVES

There has been a substantial amount of planning activity within the Thorn Creek watershed.
In addition to the plans of individual municipalities, several documents have been prepared
that are regional in focus and include all, or significant portions of, the Thorn Creek
watershed. These include:


A Vision for Butterfield Creek. Butterfield Creek Steering Committee

Biodiversity Recovery Plan. 1999. Chicago Region Biodiversity Council.

Land Acquisition Plan. June 1994. Forest Preserve District of Cook County

Northeastern Illinois Regional Greenways Plan, September 1992. developed by Northeastern Illinois
      Planning Commission and Openlands Project.

Open Space and Environmental Agenda, January 1997. South Metropolitan Regional Open Space
      Alliance.

Proposed Ten Year Capital Improvement Program, 1998. Forest Preserve District of Will County.

South Suburban Stormwater Strategy: A Plan for Watershed Management, December 1998, prepared
       by Eubanks and Associates, Inc. and French and Associates, Ltd. for South Suburban Mayors
       and Managers Association.

Thorn Creek Woods Nature Preserve Master Plan. December 1987. prepared by Illinois Natural History
       Survey.

Watershed Plan and Environmental Impact Statement, November 1978. Little Calumet River
       Watershed, Illinois

Will County Comprehensive Stormwater Management Plan, Draft-June 1988. Will County Stormwater
       Management Planning Committee.




28
                                                                                                Appendix VI
MUNICIPAL POPULATION PROJECTIONS


Municipality             Pop-1990      Pop Est 1998   %chg 1990-98   Proj-2020   %chg 1998-20   Proj 2020-SSA**   %chg 1998-20

Chicago Heights          32,966        31,635         -4.0           32,587      3.0            33,557            6.1
Country Club Hills       15,431        16,433         6.5            17,523      6.6            20,247            23.2
Crete                    6,773         8,049          18.8           11,216      39.3           13,497            67.7
Flossmoor                8,651         9,125          5.5            10,203      11.8           10,729            17.6
Ford Heights             4,259         4,123          -3.2           5,815       41.0           6,057             46.9
Glenwood                 9,289         9,079          -2.3           10,893      20.0           10,903            20.1
Homewood                 19,278        19,536         1.3            22,070      13.0           22,351            14.4
Lansing                  28,131        28,512         1.4            33,479      17.4           33,477            17.4
Lynwood                  6,535         7,677          17.5           13,213      72.1           13,217            72.2
Matteson                 11,378        12,490         9.8            24,070      92.7           27,185            117.7
Olympis Fields           4,248         4,773          12.4           7,152       49.8           7,635             60.0
Park Forest              24,656        24,365         -1.2           25,988      6.7            27,431            12.6
Richton Park             10,523        11,720         11.4           21,031      79.4           25,088            114.1
S.Chicago Heights        10,734        10,973         2.2            16,595      51.2           17,774            62.0
Sauk Village             3,695         3,837          3.8            4,179       8.9            4,441             15.7
South Holland            22,105        21,794         -1.4           22,873      5.0            22,877            5.0
Steger                   9,251         9,949          7.5            10,472      5.3            10,987            10.4
Thornton                 2,778         2,709          -2.5           3,032       11.9           3,032             11.9
University Park          6,204         6,435          3.7            17,822      177.0          27,999            335.1


TOTALS/AVG%CHG           236,885       243,214        4.6            310,213     37.5           338,484           54.2




Source- Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission

** (SSA) With South Suburban Airport




                                                                                                                        29
Funding for the development of this strategic watershed plan for the Thorn Creek Ecosystem
Partnership was provided by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources C2000 Program
and Governors State University.

Appreciation is extended to David Eubanks of Eubanks & Associates, Inc., for his facilitation
services and support of this process and to Mary Tano of the South Metropolitan Regional
Leadership Center for technical writing services.

Special appreciation is extended to Dr. Karen D’Arcy of Governors State University for her
leadership role and to Dr. Jon Mendelson of Governors State University for his contributions
in establishing the Thorn Creek Ecosystem Partnership and to all of the participants in this
planning process.


The drawings of animals and plants are the work of Jim Marzuki (1925-2000), artist,
naturalist and educator. Jim and his wife Mary Lou led the effort to preserve Thorn Creek
Woods in eastern Will County, a centerpiece of the watershed; and as a legislator and
political activist, Jim made many contributions to the environmental health of our region.

				
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