PowerPoint Presentation - Conducting the Interview

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					Writing the Interview
        Story
    By Mr. Tim Schaff
   Roundup High School
                    Basics
   Organize your notes.
   Write your lead (a good AP lead will do).
   Avoid general descriptions. (You owe your
    subject more than that.
     Example of a general description: Melissa
      Green is a lively attractive senior.
    Getting the Portrait on Paper
 Use details that will help your readers “see” the
  subject.
 Example: At 5’ 4” most people wouldn’t think
  Melissa would be much of a threat on the
  basketball floor. After all hoops are for tall
  people. Melissa’s floor speed, and lateral
  quickness leave defenders gasping. Many
  times, the last thing they see is the flying brown
  pony tail and the big number 10 on the back of
  her jersey.
                     Using Quotes
   Let the subject tell the
    story. Use many direct
    quotes when you write an
    interview story.
   Quotes bring the subject
    to life for the reader.
   Try to focus on quotes
    that tell why.
   Then focus on who and
    what.
     Example: Green said, “I love
      blowing by defenders and
      breaking down defenses. It
      gets everybody involved in the
      game.”
             Using Quotes Cont.
   Tell the when and
    where with straight
    writing.
   Remember to keep
    yourself out of the story.
    Third person is best.
     Never: “When asked how it
      felt.” Statements like this
      put the writer in the story.
     Always: She said that being
      a part of the Panther squad
      was “one of the best parts
      of high school.”
Q&A
    Q & A interview articles are
     when the exact questions
     and exact answers are
     written.
      Example: Q.: How does it feel
       to be part of such a good
       team? A: It has to be one of the
       best parts of being in high
       school.
    Q & A articles are the lazy
     way of doing an interview
     article and have become
     almost clichés in high school
     newspapers.
    Work harder . Strive to be
     different!
    Prior Review by the Soure?
   What if a subject wants to read the
    article before you publish it?
     Use to be an unqualified no.
     Today many journalists use a read back.
     One university journalism school in
      Missouri requires read backs.
     It does help in accuracy.
     The Panther Parade uses read back.
                Handling Quotes
   You have to be sure that your quotes are
    accurate.
     Use read back during the interview.
   You must to use quotes in context.
     Report facts. Keep your slant out.
 Don’t use exact quotes if the source curses or
  uses poor grammar. You can clean this up. Use
  good taste.
 Use paraphrase to state facts not direct quotes.
 Use partial quotes to avoid overuse of either direct
  quotes or paraphrases. Partial quotes can aid in
  the story’s flow.
                   Punctuation
 In general remember to punctuate with comma then quote,
  and that end marks generally go inside the quotes. See
  your AP manual for more detailed rules.
 Direct Quote: Green said, “I love blowing by defenders
  and breaking down defenses. It gets everybody involved in
  the game.” (Note the comma preceded the quote mark and
  that the period was inside the closing quote mark.
 Partial Quote: Green said that being a part of the
  Panther squad was “one of the best parts of high school.”
  (Note there was no comma preceding the opening quote
  mark and that the period was inside the closing quote
  mark.
               Punctuation cont.
   Paraphrases or indirect quotes are puntuated with
    no quote marks.
     Example:Green said their next game would start at 8
      p.m., Saturday.
                     Attribution
   Attribution is simply giving the reader the name of
    the source.
     Green said, “I love blowing by defenders and breaking
      down defenses. It gets everybody involved in the
      game.”
       Word To Use for Attribution
   The best word for attribution is simply “said.”
   Other words imply facts or opinions that may not be true.
     Explained (should be used only if the quote was an explanation.
      Many times explanations are lists of facts and should be
      paraphrased rather than quoted.
     Pointed out (This give the readers an impression that what was
      said is a fact. Ask yourself, “Was it a fact or opinion.)
     Noted (This one is just dull and boring).
     Warned (Is there a genuine warning here? Is there a genuine
      threat. Beware of the context of this word).
     Charged (This word has legal potential. Be sure of yourself here).
     Asserted, stated and declared (slightly stronger and more formal
      than said. Do you need to be formal? Formal tends to bore kids.)
           More Words To Use for
                Attribution
   The best word for attribution is simply “said.”
   Other words imply facts or opinions that may not be true.
     Admitted (Implies guilt, a mistake or wrong doing. Be certain one of
      these is the case.)
     Claimed (Implies what is being said might be disputed or is being
      disputed.)
     Quipped (Implies the use of humor or wit. Was the statement
      light?)
     Snapped, wept, laughed (imply non-verbal communications. These
      words are usually weak and should be avoided.)
   USE SAID. It is the best attribution.
         When do you Attribute
 If a story is a simple announcement and of little
  consequence specific attribution may not be
  needed.
 If the story is of great consequence or
  controversial always attribute.

				
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