Specifications for teaching from 2009 Humanities

Document Sample
Specifications for teaching from 2009 Humanities Powered By Docstoc
					GCSE
Specifications for teaching
from 2009


Humanities
                                            GCSE HUMANITIES 1




Contents


                 WJEC GCSE in HUMANITIES

          For Teaching from 2009
           For Award from 2011




                                                  Page

  Summary of Assessment                             2

  Introduction                                      5

  Specification Content                           11

  Scheme of Assessment                            38

  Awarding and Reporting                          41

  Administration of Controlled Assessment         42

  Grade Descriptions                              54

  The Wider Curriculum                            56
GCSE HUMANITIES 2




                                GCSE HUMANITIES

                        SUMMARY OF ASSESSMENT

UNIT 1:    HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON THE ENVIRONMENT
Centres choose to study one of the following options:

People and their environments
Patterns and places

This will be assessed by one examination paper of 1 hour duration.
The raw mark will be 50 and the weighting 25%                      (50 UMS)


UNIT 2:    HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON THE PAST
Centres choose to study one of the following options:

Society in change: the United Kingdom, 1939-1974
Society in change: the USA, 1945-1975

This will be assessed by one examination paper of 1 hour duration.
The raw mark will be 50 and the weighting 25%                      (50 UMS)

The examination papers for Unit 1 and Unit 2 will be available in one examination
session of two hours duration. Candidates can sit both papers in one session or one
paper if the assessment is staged.


UNIT 3:    HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON BELIEFS AND RIGHTS
Centres choose to study one of the following options:

Christianity and contemporary lifestyles
Christianity and Judaism in today’s world
Christianity and Islam in today’s world
Christianity and Hinduism in today’s world

This will be assessed by one examination paper of 1 hour duration.
The raw mark will be 50 and the weighting 25%                      (50 UMS)
                                                                       GCSE HUMANITIES 3




UNIT 4:     CONTEMPORARY THEMES AND ISSUES
Centres choose to study one of the following options:
Tourism, travel and leisure
Conflict and co-operation
Rights and responsibilities
The changing world of work

This will be assessed by controlled assessment and will be internally assessed.
The raw mark will be 50 and the weighting 25%                        (50 UMS)
In the controlled assessment, candidates are required to complete an enquiry into an issue
or issues arising from the content of the chosen option. The task set will enable candidates
to investigate an issue which has contemporary relevance and debate. The controlled
assessment will take the form of an extended response to a series of connected tasks. The
emphasis must be firmly on enquiry.

               OPTION / ENTRY CODES                                    English Welsh
                                                                       medium medium
GCSE Cash in entry                                           4320        SA     GU
                                          UNIT 1
People and their environments                                4321         01         W1
Patterns and places                                          4321         02         W2
                                     UNIT 2
Society in change: the United Kingdom, 1939-1974              4322        01         W1
Society in change: the USA, 1945-1975                         4322        02         W2
                                        UNIT 3
Christianity and contemporary lifestyles                      4323        01         W1
Christianity and Judaism in today’s world                     4323        02         W2
Christianity and Islam in today’s world                       4323        03         W3
Christianity and Hinduism in today’s world                    4323        04         W4
                                          UNIT 4
Controlled assessment                                         4324        01         W1

                     AVAILABILITY OF ASSESSMENT AND CERTIFICATION

                                         June 2010        June 2011
                      Unit 1
                      Unit 2
                      Unit 3
                      Unit 4
                      Subject Award


          There will be an opportunity to take the Unit 3 paper only in June 2010.
                     Qualification Accreditation Number: 500/4573/8
                                                                      GCSE HUMANITIES 5



HUMANITIES
1          INTRODUCTION


    1.1    Rationale
    •      The specification provides opportunities for candidates to engage in a broad
           humanities experience thereby providing breadth, balance, differentiation and
           relevance.

    •      This specification offers opportunities for centres to choose their own pathway
           through the course in response to the individual needs of students.

    •      The specification presents a structured approach offering students a flexible
           teaching-learning programme that responds to the varying needs of
           candidates.

    •      The specification emphasises process as well as content. It will, therefore,
           utilise the appropriate activities and teaching methods and must include
           enquiry based learning.

    •      The methods of assessment will ensure that the learning experience of all
           candidates will be comparable irrespective of the selection of units.

    •      The specification has been designed to make an important contribution to the
           whole school curriculum and, in this context, can be used to deliver a number
           of cross-curricular themes and key skills.

    1.2    Aims and Learning Outcomes
    Following a course in GCSE Humanities should encourage students to:

    Study the key features and characteristics of issues, themes and, where appropriate,
    the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversities of the societies studied, and the
    past and current experience of people in these societies.

    Explore and examine issues important to humanity at a range of different levels, such
    as individual, family, local, regional, national and global.

    Study the attitudes and values that inform human behaviour, influence human
    experiences and shape a sustainable future.

    Study a variety of cultural, economic, environmental, historical, moral, political,
    religious, social, spatial and spiritual factors that impact issues important to people
    and the world we live in.
GCSE HUMANITIES 6



      1.3    Rationale for selected content
      The WJEC GCSE Humanities course meets all the subject criteria as laid down by
      the regulatory authorities. It requires candidates to study:

         the key features and characteristics of issues and themes and, where
         appropriate, the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the various
         societies studied;
         issues important to humanity at a range of different levels, including past and
         current experience of people in the societies studied;
         the attitudes and values that inform human behaviour, influence human process
         and shape a sustainable future;
         a variety of cultural, economic, environmental, historical, moral, political, religious,
         social, spatial and spiritual factors that impact issues important to people.

      The course is structured to provide centres with the flexibility to design a pathway
      which is coherent, relevant, interesting and reflects the needs of their students, while
      maintaining rigour and demand throughout. This is reflected in the structure of the
      course:

      In Unit 1 all centres have to choose one option. Each option focuses on the ways
      that environmental, geographical, economic, social, cultural, political, historical, moral
      and religious factors influence people’s lives and their interaction with the natural
      environment in a variety of ways. In particular these options encourage learners to
      demonstrate a critical awareness of the need to implement sustainable management
      strategies in an attempt to reconcile human and economic development with the
      moral obligation of stewardship of our planet and the need for people to take
      preventative action at a range of scales. Learners will develop enquiry and critical
      thinking skills through discussion of issues that are important, real and relevant to the
      world in which they live.

      In Unit 2 all centres have to choose one option which focuses mainly on the
      interaction of the political, social, economic and moral pressures that have affected a
      society in the past. Each option concentrates on the theme of change in a society in
      the recent past and ensures a number of learning outcomes. It considers the ways
      that historical, political, moral, cultural, religious, economic, social and geographical
      factors interacted to shape and change aspects of the chosen society. It examines
      issues that affected the quality and nature of human life, including an appreciation of
      diversity and similarities and differences of attitudes, values and beliefs in society. It
      considers the experiences of war, economic, political and social issues, changes in
      culture and lifestyle and how people have contributed to society. It also enables the
      changes that affected this society to be studied with a degree of hindsight. Learners
      will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are
      important, real and relevant to the world in which they live.

      In Unit 3 all centres have to choose one option focussing mainly on the interaction of
      religious, spiritual and moral beliefs and their effect on human responsibilities In
      following their chosen option, learners should be able to relate to people of different
      cultures and faiths within their own community and from the wider world. Learners
      should also be aware of the limitations on their own actions and the actions of others
      if we are to live in a world that is both tolerant and sustainable. This will lead them to
      assess the factors that affect human life both now and in the future. Through
      individual investigation and insight as well as collaborative work they should consider
      their role in wider society and their own broader contribution to human life.
                                                                   GCSE HUMANITIES 7



In Unit 4, all centres have to choose one option considering a contemporary theme
which explores how a range of factors have interacted to have an influence on
people’s lives today. The option also allows learners to consider the opportunities
and constraints that influence society and issues that affect the quality of life. In
particular, the controlled assessment nature of this unit will allow learners to actively
engage in the process of humanities to develop as effective and independent
thinkers with enquiring minds.

Consequently this course gives centres the opportunity to study a range of
inspirational topics that reflect aspects of people’s lives in society today. It ensures
study from a range of perspectives that are coherent, holistic and stretch well beyond
single subject remits.


Ensuring a coherent and holistic approach

The WJEC course is designed to enable centres to develop a GCSE experience
which fulfils the needs and interests of its students and staff. It has a large degree of
coherence without being too prescriptive. The need to address issues from a range
of perspectives gives it a coherent and holistic flavour which goes beyond the remit
of any single subject discipline. There is a degree of overlap with certain other
GCSE subjects, but the range of options on offer to centres extends beyond the remit
of single subject disciplines and ensures discussion of a range of perspectives on
issues that currently affect and have affected people and society.

The Humanities course in its entirety also ensures coverage of the range of learning
outcomes specified in the subject criteria. Learners have to explore issues from a
wide range of perspectives thereby ensuring a coherent and holistic experience. The
whole course is underpinned by the holistic concept of influences and pressures that
have affected and continue to affect society.
GCSE HUMANITIES 8


       REFLECTING THE LEARNING OUTCOMES THROUGH THE CONTENT

       The grid below demonstrates how selection of different units ensures that learners address the required range of learning outcomes. The
       learning outcomes are also clearly identified in the content exemplification.

       [The numbers relate to the option / papers in numerical order, eg: 01 is People and their Environments while 12 is The Changing World of
       Work.]


                  Main learning outcomes                       01    02     03    04     05    06     07    08     09    10    11    12

How people of different cultures and societies relate to
each other                                                    √ √                √            √ √           √ √               √
How various factors have interacted to shape today’s
world                                                         √ √ √ √                   √ √ √               √ √ √ √ √
Consider the opportunities and constraints that influence
human societies                                                      √ √ √              √ √ √               √ √ √ √ √
Examine issues that affect the nature and quality of human
life                                                          √ √ √ √                   √ √ √               √ √ √ √ √
Develop enquiry and critical thinking skills
                                                              √ √ √ √                                             √ √ √ √
Consider the rights and responsibilities of individuals
                                                              √ √                √      √ √ √               √ √               √
                                                                   GCSE HUMANITIES 9



1.4    Prior Learning and Progression
Although there are no specific requirements for prior learning, this specification builds
upon elements of the Programmes of Study for Geography, History and Religious
Studies for Key Stages 1-3 as defined in the curricula for Wales, England and
Northern Ireland and the Programmes of Study in locally agreed specifications for
Religious Education.
This specification may be followed by any candidate, irrespective of their gender,
ethnic, religious or cultural background.
This specification is not age specific and, as such, provides opportunities for
candidates to extend their life-long learning.
This specification provides a basis for the study of Humanities or a related subject at
Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced GCE, Vocational A Levels and a basis for future
employment.

1.5    Equality and Fair Assessment
GCSEs often require assessment of a broad range of competences. This is because
they are general qualifications and, as such, prepare candidates for a wide range of
occupations and higher level courses.
The revised GCSE qualification and subject criteria have been reviewed to identify
whether any of the competences required by the subject presented a potential barrier
to any disabled candidates. If this was the case, the situation was reviewed again to
ensure that such competences were included only where essential to the subject.
The findings of this process were discussed with disability groups and with disabled
people.
In the case of GCSE Humanities, some aspects of the assessments, especially
regarding the use of visual stimuli, may present difficulties to candidates with
particular disabilities. The assessments will be adjusted where appropriate to
mitigate the effects of this potential barrier. For this reason, very few candidates will
have a complete barrier to any part of the assessment. Information on reasonable
adjustments is found in the Joint Council for Qualifications document Regulations
and Guidance Relating to Candidates who are eligible for Adjustments in
Examinations. This document is available on the JCQ website (www.jcq.org.uk).
Candidates who are still unable to access a significant part of the assessment, even
after exploring all possibilities through reasonable adjustments, may still be able to
receive an award. They would be given a grade on the parts of the assessment they
have taken and there would be an indication on their certificate that not all of the
competences have been addressed. This will be kept under review and may be
amended in future.

