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REGIONAL COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

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					                       PIONEER TRAILS
                REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION


     REGIONAL COMPREHENSIVE
  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Prepared by the Pioneer Trails Regional Planning Commission staff and the Pioneer Trails
                                   CEDS Committee
                                        July 2007




                  This Report was Prepared Under an Award from the
                           U.S. Department of Commerce
                        Economic Development Administration
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.     ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE                    8
       A.  Overview and CEDS Committee             9
       B.    Data Sources Used in This Document    13
       C.    WCMED Overview                        14

II.    REGIONAL GOALS                              16

       A.   Overview and Process                   16
       B.   Priority Strengths                     16
       C.   Priority Opportunities                 17
       D.   Priority Weaknesses                    17
       E.   Priority Threats                       18
       F.   Regional Goals                         18
       G.   Regional Strategies                    19
       H.   Implementation Plan                    20
       I.   Evaluation                             21

III.   THE PIONEER TRAILS REGION                   22

       A.   Regional Overview                      22
       B.   Transportation                         23
       C.   Economy                                24
       D.   Regional Trade Centers                 25
       E.   Economic and Community Development     25
       F.   Regional Labor Basin                   26
       G.   WCMED Regional Labor Survey            28
       H.   Ecology And Agricultural Development   52

IV.    JOHNSON COUNTY                              54

       A.   County Profile                         54

       B.   Geography, geology, and climate        55
       C.   Form of government                     56



                                                        2
D.   Significant cultural/social issues                      56

E.   Media                                                   56

F.   Demographic information                                 57

G.   Economy, employment, and industry                       58

H.   County Labor Study                                      58

I.   Primary Industries                                      60

J.   Access to employment: in-commuting                      60
K.   Development Trends                                      60

L.   Roadways                                                61

M.   Railways                                                61

N.   Airports                                                61

O.   Public Transportation                                   62

P.   Telecommunications                                      63

Q.   Infrastructure, services and facilities                 64
             Sewer and water                                 64
             Electric/Natural gas                            64
             Solid waste disposal                            64
             Law enforcement                                 64
             Emergency Medical services                      65
             Fire Protection                                 65
             Emergency Services (911)                        65
             Underground infrastructure                      66
             Inventory of commercial/industrial facilities   67
R.   Housing                                                 67
S.   City Profiles                                           69




                                                                  3
V.   LAFAYETTE COUNTY                                             80

     A.   County Profile                                          80

     B.   Geography, geology, and climate                         81
     C.   Form of government                                      82

     D.   Significant cultural/social issues                      82

     E.   Media                                                   82

     F.   Demographic information                                 82

     G.   Economy, employment, and industry                       83

     H.   County Labor Study                                      83

     I.   Primary Industries                                      85

     J.   Access to employment: in-commuting                      86
     K.   Development Trends                                      87

     L.   Roadways                                                87

     M.   Railways                                                87

     N.   Airports                                                87

     O.   Public Transportation                                   87

     P.   Telecommunications                                      88

     Q.   Infrastructure, services and facilities                 88
                  Sewer and water                                 88
                  Electric/Natural gas                            89
                  Solid waste disposal                            89
                  Law enforcement                                 89
                  Emergency Medical services                      89
                  Fire Protection                                 89
                  Emergency Services (911)                        90
                  Underground infrastructure                      90
                  Inventory of commercial/industrial facilities   90


                                                                       4
      R.   Housing                                   91
      S.   City Profiles                             93


VI.   PETTIS COUNTY                                  108

      A.   County Profile                            108

      B.   Geography, geology, and climate           109
      C.   Form of government                        110

      D.   Significant cultural/social issues        110

      E.   Media                                     111

      F.   Demographic information                   112

      G.   Economy, employment, and industry         113

      H.   County Labor Study                        115

      I.   Primary Industries                        116

      J.   Access to employment: in-commuting        116
      K.   Development Trends                        117

      L.   Roadways                                  117

      M.   Railways                                  118

      N.   Airports                                  118

      O.   Public Transportation                     118

      P.   Telecommunications                        118

      Q.   Infrastructure, services and facilities   119
                   Sewer and water                   119
                   Electric/Natural gas              119
                   Solid waste disposal              120
                   Law enforcement                   120
                   Emergency Medical services        120
                   Fire Protection                   120


                                                           5
                    Underground infrastructure                      120
                    Inventory of commercial/industrial facilities   120
       R.   Housing                                                 122
       S.   City Profiles                                           134


VII.   SALINE COUNTY                                                141

       A.   County Profile                                          141

       B.   Geography, geology, and climate                         143
       C.   Form of government                                      143

       D.   Significant cultural/social issues                      144

       E.   Media                                                   144

       F.   Demographic information                                 145

       G.   Economy, employment, and industry                       146

       H.   County Labor Study                                      147

       I.   Primary Industries                                      148

       J.   Access to employment: in-commuting                      149
       K.   Development Trends                                      150

       L.   Roadways                                                150

       M.   Railways                                                151

       N.   Airports                                                151

       O.   Public Transportation                                   151

       P.   Telecommunications                                      151

       Q.   Infrastructure, services and facilities                 152
                    Sewer and water                                 152
                    Electric/Natural gas                            152
                    Solid waste disposal                            153
                    Law enforcement                                 153


                                                                          6
            Emergency Medical services                      153
            Fire Protection                                 153
            Emergency Services (911)                        154
            Underground infrastructure                      154
            Inventory of commercial/industrial facilities   154
R.   Housing                                                156
S.   City Profiles                                          158




                                     o O o




                                                                  7
SECTION ONE: ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

        Pioneer Trails Regional Planning Commission is one of 19 regional planning

organizations chartered by the Governor in the State of Missouri. Originally chartered in

1967 as the Show Me Regional Planning Commission, the organization was renamed in 1995

as Pioneer Trails. In 1996 the RPC became an inactive, but not dissolved RPC District.

        To address the situation numerous local, state and federal organizations including the

US Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration, Missouri

Department of Economic Development, Missouri Office of Administration, Missouri

Association of Councils of Government and all of the local economic development

organizations, immediately began working with the local elected officials to revitalize the

RPC District. In March 2003 the State Office of Administration recognized the district as a

functioning active council of governments. In September 2003, the Show Me Board of

Directors began hiring start-up staff and began operations in September 2003.

        The enthusiastic leadership of the organization adopted a mission/vision statement

that set a positive platform for the future of the region:



 “The Pioneer Trails Regional Planning Commission serves as a cooperative of the local governments of our
      four county region to coordinate and prioritize the community development needs of the region”


        In 2004 the By Laws were amended to define the selection process of the municipal

representatives, but without further defining membership or making any change in the dues

structure. Dues were assessed on a per capita basis to the counties only, which paid for

residents both corporate and unincorporated areas.




                                                                                                     8
        Further development of the Commission structure took place throughout 2005,

culminating in additional amendments to the By Laws. The Board adopted the membership

composition in January 2006 membership is currently defined as all chief elected officials

throughout the four county region. Governance is directed a twelve-county Board of

Directors. Board structure is organized as eight members originally defined, plus specific

appointed members representing dues-paying municipalities within each county.



        With economic development noted as one of six regional priorities, along with

transportation, grant work, data/demographics, local planning and emergency management

programs, it is not surprising that regional development rapidly emerged as a priority. In

November 2004, the Commission established a working Economic Development

Committee, charged with producing a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy

(CEDS).



I.A Overview and CEDS Committee

Pioneer Trails Regional Planning Commission represents Johnson, Lafayette, Pettis, and

Saline Counties in west-central Missouri. As part of a Planning Grant from the U.S.

Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration awarded in April, 2005,

Pioneer Trails began and completed a Regional Comprehensive Economic Development

Strategy (CEDS). The project was completed within 12 months.



This work was undertaken as part of a broader regional project to develop and initiate

regional strategies for the long-term growth and economic stability of the region. Among

the activities undertaken in the creation of the CEDS were public-private partnerships,



                                                                                          9
retention and expansion of the manufacturing base and diversification into specific clusters,

and development of a regional tourism plan. Services provided by Pioneer Trails in the

successful completion of this project have included technical assistance, information and data

services, marketing, planning, and professional services.



Throughout the CEDS process Pioneer Trails involved all local elected officials from the

regions county and municipal governments.




                                                                                        10
        The CEDS Committee and the Governing Board are comprised of the following members:

                            Pioneer Trails Regional Planning Commission
                                  Economic Development District

                                Current Board Membership: July 18, 2007
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I. Government Representatives

Name                          Government                                  Position

Bill Brenner                  Johnson County                              Commissioner
Harland Mieser                Lafayette County                            Commissioner
Rod Lindemann                 Pettis County                               Commissioner
Norvell Brown                 Saline County                               Commissioner
Jeff Hancock                  City of Warrensburg                         City Manager
Dawson Heathman               City of Higginsville                        City Councilmember
Keith Riesberg                City of Sedalia                             City Manager
Roy Hunter                    City of Marshall                            Economic Development Director
Tracy Brantner                Johnson County small cities                 Economic Development Director
Joe Kite                      Lafayette County small cities               City Councilmember
Allan Rohrbach                Pettis County small cities                  Mayor
Lewis Bybee                   Saline County small cities                  City Councilmember

II.   Non-Government Representatives

         A. Private Sector Representatives:

Name                          Company/Enterprise                          Position

Greg Swift                    Swift Trucking                              Owner
Charles Mason                 The Concordian                              Editor
Terry Thompson                B&L Bank                                    President
Steve Flick                   Show Me Energy Corporation                  CEO
Jason Kempton                 Dugan’s Paints                              Store Manager
David Furnell                 Furnell Investments                         CEO

         B. Stakeholder Organization Representatives:

Name                          Company/Enterprise                          Position

Tammy Long                    Warrensburg Area Chamber                    Executive Director
Ken Yowell                    Marshall Chamber                            Executive Director




                                                                                                             11
                                                                      CEDS Strategy Committee Members
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            Pioneer Trails Regional Planning Commission
                                  Economic Development District

                            Current Committee Membership: July 18, 2007

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I. Private Sector Representatives

Name                          Company/Enterprise                          Position

Greg Swift                    Swift Trucking                              Owner
Charles Mason                 The Concordian                              Editor
Terry Thompson                B&L Bank                                    President
Steve Flick                   Show Me Energy Corporation                  CEO
Jason Kempton                 Dugan’s Paints                              Store Manager
David Furnell                 Furnell Investments                         CEO
Harland Mieser                Mouse’s Barbershop                          Owner
Gilbert Walker                Ribs & More Restaurant                      Owner
Danny Merrick                 Merrick Enterprises                         Owner
Joe Fischer                   Fischer’s Concrete                          Owner
Dan Brandt                    CoreSlab, Inc.                              Manager
Craig Hedrick                 US Bank                                     President


II.   Representatives of Other Economic Interests

         Name                 Area of Interest                            Position

Bill Brenner                  Local Government                            Commissioner
Rod Lindemann                 Local Government                            Commissioner
Norvell Brown                 Local Government                            Commissioner
Jeff Hancock                  Local Government                            City Manager
Dawson Heathman               Local Government                            City Councilmember
Keith Riesberg                Local Government                            City Manager
Roy Hunter                    Economic Development                        Economic Development Director
Tracy Brantner                Economic Development                        Economic Development Director
Joe Kite                      Local Government                            City Councilmember
Allan Rohrbach                Local Government                            Mayor
Lewis Bybee                   Local Government                            City Councilmember




                                                                                                             12
       The CEDS Committee did not utilize a formal agenda; however, the Committee was clearly

       informed of the CEDS planning process and purpose. The Committee utilized an informal

       priority process to determine the economic needs of the region and collectively identified the

       priority goals/projects the District should undertake.



       Executive Director, Rick Childers, initially prepared the CEDS document. The final

       document was prepared by Doug Hermes, Interim Director with assistance from partner

       Regional Planning Commissions throughout the state of Missouri.



       Pioneer Trails Regional Planning Commission employs four individuals who are qualified

       and prepared to assist with the implementation of the CEDS. Reporting will be the

       responsibility of the Interim Director and ultimately will be the duties of the Executive

       Director.



       The Commission received input from the general public through the Board of Directors

       open meetings and through the Regional Economic Development Committee which

       representative of a variety of public sectors.




I.B.   Data Sources Used in This Document


        Numerous resources that have been developed during the course of work of Pioneer Trails

have been utilized within this study. These include base demographic data, which is compiled on a

regular basis in our ongoing role as an Affiliate of the Missouri Census Data Center. Specific data



                                                                                                   13
regarding local development activities and priorities have been compiled in conjunction with the

local economic development organizations working within each of the represented Counties. Labor

availability data has been compiled under a research study conducted by the Docking Institute of

Public Affairs, Hays, KS -- a nationally recognized labor research affiliate of Fort Hays State

University. Materials regarding environmental and climatological data have been adapted from

county-based Multi-Jurisdictional Natural Hazard Mitigation planning previously completed by the

Commission under contract from the Missouri State Emergency Management Agency in compliance

with standards set by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.


I.C.     WCMED Overview
         One exceptionally significant result of the process of developing this Strategy has been the

determination by local economic development professionals to form an ongoing working group to

be incorporated as a Missouri Not-For-Profit Corporation with the express intent of furthering the

ability of the region to utilize the benefits of cooperative activities.

         That process produced immediate activity as best summarized in the following press release

which was carried in its entirety or in part by the majority of local media outlets, dated May 17, 2005:



                 WEST CENTRAL MISSOURI ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

                           LAUNCHES $140,000 REGIONAL INITIATIVE

         The Economic Development Committee of Pioneer Trails Regional Planning Commission has launched an
extensive project to assist in the creation of new jobs within the four-county Region. The Committee, containing all of
the Development Professionals in Lafayette, Johnson, Pettis and Saline Counties as well as development experts from
workforce and utility organizations serving the Region, is pleased to announce this multi-phase, multiple year project.
         Phase One, initiated by Pioneer Trails, is the development of a Regional Comprehensive Economic
Development Strategy. Funded in part by the US Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration
and matched dollar for dollar by the RPC, the regional strategy will integrate transportation needs, workforce and



                                                                                                                  14
labor market needs, and planning for growth in the industrial, commercial, retail and tourism segments. This Phase,
which will provide benefits to all aspects of the region, was initiated beginning April 1, 2005, and will be complete by
March 31, 2006.
         The Second Phase consists of updating county-by-county labor market information into a unified format, and
has also begun. This Phase includes local wage and benefit analyses, workforce characteristics logging, and local
strategic planning. In addition, the Workforce Development Board has initiated a Workforce Labor Gap Analysis
which will mesh perfectly with local data being obtained. Current employers will benefit greatly from this information,
which is in progress now and will be complete by mid-summer.
         In Phase Three, a comprehensive labor-basin survey will be completed which will detail both skills and
potential employees avail-able within the area. Designed as County-specific labor basins, the study will be conducted by
the Docking Institute of Public Affairs, a nationally recognized survey and labor analysis organization. This labor
analysis will determine skills availability, recruiting wage parameters, and a complete statistical “snapshot” of the local
workforce. The study, funded by local contributions, will begin in July and has a target completion date of September,
2005.
         Once this element has been completed, the task of putting the data to work begins. In Phase Four, the
marketing phase, the compiled basin data must be delivered to prospective firms in a position to open a facility. The
identification of specific target firms has also begun, using local and State data sources, and the Marketing Sub-
Committee is in the final stages of identifying specific venues to apply the data developed in the first three phases.
Funding for this Phase of the project will be provided by local Economic Development organizations with critical
assistance requested from the US Department of Agriculture Rural Development.
         Combining resources from local communities, Counties, economic development organizations, utilities, and
State and Federal sources, this project incorporates over $140,000 in investments. Any one of the member Counties
might have undertaken a similar project locally, but the cost could have been ad much as $65,000 for each County.
By combining resources and working regionally, the net impact will be enhanced extensively, and the cost to local
communities will have been dramatically reduced.
         As the attached Regional Funding Breakdown demonstrates, local funds totaling $33,900 pooled from local
organizations is being leveraged to draw in an additional $96,000 from Regional and Federal sources, and linked to
an additional $12,000 in State resources. This is, quite simply, the benefit to working regionally.


         With assistance from a planning grant provided by a member utility, West Central Missouri
Economic Development will begin a guided plan development program in April, 2006, utilizing the
services of Smart Solutions, Inc., of Des Moines, IA.


                                                                                                                     15
SECTION TWO: REGIONAL GOALS

II.A.   Overview and Process

        The development of regional goals, along with the establishment and implementation of a working
strategy to realize those goals, is the principal focus of the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy
as envisioned by the US Economic Development Administration. We have succeeded in the development of
both goals and strategies during this process. Not surprisingly, a portion of the strategy developed includes a
recognized need for continued planning and strategy development.
        The process utilized in goal setting was regional in scope, broad-based in representation, and far-
reaching in consequence. Upon establishment of a regional committee, regular meetings were scheduled and
held to ascertain in broad strokes the views of a variety of economic segments regarding past and current
practices, a regional SWOT analysis, areas of potential cooperative effort, and targeted focus areas for
development activities.
        This process was begun in earnest even before funding authorization was approved, to include the
design, funding and implementation of a regional labor availability analysis. A significant portion of the
ongoing work of both the Executive Committee and the CEDS Committee was focused around the
implementation of this analysis, and the delivery of final results. It should be noted that the labor availability
analysis was funded in its entirety by local sources. Staff resources were included in the funds provided by
EDA for this planning process, but all contractual work was accomplished using local funds.
        From the earliest stages of the planning process, it became very apparent that one very important
need was for local development of strategic plans. Each of the four counties, or entities within those
counties, began their own planning process as a result of this realization. While much progress has been
made on the local level, only Pettis County has produced a full written strategy for local activities. In the
other counties, numerous informal strategic decisions have been produced by this plan and local strategic
planning continues. To the greatest extent practicable, this local planning is being integrated into the regional
strategy on an ongoing basis.
        As noted, one key component of the planning process was analysis of Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities and Strengths for the Region. Following is the complete prioritized list, with additional
elements noted.