1.6    Classification Codes
Every specification is assigned a national classification code indicating the subject
area to which it belongs. The classification code for this specification is 4510.
Centres should be aware that candidates who enter for more than one GCSE
qualification with the same classification code will have only one grade (the highest)
counted for the purpose of the School and College Performance Tables.
Centres may wish to advise candidates that, if they take two specifications with the
same classification code, schools and colleges are very likely to take the view that
they have achieved only one of the two GCSEs. The same view may be taken if
candidates take two GCSE specifications that have different classification codes but
have significant overlap of content. Candidates who have any doubts about their
subject combinations should check with the institution to which they wish to progress
before embarking on their programmes.
                                                                                                          GCSE HUMANITIES 11




2             SPECIFICATION CONTENT

       Examined Units
Centres must study one option from each of the three units as shown below:


                   Unit 1                                        Unit 2                       Unit 3

        Human Perspectives on the                       Human Perspectives on         Human Perspectives on
             Environment                                      the Past                  Beliefs and Rights

            People and their                              A society in change:         Christianity and
            environments                                  the United Kingdom, 1939-    Contemporary
                                                          1974                         Lifestyles


            Patterns and Places                                                        Christianity and
                                                          A society in change:         either Judaism, Islam or
                                                          the USA, 1945-1975           Hinduism in today’s world
GCSE HUMANITIES 12


UNIT 1:       HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON THE ENVIRONMENT: PEOPLE AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTS

This unit focuses on the interrelationship between people in the UK and the wider world and their environment and ensures a number of learning
outcomes. It considers the ways that environmental, geographical, economic, social, cultural, political, historical, moral and religious factors
influence people’s attempts to control, exploit and modify the hydrological cycle and global ecosystems. The unit examines issues that show the
impact of people on their environment at a range of scales and how the natural environment can affect aspects of the quality and nature of human
life. In particular this unit encourages students to demonstrate a critical awareness of the need to implement sustainable management strategies
in an attempt to reconcile human and economic development with the moral obligation of stewardship of our planet. Learners will develop enquiry
and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are important, real and relevant to the world in which they live.

   Main learning outcome 1                              Examine issues that affect the nature and quality of human life
          Key Issues                                 through a study of people and their relationship with water resources
 How do people have an            • How do humans affect the movement of water within a drainage basin?
 impact on natural systems?         (the main pathways for the movement of water in a drainage basin such as interception and run-off; the
                                    effects of deforestation, land use and urbanisation on rivers)
                                     How does water pollution in rivers affect the quality of human life?
                                     (pollution from agricultural run-off, industrial processes, sewage treatment plants; specific case studies
                                     from the UK and/or the EU; is the issue of polluted rivers a recent problem?)
 How do people respond to         • How do natural disasters such as flooding affect the quality of human life?
 the threat posed by natural         (flash flooding and floods caused by prolonged rainfall using suitable case studies, including at least one
 disasters?                          from within the UK)
                                     How can humans try to control floods?
                                     (an assessment of the costs and benefits of different methods such as levees, dams, channel alteration,
                                     afforestation, land-use zoning)
 Why is the management of         • Why does water supply and demand in the UK vary?
 natural resources                   (the growth in demand for water, both domestic and industrial; water surplus and deficit areas)
 necessary?                          What is the impact of large water management schemes on the quality of human life?
                                     (the reasons for and the advantages and disadvantages of dam/reservoir construction using at least one
                                     case study from within the UK and one from elsewhere in the world)
                                                                                                               GCSE HUMANITIES 13

   Main learning outcome 2          Explore ways in which cultural, economic, environmental, moral and political factors
          Key Issues                    interact through a study of the sustainable development of tropical rainforests
How has the tropical          Where are tropical rainforest areas located?
rainforest ecosystem          (the location of the world’s tropical rainforests; explanation of equatorial climates)
evolved?                      What are the main features of the tropical rainforest?
                              (the main features of the forest structure such as emergents and canopies; vegetation as a response to
                              climate; nutrient cycles; fauna)
How do people exploit the     How did native peoples traditionally use the rainforests?
tropical rainforest           (traditional lifestyle/social organisation of native peoples; shifting cultivation and its benefits and
ecosystem?                    drawbacks)
                              What are the environmental, economic and political pressures on the rainforest ecosystem?
                              (the extent and causes of rainforest destruction such as new settlement and farming, logging, mining,
                              extraction; the impact on native tribes, rubber tappers etc.)
Is sustainable development    Why is the tropical rainforest such an important ecosystem in the world?
of tropical rainforests       (the diversity of plant and animal life; the value of rainforests; possible impact on regional and global
possible?                     climate change)
                              How can people and authorities interact to conserve tropical rainforests?
                              (the need for protection, sustainable development, conservation methods such as national parks and eco-
                              tourism; how can individuals help?)
   Main learning outcome 3                Consider the opportunities and constraints that influence human societies
          Key Issues                      through a study of the pressures of food supply on the global environment
How does farming affect the   How has agriculture in the United Kingdom taken advantage of new opportunities since 1950?
landscape and environment     (increased mechanisation, productivity, agribusiness; the influence of supermarkets; the impact of the EU:
of the United Kingdom?        CAP, subsidies, quotas, set-aside, etc.)
                              How does farming affect the environment of the United Kingdom today?
                              (environmental issues and farming such as hedgerow loss, the use of fertilisers and pesticides, GM crops;
                              farmers as custodians of the countryside; the advantages and disadvantages of organic farming)
What are the challenges       How do people traditionally farm in LEDCs?
facing farming in less        (agricultural organisation in LEDCs including subsistence farming, cash cropping, etc.; a case study of
economically developed        farming in a LEDC such as rice, coffee, cotton, etc.)
countries?                    What can be done to encourage take-up of new opportunities in farming in LEDCs?
                              (the use of high-yielding varieties; increased mechanisation; irrigation and its advantages and
                              disadvantages)
How can people cope with      How does desertification constrain human life in parts of the world?
the problems caused by        (areas of the world affected; natural causes such as rainfall variability and climate change; human causes
desertification?              such as population pressure, overgrazing, monoculture, deforestation)
                              How can humans and authorities interact to help to solve desertification?
                              (controlling run-off, reforestation, social and economic changes)
GCSE HUMANITIES 14




UNIT 1:       HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON THE ENVIRONMENT: PATTERNS AND PLACES

This unit focuses on the theme of global patterns that have been produced by people and their activities and ensures a number of learning
outcomes. It considers the ways that environmental, geographical, economic, social, cultural, political, historical, moral and religious factors
have affected the distribution and growth of world population, the organisation and layout of urban areas and the world’s climate. The unit
examines demographic patterns and trends and the impact of natural events on people; issues surrounding the social and environmental
impacts of urbanisation; and explores the causes and consequences of global climate change focussing in particular on the need for people to
take preventative action at a range of scales. Learners will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are
important, real and relevant to the world in which they live.

   Main learning outcome 1                  Examine issues that affect the nature and quality of human life through a study of the
          Key Issues                          influence of the physical environment on the distribution and activities of people.
How can the distribution and           What factors have interacted to affect the distribution of the world’s population?
growth of the world’s                  (the physical factors which affect the distribution of the world’s population such as climate, relief, soil,
population be explained?               vegetation; how the world’s population has changed through a study of birth & death rates and the
                                       demographic cycle)
                                       How is the nature and quality of human life being affected by changes in world population?
                                       (birth & death rates; age-sex pyramids; the demographic cycle; population trends and levels of economic
                                       development)
 How do extreme climatic               How can the quality of human life be affected by extreme climactic events?
 events affect people?                 (the causes, development and growth of tropical storms / hurricanes; major features; common hurricane
                                       tracks)
                                       How have people interacted to deal with the threat posed by extreme climactic events?
                                       (monitoring & early warning systems; a case study of a major hurricane disaster e.g. Hurricane Katrina)
 What impact do natural                How is the quality of human life affected by natural disasters?
 disasters have on people and          (the causes of earthquakes: plate tectonics and the global distribution of earthquakes)
 societies?                            How have people interacted to deal with the threat of earthquakes?
                                       (the effectiveness of strategies involving prevention, prediction and preparedness through a comparative
                                       study of major earthquake events in both MEDCs and LEDCs)
                                                                                                                         GCSE HUMANITIES 15

   Main learning outcome 2                             Consider the opportunities and constraints that influence
          Key Issues                                      human societies through a study of life in urban areas
What are the causes and          What factors have interacted to cause the growth of the world’s cities?
effects of urbanisation?         (historical and global patterns of urbanisation; differences between LEDCs and MEDCs; the causes of rural-
                                 urban migration in LEDCs.)
                                 What have been the main causes and patterns of urbanisation in the UK since 1945?
                                 (the growth of suburbia; the reasons for urban - rural migration, re-urbanisation and city living)
What patterns can be seen         How does land-use and quality of life vary within UK towns and cities?
within cities in the United       (simple land-use models; the characteristics of each zone e.g. CBD, inner city areas, suburbs; quality of life
Kingdom?                          indicators; variations in quality of life.)
                                  What attempts have been made to improve the quality of life of people in cities in the UK?
                                  (comprehensive redevelopment, post-war and recent; the advantages and disadvantages of high-rise
                                  developments; urban regeneration and urban renewal schemes; success of these schemes)
How do social and                 What are the opportunities and constraints caused by car use in cities?
environmental factors affect      (the growth and extent of car ownership leading to traffic congestion, air quality and smog; possible solutions
the lives of people living in     such as by-passes and ring roads, park and ride, congestion charging, public transport.)
cities?                           How can the problem of shanty towns/squatter settlements in LEDC cities be solved?
                                  (the problems faced by people living in shanty towns/squatter settlements, possible solutions to the problems
                                  such as self-help schemes; a case study of a shanty town/squatter settlement in an LEDC.)
   Main learning outcome 3                  Explore ways in which cultural, economic, environmental, moral and political
          Key Issues                        factors interact through a study of issues connected with the world’s climate
What factors are bringing        What factors have interacted to bring about global warming?
about changes to the world’s     (geological evidence of past climate change – ice ages, etc.; greenhouse gases; the increasing use of fossil
climate?                         fuels; growing energy use in MEDCs and LEDCs.)
                                 Is human activity responsible for global warming?
                                 (different perspectives on the extent of human responsibility for the problem; is climate change exaggerated?)
What are the likely effects of   What are the most likely effects of climate change?
climate change for the people    (glaciers and ice cap melting – the plight of the polar bear; rising sea levels and its effect on communities such
and societies?                   as Tuvalu or Bangladesh.)
                                 How bad could the impact of global warming get?
                                 (extreme weather events; tipping points and feedback loops; coastal flooding and displaced populations.)
How should people and            What political solutions may there be to the problem of climate change?
society respond to climate       (the problems of reaching agreement on climate changing, e.g. Kyoto; sources of energy: fossil fuels v
change?                          renewable energy such as wind, water and solar power; the nuclear power debate)
                                 What can individuals do about the problem of climate change?
                                 (reducing carbon footprints through fuel-efficient transport; energy efficiency in the home; sustainable
                                 resource use such as re-cycling and re-using.)
GCSE HUMANITIES 16




UNIT 2:        HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON THE PAST: A SOCIETY IN CHANGE: THE UNITED KINGDOM, 1939-1974

This unit focuses on the theme of change in a society in the recent past and ensures a number of learning outcomes. It considers the ways that
historical, political, moral, cultural, religious, economic, social and geographical factors interacted to shape and change aspects of society in
the United Kingdom between 1939 and 1974. It examines issues that affected the quality and nature of human life, including an appreciation of
diversity and similarities and differences of attitudes, values and beliefs in society. It considers the experiences of war, economic, political and
social issues, changes in culture and lifestyle and how people contributed to society. It also enables the changes that affected this society to
be studied with a degree of hindsight. Learners will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are important,
real and relevant to the world in which they live.


  Main learning outcome 1                       Consider the opportunities and constraints that have influenced human societies
         Key Issues                               in the past through a study of the impact of war on people’s lives 1939-1945
How can the lives of ordinary            How can ordinary families be directly threatened by war?
people be affected by the                (the bombing of the cities of the UK e.g. London, Coventry, Liverpool, Cardiff, Swansea; the extent and
experience of war?                       effects of the bombing campaigns; is it right to attack civilians?)
                                         What methods can be used to protect the civilian population?
                                         (use and effectiveness of air raid precautions such as gas masks, shelter, ARP, blackouts, the Home
                                         Guard.)
 How can people’s lives be               How can government policy affect people’s lives during war time?
 influenced by government                (the organisation of evacuation; the evacuees; reception and neutral zones; areas of evacuation)
 policy?                                 What impact did evacuation have on society in the UK?
                                         (experiences of evacuees and host families; the interaction of town and country; schooling; successes
                                         and/or failure of evacuation)
 How can whole populations               How can the war effort be organised by governments?
 be mobilised to fight a ‘total’         (conscription; women in the factories, homes and farms; keeping up morale; Churchill as a symbol of
 war?                                    defiance; propaganda)
                                         How can the people be fed during war time?
                                         (the organisation and effects of rationing; Dig for Victory; the Black Market; government policies, posters
                                         and recipes; the effectiveness of these methods)
                                                                                                                            GCSE HUMANITIES 17
  Main learning outcome 2                  Explore ways in which historical, political, economic, social, cultural and moral factors
          Key Issues                           interact through a study of economic, political and social issues 1945 – 1974
How can political and social           How can governments plan for peace after major conflict?
policies help political parties        (the Beveridge Report and the five giants; the 1944 Education Act; homes for all)
achieve electoral success?             What factors interact to win general elections for political parties?
                                       (the 1945 election: the ideals of the Labour Party; the leadership of Attlee; the khaki vote; reasons for
                                       Labour’s victory)
What impact can economic               How can government policies radically alter a country’s economy?
and social policies have on            (reasons for nationalisation; industries affected in particular, coal, transport, iron and steel; reactions to
the lives of ordinary people?          the policy of nationalisation)
                                       How can government policies radically alter people’s health and opportunities?
                                       (the setting up of the Welfare State; the NHS and the role of Aneurin Bevan; reactions to the setting up of
                                       the Welfare State)
How soon can society return            What happens to people’s lives straight after the end of a war?
to ‘normal’ after the                  (austerity and the continuation of rationing; the New Towns Act; the 1951 General Election; the recovery
experiences of war?                    of the economy during the 1950s and early 1960s)
                                       How can governments leave a lasting impression for future generations?
                                       (motorways and the Beeching axe; comprehensive education for all; the Profumo scandal.)
   Main learning outcome 3         Examine issues that affect the nature and quality of human life through a study of change and
          Key Issues               continuity of lifestyles in the 1950s and 1960s
How do changes in society              How radically did the nature and quality of life for women change?
affect the lifestyles of certain       (changes in the home; educational and employment opportunities; convenience foods and supermarkets;
groups?                                magazines and fashion; the pill; womens liberation; extent of this change for all women)
                                       Was childhood different in the 1950s and 1960s?
                                       (children's toys for boys and girls; Dinky toys and Meccano; board games; hobbies and out-door games;
                                       brownies and scouts; how different was children’s life in this period?)
How does the development                How did people’s leisure time change in the 1950s and 1960s?
of popular entertainment                (radio; concerts and clubs; television; films and magazines; youth clubs and coffee bars; sport)
contribute to society?             •    How did changing musical styles reflect changes in society?
                                        (how did people listen: record players, radio, dance halls and discos; musical trends such as rock'n'roll,
                                        soul and Motown, flower power; popular groups such as the Beatles, Rolling Stones etc; reactions to
                                        these changes in popular music)
How do political, social, and           How did society react to growing affluence and more liberal attitudes?
moral factors influence                (Mods and Rockers; fads and fashions such as the mini-skirt; the permissive society: drugs and booze;
changes in society?                     hippies and free love; the generation gap)
                                   •    What influences did political events have on the nature and quality of people’s lives?
                                        (Protest: CND and Ban the Bomb; civil unrest in Northern Ireland up to Bloody Sunday, 1972)
GCSE HUMANITIES 18




UNIT 2 :      HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON THE PAST: A SOCIETY IN CHANGE: THE USA, 1945-1975

This unit focuses on the theme of change in a society in the recent past and ensures a number of learning outcomes. It considers the ways that
historical, political, moral, cultural, economic, religious and social factors interacted to shape and change aspects of American society between
1945 and 1974. It examines issues that affected aspects of the quality and nature of human life, including an appreciation of diversity and
similarities and differences of attitudes, values and beliefs in society. It considers the emergence of the USA as a global super-power, the
challenges of living in a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural society and the impact of political, cultural, economic and social developments on the
lives of the American people. It also enables the changes that affected this society to be studied with a degree of hindsight. Learners will
develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are important, real and relevant to the world in which they live.


Main learning outcome 1                        Explore ways in which historical, political, economic, social and moral factors
                                               interact through a study of the Cold War and its impact on American society.
Key issues
Why do countries quarrel?               How can ideological differences between countries cause mistrust and suspicion?
                                        (the features of capitalism and communism: economic, political, social)
                                        How can factors interact to cause bad relations to develop?
                                        (the defeat of Germany and the Soviet takeover of Eastern Europe; the development of atomic and
                                        nuclear weapons; the space race; the use of propaganda)
How are the lives of ordinary           How do countries become embroiled in flashpoints?
people affected by global               (case study of the Cuban missile crisis: Castro and the USSR; the USA and the Bay of Pigs invasion;
events?                                 the discovery of the missiles; the USA’s attempts to resolve the crisis)
                                        How do ordinary people become caught up in such flashpoints?
                                        (the proximity of Cuba to the USA; the role of the media; impact on society: panic buying and nuclear
                                        fall out shelters; faith in Kennedy and a political solution; a more secure world – Hot Lines and nuclear
                                        test ban treaties)
How can attitudes in society            Why do countries become involved in conflicts?
affect the conduct of conflict?         (the US in southern Asia; Domino theory; containment of communism; supporting ‘free peoples’;
                                        fighting a war in Vietnam: tactics and technology; the USA and the Vietnamese people)
                                        How can a range of factors interact to affect government policy?
                                        (the role of the media; public opinion and increasing moral opposition to the war; draft ‘dodgers’ and
                                        popular protests; the cost of the war and its impact on domestic policies eg the ‘Great Society’; Nixon
                                        and the 1968 election; withdrawal from Vietnam)
                                                                                                                    GCSE HUMANITIES 19

  Main learning outcome 2            Consider the issue of diversity and differences of attitudes, values and beliefs in
          Key issues               society through a study based on the challenge of achieving racial equality in the USA
Why is there a need for racial   How do society’s attitudes and values affect people’s lives?
equality?                        (the condition of life for most black people after 1945: segregation, discrimination in housing,
                                 employment education and politics; the influence of the KKK; the impact of war)
                                 How can people campaign against inequality and injustice?
                                 (the NAACP; the impact of the Montgomery bus boycott; Little Rock and school desegregation; the
                                 first Civil Rights Act, 1957)
How can protest movements        How important are leaders in protest movements?
affect attitudes in society?     (The influence of Martin Luther King: early life; use of non-violent protests e.g. sit-ins, speeches and
                                 marches; King's ability to affect public opinion and the media)
                                 How can protest movements affect government policy and attitudes?
                                 (passing of government legislation such as the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1968; the extent of
                                 change for black people)
How do the attitudes of some     Why are some protest groups more radical than others?
groups influence the nature of   (the Black Power movement: total separation of black and white, a separate black state; the roles of
their protest?                   Malcolm X and Stokely Carmichael)
                                 Do radical protest groups influence the attitudes, values and beliefs of society?
                                 (race riots e.g. Watts, 1965; Detroit, 1967; the 1968 Olympic protest, the Black Panthers and violence;
                                 the white backlash)
   Main learning outcome 3       Consider the opportunities and constraints that have influenced human societies through a
          Key issues               study of political, social and economic influences on people’s lives in the USA after 1945
How do political and             How do favourable economic conditions give opportunities for human societies?
economic conditions help to      (the Consumer Society: increased prosperity and the buying of consumer goods; advertising and hire-
bring about increased             purchase)
prosperity?                      How can government policies help to improve standards of living?
                                 (Kennedy and the New Frontier; Johnson and the Great Society; extent of the improvements)
How do developments in           How did entertainment and leisure develop after 1945?
popular culture contribute to    (the growth of the cinema and the star system; pop music and the young; television)
changes in society?              How can different social groups react to developments in popular culture?
                                 (student protest, youth culture, the older generation, women's liberation, religious groups)
How important are political      How can iconic political events affect the attitudes and values of society?
events in influencing people     (Kennedy’s assassination: the events in Dallas in 1963; investigations such as the Warren
and society?                      Commission; the effects on the American political system and people’s lives; conspiracy theories)
                                 How can political scandal affect the attitudes and values of society?
                                 (Watergate: the initial break-in, the role of Nixon and his advisors; the impact of Watergate on the US
                                  political system and people’s faith in their politicians)
GCSE HUMANITIES 20




UNIT 3:        HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON BELIEFS AND PRACTICES: CHRISTIANITY AND CONTEMPORARY LIFESTYLES

This unit allows the study of contemporary religious issues and provides students with the opportunity to explore how people of faith interact
with the modern world around them. This will permit them to learn about how Christians consider issues of primary importance such as the
environment, race relations and medical ethics. Learners should be made aware of the impact of individual and communal actions on the wider
world. They should be aware of these implications in a spiritual, moral and physical context that will permit them to become better global
citizens. Learners will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are important, real and relevant to the world
in which they live.


   Main learning outcome 1                        Examine ways in which religious, moral, spiritual and cultural factors interact
          Key issues                               through a study of Christian beliefs and practices in contemporary society
What are the main beliefs and           What beliefs underpin the Christian religion?
teachings that underpin Christian       (beliefs about God: the Trinity, birth of Jesus, Holy Week, crucifixion, life after death, miracles)
attitudes?                              Why are holy books important to a religion?
                                        (the Bible: the teachings of Jesus, the role of parables, the importance of the Sermon on the Mount)

What are the main features of           Why are methods of worship important to people?
Christian worship?                      (nature and purpose of prayer, both communal and private; the Eucharist service and its symbolism)
                                        Why are festivals important to people?
                                        (celebration of Easter and Christmas in the modern world; the significance of such festivals to people)

How do Christians express their         How can Christianity influence people’s lifestyles and identity?
beliefs?                                (follow Christ’s example, e.g. love thy neighbour, eye of a needle, attendance at worship)
                                         How are Christian beliefs expressed in contemporary society?
                                         (changing attendance patterns and worship, changing types of worship: sacramental, charismatic, private, public;
                                         impact on the moral and spiritual health of society)
                                                                                                                                    GCSE HUMANITIES 21
   Main learning outcome 2                             Examine attitudes, values and beliefs in society through a study of
          Key issues                                    Christian relationships with others on a range of different levels
How do Christian churches             How can the Christian Church interact with the local community?
interact  with  the  local            (the use of the Church, both buildings and organisation within the community)
community?                            How can the local minister impact on the attitudes and values of the local community?
                                      (the religious and pastoral duties of a minister)
How does Christianity impact on        How does the Church celebrate events in people’s lives?
the day to day lives of individuals   (rites of passage in modern life, including birth, coming of age, marriage and death; the significance of each for
and families?                          individuals and the family)
                                       What are Christian attitudes, values and beliefs about family life in the modern world?
                                       (Jesus' teaching on the family; different types of family life such as nuclear families, cohabiting, one parent families,
                                       care of elderly relatives; moral and practical ways of the Church supporting family life; the importance of family life
                                       to Christians)
How does poverty impact on            What are the Christian attitudes, values and beliefs about poverty?
Christians today both spiritually     (Jesus' attitude to poverty; why poverty was acceptable for so long in the UK; Christian attitudes towards use and
and morally?                          distribution of wealth and resources)
                                      How can Christians response to the problems of poverty?
                                      (examples of actively helping the poor such as fundraising, education, religious and moral support; a case study of
                                      a Christian response to poverty such as Barnado's, Mother Teresa)
   Main learning outcome 3                          Consider people’s rights and responsibilities and their contribution to
          Key issues                              humanity through a study of Christian attitudes to contemporary problems
What are the Christian                 What do Christians believe about racism?
approaches to the issue of             (why are some people prejudiced; Jesus’ teachings on how we should treat others e.g. the Good Samaritan; has
racism in Britain today?               the Church always been against racism?)
                                       What are the Christian responses to racism today?
                                       (how Christians help fight against racism today; the work of a Christian individual or organisation who has fought
                                       against racism e.g. Martin Luther King)
What are the individual        and     What are Christian attitudes concerning exploitation?
communal      implications      of     (creation and humankind’s stewardship of the planet; is exploitation justified, (Genesis 1:26); fair trade; sustainable
exploitation?                          use of resources, e.g. whaling, battery farming; has the Church always been against exploitation?)
                                       What can Christians do to help fight exploitation today?
                                       (the responsibilities of Christians in fighting exploitation; an example of a Christian individual or group helping to
                                       care for the planet or alleviate child labour)
How can the Christian faith            What are Christian attitudes towards contraception and abortion?
reconcile with advancing               (different types of contraception; 'abortion on demand'; different Christian views on this issue)
technology?                            What are Christian attitudes to modern medical advances?
                                       (the Church and medical advances in the past; modern attitudes to organ transplants; genetics; choosing the sex of
                                       a child; stem cell technology)
GCSE HUMANITIES 22

UNIT 3:       HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON BELIEFS AND PRACTICES: CHRISTIANITY AND JUDAISM

This unit allows the study of two contemporary faith systems common to Britain today and provides students with the opportunity to explore how
people of faith interact with each other and the modern world around them. This will permit them to learn about how faith impacts on society in a
number of ways including their relationship with others, the environment and modern technology. Learners should be made aware of the impact
of individual and communal actions on the wider world. They should be aware of these implications in a spiritual, moral and physical context that
will permit them to become better global citizens. Learners will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are
important, real and relevant to the world in which they live.