II.B    Priority Strengths:
        Excellent colleges & universities
        Excellent vocational schools
        Strong agriculture base
        Central location




                                                                                                            16
       Additional Noted Strengths:
       4-lane US 50
       Midwest values & Work Ethic
       Whiteman AF Base
       I-70 service
       US24 Scenic Byway designation
       Strong tourism base
       Strong industrial sector base
       Strong service-sector base
       Strong Workforce Investment Board
       Strong Community Action Agency
       WCMED cooperative efforts
       Local/regional tourism projects
       Malta Bend ethanol production
       Elementary & Secondary schools
       Regional cooperation & focus
       Labor force database

II.C   Priority Opportunities:
       ExUrban Migration
       Agri-business initiatives
       Land/labor costs
       Tourism
       Existing businesses

       Additional Noted Opportunities:
       MO 13 corridor development
       Micropolitan business targeting
       Regional partnerships
       Military/defense spin-offs
       Geriatrics/In-Home care
       I-70 upgrades
       Medical satellites (clinics, etc.)
       Pro-business climate
       Growing multi-cultural workforce
       Housing trust funds
       Elementary/secondary schooling sharing resources
       High speed data
       Focus resources

II.D   Priority Weaknesses:
       Housing
       Support mechanisms for multi-cultural workforce
       Declining life and job skills
       Quality jobs for youth
       Additional Noted Weaknesses:
       Lack of comprehensive regional plan
       Need for regional tech-based training regimen
       Lack of regional GIS/GPS initiative (initiated January 06)
       Highway construction



                                                                    17
        Traffic congestion spreading from metro
        Perceived limitations on workforce
        Limited resources to fund development w/o projects in hand
        Limited resources to attract potential employers – new or expansion
        Access to housing funding
        Limited ―workforce‖ housing
        Highway 13
        Lack of public transportation
        MO 23 flooding
        Limitations on availability of highspeed internet
        Rail
        Health care
        Local solutions within regional problems
        Availability of land & infrastructure
        Absence of barge traffic
        Decreasing populations
        Aging workforce

II.E    Priority Threats:
        Lack of current/updated Comprehensive Plans; municipal & County
        Lack of extended infrastructure/age of existing infrastructure
        Lack of County zoning: Johnson, Pettis & Saline
        Declining life and job skills

        Additional Noted Threats:
        Aging population
        ―CAVE‖ mentality (Citizens Against Virtually Everything)
        Lack of ED funding (all levels; esp. local)
        Lack of local investment
        Lack of educational funding
        Cuts in social services
        Resistance to change
        Whiteman BRAC sensitivity
        Limited ability to control transportation spending


II.F    Regional Goals
        Resulting directly from the development of local strategy and the accumulation of a focused regional
sense of priority, the following goals have been identified for development and implementation:


        1.      Creation of a funded regional cooperative marketing program, to include the specific
                sectors of basic industrial development, targeted bio-agricultural and bio-science industrial
                development, local retail development, and tourism development;
        2.      Creation of detailed information regarding potential development sites, especially as those
                         relate to potentials within the bio-agricultural and bio-sciences sectors; to include
                brownfield cleanup and development.



                                                                                                          18
        3.        Creation of a regional mechanism to incorporate minority involvement into the economic
                  development planning process;
        4.        Creation of a regional mechanism to support and further enhancements to the existing
                  infrastructure system, to include roadways, water, sewer, natural gas, electricity,
                  telecomm/data system, and housing; to include pursuing other funding programs for
replacement of aging infrastructure.
        5.        Continued support for regional Workforce Development efforts to enhance worker training
                  programs, especially those targeted toward youth; and to pursue contracting to operate
Workforce Development programs.
        6.        Continued support for regional efforts to upgrade local planning efforts at the municipal and
                  county levels.


II.G    Regional Strategies
        Goal 1: Secure funding for continued strategic planning to identify specific cooperative ventures
                  such as trade show attendance and equitable lead distribution, design of regional marketing
                           materials for a variety of venues, identification of specific venues for ad placement,
                                    development of an advertising and lead management system. This would
        include     participating in regional tourism and marketing efforts highlighting area wineries and
        hiking and biking trails.
        Goal 2: Secure funding for GPS-based identification and mapping of existing cluster and scattered
                  development sites for use in regional marketing materials, with the initial focus on bio-
                  agricultural and basic industrial sites, second-tier focus on bio-science sites, third focus on
                  retail and commercial development sites, and final focus on under-developed tourism sites.
        Goal 3: Secure funding to design and implement a regional minority-involvement process within the
                  context of economic development decision-making.
        Goal 4: Work with Prairie Rose Resource Conservation & Development, and other existing entities,
                  to enhance funding for basic infrastructure improvements and the development of new
                  infrastructure as required.
        Goal 5: Work with the Workforce Development Board of Western Missouri to continue to identify
                  and fund initiatives to strengthen the access to training, especially for technical skills training,
                  in the regional workforce, with a specific focus on training programs for youth training and
                  education.
        Goal 6: Implement a process to share regional and local economic development planning with City
                  and County governments, and stress the importance of current and updated comprehensive
                  planning at the local level.


                                                                                                              19
II.H      Implementation Plan
          Goal 1: Implementation has begun on this goal. Funding is secured to contract with Smart
Solutions, Inc., a Des Moines, IA, based firm specializing in the attainment of strategic plans for the
economic development community. Irv Jensen, principal with the firm, led the planning efforts which
produced the Pettis County development plan abridged to this report. Planning sessions begin April 19, 2006
at 2:00 pm. A series of five planning meetings is anticipated, with allowance for additional sessions if needed.
          Goal 2: Pioneer Trails GPS staff has begun the implementation of this goal. The results of that
work are included in this report identified as Map 3 on page 28, and including existing employment centers in
the region. The inclusion of industrial and development sites will proceed pending purchase of a portable
GPU device. A meeting is scheduled for May 10, 2006 with the existing regional GPS Users Group to fine-
tune the specifications and determine the funding pool.
          Goal 3: This goal will require significant dedicated staff time to accomplish in a meaningful manner.
Current implementation planning hinges extensively on US Department of Commerce Economic
Development Administration funding for a Local Planning Grant. If funded, a specialist with a background
in the establishment of community action organizations, preferably at the regional level, will be contracted to
undertake this portion of our planning process. If the Local Planning Grant is not funded, this item will
revert to Goal 6 pending the location of sufficient funds to implement. At this time no other fund sources
have been identified for a project such as this.
          Goal 4: Preliminary planning meetings have been held with Scott Paterson, Executive Director of
Prairie Rose Resource Conservation and Development, to discuss specific methodology and potential funding
sources for this goal. Incidental to that meeting, a project to consider mapping of local watersheds has been
initiated with reasonable potential for funding. This project, in addition to assisting in the development of a
framework for further cooperative projects, has the potential of providing funds relevant to the conclusion of
Goal 2.
          Goal 5: Implementation of this goal is an ongoing focus of Pioneer Trails and West Central Missouri
Economic Development. Larry Hightower, Executive Director of the Workforce Development Board of
Western Missouri, has served on the Regional Economic Development Committee since its inception, and
serves as an ex-officio member of the Executive Committee of that Committee.
          Goal 6: Presentations to City and County governments to provide information on local planning,
and to provide assistance in the development of local Comprehensive Plans, has been a charge of Pioneer
Trails staff for close to a year, beginning nearly simultaneously with this project. The City of Warrensburg
has recently contracted for a Comprehensive Plan update, and Johnson County has expressed interest. A
number of additional communities have received planning information, and within the next year all local
governments will have been provided with basic information.



                                                                                                          20
II.I EVALUATION

To determine the successfulness of the Implementation Plan a number of economic indicators will
be considered to measure progress. Factors that will be considered includes:

       Number of new jobs created
       Increase in Federal and State investments in the region
       Increase in private investment
       Increase in city and county revenue and tax base
       Increase in housing development
       Increase in usage of District technical assistance

During evaluation the most current economic development data will be considered in determining if
Implementation is on track or if adjustments need to be made to the Implementation Plan.




                                                                                           21
SECTION THREE:                THE PIONEER TRAILS REGION

III.A. Regional Overview




        Forty minutes west of the flagship school of the University of Missouri system at Columbia,
and only half an hour from the heart of the Kansas City Plaza shopping district, the Pioneer Trails
region is an agrarian and ex-urban delight of 2,894 sq. miles. Home to Central Missouri State
University, Missouri Valley College and State Fair Community College, as well as the nations' only
home for the B-1 Bomber at Whiteman Air Force Base, it is equally home to the nearly 150,000 who
live here.




                                                                                            22
        With rolling hills, woodlands, extremely fertile farm ground, and all of the history of
westward expansion from the Santa Fe Trail to the Civil War, the region provides solace, education
and entertainment on a daily basis to all who pass or linger. Home to the Missouri State Fair as well
as the principal birthplace of Ragtime, our region beckons thousands of tourists each season.
Attractions as diverse as Truman Reservoir just to our south, the Daum Museum of Contemporary
Art and the Lyceum Theater at Arrow Rock (itself a preserved early-1800's journey through time --
the entire city is on the National Register of Historic Places) are a constant counterpoint to the
simple joys of rural life.
        Abundant educational opportunities provide a cornerstone for our strong industrial base,
and enjoy a solid history of support for the development and ongoing training of an extremely
diverse labor force. From the automotive trades to biotechnology, the region pumps a steady
stream of parts and ideas into the world economy. Home to both major corporations and sole-
proprietorship entrepreneurial ventures, the foundation for solid growth is in place in Pioneer Trails.

III.B. Transportation
        Spanning an area roughly sixty miles across and fifty miles from top to bottom, the region is
bounded on the north by the Missouri River and the countless tons of cargo traversing it daily.
Interstate 70 dissects the region from east to west, providing nearly immediate access to one of the
most important highway trade corridors in the world. Paralleling the interstate, US Highway 50
provides a four-lane alternative across the southern half of the region.
        US Highway 65 provides an unbroken transportation route from Canada to the Gulf Coast,
while Missouri Highway 13 offers a bypass to the Kansas City metro for travelers and freight. US
Highway 24, listed as a Scenic Byway by the National Historic Trust, offers an automotive version of
the original Santa Fe Trail experience, as it loosely follows the Missouri River across the region.
        Both the Union Pacific and the Burlington Northern/Santa Fe lines provide rail shipment
into and through the region, along with added lines of the Kansas City Southern Railway.
Numerous private and municipal airports offer ample access to air transportation, while Kansas City
International can be reached in just over half an hour from much of the region.
        With the growth in biotechnology and advanced manufacturing, the ability to quickly move
cargo and information is essential. Coupled with the air and surface transportation services
available, the region also plays host to the primary core line for the World Wide Web.




                                                                                                  23
III.C. Economy
        The region enjoys an exceptionally diverse base, with significant inputs from transportation,
light and heavy manufacturing, warehousing, retail and commercial development, housing and
construction, skilled trades, education and training, health care, tourism, and an ever-growing service
industry to supply the needs of all of these. While this diversity is viewed primarily as strength, in
some instances it complicates the ability of the region to focus effectively on development strategies,
due to the "pull" from so many interests.
        In crafting regional development strategies, one of the key components is the identification
and inclusion of specific local targets. This has resulted in multiple initiatives, all with the common


                                                                                                  24
goal of increasing the net worth of the region, but each with somewhat unique ways to reach that
goal.


III.D. Regional Trade Centers
        The primary trade centers within the region are located in Warrensburg (Johnson County),
Sedalia (Pettis County), and Marshall (Saline County). While Warrensburg enjoys a very respectable
draw from both north and south, in many instances it is overshadowed by the proximity to the
Kansas City metropolitan area -- principally the eastern suburbs of Lee's Summit and Independence.
These two powerful retail areas also impact Lafayette County, which lacks a major retail trade center
of its' own.
        On the eastern side of the region, both Columbia (approximately 50 miles) and Jefferson
City (approximately 50 miles) provide more of a "specialty" retail attraction, with the majority of
daily purchases made in Sedalia and Marshall.


III.E. Economic and Community Development
        Within the region, each County exercises a slightly different approach to development.
Johnson County is served by the Johnson County Economic Development Corporation, serving the
City of Warrensburg, the majority of communities within the County, and all of the unincorporated
areas. In addition, both the City of Warrensburg and the City of Knob Noster have city-specific
development organizations.
        Lafayette County does not have a county-wide development organization, with the City of
Higginsville employing an Economic Development Director and Lexington utilizing the services of
a private non-profit organization. While the role of Lexington Economic Development includes
retail, commercial and industrial development, there is also a strong focus on tourism-related
development. Concordia uses the services of the City Administrator in a development capacity as
needed, and the City of Odessa is working with a local group to establish a private organization.
        In Pettis County, industrial development is undertaken quite successfully by the Economic
Development Corporation of Sedalia/Pettis County. There is no organization or entity that is
currently charged with countywide or local retail development. Tourism is loosely focused primarily
through the work of the Sedalia Downtown Development Corporation.
        The Marshall-Saline Development Corporation, traditionally focused exclusively on
industrial development, has broadened its approach in recent years to include retail and commercial


                                                                                                 25
development on a countywide basis. Tourism is primarily fostered through the Marshall Chamber
of Commerce Tourism Committee.


III.F. Regional Labor Basin
       The Pioneer Trails region, from the perspective of labor utilization, includes Benton,
Caldwell, Carroll, Cass, Chariton, Cooper, Henry, Howard, Johnson, Lafayette, Moniteau, Morgan,
Pettis, Ray, and Saline Counties in Missouri. In addition, portions of Clay and Jackson Counties are
included in this labor region. This accurately represents the area from which existing and potential
employers can expect to be able to successfully draw a workforce.
       The region from this perspective is as follows2:




                                                                                                26
        Within the region thus defined, the following key elements have been identified that relate to
the distribution, skills, and conditional availability of the workforce3:
     The population of the West Central Missouri Region is estimated to be 444,038. About 28% of
     the total population (or 126,278 individuals) are considered to be part of the Available Labor
     Pool (ALP).

     Of the ALP, an estimated 10,364 (8.2%) non-working and 24,706 (19.5%) working individuals
     are looking for new employment, while 15,815 (12.5%) non-working and 75,593 (59.8%)
     working individuals would consider new and/or different employment for the right
     opportunities.

     About 63% of the ALP has at least some college experience and 95% has at least a high school
     diploma. The average age for members of the entire ALP is about 42 years, and 57% of the
     ALP are women.

     Majorities of ALP members report having ―strong work skills‖ when it comes to working in
     groups and interpersonal relations (94%), writing (75%), management and supervision (74%),
     math (69%), and computers (60%).

     Approximately 11,302 members of the ALP are currently employed as general laborers,
     construction workers, or cleaners. An additional 3,053 report having experience or training in
     these fields.

     109,915 members of the ALP (or 87%) indicate that they are ―willing to work outside of their
     primary field of employment for a new or different employment opportunity.‖

     About 42% of the members (or 52,916 individuals) of the ALP will commute up to 45 minutes,
     one way, for an employment opportunity. 84% (or 106,453 individuals) will commute up to 30
     minutes for employment.

     The most important desired benefits are on-the-job/paid training, good health benefits, good
     retirement benefits, and good salary or hourly pay.

     About 76,114 people (60%) are interested in a new job at $16 an hour, 50,887 (40%) are
     available at $12 an hour, and 17,856 (14%) are available at $8 an hour.

     Of the 100,303 members in the subset of employed members of the ALP, 47,822 (48%)
     consider themselves underutilized. About 68% of this subset of the ALP has some college
     experience, and a majority (87%) is willing to change jobs to improve their underutilized status.

     Of the members in the subset of the ALP who do not own their own businesses, 37,947
     (35%) have considered starting their own businesses.




                                                                                                27
III.G. WCMED Regional Labor Survey
        This study produced a comprehensive labor-basin survey which detailed both skills and
potential employees available within the area. Designed as County-specific labor basins, the study
was conducted by the Docking Institute of Public Affairs, a nationally recognized survey and labor
analysis organization. This labor analysis determined skills availability, recruiting wage parameters,
and a complete statistical ―snapshot‖ of the local workforce. The study, funded by local
contributions, began in July, 2005 and was completed in October, 2005. Following is the report of
the Docking Institute for the Regional overall analysis:


The West Central Missouri Region
        The West Central Missouri Region includes portions of 17 counties in the west central area
of Missouri. This map provides an overview of the entire labor region – which is made up of four
labor basins: Johnson, Lafayette, Pettis, and Saline.
        The West Central Missouri Region has a total population of approximately 444,038, and a
Civilian Labor Force (CLF) of 227,279. There is an unemployment rate of 5.62%, and this research
effort suggests that there is an ample supply of available labor for a new employer and/or expanded
employment. The Docking Institute’s unique ALP analysis of this labor region shows that there are
35,015 workers and non-workers (15% of the CLF) who are actively looking for new or different
employment, and another 91,263 (40% of the CLF) who would consider new or different
employment for the right opportunity.


The Civilian Labor Force
        Traditional methods of assessing the dynamics of the labor force have concentrated on what
the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) calls the Civilian Labor Force (CLF). The CLF represents ―the
civilian non-institutional population, 16 years of age and over classified as employed or
unemployed.‖ The BLS defines ―non-institutional civilians‖ as those individuals who are not
inmates in institutions and who are not on active duty in the Armed Forces; and ―unemployed
civilians‖ as civilians available for work and who had ―made specific efforts to find employment‖ in
the previous four weeks. As mentioned previously, the CLF for the West Central Missouri Region is
227,279 workers.
        While a review of CLF statistics represents the starting point for understanding the labor
force in the West Central Missouri region, there are some limitations associated with these statistics.


                                                                                                  28
These limitations occur because the CLF excludes individuals who may be willing and able to be
gainfully employed but have not made specific efforts to find employment in the last four weeks.
These individuals may include full-time students who do not work, homemakers, the unemployed
who are no longer seeking employment, military personnel who may be leaving military employment
in the near future and retired individuals who may be willing to work but have not been looking for
work recently.
          In addition, most new employers draw their workforce from those who are presently
employed, not those who are unemployed. As such, Census-based and BLS data (such as the CLF)
do not address the possibility of workers moving from one industry to another in search of other
employment opportunities.


The Available Labor Pool
          An alternative to the CLF is the ―Available Labor Pool1.‖ The Available Labor Pool is
composed of individuals categorized as either 1) currently not working but looking for employment,
2) currently employed (full- or part-time) and looking for other employment, 3) currently not
working in any manner but willing to consider different employment for the right opportunity, and 4)
currently employed and not looking, but willing to consider different employment for the right
opportunity.
          There are two key differences between the Civilian Labor Force and the Available Labor
Pool. First, the Available Labor Pool methodology expands the pool of potential workers by
including workers excluded from the CLF2. Secondly, the number of potential workers is then
restricted to those workers who indicate they are looking for work or are available for new
employment. The advantage of this methodology is that it allows researchers to examine those
members of the labor pool who have a propensity to consider a job opportunity given their
employment expectations. Even with these restrictions, it should be noted that, in practice, not all
members of the Available Labor Pool would apply for a new job opportunity. However, the


1The Available Labor Pool includes potential workers excluded from the CLF (such as full-time students willing to take a job,
homemakers who have not yet sought employment, military personnel who may be leaving military employment in the near future,
and retired individuals who may be willing and able to be gainfully employed).

2 The number that is added to the Civilian Labor Force is derived by taking from the survey the total number of full-time students,
homemakers, military, retirees, and long-term unemployed, who state that they are seeking or available for employment and are within
a reasonable commute distance to the center of the labor region, and dividing this number by the total number of respondents. This
quotient is then multiplied by the total number of people in the labor region who are 18 to 64 years old.




                                                                                                                            29
Available Labor Pool figure for a labor region reveals to current employers and potential employers
better information about the quantity and quality of the labor pool than do Civilian Labor Force
data and unemployment statistics. The Available Labor Pool for the West Central Missouri Region
includes 126,278 individuals. This represents a substantial number of workers and potential workers
for employers to draw upon in the West Central Missouri Region.

The West Central Missouri Region’s Available Labor Pool
          This section assesses the characteristics of the Available Labor Pool in the West Central
Missouri Region by answering the following questions:

          What proportion of the labor force – employed, unemployed, homemaker, military, student,
          and retired – would seriously consider applying for a new employment opportunity?
          What skills do those who would consider a new employment opportunity have?
          What type of jobs have these workers and potential workers had in the past?
          What types of considerations (pay, benefits, commuting distance) shape their decision-
          making?
          What proportion of those workers among the available labor pool is considered
          ―underutilized―?
          What are some of the characteristics of those underutilized workers?
          What proportion of the ALP has seriously considered starting their own businesses?
          What are some of the characteristics of these potential entrepreneurs?

          The percent of the study area population in the Available Labor Pool is derived from survey
of a telephone survey of 1,149 eligible3 employed and non-employed adults living in the seventeen
counties encompassing the West Central Missouri Region. When all 1,149 respondents are included
in the analysis, the survey findings have a margin of error of +/- 2.89%. The margin of error for
subgroups is higher. Most of these analyses are based on a subgroup of respondents who were
determined to be in the Available Labor Pool (see definition above). For these 573 respondents, the
survey has a margin of error of +/- 4.09%. Please see the Methods section of this report for more
details about the survey methodology used in this study.
          Figure 1 shows that there is an Available Labor Pool in the West Central Missouri Region of
126,278. It is estimated that 10,364 (8.2 % of the ALP) non-employed4 and 24,706 (19.5%)

3A total of 3,061 households were successfully contacted during the survey period, and 1,864 of these households an adult agreed to
do the interview. Retired individuals 65 years of age and older that are not part of the ALP are excluded from this analysis. All other
working and non-working respondents (1,149) regardless of age are included.

4 The terms ―non-employed‖ and ―non-working‖ refer not only to officially unemployed members of the Civilian Labor Force, but
also include any non-employed/non-working full-time students, homemakers, retirees, and disabled individuals.


                                                                                                                               30
employed individuals are currently looking for new or different employment. 15,815 (12.5%) non-
employed individuals and 75,593 (59.8%) employed individuals would consider changing
employment for the right opportunities.




                   Figure 1: Available Labor Pool for West Central Missouri Region


                                                                                                  75,593
                                                                                                  59.8%


          70,000

          60,000

          50,000
 Number




          40,000                                          24,706
                                                          19.5%
                                                                              15,815
          30,000                 10,364                                       12.5%
                                  8.2%
          20,000

          10,000

               0
                         Lo o king,           Lo o king, Em plo yed    Right Opp,      Right Opp, Em plo yed
                       No nem plo yed                                 No nem plo yed
The to tal m ay no t sum precisely due to ro unding.




                                                                                                               31
        Table 1 shows the gender, age, education levels, and Spanish skills of the 126,278-member
Available Labor Pool. 57% are women, and the average age is 42. Almost 95% have at least a high
school diploma, two-thirds (63.2%) have at least some college education, and a quarter (25.1%) have
at least a bachelor’s degree.
               Table 1: Age, Gender, and Education Levels of Available Labor Pool

            Age                                           Age in 2005
            Range                                            18 to 79
            Average                                                42
            Median                                                 42

            Gender                                           Number     Percent
            Female                                            71,991       57.0
            Male                                              54,300       43.0
            Total                                            126,291      100.0
                                                                                    Cumulative
            Highest Level of Education Achieved              Number     Percent          Percent
            Doctoral Degree                                      809        0.6              0.6
            Masters Degree                                    11,368        9.0              9.6
            Bachelors Degree                                  19,537       15.5             25.1
            Associates Degree                                 11,464        9.1             34.2
            Some College (including current students)         36,634       29.0             63.2
            High School Diploma Only                          39,687       31.4             94.6
            Less HS Diploma                                    6,779        5.4            100.0
            Total                                            126,278      100.0

            "Do you speak Spanish?"                          Number     Percent
            "Yes"                                             25,500       20.2
                Speak Very Well                                 1,633       6.4    These percentages
                Speak Fairly Well                               4,163      16.3   represent portions of
                Speak Only a Little                            19,704      77.3       20.2%
                                                                          100.0
    The totals might not sum precisely due to rounding.




        Table 2 shows the various occupational categories of the 126,278 members of the Available
Labor Pool. Traditional blue-collar occupations represent almost 30% of the Available Labor Pool,
including 16,996 (13.5%) general laborers/cleaners/delivery drivers/maintenance workers, 8,240
(6.5%) truckers/factory workers/heavy equipment operators, and 5,205 (4.1%)
technicians/mechanics/welders.



                                                                                                      32
       Traditional service-related and ―pink-‖ and ―white-collar‖ occupations represent about 50%
of the Available Labor Pool, including 23,881 (18.9%) customer service/clerical workers/secretaries,
16,357 (13%) managers and sales operatives, 10,785 (8.5%) social service workers and
paraprofessionals, and 10,779 (8.5%) professionals.



                     Table 2: Major Occupational Categories of Available Labor
                                                                             Number     Percent
                General Labor/Delivery/Maintenance                            16,996       13.5
                Farm/Ranch Labor                                               2,523        2.0
                Trucking/Factory Worker/HEO                                    8,240        6.5
                Technician/Mechanic/Welder                                     5,205        4.1
                Gov't Service/Other BC                                         3,694        2.9
                Customer Service/Clerical/Secretarial                         23,881       18.9
                Social Service/Para-Prof.                                     10,785        8.5
                Management/Sales                                              16,357       13.0
                Executives/Professionals                                      10,779        8.5
                Writer/Researcher/Other WC                                     1,843        1.5
                Hmaker/Student/Unemp                                          17,053       13.5
                Retired/Disabled                                               8,921        7.1
                Total                                                        126,278      100.0
        The total might not sum precisely due to rounding.



       Zip codes of respondents were used to map the Available Labor Pool. Map 2 shows how
each zip code in the region compares to all other zip codes in terms of percent of total available
workers for a job in the West Central Missouri Region. Each zip code is grouped into one of five
categories specified in the legend. The zip codes containing the most available labor in the West
Central Missouri Region are located in Pettis, Johnson, Cass, Henry, Ray, and Clay Counties.
However, there is nearly 3% of the available labor contained in the other counties of the region.




                                                                                                  33
                   Map 3: Percent of Total Available Labor in Region by Zip Code




Current Skills and Experience


       To gain perspective on the types of workers that are available for new and/or different
employment in the West Central Missouri Region, survey respondents were asked questions
addressing work skills and previous work experience.


       Figure 2 shows that 119,095 (or 94%) members of the Available Labor Pool report having
―strong work skills‖ when it comes to working in groups and interpersonal relations. More than



                                                                                             34
70% of the members of the Available Labor Pool members also report having ―strong work skills‖
in writing (94,868) and management and supervision (94,261), while math comes in a close fourth
with 69% (86,861). More than half of the ALP members have strong computer operation skills
(75,746). Less than half (44%) report strong public speaking skills (55,652).


                                         Figure 2: Strong Work Skills

                                         (Non-mutually Exclusive Responses)
                             119,095
                               94%
                                           94,868
                                                         94,261
              110,000                       75%
                                                          74%         86,861
              100,000                                                  69%         75,746
               90,000                                                               60%

               80,000
                                                                                                55,652
  Number




               70,000                                                                            44%
               60,000
               50,000

               40,000
               30,000
               20,000
               10,000
                   0
                           Work in      Writing     Management/     Math       Computer      Public
                           Groups/                  Supervisory                             Speaking
                        Interpersonal




           Table 3 and Figure 3 show the results of analysis performed on data collected regarding the
current employment status and previous work or training experience of ALP members. Table 3
shows the number workers currently employed in various job categories, as well as the number of
workers that have previous work or training experience. The table also shows the sum of working
ALP members currently employed in a job category plus those that indicate previous training or
experience in that particular field.
           It is estimated, for example, that 13,869 members of the ALP in the West Central Missouri
Labor Region are currently employed (i.e., excluding those currently not working) as clerical workers,
secretaries, book-keeper, bank tellers, or similar positions. An additional 8,331 ALP members




                                                                                                         35
(excluding non-working members) in the region indicate previous employment experience or training
in one of those jobs, for a total of 22,201 individuals.


          Table 3: Current Work Experience plus Previous Work or Training Experience
                                                                             Current            Previous         Current plus Previous
                                                                          Employment*        Work/Training*        Work or Training**
                                                                            Number              Number                   Number
  General Labor/Construction/Cleaning                                        11,302               3,053                   14,355
  Farm Labor/Ranch Hand/Landscaping                                           2,523               2,403                    4,925
  Delivery/Driver/Courier                                                     1,531               1,199                    2,730
  Maintenance/W iring/Plumbing                                                4,162               3,535                    7,698
  Factory W orker/Grain Elevator/Meat Packer                                  3,597               4,581                    8,178
  Truck Driver/Heavy Equipment Operator                                       4,643               2,408                    7,051
  Police/Fire/Postal/Military Enlisted                                        3,694               3,408                    7,102
  Lab or Medical Tech/Comp Tech/Programmer                                    2,452               3,631                    6,083
  Mechanic/W elder/Carpenter/Electrician                                      2,753                 866                    3,619
  Other Blue Collar                                                               0                   0                        0
  General Customer Service/Retail/Reception/W aitress                        10,012              14,041                   24,053
  Clerical/Secretary/Book-Keeper/Bank Teller                                 13,869               8,331                   22,201
  Para-legal/Para-pro/CNA/Care Assistance                                     3,547               6,617                   10,164
  Nurse/LPN/RN/Semi-skilled Social Service                                    7,238               3,303                   10,541
  Office Manager/Small Business Owner                                        10,956              19,582                   30,538
  W riter/Instructor/Researcher                                               1,843               2,720                    4,564
  Sales/Marketing/Accounting                                                  5,402               8,885                   14,286
  Govt., Non-Profit, or Bus Exec/Farm Owner/Military Officer                    895               1,237                    2,132
  Teacher/Counselor/Social W orker/Physician's Assistant                      8,177               4,392                   12,570
  Professor/Doctor/Scientist/Engineer/Attorney                                1,707                 750                    2,457
  Other W hite Collar                                                             0                   0                        0
  Total                                                                     100,303

  * Retired, disabled, non-working students, homemakers are not included.
  ** Individual employed members of the ALP may fall within two job categories if their current employment differs from
  their previous work or training. However, ALP members indicating previous experience/training in their current field
  of employment are not accounted for twice within the same job category.

 The total might not sum precisely due to rounding.




           Figure 3 shows the same information as that presented in Table 3, but in graphic format.
Figure 3 shows that a majority of ALP members report current work experience or previous
work/training in office management/supervisory roles or as small business owners. There are
10,956 working ALP members currently employed in this category and 19,582 previously
employed/trained in this category, for a total of 30,538.




                                                                                                                                   36
         Figure 3: Current Work Experience plus Previous Work or Training Experience


           Office Manager/Small Business Owner                                      10,956                                                                  19,582


                       General Customer
                                                                                  10,012                                                   14,041
               Service/Retail/Reception/Waitress


      Clerical/Secretary/Book-Keeper/Bank Teller                                            13,869                                              8,331



             General Labor/Construction/Cleaning                                     11,302                             3,053



                     Sales/Marketing/Accounting                     5,402                                8,885


    Teacher/Counselor/Social Worker/Physician's
                                                                            8,177                            4,392
                    Assistant


       Nurse/LPN/RN/Semi-skilled Social Service                           7,238                      3,303



        Para-legal/Para-pro/CNA/Care Assistance              3,547                           6,617



      Factory Worker/Grain Elevator/Meat Packer              3,597                    4,581



                   Maintenance/Wiring/Plumbing                4,162                   3,535



               Police/Fire/Postal/Military Enlisted          3,694                  3,408



          Truck Driver/Heavy Equipment Operator                   4,643               2,408



    Lab or Medical Tech/Comp Tech/Programmer               2,452             3,631



            Farm Labor/Ranch Hand/Landscaping              2,523          2,403



                     Writer/Instructor/Researcher         1,843       2,720



          Mechanic/Welder/Carpenter/Electrician             2,753     866



                            Delivery/Driver/Courier 1,531 1,199



     Professor/Doctor/Scientist/Engineer/Attorney         1,707 750                                                                                                        Current Employment

                                                                                                                                                                           Previous Work / Training
             Govt., Non-Profit, or Bus Exec/Farm
                                                 895 1,237
                     Owner/Military Officer

                                                      0       2,000         4,000      6,000     8,000   10,000      12,000   14,000   16,000   18,000   20,000   22,000   24,000   26,000   28,000   30,000   32,000




                           In addition to collecting data regarding the current employment status and previous
work or training experience through a series of ―open-ended‖ survey questions (the results of which
are shown in the previous table and figure), respondents were asked about the five specific
employment areas listed in Figure 4. Respondents were first asked if they had training or work
experience in a specific field and then if they would take a job in that field regardless of their prior
training or experience.
          The figure indicates that 65,586 (52%) ALP members report having training and/or
experience in data entry with telephone operation, while 51,731 (41%) would consider employment
in that field. Between about 43% and 42% of the Available Labor Pool members also have training


                                                                                                                                                                                                               37
and/or experience in warehousing/distribution work (51,731 or 43%), manufacturing (53,580 or
42%), and laboratory5 work (52,552 or 42%). About one-third has training or experience in work
relating to information technology6 (40,268 or 32%).
             The most popular employment option of those listed is laboratory work, with 88,491 (70%)
of the members of the ALP reporting that they would be interested in a job in that field.
Information technology was the second most popular employment field with 71,258 (56%)
interested. A nearly identical number of ALP members report having training or experience in
manufacturing work and are willing to work in that field (53,580 and 53,168, respectively).


Figure 4: Work Experience / Willing to Work in Field

                                                   (Non-mutually Exclusive Responses)
                                                                                                  88,491
                                                                                                   70%
             90,000
                                                                                                                   71,258
             80,000      65,586                                                                                     56%
                                                     64,005
                          52%
                                                      51%
             70,000                         54,167
                                             43%                 53,580    53,168
                                  51,731                                              52,552
                                                                  42%       42%
             60,000                41%                                                 42%
    Number




                                                                                                         40,268
             50,000                                                                                       32%

             40,000

             30,000

             20,000
                                                                                                       Have Work Experience
             10,000                                                                                    Willing to Work in Field

                  0
                        Data Entry         Warehousing         Manufacturing        Laboratory Work        Information
                         w /Phone             Work                Work                                     Technology




5Specifically, respondents were asked ―Have you worked or trained in any of these areas: medical technology or lab work, agriculture
or plant research, food safety, animal health, or other life-related work?‖

6Specifically, respondents were asked ―How about in the field of information technology - such as, working with computers and the
Internet, designing Web sites, using databases, and working in a computer lab?


                                                                                                                             38
        An additional indicator of the skills and talents held by a pool of current and potential
workers is college experience. Figure 5 show the results of a question asked of current college
students and of those respondents that have completed college (including graduate students and
those with advanced degrees). Answer options included:

    A. Social Science
               Sociology, Psychology, Anthropology, Politics, History, and Social Work.
    B. Biological Sciences and Health
               Biology, Agriculture, Nursing, Pre-med, Pre-vet, and Human Performance.
    C. Physical Sciences and Engineering
               Physics, Geology, Chemistry, and Engineering.
    D. Business
               Management, Accounting, finance, Marketing, and Economics.
    E. Education and Art
               Teaching, Art, Music, and Languages.
    F. Computer Science and Math
               Computer Programming or Technology, Networking, Web design, and Math.

        The figure shows that most ALP members indicate a college major in education or art
(12,047 or 35%), while the social sciences account for the next largest number of students/former
students (6,735 or 19%). 5,798 (17%) ALP members report studying business, while 5,555 (16%)
have studied in the biological sciences.

                               Figure 5: Undergraduate College Major


                                                      Physical Sciences:
                                  Computer Sci. and         1,701
                                       Math:                 5%                   Other:
                                       1,215                                      1,701
                                        3%                                         5%



                       Education and Art:                                           Biological
                            12,047                                                  Sciences:
                              35%                                                     5,555
                                                                                      16%




                                                                      Business:
                              Social Sciences:                          5,798
                                   6,735                                17%
                                    19%




                                                                                                    39
Considerations for Employment


        An important consideration for many employers looking to locate or expand operations is
whether workers are willing to pursue new employment opportunities. Some workers may be
available for new employment but are unwilling to switch from their current job to a different type
of position. If there is a large percentage of those unwilling to change their jobs, it limits the type of
employers who can enter the labor region. This does not seem to be the case in the West Central
Missouri Region, however. Figure 4 indicates that 109,915 (87%) members of the Available Labor
Pool are willing to accept positions outside of their primary fields of employment (for example,
switching from low-skill blue collar employment to low-skill service sector employment).




                       Figure 6: Willing to Work Outside of Primary Field




                                                                      Yes:
                               No:                                   109,915
                              16,363                                  87%
                               13%




        Table 4 and Figure 7 suggest that the Available Labor Pool in the West Central Missouri
Region is open to commuting. Slightly more than 41% of the members (or 52,916 individuals) of
the Available Labor Pool will commute up to 45 minutes, one way, for an employment opportunity.
More than four-fifths (about 84.3% or 106,453 individuals) will commute up to 30 minutes for
employment, and nearly all (96.1% or 121,384 individuals) will travel up to 15 minutes for
employment.




                                                                                                    40
                             Table 4: Time Available Labor Will Commute
                                                                                 Cumulative
                                                                  Number           Percent
                             More than 60 Minutes                   3,775               3.0
                             Up to 60 Minutes                      30,932             24.5
                             Up to 55 Minutes                      31,205             24.7
                             Up to 50 Minutes                      31,968             25.3
                             Up to 45 Minutes                      52,916             41.9
                             Up to 40 Minutes                      57,960             45.9
                             Up to 35 Minutes                      60,409             47.8
                             Up to 30 Minutes                     106,453             84.3
                             Up to 25 Minutes                     107,392             85.0
                             Up to 20 Minutes                     116,662             92.4
                             Up to 15 Minutes                     121,384             96.1
                             Up to 10 Minutes                     123,754             98.0
                             Up to 5 Minutes                      126,278            100.0

                       The total might not sum precisely due to rounding.