   Main learning outcome 1                         Develop an awareness of how people of different cultures relate to each
          Key issues                                other through a study of the diversity of certain beliefs and practices
What are the main beliefs and          What beliefs underpin the Christian religion?
teachings      that  underpin          (beliefs about God: the Trinity, birth of Jesus, Holy Week, crucifixion, life after death, miracles)
Christian attitudes?                   Why are holy books important to a religion?
                                       (the Bible: the teachings of Jesus, the role of parables, the importance of the Sermon on the Mount)
What are the main beliefs and          What beliefs underpin the Jewish religion?
teachings that underpin                (there is only one God, Shema; Deuteronomy 6:4-5, Chosen People and God helping His people;
Jewish attitudes?                      Passover story)
                                       Why are holy books important to a religion?
                                       (the Torah: the word of God; Ten Commandments; Golden Rule; Leviticus 19:18; treatment of the Torah)
What are the main similarities         How and where do Christians worship?
and differences between                (the interior and important features of a church, the role of a minister; the importance of a church)
Christian and Jewish                   How and where do Jews worship?
worship?                               (the interior and important features of a synagogue, the role of a rabbi; the importance of a synagogue)
                                                                                                                             GCSE HUMANITIES 23

   Main learning outcome 2                  Examine the opportunities and constraints that influence human societies through
          Key issues                           a study of how people of different religions follow their faith in modern Britain
What are the most important        How are birth and coming of age marked in both religions?
stages in a Christian and a        (the significance of brit milah, bar / bat mitzvah, christening, confirmation, believer's baptism)
Jewish life?                       How are marriage and death marked in both religions?
                                   (the significance of Christian and Jewish wedding ceremonies and funerals)
Why      are       celebrations    How do Christians demonstrate their attitudes, values and beliefs through their celebrations?
important in both the Christian    (celebration and significance of Easter and Christmas; the culture of materialism and pressures this may put
and Jewish religion?               on families at festival times)
                                   How do Jews demonstrate their attitudes, values and beliefs through their celebrations?
                                   (the celebration and significance of Passover and Rosh Hashanah / Yom Kippur; culture of materialism and
                                   pressures this may put on families at festival times; celebrating as a minority faith)
What are the implications of      What are the problems facing Christians in practising their faith in today’s society?
practising faith in modern        (time off work to practice their faith, declining attendance at worship in many areas, increasing secularisation
Britain?                          of society; have these problems always existed?)
                                  What are the problems facing Jews in practising their faith in today’s society?
                                  (time off school/work every Friday for Shabbat; issues surrounding having a Day of Rest on Friday/Saturday,
                                  anti-Semitism, food laws, clothing for ultra-Orthodox.)
                                  It would help if students have a basic grasp of the differences between Orthodox and Reform Judaism.
   Main learning outcome 3                       Appreciate diversity and similarities and differences of attitudes, values
          Key issues                            and beliefs through a comparative study of religions in the modern world
How does religion impact on       What are Christian attitudes, values and beliefs about marriage, divorce and family life?
the day to day lives of           (Ten Commandments, Jesus' teaching on marriage and divorce; different types of family life such as nuclear
individuals and families?         families, cohabiting, one parent families, care of elderly relatives)
                                  What are Jewish attitudes, values and beliefs about marriage, divorce and family life?
                                  (Ten Commandments, Orthodox and Reform perspectives; different types of family life such as nuclear
                                  families and one parent families, care of elderly relatives)
What are the religious and        What are Christian attitudes, values and beliefs about poverty and inequality?
moral standpoints regarding       (Beatitudes (Matthew 5); 'eye of the needle' (Matthew 19:23-24), the example of Jesus and his disciples; The
inequality in society?            Good Samaritan ( Luke 10)
                                  What are Jewish attitudes, values and beliefs about poverty and inequality?
                                  ("Poverty in your midst will be unceasing" (Deuteronomy 15:11); there will be no poor among you"
                                  (Deuteronomy 15:4); concept of shemitah – rescinding of debts every seven years)
How can religious groups          What can Christians do to help fight inequality?
develop practical responses       (pray, campaign for change; donate to organisations and participate in their work e.g. Christian Aid,
to inequality?                    Salvation Army; the effectiveness of such methods)
                                  What can Jews do to help fight inequality?
                                  (pray; campaign for change, the idea of debt relief; donate and participate; tzedakah – charity, World Jewish
                                  Relief; the effectiveness of such methods)
GCSE HUMANITIES 24


UNIT 3:       HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON BELIEFS AND PRACTICES: CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM

This unit allows the study of two contemporary faith systems common to Britain today and provides students with the opportunity to explore
how people of faith interact with each other and the modern world around them. This will permit them to learn about how faith impacts on
society in a number of ways including their relationship with others, the environment and modern technology. Learners should be made aware
of the impact of individual and communal actions on the wider world. They should be aware of these implications in a spiritual, moral and
physical context that will permit them to become better global citizens. Learners will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through
discussion of issues that are important, real and relevant to the world in which they live.


   Main learning outcome 1                        Develop an awareness of how people of different cultures relate to each
          Key issues                               other through a study of the diversity of certain beliefs and practices
What are the main beliefs and        What beliefs underpin the Christian religion?
teachings      that  underpin        (beliefs about God: the Trinity, birth of Jesus, Holy Week, crucifixion, life after death, miracles)
Christian attitudes?                 Why are holy books important to a religion?
                                     (the Bible: the teachings of Jesus, the role of parables, the importance of the Sermon on the Mount)
What are the main beliefs and        What beliefs underpin the Muslim religion?
teachings that underpin              (there is only one God, Shahadah; first pillar, life after death, five pillars)
Muslim attitudes?                    Why are holy books important to a religion?
                                     (the Qu’ran: the word of Allah, the role of Muhammad as the Prophet of Allah; treatment of the Qu’ran)
What are the main similarities       How and where do Christians worship?
and differences between              (the interior and important features of a church, the role of a minister; importance of a church)
Christian and Muslim                 How and where do Muslims worship?
worship?                             (the interior and important features of a mosque, the role of an imam; importance of a mosque)
                                                                                                                      GCSE HUMANITIES 25

   Main learning outcome 2              Examine the opportunities and constraints that influence human societies through
          Key issues                      a study of how people of different religions follow their faith in modern Britain
What are the most important      How are birth and coming of age marked in both religions?
stages in a Christian and a      (the significance of aqiqah, circumcision; christening, confirmation, believer’s baptism)
Muslim life?                     How are marriage and death marked in both religions?
                                 (the significance of Christian and Muslim wedding ceremonies and funerals)
Why      are     celebrations     How do Christians demonstrate their attitudes, values and beliefs through their celebrations?
important in both Christianity   (celebration and significance of Easter and Christmas; culture of materialism and pressures this may put
and Islam?                       on families at festival times)
                                 How do Muslims demonstrate their attitudes, values and beliefs through their celebrations?
                                 (the celebration and significance of Eid ul Fitr and Eid ul Adha; culture of materialism and pressures this
                                 may put on families at festival times, celebrating as a minority faith)
What are the implications of      What are the problems facing Christians in practising their faith in today’s society?
practising faith in modern        (time off work to practice their faith, declining attendance at worship in many areas, increasing
Britain?                          secularisation of society)
                                 What are the problems facing Muslims in practising their faith in today’s society?
                                 (time off school/work for salah; Friday prayers; Islamophobia; food laws; clothing such as the headscarf)
   Main learning outcome 3                     Appreciate diversity and similarities and differences of attitudes, values
          Key issues                          and beliefs through a comparative study of religions in the modern world
How does religion impact on      What are Christian attitudes, values and beliefs about marriage, divorce and family life?
the day to day lives of          (Ten Commandments, Jesus’ teaching on marriage and divorce; different types of family life such as
individuals and families?        nuclear families, cohabitating, one parent families, care of elderly relatives)
                                 What are Muslim attitudes, values and beliefs about marriage, divorce and family life?
                                 (Muslim perspectives on arranged marriage; different types of family life such as nuclear families and one
                                 parent families, care of elderly relatives)
What are the religious and       What are Christian attitudes, values and beliefs about poverty and inequality?
moral standpoints regarding      (Beatitudes (Matthew 5); ‘eye of the needle’ (Matthew 19:23-24); the example of Jesus and his disciples;
inequality in society?           the Good Samaritan, (Luke 10)
                                 What are Muslim attitudes, values and beliefs about poverty and inequality?
                                 (Zakah; third pillar giving 2.5% of wealth to the poor and destitute)
How can religious groups         What can Christians do to help fight inequality?
develop practical responses      (pray; campaign for change; donate to organisations and participate in their work, e.g. Christian Aid,
to inequality?                   Salvation Army; the effectiveness of such methods)
                                 What can Muslims do to help fight inequality?
                                 (pray; campaign for change, donate and participate in the fight against poverty and inequality, Red
                                 Crescent; the effectiveness of such methods)
GCSE HUMANITIES 26


UNIT 3:     HUMAN PERSPECTIVES ON BELIEFS AND PRACTICES: CHRISTIANITY AND HINDUISM

This unit allows the study of two contemporary faith systems common to Britain today and provides students with the opportunity to explore
how people of faith interact with each other and the modern world around them. This will permit them to learn about how faith impacts on
society in a number of ways including their relationship with others, the environment and modern technology. Learners should be made aware
of the impact of individual and communal actions on the wider world. They should be aware of these implications in a spiritual, moral and
physical context that will permit them to become better global citizens. Learners will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through
discussion of issues that are important, real and relevant to the world in which they live.


   Main learning outcome 1                        Develop an awareness of how people of different cultures relate to each
          Key issues                               other through a study of the diversity of certain beliefs and practices
What are the main beliefs and        What beliefs underpin the Christian religion?
teachings      that  underpin        (beliefs about God: the Trinity, birth of Jesus, Holy Week, crucifixion, life after death, miracles)
Christian attitudes?                 Why are holy books important to a religion?
                                     (the Bible: the teachings of Jesus, the role of parables, the importance of the Sermon on the Mount)

What are the main beliefs and        What beliefs underpin the Hindu religion?
teachings that underpin Hindu        (there is one God, Brahman who is worshipped in many different forms; moksha; the belief that the soul
attitudes?                           passes through many successive lives and its next incarnation is always dependent on how the previous
                                     life was lived)
                                     Why are holy books important to a religion?
                                     (the Vedas: the most important texts to Hindus; the words of Brahman as given to scholars)
What are the main similarities       How and where do Christians worship?
and differences between              (the interior and important features of a church, the role of a minister; importance of a church)
Christian and Hindu worship?         How and where do Hindus worship?
                                     (the interior and important features of a mandir (temple), the role of a priest; importance of a temple)
                                                                                                                                          GCSE HUMANITIES 27

   Main learning outcome 2              Examine the opportunities and constraints that influence human societies through
          Key issues                      a study of how people of different religions follow their faith in modern Britain
What are the most important      How are birth and coming of age marked in both religions?
stages in a Christian and a      (the significance of the first haircut, sacred thread ceremony; christening, confirmation, believer’s baptism)
Hindu life?                      How are marriage and death marked in both religions?
                                 (the significance of Christian and Hindu wedding ceremonies and funerals)
Why      are     celebrations     How do Christians demonstrate their attitudes, values and beliefs through their celebrations?
important in both Christianity   (celebration and significance of Easter and Christmas; culture of materialism and pressures this may put
and Hinduism?                    on families at festival times)
                                  How do Christians demonstrate their attitudes, values and beliefs through their celebrations?
                                  (celebration and significance of Diwali and Holi; culture of materialism and pressures this may put on families
                                  at festival times; celebrating as a minority faith)
What are the implications of     What are the problems facing Christians in practising their faith in today’s society?
practising faith in modern       (time off work to practice their faith, declining attendance at worship in many areas, increasing secularisation
Britain?                         of society)
                                 What are the problems facing Hindus in practising their faith in today’s society?
                                 (time off school/work for events surrounding holy days in the mandir; finding time for puja; clothing)
   Main learning outcome 3                    Appreciate diversity and similarities and differences of attitudes, values
          Key issues                         and beliefs through a comparative study of religions in the modern world
How does religion impact on      What are Christian attitudes, values and beliefs about marriage, divorce and family life?
the day to day lives of          (Ten Commandments, Jesus’ teaching on marriage and divorce; different types of family life such as nuclear
individuals and families?        families, cohabiting, one parent families, care of elderly relatives)
                                 What are Hindu attitudes, values and beliefs about marriage, divorce and family life?
                                 (Hindu perspectives on arranged marriage; different types of family life such as nuclear families and one
                                 parent families, care of elderly relatives)
What are the religious and       What are Christian attitudes, values and beliefs about poverty and inequality?
moral standpoints regarding      (Beatitudes (Matthew 5); ‘eye of the needle’ (Matthew 19:23-24); the example of Jesus and his disciples; the
inequality in society?           Good Samaritan, Luke 10)
                                 What are Hindu attitudes, values and beliefs about poverty and inequality?
                                 (the belief in moksha; duty and karma; doing what is right to attain salvation)
How can religious groups         What can Christians do to help fight inequality?
develop practical responses      (pray, campaign for change; donate to organisations and participate in their work e.g.: Christian Aid, Salvation
to inequality?                   Army; the effectiveness of such methods)
                                 What can Hindus do to help fight inequality?
                                 (pray, campaign for change based on Hindu ideas mentioned above, donate and participate in the fight
                                 against poverty and inequality; the effectiveness of such methods)
                                                                                               GCSE HUMANITIES 29


        UNIT 4: CONTEMPORARY THEMES AND ISSUES
Centres must study one option from each of the four units as shown below:


                                                                            Unit 4

                                                                Contemporary themes and
                                                                        issues

                                                                 Tourism, travel and leisure

                                                                 Conflict and co-operation

                                                                 Rights and responsibilities

                                                                 The world of work




The assessment of this unit will be through controlled assessment.
GCSE HUMANITIES 30




UNIT 4:       CONTEMPORARY THEMES AND ISSUES: TOURISM, TRAVEL AND LEISURE

This unit focuses on the development and growth of tourism, travel and leisure and ensures a number of learning outcomes. It considers the
ways that environmental, geographical, economic, social, cultural, political, historical, moral and religious factors have affected the
development of travel and the growth and impact of tourism. In particular it considers how historical, technological and economic changes have
led to changes in the transport industry; the impact of developing tourism in a variety of popular holiday destinations; and considers the
implications of changing leisure patterns on society, culture and religion both in the United Kingdom and around the world. Learners will
develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are important, real and relevant to the world in which they live.