                             Figure 7: Available Labor by Commute Minutes


         130,000
         120,000
         110,000
         100,000          15 Minutes
          90,000        121,384 (96%)                                    45 Minutes
          80,000                                                        52,916 (42%)
Number




          70,000                       30 Minutes                                        60 Minutes
          60,000                     106,453 (84%)                                      30,932 (25%)
          50,000
          40,000
          30,000
          20,000
          10,000
              0
                   5    10      15      20      25      30      35          40   45    50     55   60   65
                                                             Minutes



                                                                                                         41
       Figure 8 shows various benefits affecting the decisions of current workers to take a different
job and potential workers to take a new job. The four most important benefits are on-the-job
training, good health benefits, good retirement benefits, and good salary/hourly wage (all receiving
more than 80% support from survey respondents).

                    Figure 8: Benefits Very Important to Change Employment

                                              (Non-mutually Exclusive Responses)

              OJT/Paid Training                                                                      111,125


           Good Health Benefits                                                                      110,241


       Good Retirement Benefits                                                                      109,483


        Good Salary/Hourly Pay                                                                    103,422

        Good Vacation Benefits                                                                99,633


        Flexible Hours/Flex Time                                                         88,016


       Good Education Benefits                                                     81,828

                                   0%   10%    20%    30%    40%    50%     60%    70%      80%    90%      100%

                                                            Percent "Yes"




       It is not surprising that many respondents (103,422 or 82%) indicate that a good salary is an
important benefit. It is interesting to note, however, that good health benefits, training, and good
retirement benefits received more support than salary. These figures suggest that employers might
consider offering these benefits (or offering improved existing benefits) to attract new employees.
      Figure 9 shows desired wages for members of the Available Labor Pool. It is estimated that
100,267 people (or 79% of the available labor) are interested in a new job at $24 an hour (or $49,920
per year). Approximately 94,679 (or 75%) members of the labor pool are interested in new
employment opportunity at $20 an hour ($41,600 per year), while 76,114 (60%) are interested at $16
an hour ($33,280 per year). Additionally, 50,887 people (40%) are interested in a new job at $12 an
hour ($24,960 yearly) and 17,856 (14%) at $8 an hour ($16,640 per year).




                                                                                                                   42
Figure 9: Available Labor by Hourly Wage


            120,000

            110,000
            100,000
             90,000                        $12 an hour
                                          50,887 (40%)
             80,000                                                                                   $24 an hour
                                                                                                     100,267 (79%)
             70,000
   Number




                                                                                 $20 an hour
             60,000         $8 an hour                                          94,679 (75%)
                           17,856 (14%)
             50,000                                              $16 an hour
                                                                76,114 (60%)
             40,000
             30,000
             20,000
             10,000
                 0
                      $6        $8        $10    $12     $14   $16     $18     $20    $22      $24     $26     $28        $30



             Figure 9 suggests the obvious: that the higher the wage, the larger the pool of available labor.
For example, 24,159 members of the ALP are available for a new or different job at $9.50 an hour
(or $19,380 a year). At $10.00 an hour (or $20,400 a year), however, the size of the available labor
jumps to 36,330 members. This represents an increase of 12,171 individuals.

             The graph also highlights various ―wage preference plateaus‖ that may be of interest to
current and potential employers. A wage preference plateau is a situation in which an increase in
wage results in an insignificant or small increase in available labor. For example, 4,123 members of
available labor are interested in a job at $6.00 an hour ($12,240 annually). At $6.50 an hour ($13,260
annually) there are 4,576 individuals available. So, while there is certainly an increase in the number
of available workers at this higher wage rate, the increase is estimated to be only 454 individuals.
Similarly, there are 58,347 individuals available at $13 ($26,520 annually) an hour but only 938 more
are available at $13.50 an hour ($27,540 annually). An additional wage plateau can be seen between
$15 and $15.50 (an increase of only about 296 individuals).
Underutilization Among Available Labor Pool Workers

             Underutilization — individuals possessing skills and/or training that exceeds the
responsibilities of their current job — is a significant issue in many communities. To assess
underutilization in the West Central Missouri Region, employed members of the ALP were
presented with a scenario describing underutilization. They were then asked a series of questions
assessing if they perceived themselves as underutilized because: 1) their skill level is greater than their



                                                                                                                     43
current job requires, 2) they possess higher levels of education than is required on the job, 3) they
earned a higher income at a similar job previously, or 4) they were limited in the number of hours
that they could work (i.e., working part-time but desiring full-time work).
        Of the 100,303 employed members of the ALP (shown in Figure 10), about half answered
―yes‖ to one or more of the questions presented above and are considered underutilized. Figure 11
shows that the underutilized workers represent 48% (or 47,822 individuals) of the employed
members of the ALP.


                   Figure 10: Employed Members of the Available Labor Pool




                             Non-                                   Employed:
                           Employed:                                 100,303
                            25,975                                    79%
                             21%




                                 Figure 11: Underutilized Workers




                                                                     Yes:
                               No:                                  47,822
                             52,482                                  48%
                              52%




                                                                                                  44
        Figure 12 shows the percentages of the positive responses (i.e., ―yes‖ answers) to the various
measures of underutilization. About 45% (or 21,549 members) of this subset of the ALP consider
themselves as possessing education levels exceeding those needed for their current jobs, while about
27% (12,984) consider themselves underutilized because they had a previous job that provided more
income. About 26% (12,508) have skills that are not being used on the job, and about 21% (9,751)
suggest they are not able to work enough hours.


                                       Figure 12: Reasons for Underutilization

                                                 (Non-mutually Exclusive Responses)


        Underutilized for Education                                                                        21,549


          Underutilized for Income                                                    12,984


            Underutilized for Skills                                                  12,508


           Underutilized for Hours                                         9,751

                                       0%               10%          20%              30%        40%           50%
                                                                    Percent "Yes"



        Table 5 and Figure 13 (next page) show some characteristics of the underutilized members
of the Available Labor Pool. Table 5 indicates that the education level of the underutilized workers
is high, with about 68% having at least some college education and almost 38% having completed
associate’s degrees.

              Table 5: Highest Level of Education Achieved Among Underutilized

                                                                                                 Cumulative
                                                                           Number      Percent     Percent
                  Doctoral Degree                                              452         0.9           0.9
                  Masters Degree                                                35         8.1           9.0
                  Bachelors Degree                                           8,990        18.8          27.8
                  Associates Degree                                          4,654         9.7          37.5
                  Some College                                              14,625        30.6          68.1
                  High School Diploma Only                                  13,379        28.0          96.1
                  Less HS Diploma                                            1,869         3.9         100.0
                  Total                                                     47,822        100

          The total might not sum precisely due to rounding.




                                                                                                                     45
        Figure 13 shows that 38% (18,225 individuals) of the underutilized workers are employed as
general labor and skilled blue-collar workers, and 62% (29,597) are in customer service-related
occupations and professional positions.




                   Figure 13: Occupational Groups of Underutilized Workers
                                                                 Customer
                            Skilled Labor:                       Service /
                                 5,965                           Support:
                                  12%                             22,118
                                                                   46%




                             General
                             Labor:                                Sales /
                             12,260                             Professional:
                              26%                                   7,479
                                                                     16%




        Respondents indicating that they were underutilized were also asked a follow-up question
addressing the willingness to change jobs in order for them to better utilize their skills and/or
education. Figure 14 suggests that a substantial portion –- 87% (or 41,755 individuals) –- of the
underutilized workers are willing to change jobs to address underutilization.



               Figure 14: Willing to Change Job to Better Use Skills/Education




                              No:
                                                                    Yes:
                             6,067
                                                                   41,755
                             13%
                                                                    87%




                                                                                                    46
Entrepreneurship Among Available Labor Pool Members


       The desire for self-employment may be another indicator of the types of workers available in
the labor region. Figure 15 shows that of the 126,278 members of the Available Labor Pool, 14%
(or 17,890 individuals) own their own businesses.




              Figure 15: Business-Owning Members of the Available Labor Pool



                                                                Yes, Ow n
                            No, Don't
                                                                Business:
                              Ow n
                                                                 17,890
                            Business:
                                                                  14%
                             108,388
                              86%




       The non-business-owning members of the ALP (estimated to be 91,300 or 83% of the
entire ALP) were asked the question: ―In the last few years have you seriously thought about starting
your own business?‖ Figure 16 shows that about a third (35% or 37,947) of the non-business-
owning members of the ALP indicate that they had seriously considered this option for new
employment. This subset of the ALP can be considered potential entrepreneurs.




                  Figure 16: “Thought About Starting Your Own Business?”



                                                                   Yes:
                                  No:                             37,947
                                70,441                             35%
                                 65%




                                                                                              47
         Table 6 and Figure 17 show some characteristics of the potential entrepreneurs. Table 6
indicates that the education level of the potential entrepreneurs is slightly lower than the overall
ALP, with about a fifth (19.6%) holding at least a bachelor’s degree and 88.4% having high school
diplomas (compared to 25.1% and almost 95%, respectively, for the overall ALP).

        Table 6: Highest Level of Education Achieved Among Potential Entrepreneurs
                                                                                    Cumulative
                                                            Number      Percent          Percent
            Doctoral Degree                                       0         0.0              0.0
            Masters Degree                                    2,385         6.3              6.3
            Bachelors Degree                                  5,066        13.4             19.6
            Associates Degree                                 3,357         8.8             28.5
            Some College                                     10,259        27.0             55.5
            High School Diploma Only                         12,474        32.9             88.4
            Less HS Diploma                                   4,404        11.6            100.0
            Total                                            37,947       100.0

    The total might not sum precisely due to rounding.




         Figure 17 (below) suggests the strength of desire to own a business. About 66% of this
subset of the ALP indicate that they ―Strongly Agree‖ with a statement asking if they ―are willing to
work evenings or weekends to make their business a success,‖ while about 12% indicate that they
―Mildly Agree‖ with this statement. About 47% indicate that they ―Strongly Agree‖ with a
statement asking if they ―would rather own their own business than pursue a promising career
elsewhere,‖ while 28% ―Mildly Agree‖ with that statement.
         Almost 40% strongly agree with the statement ―I would like to receive confidential
consulting assistance with improving or expanding my business,‖ while 24% mildly agree with that
statement. 30% strongly agree with the statement ―I would rather own my own business that earn a
higher salary working for someone else,‖ and 17% strongly agree with the statement ―I am willing to
have less security for my family in order to operate my own business.‖




                                                                                                   48
                                     Figure 17: Strength of Desire for Own Business



               Willing to Work
             Evenings/Weekends

       Ow n Bus. rather than
    Promising Career Elsew here

    Like to Receive Information to
          Help w ith Business

    Ow n Bus. rather than Higher
     Salary for Someone Else

          Ow n Bus. Even if Less
           Security for Family

                                 0%      10%    20%      30%      40%       50%       60%       70%      80%      90%    100%

                                               Strongly Agree    Mildly Agree     Mildly Disagree   Strongly Disagree


Methodology
            The findings from this study are based on a random digit telephone survey7 of adults living
in Benton, Caldwell, Carroll, Cass, Chariton, Clay, Cooper, Henry, Howard, Jackson, Johnson,
Lafayette, Moniteau, Morgan, Pettis, Ray, and Saline, in Missouri. Survey data was collected from
June 20 to August 4, 2005, using a Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) system.
            A total of 3,061 households were successfully contacted during the phone survey, and 1,864
of these households the selected adult agreed to do the interview. This represents a cooperation rate
of 60.90%. The margin of error for the 1,864 cooperating respondents is +/-2.27%. Cooperating
respondents at least 65 years of age or older and retired were then excluded from the analysis
presented in this report. This report is based upon the remaining 1,149 respondents. When all
1,149 respondents are included in the analysis, the survey findings have a margin of error of +/-
2.89%. The ALP analysis is based upon a subgroup of 573 respondents. The margin of error for the
ALP subgroup is +/- 4.09%.



7The telephone numbers were assembled by randomly generating suffixes within specific area codes and prefixes. As such, unlisted
numbers were included in this sample, minimizing the potential for response bias. Known business, fax, modem, and disconnected
numbers were screened from the sample in efforts to reach households only (and to minimize surveyor dialing time).

Up to eight attempts were made to contact each respondent during three calling periods (10 AM to Noon, 2 PM to 4 PM, and 6 PM
to 9 PM). Initial refusals were re-attempted by specially trained ―refusal converters,‖ which aided in the cooperation rate.




                                                                                                                          49
        The study sponsors and Institute personnel agreed upon the survey items used, with the
former identifying the study objectives and the latter developing items that were valid, reliable, and
unbiased. Question wording and design of the survey instrument are the property of the Docking
Institute. A detailed summary of the method of analysis used in this report can be found in Joseph
A. Aistrup, Michael S. Walker, and Brett A. Zollinger, ―The Kansas Labor Force Survey: The
Available Labor Pool and Underemployment.‖ Kansas Department of Human Resources, 2002.


                    Appendix: Current Employment Status of Available Labor Pool

                                                                          Current Employment
                                                                            Status of ALP
                                                                           Number     Percent
             General Labor/Construction/Cleaning                            11,302        9.0
             Farm Labor/Ranch Hand/Landscaping                               2,523        2.0
             Delivery/Driver/Courier                                         1,531        1.2
             Maintenance/W iring/Plumbing                                    4,162        3.3
             Factory W orker/Grain Elevator/Meat Packer                      3,597        2.8
             Truck Driver/Heavy Equipment Operator                           4,643        3.7
             Police/Fire/Postal/Military Enlisted                            3,694        2.9
             Lab or Medical Tech/Comp Tech/Programmer                        2,452        1.9
             Mechanic/W elder/Carpenter/Electrician                          2,753        2.2
             Other Blue Collar                                                   0        0.0
             General Customer Service/Retail/Reception/W aitress            10,012        7.9
             Clerical/Secretary/Book-Keeper/Bank Teller                     13,869       11.0
             Para-legal/Para-pro/CNA/Care Assistance                         3,547        2.8
             Nurse/LPN/RN/Semi-skilled Social Service                        7,238        5.7
             Office Manager/Small Business Owner                            10,956        8.7
             W riter/Instructor/Researcher                                   1,843        1.5
             Sales/Marketing/Accounting                                      5,402        4.3
             Govt., Non-Profit, or Bus Exec/Farm Owner/Military Officer        895        0.7
             Teacher/Counselor/Social W orker/Physician's Assistant          8,177        6.5
             Professor/Doctor/Scientist/Engineer/Attorney                    1,707        1.4
             Other W hite Collar                                                 0        0.0
             Homemaker                                                       7,653        6.1
             Full-Time Student                                               2,391        1.9
             Unemployed                                                      7,010        5.6
             Retired                                                         4,876        3.9
             Disabled                                                        4,045        3.2
             Total                                                         126,278       100

     The total might not sum precisely due to rounding.




                                                                                                 50
        According to MERIC the states data collection agency, and OSEDA the economic data
collector for the University of Missouri, the Pioneer Trails region shows an increase in population in
the region or at worst maintaining levels of population. Due to the proximity to Kansas City and
the lakes area to the south, the west central region provides a more rural living experience for
persons willing to commute into the metro area for work and while being within an hour from
recreational outdoor activities. The average per capita wages in the region is slightly below the state
average as is the average living cost per person.


        In May 2007, MERIC reported an average 4% unemployment rate for the region, which is in
keeping with the state and national averages. The industries providing the highest wages in the
region include: educational services, administrative and waste services, accommodation and food
services, and management positions. Indicators reflect that performing arts and spectator sports,
beverage and tobacco product manufacturing, data processing, construction, and medical care
occupations are expected to experience the most growth in coming years.


        From available economic statistics and forecast, and the attributes of the natural resources,
the region is expected to benefit economically from the production of alternative fuels. Due to the
proximity to lakes and metro areas tourism is also expected to impact the economy in the region.
The manufacturing sector in the region is expected to remain stable but will continue to face
challenges in attracting a qualified and reliable workforce; therefore, and increase in minority
populations are expected to increase to fill the void in manufacturing. The increase in minority
population is expected to create an affordable housing shortage as well as a challenge on the local
school districts and service agencies.


        Partners and organizations that can provide support to the implementation of the CEDS
goals and objectives include many partners on the local, regional, and state levels. The following
resource agencies will be utilized:


Economic Development Administration
USDA Rural Development
Missouri Department of Transportation


                                                                                                51
Missouri Department of Economic Development
Missouri Community Betterment
State Fair Community College
Small Business Development Center
RC & D Councils
Missouri Association of Councils of Governments
All county and municipal governments
Marshall-Saline Development Corp.
City of Higginsville Economic Development
City of Lexington Economic Development
Missouri Gas Energy and Aquila
Kansas City Power and Light
Workforce Development Board of Western Missouri
Warrensburg Economic Development Corp.




III.H. Ecology and Agricultural Development
       The Pioneer Trails region consists primarily of Gently Rolling Plains, with minor sections of
Dissected Ridge. The Missouri River borders the region on the north and northeast. The climate is
generally moderate. Temperatures range from an average high of 89 degrees in July to an average
low of 19 degrees in January. Rainfall averages 4 inches per month during March through July while
the average is 3 inches per month during September through December. January and February
average only 2 inches, while snowfall averages 3-5 inches in the winter months. Average wind
speeds range from 9 miles per hour in July to 13 miles per hour in March. Winter and spring winds
are from the west-northwest while summer winds blow primarily from the south
       A significant amount of the land use in the region, particularly in the eastern half, is
dedicated to agricultural production, with corn and soybeans the principal crops. This pattern has
produced a strong potential, when coupled with the rising cost of petroleum-based fuels, for
development in the area of bio-fuels -- ethanol and bio-diesel.   Extensive work is being done on an




                                                                                                  52
ongoing basis to capitalize on this potential. An ethanol facility opened in 2003 in Saline County,
and additional units are in consideration.




                                                                                                53
SECTION IV:              JOHNSON COUNTY

IV. A. County Profile
          Johnson County was named in honor of Richard Mentor Johnson, a distinguished soldier in
the Indian wars, a United States Senator and later Vice President of the United States. The county
was originally part of Lafayette County. By act of the General Assembly of Missouri the county was
organized December 13, 1834. Johnson County first comprised four townships, Jackson,
Washington, Jefferson and Madison.
          The first settlement was made near the present town of Columbus in 1833 with Nicholas
Houx building the first house. Later in 1833, Richard Huntsman settled near Fayetteville. He planted
a large number of fruit tree cuttings brought from Tennessee.
Early attention was paid to the education of the young, and schools were established as rapidly as
means were available. The first church in the county was established by the Methodist of Columbus.
          Many unpleasant scenes were enacted during the Civil War, the sentiment being sharply
divided, but no notable conflicts occurred within the borders of this county.
          Johnson County’s population slowly declined from the turn of the century until 1950 and
then endured a growth spurt until 1960. From 1960 to the present a steady increase in population
growth at an average rate of 13% has been experienced in Johnson County. Today, 49% of the
population lives in rural areas. However, only 5.1% of the total
                                                                                   TABLE 1
population actually lives on a farm.        These statistics and the     Johnson County Population by
                                                                                    Age Brackets
accompanying population density map indicate a strong presence of            Age
                                                                                       Population Percent
sprawl.                                                                    Bracket
                                                                         Under 5          3,231     6.7
                                                                         5 to 9           3,301     6.8
Johnson County                                                           10 to 14         3,457     7.2
    Total population                           48,258                    15 to 17         2,128     4.4
    Classification                             Second class              18 to 19         2,837     5.9
    Leadership structure                       Commissioners             20 to 24         6,887    14.3
    Average household income, 1999             $43,069                   25 to 34         6,285    13.0
                                                                         35 to 44         7,039    14.6
    Total housing units                        18,886
                                                                         45 to 54         5,102    10.6
    Housing unit average year built            1971
                                                                         55 to 59         1,918     4.0
    Average gross rent                         $491                      60 to 64         1,580     3.3
    Average housing value                      $96,339                   65 to 74         2,459     5.1
    Master plan                                yes                       75 to 84         1,494     3.1
    Emergency Operations Plan                  yes                       Over 85           533      1.1
    Zoning regulations                         no                        Total           48,258     100
                                                                         Source: U.S. Census 2000


                                                                                                  54
              Building regulations                                                   yes
              Subdivision regulations                                                yes
              Stormwater regulations                                                 yes
              Floodplain regulations                                                 yes
              Water service                                                          PWD #1, #2, #3
              Sewer service                                                          Wright City
              Electric service                                                       Aquila
              Fire service                                                           JCFPD and JCFPD #2
              Ambulance service                                                      JCAD
              Rivers, streams                                                        Blackwater River
              Major arterials                                                        NW US 50, SE State Hwy. 13, SE State Hwy.23
              Railroad                                                               Missouri Pacific Railroad, St. Louis SW Railway

      *CDP: Census designated places (CDP’s) are delineated for the decennial census as the statistical counterparts of
      ncorporated places.


                                Historic Population Trend of Johnson County


           50,000                                                                                                  48,258


           45,000                                                                                         42,514

                                                                                                 39,059
           40,000

                                                                                        34,172
           35,000

                       27,843                                                 28,981
           30,000
                                 26,297
                                          24,899                                                                            CHART 1
(# Persons) 25,000                                 22,413
                                                            21,617
                                                                     20,716

           20,000


           15,000


           10,000


             5,000


                0
                      1900      1910      1920     1930     1940     1950     1960     1970      1980     1990     2000
                                                                     Year




      IV.B. Geography, geology and Climate
                     Johnson County is located in the west-central part of Missouri. Bordering counties are
      Lafayette (north), Pettis (east), Henry (south), Jackson and Cass (west).
                     The land area for Johnson County is 824 square miles with a population of 48,258, according
      to the 2000 U.S. Census update. Warrensburg (pop. 16,340) is the county seat and the largest
      community in the county. Other communities in the county include Holden, Knob Noster, Leeton,
      Chilhowee, Kingsville, Centerview and LaTour.


                                                                                                                                       55
        The consistent pattern of climate in Johnson County is one of cold winters and long, hot
summers. Heavy rains occur mainly in spring and early in summer, when moist air from the Gulf of
Mexico interacts with drier continental air. Even though the annual rainfall is normally adequate for
corn, soybeans, and all grain crops in most years, yields are reduced because of the absence of rain
during July and August.

IV.C. Form of government
        The county government, as related to disaster mitigation, primarily consists of the County
Commission, Assessor, County Clerk, Sheriff, Emergency Management, Public Health, Coroner, and
Road and Bridge. Johnson County operates as a second class county. The county government has
authority to administer county structures, infrastructures, and finances as well as a master plan,
zoning code, subdivision regulations, floodplain regulations and storm water regulations. The three-
member County Commission generally is the final authority on county issues.

IV.D. Significant cultural/social issues
    Although the county’s rural character remains strong, large-lot subdivisions continue to sprawl
into the countryside as new residents emigrate from the metropolitan areas. More and more farmers
have begun to weigh the benefits of farming against the benefits of selling their land to a developer.
County officials realize they must retain the rural character that attracts new residents while avoiding
the negative effects of sprawl.

IV.E. Media
    The Daily Star Journal is the official newspaper of Johnson County. In addition, the Warrensburg
Gazette, Holden Image Progress, Knob Noster Item and the Whiteman Spirit cover news throughout
Johnson County. The Daily Star Journal most adequately provides coverage of local issues.
    Three radio stations are based in Johnson County, two are broadcasted in FM only and the third
is broadcasted in AM and FM. These stations occasionally cover local issues in depth. The Kansas
City broadcast media provide weather reports and warnings that detail specific cities and counties at
risk. The list of pertinent media outlets is included below.

Newspapers                                              Knob Noster Item – Knob Noster
Daily Star Journal – Warrensburg                        Warrensburg Gazette – Warrensburg
Holden Image-Progress/Penny Saver –                     Whiteman Spirit – Whiteman AFB
Holden


                                                                                                 56
News radio stations
KCMW (90.9 FM) – Warrensburg                           Television stations
KIX (105.7 FM) – Sedalia                               KCTV (CBS), Channel 5 – Kansas City
KLRQ (96.1 FM) – Clinton                               KMBC (ABC), Channel 9 – Kansas City
KMZU (100.7 FM) – Carrollton                           KMOS (PBS), Channel 6 – Warrensburg
KPOW (97.1 FM) – Sedalia                               KSHB (NBC), Channel 41 – Kansas City
KSDL/KSIS (92.1 FM, 1050 AM) – Sedalia                 WDAF (FOX), Channel 4 – Kansas City
KYRV (88.1 FM) – Warrensburg


IV,F. Demographic information

       The 2000 U.S. Census was used to construct a profile of the average Johnson County
resident. Statistically, this average person is between age 35 and 44, has a household income of
$43,069 and is married, living in a rural home worth $96,339 and drives to work alone. This person
has at least a high school diploma, lives and works in Johnson County.
       Although Johnson County remains predominantly white in the 2000 Census, the diversity of
the population has increased for all ethnic groups except blacks. Historically, diversity has been
scarce. However, the 2000 Census showed the presence of non-white races currently makes up
11.4% of the total population. The portion of the county’s Native Hawaiian, Alaskan, and American
Indian populations particular grew significantly. Between 1990 and 2000, the county’s Native
Hawaiian and Pacific Islander population increased from 56%, while the American Indian and
Alaskan Native population increased by 52%. However, the black population in the county
decreased by 15%. Table 2 presents a more detailed look at the county’s diversity.


                                              TABLE 2
         Johnson County Diversity
         Race                                   Census          % Change        % of Total
                                                1990    2000    1990 to 2000 for 2000
         White                                  38,996 43,491 14%               90.1%
         Black                                  2,452 2,089 -15%                4.3%
         Am Indian/Alaska Native                206     314     52%             <1%
         Asian                                  564     692     23%             1.4%
         Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander       39      61      56%             <1%
         Other                                  257     623     142%            1.3%
         Source: 2000 U.S. Census



                                                                                                57
       Roughly 86% of Johnson County’s 25-plus population are high school graduates or higher.

       The county’s age brackets in Table 3 show that 62% the population is of labor force age;
       79% of the workforce is age 25-54. Typical vulnerable populations include those age 65 and
       over at 9.4% as well as those age 14 and under at 20.7% of the general population.


                                                 TABLE 3
                               Johnson County and Incorporated Areas
                                       Historical Population Trends
   Jurisdiction      1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000
Centerview            ***     *** 268 175            198 179 208 234       223   214    249
Chilhowee             *** 425 469 414                415 335 339 297       349   335    329
Holden              2,126 2007 2,011 1,807 1,818 1,765 1,951 2,089 2,195 2,389 3,496
Knob Noster           673 670 617 683                640 585 2,292 2,264 2,040 2,261 2,462
Kingsville            323 238 214 237                212 207 225 284       365   279    257
La Tour               ***     ***      82    100     101     80    68 83    84    87     65
Leeton                *** 420 463 416                436 372 371 425       604   632    619
Warrensburg          4,724 4,689 4,811 5,146 5,868 6,857 9,689 13,125 13,807 15,244 16,340
Johnson County 27,843 26,297 24,899 22,413 21,617 20,716 28,981 34,172 39,059 42,514 48,258
Source: 200 U.S. Census, *** not applicable



IV.G. Economy, employment, and industry


   The 2000 U.S. Census reported the county had a labor force (workers 16 and over) of 23,238, or
62% of the county’s total population. The average earnings of males with income for 2000 were
$26,520, while the average earnings of females were $16,063. Nearly 14.9% of the population, or
6,666 persons, were below the federal poverty level. The 2000 unemployment rate for Johnson
County was 6.1% compared to Missouri’s 2000 rate of 4.7%.


IV.H. County Labor Study


       The Johnson County Labor Basin includes Benton, Cass, Henry, Johnson, Lafayette, Pettis,
Saline, and the eastern portion of Jackson Counties in Missouri. The purpose of this report is to
assess the ―Available Labor Pool‖ in this labor basin. The ―Available Labor Pool‖ represents those
who indicate that they are looking for employment or would consider changing their jobs for the
right employment opportunity.



                                                                                               58
  The Docking Institute’s independent analysis of this labor basin shows that:

The population of the Johnson County Labor Basin is estimated to be 307,940. About 27% of
the total population (or 84,264 individuals) is considered to be part of the Available Labor Pool
(ALP).

Of the ALP, an estimated 6,035 (7.2%) non-working and 16,910 (20.1%) working individuals
are looking for new employment, while 9,253 (11.0%) non-working and 52,065 (61.8%)
working individuals would consider new and/or different employment for the right
opportunities.

About 66% of the ALP has at least some college experience and 95% has at least a high school
diploma. The average age for members of the entire ALP is about 42 years, and 57% of the
ALP are women.

Majorities of ALP members report having ―strong work skills‖ when it comes to working in
groups and interpersonal relations (96%), management and supervision (77%), writing (75%),
math (68%), and computers (59%).

Approximately 9,459 members of the ALP are currently employed as clerical worker,
secretaries, book-keepers, bank tellers and similar positions. An additional 6,894 report having
experience or training in these fields.

73,315 members of the ALP (or 87%) indicate that they are ―willing to work outside of their
primary field of employment for a new or different employment opportunity.‖

About 40% of the members (or 33,909 individuals) of the ALP will commute up to 45 minutes,
one way, for an employment opportunity. Almost 85% (or 71,468 individuals) will commute
up to 30 minutes for employment.

The most important desired benefits are on-the-job/paid training, good health benefits, good
retirement benefits, and good salary or hourly pay.

About 48,758 people (58%) are interested in a new job at $16 an hour, 33,017 (39%) are
available at $12 an hour, and 10,751 (13%) are available at $8 an hour.

Of the 68,975 members in the subset of employed members of the ALP, 38,535 (56%)
consider themselves underutilized. About 72% of this subset of the ALP has some college
experience, and a majority (87%) is willing to change jobs to improve their underutilized status.

Of the members in the subset of the ALP who do not own their own businesses, 24,973
(35%) have considered starting their own businesses.




                                                                                           59
IV.I.   Primary industries


        Continued automation in the manufacturing process has helped drive up the demand for the
higher wages of skilled labor while requiring less employees to operate the systems. Johnson
County’s primary products include aluminum, and lawnmower fabrication, batteries, retail trade,
agricultural goods, electronic components and developmental disabilities services.
    Employment within the county by industry, as of Census 2000, consists of 16.1% education,
15.6% manufacturing, and 12.1% retail trade, 9.1% healthcare and social services. The remaining
46% includes finance, insurance, real estate, transportation, public utilities, wholesale trade,
agricultural, forestry, fishing and mining.

IV.J.   Access to employment: in-commuting
        More than 2,900 persons commute into Johnson County to work. An equal number
commute outside the county to the Kansas City Metro area to work as well.


                                                  CHART 2
                                    Johnson County Incommuting Pattern
                                                 (Number of Worker)




                                          Clay     Benton                       Pettis
                                 Cass                89
                                           96                                    897
                                 233                3%
                                          3%                                    31%
                                  8%
                    Lafayette
                      380
                      13%




                                  Henry
                                                                      Jackson
                                   580
                                                                        657
                                  20%
                                                                        22%




IV.K. Development trends
      Johnson County’s significant population growth over the past three decades is projected to
continue at a substantial rate in all age groups through 2020 at an average rate of 22%. The county’s
population growth primarily is due to its proximity to the Kansas City metropolitan area and low


                                                                                                   60
transportation costs. Many factors contributed to growth in Johnson County. Over the past few
decades, a robust national and regional economy led to low unemployment and reasonable interest
rates. These growth factors more recently have been dampened by the economic slowdown. The
Highway 50 corridor will continue to provide accessibility to the major markets/employment centers
in the Kansas City metropolitan area. In particular, Independence and the Kansas City metropolitan
area workers may continue to migrate into Johnson County in search of a lower cost of living.
         While Johnson County and the cities of Warrensburg, Holden and Knob Noster have grown
over the last 10 years some of the small communities have not grown or remained the same.
         Fifty-one percent of the county’s housing is considered by the Census to be urban housing.
These units are located primarily in or near Warrensburg, Holden, Kingsville, Knob Noster and
Whiteman AFB. Smaller concentrations exist in Centerview, Chilhowee, Leeton, and La Tour.

IV.L. Roadways
         Roadways continue to be the main source of transportation within the region to support the
movement of people and goods along 1,566 miles of road. The Missouri Department of
Transportation (MoDOT) provides and maintains all federal and state roadways, 384 miles of road,
within the county while Johnson County maintains more than 1070 miles of roadway in
unincorporated areas. Roughly 86% are either soil or gravel roads. Incorporated areas maintain a
total of 112 miles of roads within their jurisdictions.

IV.M. Railroads
         Missouri Pacific, Chicago Rock Island and Pacific, Missouri-Kansas-Texas, as well as St.
Louis Southwestern Railways all have railroad lines crosses the county. No passenger service is
available within the county.

IV.N. Airports
         The FAA notes seven airports serving Johnson County. Two are public and four are
privately owned. Additionally, there is a heliport located in Warrensburg at the Western Missouri
Medical Center, as well as one in the city of Holden. Skyhaven Airport is located along Highway 50,
4 miles west of downtown Warrensburg; Skyhaven is the largest airport in Johnson County and is
owned by Central Missouri State University, however the facility is public.   Commercial airline
travel is accessible 62 miles from the center of Johnson County at Kansas City International Airport
(KCI).


                                                                                                61
           The table below gives a more detailed description of each airport.

                                                            TABLE 4
                                                     Johnson County Airports*
                                                                                                              House
                   Airport              Ownership Associated City                      Runway Type
                                                                                                              Aircraft
       Skyhaven                           public              Warrensburg               asphalt (lights)        yes
       Fletcher Field                     private              Centerview                     turf              yes
       Fender JH                          private              Kingsville                     turf              yes
       Whiteman                           USAF                Knob Noster              concrete (lights)        yes
       Lake Sexton                        private             Warrensburg                 turf/gravel           no
       Short                              private             Warrensburg                     turf              yes
       Ferguson Farms                     private               Windsor                       turf              no
* Registered with the FAA

                                                                CHART 3
                                        Johnson County Airports Runway Lengths

                   14,000
                                                                           12,400


                   12,000



                   10,000



                    8,000

 Distance (feet)

                    6,000



                    4,000       2,800                                                     2,700                 3,000
                                                              2,200                                  2,600


                                                1,100
                    2,000


                        0
                            Skyhaven     Fletcher Field   Fender JH    Whiteman      Lake Sexton   Short     Ferguson
                                                                                                              Farms
                                                                      Airport Name


IV.O. Public transportation

           Public transportation in the county is provided by OATS, Inc. as well as the City-operated
system in Warrensburg, the Old Drum. These publicly-funded systems provides door-to-door
transportation service with flexible schedules to meet the needs of those who may have little or no
alternative means of travel, regardless of age or disability.



                                                                                                                         62
IV.P. Telecommunications

        New infrastructures and services are enhancing county residents’ quality of life.        The
following list of communication facilities is not all-inclusive, but represents the major providers of
the county’s communications infrastructure.

Telecommunication Service Providers
Southwestern Bell
CenturyTel

Wireless Communications Companies
AT&T Wireless Services
Cingular Wireless
Nextel Communications
Sprint PCS
Southwestern Bell
Verizon Wireless
VoiceStream Wireless

Long Distance Carriers
AT&T
MCI
Sprint
Southwestern Bell

Internet Service Providers
CenturyTel (T-1 lines and DSL)
Charter Communications (cable access)
Southwestern Bell (T-1)
Numerous dial-up service providers




                                                                                               63
IV.Q. Infrastructure, services and facilities


        Sewer and Water
        The county continues to improve its ability to service residents and businesses with public
water and sewer.
        Public water and sewer service is available within Centerview, Chilhowee, Leeton, Holden,
Knob Noster, and Warrensburg.         Water service in Kingsville is provided by PWD #2, and
Centerview is provided by PWD #1. Within the county, there is a large rural population that is
served by private wells.
        Wastewater needs are serviced by individual septic tanks, lagoons or private sewer systems.
The Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the U.S. Department of Commerce
Economic Development Administration (EDA) also have contributed to funding water and sewer
projects.

        Electricity and natural gas
        Ameren UE, Aquila, Consolidated Support Service Inc., Missouri Public Service Company
and West-Central Electric Co-op Inc. all provide electrical service within the county. Ameren UE,
Aquila, Williams Gas Pipelines Central Inc., and Missouri Gas Energy supply natural gas to some of
the incorporated areas within Johnson County.

        Solid waste disposal
        The county’s solid waste is collected by Steve Howler, Waste Corporation of Missouri,
Brooks Disposal, Ellsworth Collins Sanitation Service, Vic’s Disposal, and Ryans Hauling. Most
waste is trucked to the Show-Me Regional Landfill in Warrensburg.

        Law enforcement
        The Johnson County Sheriff’s Department includes the sheriff, 3 detectives, and 16 patrol
officers. The department participates in mutual aid agreements with all incorporated areas within
the county.    The Sheriff’s office is located in Warrensburg. Additionally, the communities of
Holden, Knob Noster, and Warrensburg all maintain municipal police departments.




                                                                                            64
       Emergency medical services


       The Johnson County Ambulance District (JCAD) serves nearly the entire county with the
exception of a northeast portion of the county that is covered by Concordia, and a south east
portion of the county covered by Windsor. Johnson County Ambulance District has a staff of 26
full-time and 17 part-time employees. The district provides advanced life support, with both EMT’s
and paramedics on staff. Medical control is primarily through Western Missouri Medical Center in
Warrensburg. Air support systems are available through Harrisonville Life Flight and Grain Valley
Life Net. The helipad also is used by other air ambulance services in the area.

       Fire protection
There are eight (8) fire departments serving Johnson County:
       Warrensburg
       Holden
       Knob Noster
       Johnson County Fire Protection District (JCFPD)
       Johnson County Fire Protection District #2 (JCFPD#2)
       Whiteman Air Force Base (WAFB)
       Windsor Rural
       Concordia


       Except for WAFB, these fire services are dispatched through the Johnson County 911
system. These fire departments all concur with the State Fire Marshall's Mutual Aid System. Search
and rescue for Johnson County are primarily provided by the fire departments, with support from
the local law enforcement agencies and Highway Patrol.