    Main learning outcome 1               Explore ways in which historical, economic, political, environmental and cultural factors
           Key Issue                         interact through a study of the development of transport and its links to tourism
 What were the constraints on          What was travel and tourism like before 1840?
 travel before 1914?                   (methods of transport; tourism for the wealthy – the Grand Tour; the development of spas and seaside
                                       resorts such as Brighton)
                                       How did the industrial revolution affect travel and tourism?
                                       (the benefits of rail travel – speed, access, cost; changes to working practices; the effect on seaside
                                       resorts such as day trips, places like Blackpool, etc.)
 What factors led to changes           What was the impact of the motor car on travel in the UK?
 in travel and tourism between         (the growth of car ownership; road building; the decline of the railways – Beeching.)
 1914 and 1970?                        How did social and political factors impact on holidays during the mid twentieth century?
                                       (the introduction of holiday pay; outdoor holidays such as youth hostelling and camping; the popularity of
                                       holiday camps and caravan)
 What impact has the                   How significant has air travel been for tourism?
 development of mass                   (the development of air travel and its impact on tourism; package tours and foreign travel; the impact of
 tourism had on people and             budget airlines; increasing carbon footprints)
 society since 1970?                   What are the recent environmental and cultural trends in tourism?
                                       (consider the rise of mass tourism, visitor numbers, the economic importance of tourism, global
                                       destinations against stay at home destinations)
                                                                                                                   GCSE HUMANITIES 31

  Main learning outcome 2              Examine issues that affect the nature and quality of human life through a study
         Key Issue                       of the impact of tourism on the physical environment of parts of the world
What challenges and            How can tourism cause problems in the tourism in the UK?
opportunities face tourist     (the development of the UK’s national parks; problems such as honeypot sites, traffic congestion,
destinations in the United     footpath erosion; conflicts between different users)
Kingdom?                       How have tourist patterns caused constraints and opportunities for resorts in the UK?
                               (the decline of the traditional seaside holiday; the development of new forms of entertainment and new
                               attractions; possible impact of fuel rises for British resorts)
What impact does the           How has tourism affected coastal environments in Europe?
development of tourism have    (a case study of a Mediterranean coastal area: reasons for development such as climate and scenery;
on society and the             benefits of tourism; problems caused by over-development.)
                               What has been the impact of tourism on the mountain environments?
environment?                   (a case study of the Alpine environment: the growth of winter sports holidays; benefits and problems
                               such as employment and investment against loss of tradition, environmental degradation.)
How has the growth of          How has tourism developed in LEDCs?
tourism impacted on society    (the attraction of exotic locations such as tropical beaches, safaris, ancient cultures.)
and culture in LEDCs?          How has tourism affected the nature and quality of life in LEDCs?
                               (the benefits and disadvantages of tourism for LEDCs; use of tourism for economic development,
                               environmental problems, sustainable development and eco- tourism; moral implications of impact on
                               indigenous societies)
   Main learning outcome             Consider the opportunities and constraints that influence human societies through
          Key Issue                        a study of the impact of changes in leisure on modern society and culture
What factors have led to       What factors have interacted to influence the growth of leisure in recent years?
changing patterns of leisure   (increased affluence, increased leisure time, paid holidays, early retirement, etc.)
since 1945?                    How have people’s attitudes to religious observance changed in recent years?
                               (the status of religion in the earlier twentieth century; the secularisation of the UK; the decline in church
                               attendance and changing patterns of Sunday activities; different religious perspectives on leisure.)
How can the development of     What is the impact of second home ownership?
leisure and tourism lead to    (cultural and economic advantages and disadvantages caused by second home ownership in a selected
cultural change?               area of the UK e.g. Wales, Lake District, Cornwall; are second homes fair?)
                               Is leisure becoming too Americanised?
                               (the growth of theme parks and their impact on an area e.g. Disneyland Paris, Alton Towers.)
What are the challenges        How should individuals use their leisure time?
facing modern society as a     (current trends and concerns; health issues related to T.V. and computer games, obesity)
result of changing leisure     What are the social issues raised by alcohol in today’s society?
patterns?                      (licensing laws; alcohol & health; the problems of under-age drinking and binge drinking; addressing
                               these issues)
GCSE HUMANITIES 32


UNIT 4:               CONTEMPORARY THEMES AND ISSUES: CONFLICT AND CO-OPERATION

This unit focuses on the theme of conflict and co-operation and ensures a number of learning outcomes. It considers the way that political,
historical, geographical, moral, religious, cultural, economic and social factors have interacted to determine the outbreak of conflicts and the
problems of achieving co-operation and reconciliation. It examines issues that affect aspects of the quality and nature of human life in the world
in which we live now and in the past. It includes an appreciation of diversity and similarities and differences of attitudes, values and beliefs in
society. It considers the development of conflicts and how those conflicts affect and are affected by people and individuals.. It seeks to show
how people can contribute to the resolutions of those conflicts. Learners will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of
issues that are important, real and relevant to the world in which they live.


  Main learning outcome 1                         Consider the ways in which political, economic, social, religious and cultural
         Key issues                                  factors interact through a study of the causes and impact of conflict
Why do conflicts occur?                How do factors interact to cause an outbreak of conflict?
                                       (the importance of a range of general factors, including geographical, territorial, historical, religious,
                                       economic and ideological issues)
                                       Case study: what were the causes of World War II?
                                       (a survey of the general factors which led to the outbreak of war in 1939))

Can the use of war be                   Is there such a thing as a ‘just war’?
justified?                              (St. Thomas Aquinas; examples of justification for the declaration of war and conflict)
                                        Case study: was the United Kingdom justified in going to war with Argentina in 1982?
                                        (UK and Argentinian claims to the Falklands; imperialism; nationalism and self-determination; economic
                                        factors: oil, gas)
Why have some groups been              What are the causes of persecution?
subjected to discrimination            (a case study of a recent example of persecution e.g. Bosnia, Rwanda)
and persecution?                       What challenges were faced in bringing about an end to this persecution?
                                       (sanctions; international involvement; reconciliation; the use of force; leadership and diplomacy)
                                                                                                                       GCSE HUMANITIES 33

   Main learning outcome 2                  Examine similarities and differences of attitudes, values and beliefs in society
          Key issues                            through a study of the factors which influence the nature of conflict
What factors are important in      Why were trenches used during World War One?
determining the nature of a        (the nature of trench warfare, development of the trench system, the battle of the Somme)
conflict?                          Why was the UK able to fight a successful war in the Falklands?
                                   (the navy, submarines and transport; Harriers and missiles; modern battlefield technology; professional
                                   armed forces)
Can the involvement of             How has bombing made an impact?
civilian populations in conflict   (the destruction of German cities during World War II; use of chemical weapons such as napalm and
be justified?                      Agent Orange in the Vietnam war)
                                   Why have people been forced to become refugees?
                                   (the crisis in Europe post-1945; refugee problems in latter day eastern Africa)
How important are tactics and      How important was decision making in deciding the outcome of conflicts?
technology in determining the      (Haig and the battle of the Somme; Truman and the use of the A-bomb)
outcome of conflicts?              What role has public opinion played in the resolution of conflicts?
                                   (patriotism and 'over by Christmas' 1914; the role of public opinion in ending the war in Vietnam)
  Main learning outcome 3                      Develop an awareness of how people relate to each other and the world in
          Key issues                          which we live through a study of attempts at reconciliation and co-existence
What attempts have been             How successful was the League of Nations?
made to bring about peace          (reasons why the League was set up; successes and weaknesses ; failure to achieve lasting peace)
and co-operation after major        Has the United Nations been able to maintain world peace?
conflicts?                          (structure; aims and methods; strengths and weaknesses; peace-keeping role such as Cyprus, Kosovo
                                    etc.; how successful has the UN been?)
How have some groups and           Why do some groups object to the use of force?
societies reacted to the issues    (Conscientious objectors in World War One; the CND movement)
of conflict and co-operation?      Why can’t certain groups of people or races co-exist?
                                   (a case study of the Palestinian / Israeli situation: competing claims and attitudes; attempts at peace;
                                   influence of world powers)
What problems still exist in       Why have groups that use terror tactics emerged?
achieving lasting peace and        (reasons for the emergence of such groups – for example: oppression, nationalism, religion; the
co-operation?                      justification for the word “terrorist”)
                                   What methods have been used by such organisations?
                                   (methods used; plane hijacks, bombing campaigns, suicide bombers, 9/11; ways of dealing with terrorist
                                   methods e.g. increased airport security, counter-terrorism, legislation, intelligence gathering; how serious
                                   is the threat to global society?)
GCSE HUMANITIES 34




UNIT 4:        CONTEMPORARY THEMES AND ISSUES:                        RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This unit focuses on the theme of human rights and responsibilities and ensures a number of learning outcomes. It considers the way that
political, historical, moral, religious, cultural, economic and social factors have interacted to shape aspects of modern society. It examines
issues that affect aspects of the quality and nature of human life, including an appreciation of diversity and similarities and differences of
attitudes, values and beliefs in society. It considers the development of people’s rights and responsibilities and how people can contribute to
society. Learners will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are important, real and relevant to the world
in which they live.