       Emergency services (911)

       Emergency calls are taken by Johnson County Joint Communications. This 911 center then
dispatches for the ambulance, fire and law enforcement departments that serve Johnson County.
Updating the current 4-digit 911 addressing system to 5-digits has been identified as a growing need.



                                                                                              65
As the number of homes in Johnson County continues to grow, so will the need to bring all
residences into the same 5-digit system, as responsive and high quality service depends on the ability
of emergency services to locate residences quickly and efficiently. Currently, 5-digit addresses are
assigned only to homes in new subdivisions or to homes not yet assigned a 911 street address, such
as those still on rural routes.

        Underground Infrastructure

        Due to homeland security concerns, underground utilities are not mapped in this plan.
According to the Missouri One Call System, Inc. as of April 4, 2003, the following companies
maintain underground utility lines within Johnson County. Emergency information concerning
these utility lines is contained in the county’s Emergency Operations Plan updated in 2003.

        The following companies have underground lines running through Johnson County:

Aquila
Cass County Telephone
Citizen Telephone
CenturyTel
Charter Communications
Conoco Pipeline Henry County Public Water Supply District #4
Jackson County Public Water Supply District #15
Johnson County Public Water Supply District #1
Lafayette County Public Water Supply District #1
Lafayette-Johnson County Public Water Supply District #2
Missouri Gas Energy
Missouri-American Water
Missouri Network Alliance
MCI Worldcom
Panhandle Eastern Pipeline
BP Products North America
Phillips Pipeline
SBC
K.C. Power and Light
Sprint (long distance)
Village Water and Sewer
City of Warrensburg
Wiltel Communications
West Central Electrical Co-op
Southern Star Central Gas
Level 3 Communications
Sprint



                                                                                                66
         The Missouri One Call utility location telephone number is 800-344-7483.

         Inventory of commercial/industrial facilities
         Several major manufacturing plants, a mix of both national and local companies, are located
within the county. These plants employ a minimum of 50 employees. The table below also includes
the area’s retail and commercial centers.

                                            TABLE 5
                        Johnson County Employers, 50 or More Employees
              Company Name                     Product             City    Employees
       GTE Industries                Railroad and Elec. Equip. Warrensburg    367
       Stahl Specialty Company       Aluminum Castings         Kingsville     627
                                                               Warrensburg    237
       Central Missouri State
                                                                             1645
       University                    Education                 Warrensburg
       Hawker Energy                 Batteries                 Warrensburg    500
       Whitman AFB                   Military                  Whiteman      6,698
                                     Construction Manufacture
                                                                               50
       Gilcrest Equipment Co.        Co.
       Wal-Mart                      Retail Store              Warrensburg    425

Source Warrensburg Economic Development, 5-10-04

         Three industrial parks exist within the county, located in Warrensburg, Holden, and one in
development in Centerview.

IV.R. Housing

The Johnson County housing supply is
                                                                      TABLE 6
generally tight; especially for homes at or below            Johnson County 2000 Census
the $129,600 average single-family house. Of        Housing Types               Number Percent
the total 17,410 housing units, 51% are rural       Occupied                     17,410    92%
                                                    Vacant                        1,476     8%
units, 92% are occupied, 61.5% are owner-
                                                    Urban                         9,342    49%
occupied, 66.3% are single-family units, 14.6%      Rural                         9,544    51%
are mobile homes, and 3.3% are lacking              Total Housing Units          18,886   100%
                                                    Source: 2000 U.S. Census
telephone service.


With a total of 17,390 households and 1,476 vacant units, the county would have a 9% margin in
dwelling units to accommodate changing residential needs. Of the county’s 18,886 residential


                                                                                               67
structures, 84% were built after 1950. The average housing structure in Johnson County is 29 years
old.

                                                                        CHART 4

                                      Johnson County Housing Structures Assessment


                4,000
                                                                            3,636


                3,500                                                                  3,305



                3,000



                2,500                                           2,257
                           2,180                    2,105
                                                                                                                2,023
                                                                                                    1,891
  Housing Units 2,000



                1,500



                1,000                   798
                                                                                                                              691


                 500



                   0
                        1939 or    1940 - 1949 1950 - 1959 1960 - 1969 1970 - 1979 1980 - 1989 1990 - 1994 1995 - 1999    1999 to
                        Earlier                                                                                          March 2000
                                                                        Year Built



       Total inventory of structures

The total Johnson County assessed valuation for 2003, including both real estate and personal
property, was $406,618,787, according to Johnson County Clerks Office. Therefore, the average
assessed valuation was $13,993 per parcel. Rural parcels totaled $136,984,411 or 34% of the
county’s assessments. Urban assessed values were $149,466,258 or 37% of the county’s
assessments. Tax-exempt parcels and state assessed utilities accounted for the remaining 29%.




                                                                                                                                      68
IV.S. City Profiles
Centerview
    Total population                  249
    Classification                    Fourth class
    Incorporation date                1960
    Leadership structure              Mayor/Council
    Median household income, 1999     $28,333
    Total housing units               107
    Housing unit, median year built   1960
    Median gross rent                 N/A
    Average housing value             $44,167
    Master plan                       no
    Emergency Operations Plan         no
    Zoning regulations                no
    Building regulations              no
    Subdivision regulations           yes
    Storm water regulations           no
    Floodplain regulations            no
    Water service                     Centerview
    Sewer service                     Centerview
    Electric service                  Aquila
    Fire service                      JCFPD #1
    Ambulance service                 JCAD
    Rivers, streams                   None
    Major arterials                   SW State Hwy. 58, and VV




                                                                 69
Chilhowee
    Total population                   329
    Incorporation date                 1907
    Classification                     Forth class
    Leadership structure               Mayor/Council
    Average household income, 1999     $32,033
    Total housing units                165
    Housing unit, average year built   1960
    Average gross rent                 $270
    Average housing value              $41,883
    Master plan                        no
    Emergency Operations Plan          no
    Zoning regulations                 no
    Building regulations               no
    Subdivision regulations            no
    Storm water regulations            no
    Floodplain regulations             no
    Water service                      Chilhowee
    Sewer service                      Chilhowee
    Electric service                   Aquila
    Fire service                       JCFPD
    Ambulance service                  JCAD
    Rivers, streams                    None
    Major arterials                    SW State Hwy. F, 2 Hwy




                                                                70
Holden
   Total population                   2,496
   Classification                     Third class
   Incorporation date                 1861
   Leadership structure               Mayor/Council
   Average household income, 1999     $34,520
   Total housing units                1,089
   Housing unit, average year built   1959
   Average gross rent                 $436
   Average housing value              $62,576
   Master plan                        no
   Emergency Operations Plan          no
   Zoning regulations                 yes
   Building regulations               yes
   Subdivision regulations            yes
   Storm water regulations            yes
   Floodplain regulations             yes
   Water service                      Holden
   Sewer service                      Holden
   Electric service                   Aquila
   Fire service                       Holden
   Ambulance service                  JCAD
   Rivers, streams                    East Branch Pine Oak Creek
   Major arterials                    SW State Hwy. 58, State Hwy. 131, Missouri Pacific
                                      Railroad




                                                                                    71
Kingsville
    Total population                   257
    Classification                     Fourth class
    Incorporation date                 1885
    Leadership structure               Mayor/Council
    Average household income, 1999     $43,210
    Total housing units                117
    Housing unit, average year built   1964
    Average gross rent                 $488
    Average housing value              $56,579
    Master plan                        no
    Emergency Operations Plan          no
    Zoning regulations                 yes
    Building regulations               yes
    Subdivision regulations            yes
    Storm water regulations            yes
    Floodplain regulations             yes
    Water service                      Public Water District #2
    Sewer service                      Own
    Electric service                   Aquila
    Fire service                       JCFPD #2
    Ambulance service                  JCAD
    Rivers, streams                    None
    Major arterials                    SW State Hwy. W, SW State Hwy. 58, SW State Hwy.
                                       T, Missouri Pacific Railroad




                                                                                  72
Knob Noster
   Total population                   2,462
   Classification                     Fourth class
   Incorporation date                 1890
   Leadership structure               Mayor/Council
   Average household income, 1999     $39,139
   Total housing units                1,092
   Housing unit, average year built   1970
   Average gross rent                 $424
   Average housing value              $86,600
   Master plan                        yes
   Emergency Operations Plan          yes
   Zoning regulations                 yes
   Building regulations               yes
   Subdivision regulations            yes
   Storm water regulations            yes
   Floodplain regulations             yes
   Water service                      City of Knob Noster
   Sewer service                      City of Knob Noster
   Electric service                   Aquila,
   Fire service                       JCFPD, City of Knob Noster
   Ambulance service                  JCAD
   Rivers, streams                    Clear Fork
   Major arterials                    NE US Hwy. 50, NE Hwy. 23, Union Pacific
                                      Railroad




                                                                                 73
La Tour
    Total population                  65
    Classification                    Village
    Incorporation date                1912
    Leadership structure              Chairman/Trustees
    Average household income, 1999    $47,048
    Total housing units               28
    Housing unit average year built   1942
    Average gross rent                $200
    Average housing value             $27,885
    Master plan                       no
    Emergency Operations Plan         no
    Zoning regulations                no
    Building regulations              no
    Subdivision regulations           no
    Storm water regulations           no
    Floodplain regulations            no
    Water service                     Public Water District #2
    Sewer service                     City of La Tour
    Electric service                  Aquila
    Fire service                      JCFPD#2
    Ambulance service                 JCAD
    Rivers, streams                   None
    Major arterials                   SW State Hwy. 2, SW County Hwy. ZZ




                                                                           74
Leeton
    Total population                  619
    Classification                    Fourth class
    Incorporation date                1946
    Leadership structure              Mayor/Council
    Average household income, 1999    $35,879
    Total housing units               277
    Housing unit average year built   1959
    Average gross rent                $347
    Average housing value             $50,725
    Master plan                       no
    Emergency Operations Plan         no
    Zoning regulations                yes
    Building regulations              yes
    Subdivision regulations           yes
    Storm water regulations           no
    Floodplain regulations            yes
    Water service                     City of Leeton
    Sewer service                     City of Leeton
    Electric service                  Aquila
    Fire service                      JCFPD
    Ambulance service                 JCAD
    Rivers, streams                   None
    Major arterials                   SE State Hwy. 2, St. Louis SW Railway




                                                                              75
Warrensburg
   Total population                  16,340
   Classification                    Third class
   Incorporation date                1855
   Leadership structure              Mayor/Council
   Average household income, 1999    $37,980
   Total housing units               6,380
   Housing unit average year built   1970
   Average gross rent                $506
   Average housing value             $99,694
   Master plan                       yes
   Emergency Operations Plan         yes
   Zoning regulations                yes
   Building regulations              yes
   Subdivision regulations           yes
   Storm water regulations           yes
   Floodplain regulations            yes
   Water service                     American Water Co.
   Sewer service                     City of Warrensburg
   Electric service                  Aquila
   Fire service                      JCFPD, City of Warrensburg
   Ambulance service                 JCAD
   Rivers, streams                   W Fork Post Oak Creek
   Major arterials                   NW US 50, SE State Hwy. 13, Missouri Pacific
                                     Railroad




                                                                                    76
Whiteman AFB
Total population                       3,814
Classification                         NA
Incorporation date                     NA
Leadership structure
Average household income, 1999         $39,322
Total housing units                    982
Housing unit average year built        1964
Average gross rent                     $546
Average housing value                  NA
Master plan
Emergency Operations Plan              yes
Zoning regulations                     yes
Building regulations                   yes
Subdivision regulations                yes
Storm water regulations                yes
Floodplain regulations
Water service
Sewer service
Electric service
Fire service                           Whiteman
Ambulance service                      Whiteman, JCAD
Rivers, streams                        Long Branch, Brewer Branch
Major arterials                        SE State Hwy. 23, SE State Hwy. D




  Map not available; Department of Defense facility




                                                                           77
All cities
     Total population                      26,631
     Classification                        various
     Leadership structure                  various
     Median household income, 1999         $37,496
     Total housing units                   10,237
     Housing unit, median year built       1961
     Median gross rent                     $402
     Median owner-occupied housing value   $58,764
     Master plan                           2 yes, 6 no
     Emergency Operations Plan             2 yes, 6 no
     Zoning regulations                    5 yes, 3 no
     Building regulations                  5 yes, 3 no
     Subdivision regulations               5 yes, 3 no
     Stormwater regulations                4 yes, 4 no
     Floodplain regulations                5 yes, 3 no
     Water service                         6 jurisdictions provide service
     Sewer service                         7 jurisdictions provide service
     Electric service                      8 jurisdictions use Aquila
     Fire service                          3 cities have stations
     Ambulance service                     All cities use JCAD




                                                                             78
SECTION V: LAFAYETTE COUNTY

V. A. County Profile
          Organized November 16, 1820, (effective January 1, 1821) from Cooper County and named
for Marquis de La Fayette. Originally organized as Lillard County in honor of James (William) Lillard
of Tennessee, who served in                                Lafayette County Population Trend, 1900-2000

the first state constitutional      35,000


convention and first State          30,000                                                                                  2000
                                                                                                                     1990
                                             1900   1910      1920                                            1980
Legislature. The name was           25,000
                                                                     1930   1940
                                                                                                       1970
                                                                                    1950     1960
changed in honor of Marquis         20,000

de La Fayette’s visit to the
                                    15,000

United States by an act of the
                                    10,000

Legislature on February 16,
                                     5,000

1825. In 1872 improved land
                                        0
in Lafayette County was
                                                                            Source: U.S. Census 2000
selling                                                                        CHART 5

for an average of twenty dollars per acre while unimproved ground brought an average of twelve
dollars an acre.

          Timber was reported as being overly abundant with timberlands being worth twenty dollars
an acre and bottom lands about the same as they were usually covered in heavy timber. Prior to the
Civil War, Lafayette County was principally engaged in hemp production.

          Waverly and Lexington both had rope manufacturers or rope walks, as they were known.
Large quantities of the unfinished product were shipped east in large bales. These were stored along
the riverfront in huge warehouses to await shipment by steamboat.


The county lies on the south side of the Missouri River and is the second county from the western
border of the state. It is approximately thirty-three miles in length and about eighteen miles in
breadth and has a riverfront of about forty miles. The county seat is Lexington, which is situated on
a high bluff overlooking the Missouri River about twelve miles from the western boundary of the
county.
          Lafayette County is a rural county located in west central Missouri. The Missouri River
forms the northern boundary. The county is bordered to the east by Saline County,


                                                                                                                                   79
                                                         to the south by Johnson County and to the
       Lafayette County Population
             by Age Bracket                      west by Jackson County. Its borders encompass
                                                 629.4 square miles.
       Age         Population       Percent
Under 5                  2,008          6.1%             Based on the 2000 Census, Lafayette County
5--9                     2,393          7.3%     has a population of 32,960, which is a 6% increase
10--14                   2,600          7.8%
                                                 since the 1990 census was conducted.
15-19                    2,464          7.5%
20-24                    1,665          5.1%             Lexington, the county seat, is now the third
25-34                    3,900         11.8%
35-44                    5,162         15.7%     largest town with a population of 4,453. Other cities
45-54                    4,362         13.2%     and their population are Napoleon (208), Wellington
55-59                    1,840          5.6%
60-64                    1,487          4.5%     (784), Higginsville (4,682), Odessa (4,818), Corder
65-74                    2,503          7.6%     (427), Concordia (2,360), Dover (108),
75-84                    1,745          5.3%
                                                            Source: US Census             Aullville (86),
85 and over                831          2.5%
Total                   32,960        100.0%     Waverly (806), Alma (399),
TABLE 7                         Bates City (245), Mayview (294). Emma (89) and Oak Grove (60),
and Blackburn (23) have populations in Lafayette County, but matters of hazard mitigation are
guided within another county. Of a total population of 32,960, only about 39% reside in
unincorporated areas of the county.

V.B.    Geography, geology and climate



The county is just west of Jackson County. The Missouri River forms the border for the northern
edge of the county. Johnson County lies to the south and Saline County to the east.
Lafayette County encompasses approximately 629 square miles, or 402,560 acres. The Missouri
River floodplain blankets the northern edge of the county in alluvium (silt, sand, and gravel). The
topography for the most part is gently rolling plains.


        The climate is generally moderate. Temperatures, according to the national Weather Service
(NWS) station at Kansas City International Airport, range from an average high of 89 degrees in July
to an average low of 20 in January. Rainfall averages 4 inches throughout the year. Between the
months of December and March the average snowfall is 4 inches. Winter and spring winds are from
the west-northwest while summer winds blow primarily from the south.


                                                                                                       80
V.C.    Form of government


The county government consists of the County Commissioners, Assessor, County Clerk, Sheriff,
Emergency Management director, Coroner, and local fire and police. Lafayette County operates as a
fourth-class county.

V.D.    Significant cultural/social issues


Although the county’s rural character remains strong, the county has become part of the Kansas
City Metropolitan statistical area. The County Commission has control of planning and zoning for
the county. However, they do not control planning and zoning for individual municipalities.
County officials must try to retain the rural character that attracts new residents while avoiding the
negative effects of sprawl.

V.E.    Media
        The Lexington News is the official newspaper of Lafayette County. In addition, there are
various weekly papers throughout the county. They provide adequate coverage of planning issues
such as natural hazard mitigation. There are many radio stations in the area the two local stations are
KMZU-FM, Carrollton, and KCMO AM and FM these stations cover local issues in depth. The
Kansas City broadcast media provide weather reports and warnings that detail specific sites and
counties at risk. The list of pertinent media outlets is included below.

        Newspapers                                      Television stations
        The Kansas City Star                            WDAF-4 (Fox), Kansas City
        The Concordian                                  KMBC-9 (ABC), Kansas City
        Lexington News                                  KCMO-5 (CBS), Kansas City
        The Odessan                                     KSHB-41 (NBC), Kansas City
                                                        KCPT-19 (PBS), Kansas City

        Radio stations
        WDAF-FM Kansas City
        KYYS-FM Kansas City


                                                                                                         81
          KUDL-FM Kansas City
          KMBZ-AM Kansas City
          KLTH-FM Kansas City
          KMXV-FM Kansas City
          KMZU-FM Carrollton
          KCMO-AM-FM Kansas City

          News releases are distributed by PTRPC as the particular situation warrants.


   V.F.

   Demographic information


   The 2000 U.S. Census was used to construct a profile of the average Lafayette County resident.
   Statistically, this average person is between age 35 and 44, has an income of $18,493 and lives in a
   rural single-family home within a mile of 52.4 other people. The average $74,400 home is maintained
   with a household income of $38,235. This person has at least a high school diploma, lives in
   Lafayette County, works in the county and drives to work alone in less than 25 minutes.

          Lafayette County’s population grew according to the 2000 census there was a population
   increase of 6% for the county from 1990 to 2000.

                         Lafayette County and Incorporated Areas
                                Historical Population Trends
 Jurisdiction 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990                                2000
Alma            248     319    369     361     366     357 390   380 445 446                     399
Aullville    ***        166    128     128     178     123   90  108     92     72                86
Bates City ***           74     98      94     103      87 110   229 199 197                     245
Concordia       889     931    962 1,140 1,077 1,218 1,471 1,854 2,129 2,160                   2,360
Corder          538     649    768     610     630     541 506   476 483 485                     427
Dover           242     214    229     252     233     173 172   133 126 115                     108
Emma         ***    ***     ***    ***     ***     ***     202   224 267 194                     243
Higginsville 2,791 2,628 2,742 3,339 3,533 3,428 4,003 4,318 4,595 4,693                       4,682
Lexington     4,190 5,242 4,695 4,595 5,341 5,074 4,845 5,388 5,063 4,860                      4,453
Mayview         433     308    406     322     325     268 270   330 291 279                     294
Napoleon        132     146    156     131     132     143 215   263 271 233                     208
Odessa        1,445 1,531 1,786 1,861 1,881 1,969 2,034 2,839 3,088 3,695                      4,818
Waverly         722     777    810     941     876     809 837   827 941 837                     804
Wellington      520     558    878     756     656     649 651   720 780 779                     784
County       31,679 30,154 30,006 29,259 27,856 25,272 25,274 26,626 29,925 31,107            32,960
                                               Table 8




                                                                                                          82
        Lafayette County remains predominantly white in the 2000 Census with a minority
population of 4.5%.

        Roughly 80% of Lafayette County’s 25-plus population are high school graduates or higher.
Depending upon regional economic conditions, this high level of educated populace may be better
able to find alternative employment if a disaster were to eliminate jobs.
The County’s age brackets in Table 3 show that typically vulnerable populations include those over
65 at 15.4% as well as those age 14 and under at 21.2% of the general population.



V.G.    Economy, employment, industry




The U.S. Census reported the county had a labor force (workers 16 and over) of 15,977 or 6.3% of
the county’s total workforce. The average wage for the first quarter



of 2000 was $355 per week. Nearly 8.8% of the population, or 2,902 persons, were below the federal
poverty level. The 2000 unemployment rate for Lafayette County was 2.4%.
Lafayette County’s primary products include processed food products, electrical
housings, retail trade, nursing and retirement services.

V.H. County labor study

        Employment within the county, as of Census 2000, consists of 15.3% manufacturing, 12.9%
retail trade, 7.9% education, 11.8% health care/social assistance. The remaining 47.9% include
finance, insurance, real estate, transportation, and public utilities, wholesale, trade, agricultural,
forestry, fishing and mining.



        The Lafayette County Labor Basin includes Caldwell, Carroll, Clay, Jackson, Johnson,
Lafayette, Pettis, Ray, and Saline Counties in Missouri. The purpose of this report is to assess the
―Available Labor Pool‖ in this labor basin. The ―Available Labor Pool‖ represents those who




                                                                                                         83
indicate that they are looking for employment or would consider changing their jobs for the right
employment opportunity.

       The Docking Institute’s independent analysis of this labor basin shows that:

     The population of the Lafayette County Labor Basin is estimated to be 243,338. About 23% of
     the total population (or 56,301 individuals) is considered to be part of the Available Labor Pool
     (ALP).

     Of the ALP, an estimated 5,652 (10.0%) non-working and 6,467 (15.0%) working individuals
     are looking for new employment, while 8,235 (14.6%) non-working and 33,947 (60.3%)
     working individuals would consider new and/or different employment for the right
     opportunities.

     About 63% of the ALP has at least some college experience and slightly more than 94% has at
     least a high school diploma. The average age for members of the entire ALP is about 42 years,
     and almost 57% of the ALP are women.

     Majorities of ALP members report having ―strong work skills‖ when it comes to working in
     groups and interpersonal relations (95%), writing (76%), management and supervision (75%),
     math (68%), and computers (61%).

     Approximately 5,965 members of the ALP are currently employed as general laborers,
     construction workers, or cleaners. An additional 1,394 report having experience or training in
     these fields.

     50,374 members of the ALP (or 89%) indicate that they are ―willing to work outside of their
     primary field of employment for a new or different employment opportunity.‖

     About 43% of the members (or 24,302 individuals) of the ALP will commute up to 45 minutes,
     one way, for an employment opportunity. 83% (or 46,833 individuals) will commute up to 30
     minutes for employment.

     The most important desired benefits are on-the-job training, good health benefits, good
     retirement benefits, and good salary or hourly pay.

     About 34,253 people (61%) are interested in a new job at $16 an hour, 23,614 (42%) are
     available at $12 an hour, and 8,971 (16%) are available at $8 an hour.

     Of the 44,421 members in the subset of employed members of the ALP, 24,152 (54%)
     consider themselves underutilized. Almost 70% of this subset of the ALP has some college
     experience, and a majority (90%) is willing to change jobs to improve their underutilized status.

     Of the 48,616 members in the subset of the ALP who do not own their own businesses,
     16,963 (35%) have considered starting their own businesses.


                                                                                                    84
V.I.    Primary Industries
        The retail and wholesale sector for Lafayette County can substantially be traced by following
the main roadways in the county.


        Establishments throughout the county provide for multiple types of retail and wholesale
transactions such as shopping malls, as well as food and entertainment facilities.
Retail and Wholesale trade is established sparsely along the U.S. 24 Corridor and the Missouri
Highway 23 Corridor. Missouri Highway 13, particularly at Higginsville and Lexington is more
densely populated with these establishments. The region of the county that can be best defined, as
the main retail portion of the county is the Southern portion, following the Interstate 70 Corridor.
This portion provides retail and wholesale trade to interstate travelers, as well as trade to Saline,
Pettis, Johnson, and Jackson Counties and neighboring Whiteman Air Force Base.
        The Construction Industry makes up 13.3 % of the Employed Civilian Population 16 years and
older and 15.3% of industrial workforce for Lafayette County. This sector is well dispersed through the
county, particularly in the earthmoving field of construction, while the general construction is
located toward the municipalities. This is one sector that shows a high trend of people commuting
outside of Lafayette County for employment.
        The Manufacturing Sector for Lafayette County consists primarily of small business
establishments.    The 2001 County Business Pattern shows the county to have thirty-six
manufacturing establishments. Only six of these establishments employ over 50 employees.
Plastics, Machine Shops, Machinery Manufacturing and Food Manufacturing make up the bulk of
the Manufacturing Sector in the county. The majority of the employment base in manufacturing for
the county can be pinpointed to the Interstate 70 corridor in the Southern region of the county.
        Agriculture remains an important part of the regional economy. County Summary
Highlights from the 2002 Census of Agriculture, conducted by the USDA, reveals that Lafayette
County has 1,286 farms consisting of 363,186 acres. Lafayette County has 1,164 farms with
cropland totaling 285,408 acres, producing various crops. Soybeans, corn, forage (silage), and winter
wheat are the dominant crops in the county, with over 251,000 acres used in production. The
County has a very large presence in the State of Missouri’s hog and cattle production. Prices have
been at or below production cost in some years in most of the county. Government programs to



                                                                                                        85
enhance the income of the farmer through direct subsidies and payments for conservation reserve
programs have been helpful to individual farmers but have had a negligible impact on the County’s
economy.



Access to employment: in-commuting and out-commuting


The majority of Lafayette County’s workforce works inside the county. Most commuters travel to
Jackson County to the west or Johnson County to the south.




                                   1.0% Ray Co.    2.2% Saline Co.
                                                                     Other Missouri Counties
                                                                     with less than 1%(4)
                                                                     1%
                        3.1% Johnson Co.




             28.2% Jackson
             County, MO




                                                                                 59.3%
                                                                                 Lafayette Co.



        2.2% Clay Co.


                 3.0% Kansas Co.




                                   Lafayette County Outcommuting Patterns




V.K.



                                                                                                  86
Development trends


Lafayette County has shown growth in the last few decades, part of this is caused by the expanding
Kansas City MSA. The county will continue to be a majority-farming county in the next few
decades. However, it may see an influx in residents as Kansas City residents leave the suburbs and
seek cheaper living in Lafayette County.

       Analysis of current data suggests the following:

       Agriculture remains a driving force to the economy of Lafayette County in terms of dollars
       and land use.

       The location of Lafayette County and the access to the Metropolitan Kansas City Area
       provides manufacturing base.

       Small business is vital to the county.

       A large employment base occurs in the hospitality service or food service areas.



V.L.   Roadways

       The principal roadways serving Lafayette County are Interstate 70, US Highway 24, and
Missouri Highways 13, 20 and 23. Numerous letter-grade roads provide road access to smaller
communities, developed during the 1950's and '60's as "farm to market" routes.


V.M. Railroads

The Union Pacific and the Chicago Missouri Western have routes through Lafayette County.
However, no passenger service is available within the county.
V.N. Airports


Commercial airline travel is accessible with less than a 90-minute drive from most locations in
Lafayette County. Kansas City International Airport is located approximately 76 miles to the east.
The small airports in Lafayette County are shown in the above map.
V.O.
Public Transportation



                                                                                                     87
OATS, Inc provides public transportation in the county. This publicly funded system provides door-
to-door transportation service with flexible schedules to meet the needs of those who may have little
or no alternative means of travel, regardless of age or disability.
V.P.
Telecommunications


New infrastructures and services are enhancing county residents’ quality of life. The following list of
communication facilities is not all-inclusive, but represents the major providers of the county’s
communications infrastructure.

Telecommunication Service Providers

Sprint
Alma Telephone Company

Wireless Communications Companies

AT&T Wireless Services
Cingular Wireless
Sprint PCS
T Mobile Wireless
Voice Stream Wireless
Southwestern Bell Wireless
Verizon Wireless

Long Distance Carriers

Sprint
AT&T
MCI

Internet Service Providers

Access Internet
CDS Internet
CLASSICNET.NET
Comcast
I-Land Internet Services
Interstate Software
SOCKET

Television Communications


                                                                                                     88
Six Kansas City based broadcast television stations
Classic Cable
COMCAST
Galaxy Cablevision
Mediacom


V.Q.    Infrastructure, services and facilities

        Water and Sewer

The county continues to improve its ability to service residents and businesses with public water and
sewer. Lafayette County Water District #1, US Water-Lexington Missouri Inc. of Lexington provide
for the Lexington and surrounding area. The City of Higginsville provides water service in and
around the city limits. The City of Concordia provides water services in and around the city limits.
The county water is provided mainly by private wells. The Table 8 below shows the water districts
that serve Lafayette County. Wastewater Treatment Plant City of Higginsville serves in an around
the city limits. Concordia Wastewater treatment serves the city of Concordia.


        Electricity and Natural gas

West Central Electric Coop, City of Higginsville and Aquila provide electrical service to the county.
The county has the ability of a self-sustaining power grid, through the Higginsville power plant.
Aquila as well as Missouri Gas Energy provides natural gas to some of the incorporated areas.

Solid waste disposal

Several different companies throughout the region collect the County’s solid waste: Allied Waste,
Sandra Rumble disposal, Steve Haller disposal, Odessa community service center. Lafayette County
has no landfills within the county. Lafayette County is part of the West Central Missouri solid waste
district, shown as region F in Figure 3.



Law enforcement


The Lafayette County Sheriff’s Department includes the sheriff, 1 lieutenant, 3 sergeants, 2
detectives, and 8 deputies. The department participates in mutual aid agreements with all



                                                                                                    89
incorporated areas within the county. They patrol approximately 670 square miles of county roads.
The Missouri Highway patrol, troop A from Lee’s Summit, monitors traffic on Interstate 70 and
other state highways. Some municipalities within the county maintain local police: Lexington,
Higginsville, Odessa, Wellington, Corder, Concordia, Napoleon, Waverly, Alma, and Dover.
       Emergency medical services


The Lafayette County Ambulance district provides EMS services to the county. The Table 10 below
shows the Ambulance locations in Lafayette County. The Lafayette regional health center in
Lexington is the main hospital in Lafayette County. Larger hospitals are available within a few hours
in Kansas City and Columbia.
       Fire protection


The following communities provide fire protection services for the county:




Alma Fire Protection District


Concordia Fire Protection District


Corder Fire Protection District


Mayview Fire District


Higginsville


Odessa Volunteer & Rescue


Wellington-Napoleon Fire Department


Lexington Fire Department
        The county has an ISO rating of 6. Rural areas that are beyond this type of service are given
an ISO rating of 9. The ISO rating can be reduced from 9 to 6 with enough water hauling capacity


                                                                                                   90
and sufficient mutual aid response agreements with neighboring jurisdictions. It is the intent of the
fire protections districts to provide improvements that will allow most rural areas of the county to
be granted the more preferable ISO rating of 6, which would create a savings of 10 to 15 percent on
insurance premiums and mitigate the risk of fire damage.
         Emergency services (911)


Lafayette County has in place a 9-1-1 phone system to take calls in case of emergencies. This 911
center then dispatches for the ambulance, fire, and law enforcement departments that serve
Lafayette County.


Underground Infrastructure


Due to homeland security concerns, underground utilities are not mapped in this plan. According to
the Missouri One Call System, Inc. as of January 2, 2004, the following companies maintain
underground utility lines within Lafayette County. Emergency information concerning these utility
lines is contained in the county’s Emergency Operations Plan updated in 2003. The Lafayette
County Emergency Management director’s telephone number is 660-259-6551.
The following companies have underground lines running through Lafayette County:


Alma Telephone Company


Aquila


AT&T Corp.


B P Products N. America Inc.


Centurytel


Citizens Telephone Company


City of Higginsville


                                                                                                       91
Comcast Cablevision


Galaxy Cablevision


Jackson County PWSD16


Johnson County PWSD 1


KCPL


Lafayette County PWSD 1
        Lafayette-Johnson County PWSD 2
        Lightcore
        Mid Missouri Cellular
        Missouri Network Alliance
        Missouri Gas Energy
        SBC (Southwestern Bell)
        Sinclair Pipeline Co.
        Southern Star Central Gas
        Sprint Local
        U S Water
        West Central Electric Cooperative
        Williams Pipeline
        The Missouri One Call utility location telephone number is 800-344-7483.

        Inventory of commercial/industrial facilities


The industry in the county includes processing and service. There are several shopping areas in Lafayette
County, including Wal-Mart and an Outlet mall in Odessa. The majority of the county is related to
Agricultural business.




                                                                                                            92
                Lafayette County Employers, More Than 30 Employees
       Company Name                      Product            City                              Employees
Continental Deli                Ham Processing           Concordia                           225
Lutheran Good Shepherd          Nursing/Retirement       Concordia                           180
Home
Millbank Manufacturing          Electrical Enclosures    Concordia                           150
Travel Centers of America       Truck service/Restaurant Concordia                           80
Concordia R-2 Schools           Public School            Concordia                           77
Evans Equipment                 Recondition earth moving Concordia                           30
                                equipment
                                            Table 9



V.R.    Housing


        The Lafayette County housing
                                                              Lafayette County 2000 Census
supply is generally tight; especially for
                                                   Housing Types                     #     Percent
homes at or below the $74,400 average              Single-family                    10,488    76.5%
single-family house. Of the total 13,707           Multi-family                      1,492    10.9%
                                                   Mobile Homes                      1,694    12.4%
housing units, 57.2 are rural units, 91.7%         Miscellaneous types                  33     0.2%
are owner-occupied, 76.5% are single               Total Housing Units              13,707    100%
                                                   Source: 2000 U.S. Census
family units.                                                                     Table 10
        With a total of 12,568 households
and 1,137 vacant units, the county would have a only a 9% margin in dwelling units to accommodate
changing residential needs.
        Of the county’s 12,584 households, 69.3% were built before 1979. Therefore, the average



                Lafayette County Housing Structure Age

                                            1999-March 2000
                                                                      1995-1998
                       Pre-1940                      429
                                                                      1,107           1990-1994
                       3,183                           3.1%             8.1%          881
                       23.2%
                                                                                      6.4%


                                                                                              13.1%
                                                                                               1,794
   1940-1949                                                                                   1980-1989
       1,004
            7.3%

                     8.9%
                  1,220                                                          18.2%
                                    11.7%
                1950-1959
                                  1,601
                                                                              1970-1979                    93
                                                                              2,488
                                  1960,1969
structure in Lafayette County is 20 to 25 years old. Table 17 shows the number of housing units in
the county and table 18 shows the age of the housing.


       Total inventory of structures

The total Lafayette County assessed valuation for 2003, including both real estate and personal
property was $312,394,851 according to Missouri Department of Revenue. Therefore the average
assessed valuation was $9,478 per capita.