   Main learning outcome 3                           Consider the rights and responsibilities that people have as individuals
          Key issues                                        through a study of UK politics and position in the world
What are the key features of the        How is our political system set up?
political system in the UK?             (Parliament: the houses of Commons and Lords, the Prime Minister and the Cabinet, MPs; the Welsh and Scottish
                                        Assemblies; the role of local councils)
                                        What is the role and function of political parties?
                                        (ideas and manifestos, debates and law-making, government and opposition)
How do people exercise their            How did people fight for the vote in the UK?
democratic rights?                      (focus on the Suffragette movement: their aims and methods, reaction to them by people and government)
                                        How do people vote in elections?
                                        (elections for different bodies; methods of voting: first past the post, proportional representation; the importance of
                                        voting for individuals and for society, why many people don’t vote



How does the UK influence world         What is the UK’s role in Europe?
affairs?                                (the European Parliament and MEPs; the debate over the Euro; issues of immigration; the advantages and
                                        disadvantages of membership of the EU)
                                        How does the UK interact with the wider world?
                                        (global patterns of trade, including the north-south divide; membership & responsibilities within the United nations; a
                                        case study of the UK’s involvement in an issue of global significance)
                                                                                                                             GCSE HUMANITIES 35

   Main learning outcome 2                     Appreciate diversity and similarities and differences of attitudes, values
          Key issues                            and beliefs through a study of participation in a multi-cultural society
What factors lead to the          Why have people migrated into the UK since 1945?
development of a multi-cultural   (economic, political, religious factors; a case study of one wave of immigration, e.g. Caribbean, East African, East
society?                          European)
                                  What influences has the creation of a multi-cultural society had?
                                  (on food, fashion, the arts and sport; a case study of a role model from an ethnic background)
How can society encourage         What challenges does society face in developing religious toleration?
religious tolerance?              (attitudes to religious issues e.g dress, food, employment and religious practice, religious festivals/holidays)
                                  How have multi-faith communities developed?
                                  (the provision of places of worship in specific communities; education and faith schools; multi-faith cooperation)
What attempts have been made      What legislation has been used to tackle issues of racism?
to promote racial tolerance in    (equal opportunities laws, the Commission for Racial Equality; the extent of success of legislation)
society?                          How does society encourage racial integration?
                                  (educational programmes, use of the media, the role of religious groups, growth of multi-cultural festivals and
                                  celebrations, the extent of integration)
   Main learning outcome 3                   Consider the opportunities and constraints that influence human societies
          Key issues                            through a study of the responsibility to care for others in the world
How factors lead to poverty and   How does poverty show itself in human society?
inequality in the UK?             (e.g. health problems, low educational attainment, sporadic employment, lower income, dependency culture,
                                  loneliness and isolation, fragmentation of family life)
                                  What are the main patterns of poverty and inequality in human society?
                                  (e.g. regional variations, urban and rural; absolute or relative poverty)

How can society help people in    How can authorities help those in need?
need?                             (historic government reforms such as education for all and the NHS; modern government initiatives such as equal
                                  opportunities legislation; rising living standards and improving technology; evaluation of effectiveness)
                                  How have charities and religious organisations helped?
                                  (methods used to help those in need: financial, educational, moral; a case study of a particular charity or group that
                                  helps the disadvantaged e.g. Help the Aged, The Salvation Army, Children in Need. This can be in the past or
                                  present)
How can the issue of global       What aid has been provided to LEDCs?
inequality be addressed?          (different types of aid: governmental or non-governmental; a case study of the work of an aid agency working in an
                                  LEDC e.g. Oxfam, UNICEF)
                                  How can people in the UK support those in need?
                                  (can individuals help?; the promotion of long term benefits: financial, religious, moral, economic, educational; fair
                                  trade; the dilemma of helping those in the UK or those abroad or both)
GCSE HUMANITIES 36


UNIT 4:        CONTEMPORARY THEMES AND ISSUES:                      THE CHANGING WORLD OF WORK

This unit focuses on the theme of the changing nature of work and working patterns and practices and ensures a number of learning outcomes.
It considers the ways that economic, historical, geographical, moral, cultural, religious and social factors have interacted to shape the
development of modern working practices. It examines issues that affect aspects of the quality and nature of human life, including an
appreciation of diversity and similarities and differences of attitude, values and beliefs in society. It considers the main developments in the
workplace, factors influencing economic activity and how people have contributed to and been affected by these changes and developments.
Learners will develop enquiry and critical thinking skills through discussion of issues that are important, real and relevant to the world in which
they live.


    Main learning outcome 3                   Consider the opportunities and constraints that influence societies through a study
           Key issues                             of the main changes in working practices in the UK and abroad since 1960
How has technology                      How have working practices changed since 1960?
influenced changes in working           (mass production, the growth of mechanisation and automation; CAD and CAM)
practices since 1960?                   What impact have developments in communications had on the work-place?
                                        (the impact of mass-communication; computerisation and electronic communication; video conferencing;
                                        developments in credit and banking; call centre growth; working from home)
What impact has the                     How has technology provided opportunities in work in recent years?
development of technology               (speed; efficiency; re-skilling; standardisation; quality control; job opportunities)
had in the work-place?                  Has technology improved working practices for all?
                                        (job losses; de-skilling; changes to the working environment – time and place; ‘ageism’)
How have some communities               What areas of the UK have seen major industrial change since 1960?
been affected by industrial             (the decline of traditional industries such as coal, ship building, textiles, iron and steel in areas like
change?                                 Scotland, the North East, South Wales or any selected region of the UK.
                                        How have individuals and communities taken opportunities created by this change?
                                        (the setting up of industrial and technology parks; retail and leisure developments; industrial heritage
                                        sites; examples of community responses to closure and rationalisation)
                                                                                                                      GCSE HUMANITIES 37


   Main learning outcome 2            Examine issues that affect the nature and quality of human life, including an appreciation of
          Key issues                 diversity through a study of the key influences on economic and industrial activity since 1960
What factors determine the       •   What are the differences between primary, secondary and tertiary industries?
nature of industrial activity?       (the main characteristics of extractive, manufacturing and service industries)
                                     How does industrial activity change as economies develop?
                                     (a study of the relative importance of primary, secondary and tertiary industries in MEDCs)
How has legislation affected         How have equal opportunities in the work place developed?
the world of work?                   (the implications for workers and employers of race, gender and disability legislation)
                                     How important is the role of Trade Unions in the modern workplace?
                                     (working conditions, employment protection, education & training; government legislation, declining
                                     membership)
How important is education           How have employment opportunities for men and women changed since 1960?
and training for industry and        (the social implications of employment change – decline of traditional ‘male’ work, rise of the tertiary
the economy?                         sector; flexibility and the need for new skills)
                                     Why have education, training and qualifications become increasingly important?
                                     (changes in the school curriculum, work-related activities, vocational qualifications, key skills)

   Main learning outcome 3                           Develop an awareness of how people of different cultures and
          Key issues                                societies relate to one another by a study of the global economy
What factors influence               What are the challenges for industrial development in LEDCs?
economic development in              (over-reliance on one type of export eg coffee; minerals; fluctuations in world commodity prices; balance
LEDCs?                               of trade problems)
                                     What factors have led to the growth of newly industrialising economies?
                                     (a case study of industrial development in a newly industrialising economy such as China, India, Korea)
How important are multi-             What is meant by the term multi-national company?
national companies in the            (the main features of a multi-national company, such as Microsoft, Coca-Cola, Nike)
global economy?                      What are the benefits and disadvantages of multi-national companies for the economies of
                                     LEDCs?
                                     (investment; education and training; multiplier effect; exploitation; environmental and cultural damage)
How does the UK help                 How does the UK government attempt to promote economic development in LEDCs?
developing economies                 (multilateral, bilateral and unilateral aid; the effectiveness of different types of aid)
globally?                            How do non-governmental aid agencies help in this area?
                                     (a case study of the contribution of an aid agency in promoting economic development in LEDCs)
GCSE HUMANITIES 38




3               ASSESSMENT

      3.1       Scheme of Assessment
      Assessment for GCSE Humanities is un-tiered, i.e. all components/units cater for the
      full range of ability and allow access to grades A*-G for the subject award.


      The scheme of assessment will consist of:

      Unit 1:          Written Examination:        25% (1 x 1 hour examination paper)

      Centres will choose one option from a choice of two:

      People and their Environments
      Patterns and Places

      Candidates will be required to answer one compulsory question in Section A and one
      question, from a choice of two, in Section B

      Unit 2:          Written Examination:        25% (1 x 1 hour examination paper)

      Centres will choose one option from a choice of two:

      A Society in Change: The United Kingdom, 1939-1974
      A Society in Change: The USA, 1945-1975

      Candidates will be required to answer one compulsory question in Section A and one
      question, from a choice of two, in Section B


      Unit 3:          Written Examination:        25% (1 x 1 hour examination paper)

      Centres will choose one option from a choice of four:

      Christianity and contemporary lifestyles
      Christianity and world religions
      (there is an opportunity to focus on either Judaism, Islam or Hinduism)

      Candidates will be required to answer one compulsory question in Section A and one
      question, from a choice of two, in Section B

                The external assessment examination papers will be organised as follows:

                Session 1     Unit 1 Option                       2 hours
                              Unit 2 Option                       (1 hour on each option)

                Session 2     Unit 3 Option                       1 hour
                                                                 GCSE HUMANITIES 39


Unit 4:        Contemporary themes and issues:          25% (internal assessment)

Centres will choose one option from a choice of four:

Tourism, travel and leisure
Conflict and co-operation
Rights and responsibilities
The changing world of work

This unit is assessed through controlled assessment. The controlled
assessment is a compulsory part of GCSE Humanities. It complements the
external examinations by offering a distinct means of assessment. It is important for
a number of reasons:

            it enables candidates to engage in the process of investigation and
            enquiry and reach substantiated conclusions
            it enables candidates to analyse and evaluate information, sources,
            arguments and interpretations in the context of an enquiry
            it enables candidates to produce extended narratives, explanations and
            analyses
            where appropriate, it enables candidates to investigate and understand
            issues that have had an impact on their local community.


In the controlled assessment, candidates are required to complete a planned enquiry
into an issue or issues arising from the content of the chosen option. The task set will
enable candidates to investigate an issue which has contemporary relevance and
debate.

A planned enquiry is one in which the candidate follows a line of enquiry, involving
the collection, scrutiny and interpretation of evidence and reaches a balanced
conclusion.
GCSE HUMANITIES 40




      3.2      Assessment Objectives
      Candidates will be required to demonstrate their ability to:


      AO1      Recall, select, use and communicate their knowledge and understanding of
               concepts, issues and terminology in humanities in an effective manner

      AO2      Apply their knowledge and understanding in a range of familiar and unfamiliar
               contexts

      AO3      Analyse      and    evaluate    information,     sources,     arguments   and
               interpretations

      The weighting of assessment objectives across examination components is as
      follows:


                              AO1             AO2         AO3        Total
      Unit 1                  12%             8%          5%           25%

      Unit 2                  12%             8%          5%           25%

      Unit 3                  12%             8%          5%           25%

      Controlled
                              7%              8%          10%          25%
      Assessment
      Total
      Weighting              43 %             32%         25%          100%


      3.3      Quality of Written Communication

      All the unit assessments have components involving extended writing. Candidates
      will be assessed on the quality of their written communication within the overall
      assessment of that component.

      Mark schemes for these components include the following specific criteria for the
      assessment of written communication:

      •   legibility of text; accuracy of spelling, punctuation and grammar; clarity of
          meaning
      •   selection of a form and style of writing appropriate to purpose and to complexity
          of subject matter
      •   organisation of information clearly and coherently; use of specialist vocabulary
          where appropriate.
                                                                         GCSE HUMANITIES 41




4          AWARDING, REPORTING AND RE-SITTING

    GCSE qualifications are reported on an eight point scale from A* to G, where A* is
    the highest grade. The attainment of students who do not succeed in reaching the
    lowest possible standard to achieve a grade is recorded as U (unclassified) and they
    do not receive a certificate.

    This is a unitised specification which allows for an element of staged assessment.
    Up to two of the externally assessed Units 1, 2 and 3 may be taken as staged
    assessment. These units may be re-taken once only (with the better result counting)
    before aggregation for the subject award. One externally assessed unit must be
    taken at the end of the course, along with the Controlled Assessment, to satisfy the
    requirement for at least 40% terminal assessment.

    Results for a unit have a shelf-life limited only by the shelf-life of the specification. A
    candidate may retake the whole qualification more than once.

    Individual unit results are reported on a uniform mark scale (UMS) with the following
    grade equivalences:



    GRADE                  MAX.     A*      A       B      C       D       E      F      G

    Units 1 - 4            50       45      40      35     30      25      20     15     10

    Qualification          200      180     160     140    120     100     80     60     40
GCSE HUMANITIES 42




5            ADMINISTRATION OF CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT

      ADMINISTRATION OF CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT

      The WJEC GCSE Humanities specification meets all the regulations for controlled
      assessment as laid down by the regulatory authorities.

      THE SCHEME OF ASSESSMENT

      The controlled assessment task is worth 25% of the total marks available for the
      specification.

      The controlled assessment tests all the assessment objectives for GCSE
      Humanities. This is within the weightings as stipulated by the regulatory authorities.

       AO1       Recall, selection and communication of knowledge         14 marks
                 and understanding of concepts, issues and                (7% of total)
                 terminology
       AO2       Application of knowledge and understanding               16 marks
                                                                          (8% of total)

       AO3       Analysis and evaluation of information, sources,         20 marks
                 arguments and interpretations                            (10% of total)


      LEVELS OF CONTROL

      The regulation of controlled assessment in GCSE Humanities is split into three
      stages:

      • task setting
      • task taking
      • task marking

      For each stage, the regulatory authorities have specified a certain level of control to
      ensure authenticity and reliability.

      RATIONALE FOR CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT

      The controlled assessment is a compulsory part of GCSE Humanities. It
      complements the external examinations by offering a distinct means of assessment.
      It is important for a number of reasons:
      • it enables candidates to develop enquiry, critical thinking and decision-making
           skills through investigation of real and relevant issues
      • it enables candidates to engage in the process of investigation and enquiry and
           reach substantiated conclusions
      • it enables candidates to analyse and evaluate information, sources, arguments and
           interpretations in the context of an enquiry
      • it enables candidates to produce extended narratives, explanations and analyses
      • where appropriate, it enables candidates to investigate and understand issues that
           have had an impact on their local community.
                                                                     GCSE HUMANITIES 43




    TASK SETTING

    Overall this aspect has a high level of control.


    Candidates must complete an enquiry into an issue of contemporary relevance
    or significance. This should arise naturally out of the teaching of the chosen option
    for unit 4. The enquiry must enable candidates to explore ways in which varying
    factors have interacted to influence society and to develop enquiry and investigative
    skills.

    The assessment will take the form of an extended response to a series of
    connected tasks. It is worth 25% of the total mark for the examination.


    The completed controlled assessment must take the form of a planned enquiry
    in which the candidate follows a line of enquiry, involving the collection, scrutiny and
    interpretation of evidence and reaches a balanced conclusion

    WJEC will provide one controlled assessment for each option in unit 4. These
    will be published in the GCSE Humanities specification. Each controlled assessment
    will be comparable in terms of structure, learning outcomes, assessment weightings
    and accessibility. Centres are permitted to contextualise the controlled assessments
    to suit their specific circumstances in relation to the availability and access to
    resources. The latter is of particular importance when investigating issues of local
    significance and importance.


    WJEC will issue a new set of tasks for each cohort at the commencement of
    the course each year. This meets the regulators’ requirement that tasks
    should be replaced each year.


    A generic mark scheme is provided for the controlled assessment. This reflects the
    assessment objectives for GCSE Humanities. As centres will sometimes need to
    contextualise the controlled assessment, the generic mark schemes must also be
    contextualised to reflect the structure of the enquiry and any specific examples that
    are used in completing the controlled assessment. This contextualised mark
    scheme must maintain the assessment weightings given in this specification
    and must include task-specific levels of response descriptors.




PLEASE NOTE THAT THE CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT TASKS UNDERTAKEN BY
CANDIDATES MUST BE REPLACED FOR EVERY EXAMINATION CYCLE.
GCSE HUMANITIES 44



          EXAMPLES OF CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT TASKS FOR GCSE HUMANITIES

The controlled assessment tasks arise naturally from the contemporary themes and issues
studied for Unit 4.

Centres must teach the whole option chosen and it will be assessed through the completion
of the controlled assessment task.

The content for these options appears on pages 29 – 37.



Each one of the tasks outlined below addresses the aims and learning outcomes of the
subject criteria for humanities.



Each example ensures a holistic approach to the study of humanities. Each example
ensures that the learning outcomes for GCSE Humanities are addressed clearly and
consistently. Each controlled assessment will ensure that learners:

      •    explore the interactivity of a range of factors
      •    consider how society is influenced by various opportunities and constraints
      •    examine a range of issues that affect the nature and quality of human life
      •    develop enquiry, critical thinking and decision making skills
      •    investigate issues that are important, real and relevant to young people



In addition, each example will require learners to:

      •    study the key features and characteristics of the themes studied
      •    examine issues important to humans from a range of perspectives
      •    study attitudes and values that have influenced human behaviour
      •    study the ways in which a range of factors have interacted to impact on issues that
           are important to people and the world in which we live.



The controlled assessments outlined below are for first examination in 2011 only.

Each one takes a similar format for consistency, giving learners the opportunity to:

      •    recall , select and communicate their knowledge and understanding
      •    apply their knowledge in context
      •    analyse and evaluate source material, arguments and interpretations
                                                                         GCSE HUMANITIES 45




TOURISM, TRAVEL AND LEISURE


Since 1950 many changes have taken place in travel, tourism and leisure.
Describe how people’s changing attitudes and values have influenced their choice of
holiday destinations during this period;
Explain how historical, geographical, technological, political, social and economic factors
have interacted to influence people’s choice of holiday destinations;
Analyse the opportunities and constraints caused by a growth in tourism on the
environment, the community and culture of a holiday destination of your choice;
Evaluate whether enough is being done to limit the negative effects of this growth in
tourism on your chosen area.



CONFLICT AND CO-OPERATION


Since 1960 there have been many outbreaks of conflict in the world.
Using a conflict you have researched, describe the main events of the conflict;
Explain how historical, ethnic, political, geographical, cultural, religious and economic
factors interacted to bring about this conflict;
Analyse how this conflict affected the nature and quality of life for humans affected;
Evaluate whether the attempts to bring this conflict to an end have been effective.



RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES


Poverty and inequality is one of the greatest challenges facing society today.
Describe the patterns of poverty and inequality in an area of your choice (global, national,
regional or local);
Explain how historical, geographical, economic, social, cultural, religious, and ethnic factors
have interacted to cause poverty and inequality;
Analyse the extent of responsibility that humans have to help tackle poverty and inequality
in the area chosen
Evaluate the effectiveness of the attempts that have been made to support those in need.



THE CHANGING WORLD OF WORK


Industries have to adapt to changing economic conditions. Using an example of an
industry of your choice at a regional or local level:
Describe the work and organisation of that industry;
Explain how historical, geographical, economic, social, political, and technological factors
interacted in the setting up of that industry;
Analyse the opportunities provided by the industry for the local community;
Evaluate the success of the industry today in adapting to changing economic conditions
GCSE HUMANITIES 46



TASK TAKING

RESEARCH, DATA COLLECTION AND PREPARATION

Overall this aspect has a limited level of control.

Authenticity control:
The criteria specify that preparation for the controlled assessment has limited supervision.
However, it is envisaged that the majority of preparatory work for the controlled
assessment is done in lesson time under teacher supervision. It is permissible for some
preparatory work to be undertaken outside the lesson situation. This is particularly important
when any individual research or data collection is needed. The teacher must be able to
authenticate this work and there must be acknowledgement and referencing of any sources
gained from individual research outside the classroom situation. Both teacher and
candidates will be required to confirm in writing that the work has been completed unaided.

Feedback control:
In the preparatory stage, the teacher can teach. It is permissible to give the same degree of
assistance as in a normal lesson situation. The chosen topic area needs to be introduced
and specific issues taught and discussed. Guidance will be needed on specific
background to the related title, the nature of the resources available and particular
enquiry techniques. Teachers may wish to comment on preparatory work completed by
candidates and can offer feedback on its suitability, where appropriate. Some candidates
may need more assistance than others. Any support, both oral and written, given to
candidates at this stage should be recorded by teachers. This record should indicate clearly
the exact nature of the advice. The extent of support will need to be considered when
awarding the final levels and marks.

Time control:
It is recommended that the preparation stage, including teaching time, should be a maximum
of 10 weeks. This time span is designed to accommodate the needs of those candidates
who may need extra time due to issues such as learning difficulties or disabilities. (This
complies with the JCQ document Access Arrangements and Special Consideration)

Collaboration control:
The work of individual candidates may be informed by working with others at this stage, but
candidates must produce an individual response ultimately. The teacher needs to be clear
that the work is the candidate’s own.

Resource control:
Candidates should be given access to the same initial resource material. There will be
opportunities to select relevant and appropriate information from the provided material.
Candidates should also be encouraged to research and collect material of their own to
utilise, as part of the controlled assessment. Candidates should create a file / folder of work
and material carried out during this stage which they will use in the analysis and evaluation
stage.
                                                                        GCSE HUMANITIES 47



ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION OF FINDINGS

Overall this aspect has a high level of control.

Authenticity control:
The completion of the controlled assessment must be undertaken under formal
supervision, normally in lesson time. Candidates are permitted to bring with them the
following items:
      • a collection of resources which were gathered independently by the candidate
          during the research stage. This material will have been authenticated by the
          teacher as the candidate’s own
      • any other material such as questionnaires and surveys were constructed and
          utilised independently during the research stage. This material will have been
          authenticated by the teacher as the candidate’s own
      • any relevant class notes and materials which were produced independently by
          candidates during the research stage.          These materials will have been
          authenticated by the teacher as the candidate’s own

Candidates can complete the work in hand-written form or by using ICT, where appropriate.

Feedback control:
During the completion of the controlled assessment, teachers are allowed to communicate
with candidates to clarify issues, but not to offer suggestions or solutions. Teachers can
give help regarding technical issues such as use of ICT equipment or using library systems.

Time control:
The controlled assessment must be normally completed in a maximum of six hours of
formal supervised time. This does not need to be in one block. It can be spread over a
series of sessions. This time span is designed to accommodate the needs of candidates
who may need extra time due to issues such as learning difficulties or disabilities. Research
material and any written work left unfinished after a session must be collected in and given
out at the start of the next session. The evaluation and communication of findings must not
exceed 2000 words. This can be hand-written or word-processed. If the work is word-
processed the spell-checker must be switched off.

Collaboration control:
All candidates must complete the controlled assessment task independently.


Resource control:
During the analysis and evaluation stage, candidates will be allowed to use only the material
collected during the research and preparation stage to complete the controlled assessment.
This is listed in the authenticity control. No other sources of support will be allowed at this
stage.
GCSE HUMANITIES 48



TASK MARKING

Overall this aspect has a medium level of control.

Initial marking
Teachers at the centre mark the controlled assessment using the mark scheme set or
approved by WJEC. Annotation of the work can be written in the text or at the end of the
work or by a combination of both. Annotation needs to be expressed in terms of levels of
response and needs to justify the levels and marks awarded. The annotation needs to be
addressed to the moderator not to the candidate.

The marking criteria for the controlled assessments are based on the assessment objectives
for GCSE Humanities and the general requirement for the assessment of quality of written
communication.

The marking criteria on pages 59-62 should be used to assess the candidates’ work. Marks
awarded must be based exclusively on the assessment criteria. The marking criteria are
presented in Levels of Response. Teachers must read the candidates’ work and assign an
appropriate level and allocate a mark for each of the assessment criterion, adopting the
principle of ‘best fit.’ To select the most appropriate mark within the level, teachers should:
      • award the highest mark available if the piece of work assessed fully meets the
          descriptor
      • award a mark in the mid-range if a piece of work does not fully meet the descriptor
          but exceeds the minimum required
      • award the lowest mark in the level if a piece of work only just meets the descriptor.


Internal moderation

Internal moderation is the process whereby the work of candidates in different teaching
groups within a centre are checked for accuracy and consistency. This has to be done
before the sample is chosen. A teacher responsible for the course should check that the
agreed standards of marking have been consistently applied, and adjust the marks if
necessary. The results of any internal moderation should be clearly shown on the
coursework report forms and details provided with the necessary documentation when the
sample is sent to the WJEC moderator.


Authentication of Controlled Assessments

Candidates are required to sign that the work submitted is their own and teachers/assessors
are required to confirm that the work assessed is solely that of the candidate concerned and
was conducted under the required conditions. It is important to note that all candidates are
required to sign the appropriate declaration and not merely those whose work forms part of
the sample submitted to the moderator. Malpractice discovered prior to the candidate
signing the declaration of authentication need not be reported to WJEC but must be dealt
with in accordance with the centre’s internal procedures.

Before any work towards the Controlled Assessment is undertaken, the attention of
candidates should be drawn to the relevant JCQ Notice to Candidates. This is available on
the JCQ website (www.jcq.org.uk) and included in Instructions for Conducting
Coursework/Portfolios. More detailed guidance on the prevention of plagiarism is given in
Plagiarism in Examinations; Guidance for Teachers/Assessors also available on the JCQ
website.
                                                                     GCSE HUMANITIES 49



External moderation
External moderation is the process whereby the marks awarded by the centre are checked
for accuracy and consistency. This is done by checking a sample of the work from a centre.
This is done by a moderator appointed by the WJEC. The WJEC sends out a general
coursework manual each year which contains information about selecting a sample for
external moderation.

When selecting a sample, centres should ensure that:
  •      candidates from each teaching group should be represented
  •      in bilingual centres, work should be submitted in both Welsh and English.
  •      the sample should contain examples of the work of both sexes, where
         appropriate

Centres should also send to their appointed moderator the following documents:
   •      any relevant administration forms
   •      the title of the task and any support materials (even if they are WJEC exemplars)
   •      copies of the mark schemes used
   •      copies of the source packs
   •      any further information you think the moderator needs to know

The work will have been carried out in class under the supervision of a teacher. It is the
teacher's responsibility to confirm this and to authenticate the work, by signing the
appropriate box on the relevant forms.


Submission of the Controlled Assessment

The following should be submitted to the moderator:

   •      the HUM1 form
   •      copies of the set assignments
   •      any general notes of guidance given to candidates
   •      any general resource material given to candidates
   •      the completed Controlled Assessment for each candidate in the sample, in a
          manilla folder, clearly labelled with the HUM2 form signed by the candidates and
          the teacher

   Material that candidates may have gathered in their research which does not inform the
   controlled assessment should not be submitted.


   Return of Controlled Assessment

   Work will be returned to centres by the moderator when the moderation process is
   complete. A sample of work will be sent to the Chief Moderator and may be retained for
   use at Awarding meetings or at INSET. Centres need to retain this work until the end of
   the November following the summer examination.
GCSE HUMANITIES 50



GENERIC MARKING SCHEME FOR THE CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT

THE SCHEME OF ASSESSMENT

The controlled assessment tests all the assessment objectives for GCSE Humanities, within
the weightings as stipulated by the regulatory authorities.

AO1          Recall, selection and communication of 14 marks
             knowledge and understanding of concepts, (7% of total)
             issues and terminology
AO2          Application of knowledge and understanding 16 marks
                                                        (8% of total)

AO3          Analysis and evaluation of information, 20 marks
             sources, arguments and interpretations  (10% of total)



The generic marking scheme must be contextualised to meet the specific
requirements of the set controlled assessment. The generic descriptors below are
offered only as a guide to centres:



Knowledge       and 8 marks       AO1
understanding of
the task / issue
Level 1             0-3 marks     Gives some brief statements about what the task is
                                  designed to achieve; gives some basic information about
                                  the example chosen for investigation; will show some
                                  relevant knowledge and understanding about the key
                                  concepts, issues and terminology

Level 2              4-6 marks    Gives statements describing the purpose and aims of
                                  the task; gives some sound contextual information about
                                  the example chosen for investigation; can identify key
                                  concepts and issues and use appropriate terminology

Level 3              7-8 marks    Gives clear statements describing the purpose and aims
                                  of the task; gives a full and clear account of the context
                                  surrounding the issue to be investigated / discussed;
                                  show a perceptive understanding of the appropriate
                                  concepts and issues with accurate use of relevant
                                  terminology
                                                                   GCSE HUMANITIES 51




Structure     and 6 marks       AO1
quality of written
communication
Level 1            0-2 marks    Account is brief and undeveloped; little obvious plan or
                                direction; most of the text is legible and spelling,
                                punctuation and grammar are used to make meanings
                                clear; needed frequent teacher support in preparation
                                stage

Level 2             3-4 marks   Account is quite well structured and tries to address the
                                key issues; tends to ramble off the point; text is legible
                                and spelling, punctuation and grammar are sufficiently
                                accurate to make meaning clear; uses some specialist
                                vocabulary; needed some teacher support at preparation
                                stage;

Level 3             5-6 marks   Account is well developed, accurate and focussed;
                                structure is clear; the text is legible and spelling
                                punctuation and grammar are consistently accurate to
                                make meaning clear; uses specialist vocabulary
                                accurately; needed minimal teacher support in
                                preparation stage.




Explaining the      8 marks     AO2
reasons and
importance of the
factors affecting
the issue
Level 1             0-3 marks   Understands some key ideas and concepts; gives
                                simple reasons for the development; gives some basic
                                statements about the importance of the factors; will tend
                                to mainly describe rather than explain

Level 2             4-6 marks   Applies knowledge and understanding of key reasons;
                                can list more detailed reasons for the development;
                                gives an explanation of the importance of the factors
                                which impact on the issue

Level 4             7-8 marks   Gives a full and accurate explanation of the reasons for
                                the development; shows clear understanding of the
                                relative importance of all of the factors affecting the
                                issue
GCSE HUMANITIES 52


Addressing the       8 marks     AO2
main learning
outcomes
Level 1              0-3 marks   Any attempt to link factors will be weak; can show how
                                 society has dealt with its opportunities and constraints;
                                 statements about the impact on human life will be
                                 general

Level 2              4-6 marks   Will attempt to consider links between factors;
                                 discusses how society has dealt with its opportunities
                                 and constraints; can show how nature and quality of life
                                 has changed due to the issue studied

Level 4              7-8 marks   Can clearly demonstrate ways in which factors interact;
                                 shows a clear understanding of how society has dealt
                                 with its opportunities and constraints; clearly shows how
                                 the issue concerned has affected the nature and quality
                                 of human life




Analysis of the 8 marks          AO3
issue       under
investigation
Level 1           0-2 marks      Shows some awareness of the adequacy of the
                                 arguments or interpretations used; gives a simplistic
                                 analysis of the issue under investigation; shows little
                                 awareness of its importance; may describe different
                                 attitudes and beliefs where appropriate

Level 2           3-5 marks      Identifies the main debate and can recognise the main
                                 arguments and interpretations; gives a more reasoned
                                 analysis of the issue under investigation; shows greater
                                 understanding of its importance; will begin to discuss
                                 different attitudes and beliefs where appropriate

Level 3           6-8 marks      Examines the main debate and comments on the
                                 strength and weaknesses of the arguments; gives a
                                 detailed analysis of the issue under consideration;
                                 shows a full understanding of its importance; includes
                                 discussion of different attitudes and beliefs where
                                 appropriate
                                                                 GCSE HUMANITIES 53


Arriving at an 6 marks        AO3
evaluation or a
judgement of the
issue
Level 1          0-2 marks    Identifies simple connections between information to
                              make largely generalised comments; gives a simplistic
                              evaluation or judgement with little supporting evidence

Level 2           3-4 marks   constructs a reasoned argument; gives a reasoned
                              evaluation or judgement with some supporting evidence

Level 3           5-6 marks   Analyses and evaluates the selected sources to arrive at
                              a well-considered and informed evaluation or judgement,
                              well supported with appropriate evidence.




Analysis       of 6 marks     AO3
information,
sources and data
Level 1           0-2 marks   Present       information  with   limited organisation;
                              information, sources and data used are largely for
                              illustration; expect some copying and paraphrasing

Level 2           3-4 marks   Organise and present information in a structured
                              manner; information, sources and data are well
                              selected and analysed for their use, but not consistently

Level 3           5-6 marks   Summarise, organise and present information in an
                              effective and coherent manner; information, sources
                              and data used are appropriate and well chosen;
                              consistently analysed for their use in supporting
                              findings
GCSE HUMANITIES 54




6            GRADE DESCRIPTIONS

      Grade descriptions are provided to give a general indication of the standards of
      achievement likely to have been shown by candidates awarded particular grades.
      The descriptions must be interpreted in relation to the content in the specification;
      they are not designed to define that content.

      The grade awarded will depend in practice upon the extent to which the candidate
      has met the assessment objectives overall. Shortcomings in some aspects of
      candidates’ performance in the assessment may be balanced by better
      performances in others.

      Grade A

      Candidates recall, select and communicate detailed knowledge and thorough
      understanding of a range of features, characteristics and diversities of the societies
      studied. They understand the factors that impact on people and their societies, and
      the attitudes and values that shape human behaviour. They convey a perceptive
      understanding of the concepts and issues important to humanity. They understand
      and use terminology accurately.

      They apply relevant knowledge and understanding of different concepts to familiar
      and unfamiliar contexts. They have a discriminating understanding of the complex
      relationships between individuals, individuals and groups, society and the
      environment, and of the consequences when relationships break down.

      They summarise, organise and present information in an effective and coherent
      manner to identify patterns and trends. They construct effective arguments and make
      informed decisions. They examine issues and debates systematically and comment
      on the strengths and weaknesses of arguments. They analyse and evaluate the
      sources and methods of investigation used to arrive at substantiated conclusions.

      Grade C

      Candidates recall sound knowledge and understanding of the key features,
      characteristics and diversities of the societies studied. They identify and describe the
      factors that have impacted on people and societies, and the attitudes and values that
      shape human behaviour. They identify the concepts and issues important to
      humanity and provide reasons for these. They use terminology appropriately.

      They apply knowledge and understanding of different concepts to familiar and
      unfamiliar contexts. They understand relationships between individuals, individuals
      and groups, society and the environment, and of the consequences when
      relationships break down.

      They organise and present information in a structured manner, and identify obvious
      patterns and/or trends. They construct reasoned arguments. They identify issues and
      debates, and recognise the main strengths or weaknesses in the arguments. Their
      evaluation of sources and/or methods of investigation is generally appropriate.
                                                              GCSE HUMANITIES 55


Grade F

Candidates recall some relevant knowledge and understanding about human
societies, the factors that have impacted on people and societies, and the attitudes
and values that shape human behaviour. They demonstrate some basic
understanding of terminology.

Candidates understand some key ideas and simple concepts from the specification
content. They apply some basic knowledge and understanding in familiar and/or
unfamiliar contexts. They understand simple relationships between individuals,
individuals and groups, society and the environment, and some consequences when
relationships break down.

They present information with limited organisation and identify simple patterns or
trends. They identify simple connections between information to make
generalisations. They show some awareness of the adequacy of the arguments
and/or sources and/or methods of investigation used.
GCSE HUMANITIES 56




7            THE WIDER CURRICULUM

      Key Skills
      Key Skills are integral to the study of GCSE HUMANITIES and may be assessed
      through the course content and the related scheme of assessment as defined in the
      specification. The following key skills can be developed through this specification at
      levels 1 and 2:

          Communication
          Problem Solving
          Information and Communication Technology
          Working with Others
          Improving Own Learning and Performance
          Application of Number

      Mapping of opportunities for the development of these skills against Key Skills
      evidence requirement is provided in 'Exemplification of Key Skills for GCSE
      Humanities', available on WJEC website.

      Opportunities for use of technology
      This specification is designed to provide a range of opportunities for the use of ICT.
      The grid below suggests an example of a possible development opportunity.

          Opportunities for the use of ICT            Development opportunities
       Controlled assessment                  Accessing the internet or a CD–Rom for
       Any area of enquiry for the controlled sources and pictorial evidence for inclusion
       task                                   in the controlled assessment assignment.

       Controlled assessment                   Use a spreadsheet programme to record
       Skills exercise using holiday data      changes in holiday patterns over a given
                                               time period.

       Controlled assessment                   Word       process    the    assignment,
       Presentation of the assignment          incorporating visual material accessed
                                               through the use of a scanner or digital
                                               camera or materials down loaded from the
                                               Web.

       All assessments                      Candidates might be asked to comment on
       How useful is the source as evidence the usefulness of a source obtained from
       to an enquiry?                       the internet.
                                                                  GCSE HUMANITIES 57




Spiritual, Moral, Ethical, Social and Cultural Issues
This GCSE Humanities course is, by its nature, one that requires candidates to
examine the actions and interactions of people in society, and thereby poses issues
about the perspectives, motivation and reactions of people in given situations.
Through the study of societies, candidates will have opportunities to reflect on a
range of spiritual, moral, ethical, social, cultural and environmental issues. The grid
below suggests examples of possible development opportunities.

Issue             Units                      Work that can illustrate discussion of
                                             issues
Spiritual            Christianity and one    Much of this course deals with spiritual
                     major world             issues. The teaching programme will draw
                     religion.               out the numerous opportunities.

Moral / ethical      Human rights and        A class discussion on the benefits and
                     responsibilities        challenges posed by immigration.

Social            Patterns and places        A classroom discussion of the contrasting
                                             social problems facing people in LEDCs
                                             and MEDCs such as the UK.

Cultural          Wales and England,         Oral interviews with older people to find
                  1939-1974                  out their reactions to the arrival of the
                                             evacuees into their communities during
                                             the Second World War.



Citizenship
This specification is designed to make a contribution to the development of
knowledge, skills and understanding of Citizenship. The grid below suggests
examples of possible development opportunities.
     Citizenship programme of study         Class work that supports evidence of
                                            achievement
  Rights and responsibilities
                                            The whole course deals with issues relating
                                            to citizenship The teaching programme will
                                            present a wide range of opportunities to
                                            generate evidence of achievement.

 Christianity and contemporary              An investigation into the provision of
 lifestyles                                 support for the elderly in the local area.
GCSE HUMANITIES 58




         Environmental Issues

Environmental                 People and their        Much of this course deals with
                              Environments            environmental issues. The teaching
                                                      programme will draw out the numerous
                                                      opportunities.



         Health and Safety Consideration
                                   Health and Safety considerations
          At all times, teachers and candidates should consider Health and Safety issues
          arising from work undertaken both within and outside school. When working with
          tools, equipment and materials, in practical activities and in different environments,
          including those that are unfamiliar, candidates should be taught:
                        about hazards, risks and risk control;
                        to recognise hazards, assess consequent risks and take steps to control
                        the risks to themselves and others;
                        to use information to assess the immediate and cumulative risks;
                        to manage their environment to ensure the health and safety of
                        themselves and others;
                        to explain the steps they take to control risks;

          Due regard should also be given to any appropriate LEA Guidance



         The European Dimension
         This GCSE Humanities specification provides opportunities for candidates to develop
         their awareness of European developments. The grid below suggests examples of
         possible development opportunities.


                   European developments              Class work that supports evidence of
                                                                   achievement
          Rights and responsibilities               A study tracing the involvement of the UK in
                                                    the EU

          People and their environments             Oral interviews with farmers on the impact
                                                    of the EU common agricultural policies.




GCSE Humanities Specification (2011)/MLJ
26 January 2010

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:10
posted:9/2/2011
language:English
pages:59