                                                                                                     94
V.S.   City profiles


Alma
       Total Population                      399
       Classification                        City-fourth class
       Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
       Median household income, 1999         $37,426
       Total housing units                   190
       Housing unit, median year built       1949
       Median gross rent                     $394
       Median owner-occupied housing value   $59,800
       Master plan                           no
       Emergency Operations Plan             no
       Zoning regulations                    no
       Building regulations                  no
       Subdivision regulations               no
       Stormwater regulations                no
       Floodplain regulations                no
       Water service                         Yes
       Sewer service                         Yes
       Electric service                      Yes
       Fire service                          Alma F.D.
       Ambulance service                     Yes
       Rivers, streams                       no
       Major arterials                       MO 23




                                                                 95
Aullville
        Total Population                      86
        Classification                        Village
        Leadership structure                  Chairman/Trustees
        Median household income, 1999         $33,542
        Total housing units                   38
        Housing unit, median year built       1959
        Median gross rent                     $275
        Median owner-occupied housing value   $37,500
        Master plan                           No
        Emergency Operations Plan             No
        Zoning regulations                    No
        Building regulations                  No
        Subdivision regulations               No
        Stormwater regulations                No
        Floodplain regulations                No
        Water service                         Yes
        Sewer service                         No
        Electric service                      Yes
        Fire service                          Higginsville F.D.
        Ambulance service                     Yes
        Rivers, streams                       No




                                                                  96
Bates City
       Total Population                      245
       Classification                        City-fourth class
       Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
       Median household income, 1999         $43,125
       Total housing units                   96
       Housing unit, median year built       1970
       Median gross rent                     $350
       Median owner-occupied housing value   $75,000
       Master plan                           No
       Emergency Operations Plan             No
       Zoning regulations                    unknown
       Building regulations                  unknown
       Subdivision regulations               No
       Stormwater regulations                No
       Floodplain regulations                Yes
       Water service                         Yes
       Sewer service                         Yes
       Fire service                          Yes
       Ambulance service                     Yes




                                                                 97
Concordia
      Total Population                      2,360
      Classification                        Fourth-class
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $33,906
      Total housing units                   1,006
      Housing unit, median year built       1960
      Median gross rent                     $330
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $74,500
      Master plan                           Yes
      Emergency Operations Plan             Yes
      Zoning regulations                    Yes
      Building regulations                  Yes
      Subdivision regulations               Yes
      Stormwater regulations                No
      Floodplain regulations                No
      Water service                         Yes
      Sewer service                         Yes
      Electric service                      Yes
      Fire service                          Yes
      Ambulance service                     Yes




                                                            98
Corder
        Total Population                           2,360
        Classification                             City-fourth class
        Leadership structure                       Mayor/Council
        Median household income, 1999              $32,727
        Total housing units                        203
        Housing unit, median year built            1944
        Median gross rent                          $463
        Median owner-occupied housing value        $43,200
        Master plan                                no
        Emergency Operations Plan                  no
        Zoning regulations                         no
Building regulations                        yes
Subdivision regulations                     no
Stormwater regulations                      no
Floodplain regulations                      yes
Water service                               Higginsville
Sewer service                               city
Electric service                            KCPL
Fire service                                Higginsville
Ambulance service                           Higginsville
Rivers, streams                             no




                                                                       99
Dover
        Total Population                           108
        Classification                             Village
        Leadership structure                       Chairman/Trustees
        Median household income, 1999              $39,688
        Total Housing units                        64
        Housing unit, median year built            1949
        Median gross rent                          $375
        Median owner-occupied housing value        $37,500
        Master plan                                no
Emergency Operations Plan                   no
Zoning regulations                          no
Building regulations                        no
Subdivision regulations                     no
Stormwater regulations                      no
Floodplain regulations                      yes
Water service                               Higginsville
Sewer service                               no
Electric service                            KCPL
Fire service                                Higginsville
Ambulance service                           Higginsville
Rivers, streams                             no




                                                                       100
Higginsville
      Total Population                      4,682
      Classification                        City-fourth class
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $31,497
      Total housing units                   1,934
      Housing unit, median year built       1965
      Median gross rent                     $364
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $67,700
      Master plan                           yes
      Emergency Operations Plan             yes
      Zoning regulations                    yes
      Building regulations                  yes
      Subdivision regulations               yes
      Stormwater regulations                yes
      Floodplain regulations                no
      Water service                         yes
      Sewer service                         yes
      Electric service                      City
      Fire service                          yes
      Ambulance service                     yes
      Rivers, streams                       yes




                                                                101
Lake Lafayette
      Total Population                      346
      Classification                        City-fourth class
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $30,750
      Total housing units                   156
      Housing unit, median year built       1976
      Median gross rent                     $475
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $50,000
      Master plan                           no
      Emergency Operations Plan             no
      Zoning regulations                    no
      Building regulations                  no
      Subdivision regulations               no
      Stormwater regulations                no
      Floodplain regulations                no
      Water service                         PWSD
      Sewer service                         no
      Electric service                      KCPL
      Fire service                          RFPD
      Ambulance service                     Odessa, Lexington
      Rivers, streams                       yes




                                                                102
Lexington
      Total Population                      4,453
      Classification                        City-third class
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $32,759
      Total housing units                   2,015
      Housing unit, median year built       1953
      Median gross rent                     $440
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $63,100
      Master plan                           Yes
      Emergency Operations Plan             Yes
      Zoning regulations                    Yes
      Building regulations                  Yes
      Subdivision regulations               Yes
      Stormwater regulations                No
      Floodplain regulations                No
      Water service                         Yes
      Sewer service                         Yes
      Electric service                      Aquila
      Fire service                          Yes
      Ambulance service                     Yes
      Rivers, streams                       Yes




                                                               103
Mayview
      Total Population                          294
      Classification                            City-fourth class
      Leadership structure                Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999             $25,313
      Total housing units                       111
      Housing unit, median year built           1947
      Median gross rent                         $425
      Median owner-occupied housing value       $29,300
      Master plan                               no
      Emergency Operations Plan                 no
      Zoning regulations                        no
      Building regulations                      no
      Subdivision regulations                   no
      Stormwater regulations                    no
      Floodplain regulations                    no
      Water service                             PWSD
      Sewer service                             no
      Electric service                          KCPL
      Fire service                              RFPD
      Ambulance service                         Odessa, Lexington
      Rivers, streams                           yes




                                                                    104
Napoleon
     Total Population                      208
     Classification                        City-fourth class
     Leadership structure                  City-fourth class
     Median household income, 1999         $36,875
     Total housing units                   99
     Housing unit, median year built       1949
     Median gross rent                     $519
     Median owner-occupied housing value   $58,200
     Master plan                           no
     Emergency Operations Plan             no
     Zoning regulations                    no
     Building regulations                  no
     Subdivision regulations               no
     Stormwater regulations                no
     Floodplain regulations                no
     Water service                         PWSD
     Sewer service                         no
     Electric service                      KCPL
     Fire service                          RFPD
     Ambulance service                     Lexington
     Rivers, streams                       yes




                                                               105
Odessa
      Total Population                      4,818
      Classification                        City-fourth class
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $34,007
      Total housing units                   2,011
      Housing unit, median year built       1971
      Median gross rent                     $235
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $51,300
      Master plan                           yes
      Emergency operations plan             yes
      Zoning regulations                    yes
      Building regulations                  yes
      Subdivision regulations               yes
      Stormwater regulations                yes
      Floodplain regulations                yes
      Water service                         yes
      Sewer service                         yes
      Electric service                      Aquila
      Fire service                          yes
      Ambulance service                     yes
      Rivers, streams                       yes




                                                                106
Waverly
      Total Population                      806
      Classification                        City-fourth class
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $36,806
      Total housing units                   369
      Housing unit, median year built       1955
      Median gross rent                     $353
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $51,900
      Master plan                           yes
      Emergency operations plan             no
      Zoning regulations                    no
      Building regulations                  yes
      Subdivision regulations               no
      Stormwater regulations                no
      Floodplain regulations                yes
      Water service                         yes
      Sewer service                         yes
      Electric service                      Aquila
      Fire service                          yes
      Ambulance service                     yes
      Rivers, streams                       yes




                                                                107
Wellington
       Total Population                      784
       Classification                        City-fourth class
       Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
       Median household income, 1999         $32,500
       Total housing units                   361
       Housing unit, median year built       1955
       Median gross rent                     $338
       Median owner-occupied housing value   $64,900
       Master plan                           yes
       Emergency operations plan             yes
       Zoning regulations                    yes
       Building regulations                  yes
       Subdivision regulations               yes
       Stormwater regulations                yes
       Floodplain regulations                yes
       Water service                         yes
       Sewer service                         yes
       Electric service                      yes
       Fire service                          yes
       Ambulance service                     yes
       Rivers, streams                       yes




                                                                 108
Lafayette County
       Total Population                               32,960
       Classification                                 County-fourth class
       Leadership structure                   Presiding Comm/Associates.
       Median household income, 1999                  38,235
       Total housing units                            13,707
                Housing unit, median year built              1963
       Median gross rent                              $416
       Median owner-occupied housing value            $88,003
       Master plan                                    Yes
       Emergency Operations Plan                      Yes
       Zoning regulations                             Yes
       Building regulations                           Yes
       Subdivision regulations                        Yes
       Stormwater regulations                         No
       Floodplain regulations                         Yes
       Water service                                  Rural water districts
       Sewer service                                  Lagoons and Septic tanks
       Electric service                               Aquila
       Fire service                                   Provided by 9 fire departments
       Ambulance service                              5 Ambulance barns
       Rivers, streams                                Missouri river and many tributaries




                                                                                            109
SECTION VI:               PETTIS COUNTY
VI.A. County Profile
          Pettis County is one of 115 counties and county equivalent cities in Missouri. It has 684.8 sq.
miles in land area and a population density of 57.5 per square mile. In the last three decades of the
1900s its population grew by
                                                               Pettis County Population Trend, 1900-2000
15.4%. On the 2000 census
form, 98.4% of the population           45,000

                                        40,000
reported only one race, with            35,000
                                                                                                                         2000
                                                                                                           1980   1990
3.0% of these reporting                 30,000
                                                 1900
                                                        1910     1920
                                                                        1930
                                                                               1940
                                                                                      1950
                                                                                             1960
                                                                                                    1970

                                        25,000
African-American. The
                                        20,000

population of this county is            15,000


3.9% Hispanic (of any race).            10,000

                                         5,000
The average household size is               0

2.49 persons compared to an
average family                                   CHART 8
size of 3.01 persons.
          Pettis County was organized January 26, 1833, and took its name from Spencer Pettis, the
third Congressman from Missouri, elected in 1828, when the entire State made but one
congressional district. He is remembered for his duel with Major Thomas Biddle, which resulted in
the death of both. The territory of Pettis County was taken from the counties of Cooper and Saline;
at one time the southern boundary of Saline County passed through the present city of Sedalia.
          During the Civil War sentiment was greatly divided, and a large number of the arms-bearing
people entered one or the other of the contending armies. With the exception of the attack upon
Sedalia during the Price raid in 1864, the county saw little of war except the occasional passage of
troops. However, the county seat was a large military post and depot. A few of the personal feuds
which so greatly marred some other portions of the State did exist in the county.

          Pettis County is a strong rural county, but Sedalia was closely tied to the railroad lines
passing through it. Those times are almost forgotten, except for the annual Ragtime Festival held to
commemorate the partnership in Sedalia of music publisher John Stark and ragtime composer Scott
Joplin.




                                                                                                                         110
       The population of the county increased from 32,438 in 1900 until 1940 when the population
was 33,336. The years between 1940 and 1950 showed a decline to 31,577 after 1950 there had been
a steady increase until 1980 when the population was 36,378. The population for 1990 was 35,437
and by the 2000 census had grown to 39,403 which is an increase of 11.2% over the 1990 figures.
Today, 37.8% of the population lives in rural areas. However there only 5% of the population a
living on farms.
       The total 2003 population of Pettis County is 39,344. This ranks Pettis County 27th of 115
counties in terms of Missouri population. From 1990 to 2000, the population of Pettis County
increased by 11%. 15.3% of the County population is over 65 years of age. The mean age of the
County is 37 years of age, the same as the Missouri average. The 2002 per capita personal income
was $23,915, up 17.8% since 1992. The state of Missouri per capita income for 2002 was $28,512.
       The County unemployment rate, based on 2003 figures was 5.9%. Employers draw
employees from both within and outside the County.




                                  Pettis County                                     2000 Census
                               Population Density                                 Number Percent
               Total Persons                                                      39,403    100
               Urban Clusters                                                     24,501    62.2
               Rural Population                                                   14,902    37.8
               Persons on Farms                                                    1,978    5.0
               Persons Per Square Mile (686square miles)                           57.5
                                       Source: 2000 U.S. Census, Summary file 1

                                                   Table 11

VI.B. Geography, geology and climate
       Pettis County is in the central part of the State. It is bounded on the north by Saline County;
east by Cooper and Morgan Counties; south by Benton County; and west by Lafayette, Johnson and
Henry Counties.
               Pettis County encompasses approximately 685 square miles, or 438,400 acres. The
Lower Missouri-Blackwater-Lamine River Basin includes those streams in the west-central part of
Missouri, which drain into the Missouri River. The Lamine River is formed when Flat and Richland


                                                                                                   111
creek meet in Morgan County to form a prominent Missouri River tributary - the Lamine River.
From it’s beginning just south of Highway 50 to its confluence with the Missouri, 59 river miles
north, the Lamine meanders through Pettis County. According to the Topography relief map
below, Pettis County’s topography consists mostly of gently rolling plains and some highly dissected
plateaus.
        The climate is generally moderate. Temperatures range from an average high of 89 degrees in
July to an average low of 19 degrees in January. Rainfall averages 4 inches per month during March
through July while the average is 3 inches per month during September through December. January
and February average only 2 inches, while snowfall averages 3-5 inches in the winter months.
Average wind speeds range from 9 miles per hour in July to 13 miles per hour in March. Winter and
spring winds are from the west-northwest while summer winds blow primarily from the south

VI.C. Form of government
        The county government consists of the County Commission, Planning and Zoning,
Assessor, County Clerk, Sheriff, Emergency Management, Public Health, Coroner, and Road and
Bridge. Pettis County operates as a second-class county. The county government has authority to
administer county structures, infrastructures, and finances as well as a master plan, zoning code,
subdivision regulations, floodplain regulations and storm water regulations.




VI.D. Significant cultural/social issues
        There has been very rapid growth in Hispanic population in Pettis County during the past
decade. School enrollment data show a 545 percent increase in Hispanic students since 1990. The
increase was almost 600 percent in the Sedalia district, where Hispanic students now account for 4
percent of total enrollment. Experience has shown that the increase has been even more explosive in
the general population due to an influx of many young unmarried males in search of employment.
The latest figures from the Migrant Education Center show 224 migrant children enrolled in Pettis
County. There has also been a sizable influx of Russian/Ukrainian residents to the area as well. This
rapid influx has created many issues and concerns around health services, housing, law enforcement,
banking, education, transportation, communication, etc.



                                                                                                     112
VI.E. Media
       The Sedalia Democrat is the official newspaper of Pettis County. In addition, the Central
Missouri News covers news in Sedalia and the surrounding areas. Both provide adequate coverage of
planning issues such as natural hazard mitigation.
       Four radio stations are based in Pettis County -- two AM and two FM. These local stations
cover local issues in depth. The Kansas City broadcast media also provides coverage. The list of
pertinent media outlets is included below.
       Newspapers
              Sedalia Democrat
              Central Missouri News
              Knob Noster Item
       Radio stations
              KDRO-AM, Sedalia
              KPOW-FM, Sedalia
              KSIS-AM, Sedalia
              KIX-FM-Sedalia
       Television stations
              KMOS-6 (PBS), Sedalia
              WDAF-4 (Fox), Kansas City
              KCTV-5 (CBS), Kansas City
              KCPT- 19 (PBS), Kansas City
              KCMI-38 (IND), Kansas City
              KSHB-41 (NBC), Kansas City
              KSMO-62 (WB), Kansas City

       News releases are distributed by PTRPC as the particular situation warrants




                                                                                                   113
VI.F. Demographic information

        The 2000 Census was used to construct a profile of the average Pettis County resident.
Statistically, this average person is between 35 and 44, has an income of $16,251 and lives in an
                                                      urban single family home within a mile of 57.5
                 Table 12                             other people. The average $67,400 home is
Population Trends Cities within Pettis County
                                                      maintained with a household income of
 Jurisdiction      1990       2000    % of Change
Green Ridge         447        479        7.15        $31,580. This person has at least a high school
  Houstonia         293        296        1.02        diploma, lives in Pettis County, works in Pettis
 Hughesville        150        157        4.66
                                                      County and drives to work alone in less than
  LaMonte           992       1,059       6.75
   Sedalia        19,800     20,447       3.26        20 minutes.
  Smithton          549        501       -8.74                        http://mcdc.missouri.edu
Pettis County     35,437     39,403      11.19                Although Pettis County remains
predominantly white in the 2000 Census, the diversity of the population has increased. Historically,
diversity has been scarce. However, the 2000 Census showed the presence of non-white races
increased to 3.4% of the total population. The portion of the county’s Hispanic population in
particular grew significantly. Between 1990 and 2000, the county’s Hispanic population increased
from 268 to 1,542. The county’s increase exceeded the state’s 92.2% increase. Table 13 presents a
more detailed look at the
county’s diversity.                                          Table 13
Roughly 78% of Pettis                                Pettis County Diversity
                                         Race              Census     % Change               % of Total
County’s 25 –plus
                                                         1990 2000 1990 to 2000               for 2000
population are high                      White          33,963 36,418     7.2%                 92.1%
school graduates or                      Black          1,167 1,862       59%                    3%
                              Am Indian/Alaska Native 103 1,581          1434%                  <1%
higher. Depending upon         Asian/Pacific Islander 123 395             221%                  <1%
regional economic                      Hispanic          268 1542         475%                  3.9%
conditions, this indicates         2 or more races       N/A 632          N/A                   N/A
                               Source: 2000 U.S. Census
the workforce should be
able to find alternative employment if a disaster were to eliminate jobs. The county’s age bracket in
Table 14 shows that 58.5% of the population is of labor force age; 40.1% of the work force is age
25-54. Typical vulnerable populations include those age 65 and over at 16% as well as those age 14
and under at 21.9% of the general population.




                                                                                                     114
               Table 14
   Pettis County Population by Age
              Brackets
       Age       Population Percent
Under 5                2,754        7
5 to 9                 2,902      7.4
10 to 14               2,954      7.5
15 to 17               1,757      4.4
18 to 19               1,201        3
20 to 24               2,480     6.3
25 to 34               4,855     12.3
35 to 44               6,216     15.8
45 to 54               4,670       12
55 to 59               1,851      4.7
60 to 64               1,644      4.2
65 to 74               3,154        8
75 to 84               2,190        6
Over 85                  775        2


Total                   39,403
        Source: U.S. Census 2000


VI.G. Economy, employment and industry
   The 2000 U.S. Census reported the county had a labor force (workers 16 and over) of 18,286, or
46% of the county’s total population. The average wage for the first quarter of 2001 was $468 per
week. Nearly 12.6% of the population, or 4,967 persons, were below the federal poverty level. The
2000 unemployment rate for Pettis County was 4.9% compared to Missouri’s 2000 rate of 4.7%.




                                                                                               115
                                            Table 15

                        Pettis County Economic Indicators


                                                                            Number    Percent

Civilian labor force                                                         18,286

Employed                                                                     18,333             65
Unemployment rate                                                             4.9%          (X)
INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, hunting, mining                                654          3.6
Construction                                                                  1,305         7.1
Manufacturing                                                                 4,316        23.5
Wholesale trade                                                                654          3.6
Retail trade                                                                  2,236        12.1
Transport, warehouse, utilities                                                848          4.6
Information                                                                    428          2.3
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental, leasing                               664         3.62
Professional, scientific, management, administrative, waste                    690          3.8
management services
Educational, health, social                                                   3,487             19
Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation                                1,334         7.3
Other services (except public administration)                                  981          5.4
Public administration                                                          736               4
Per capita income (dollars)                                                  16,251         (X)
Individuals below poverty level                                               4,967         (X)
Percent of total population                                                    (X)         12.6
                              Source: U.S. Census 2000; Summary File DP-3




                                                                                                     116
VI.H. County Labor Study
       The Pettis County Labor Basin includes Benton, Cooper, Henry, Howard, Johnson,
Lafayette, Moniteau, Morgan, Pettis, and Saline Counties in Missouri. The purpose of this report is
to assess the ―Available Labor Pool‖ in this labor basin. The ―Available Labor Pool‖ represents
those who indicate that they are looking for employment or would consider changing their jobs for
the right employment opportunity.

       The Docking Institute’s independent analysis of this labor basin shows that:

     The population of the Pettis County Labor Basin is estimated to be 250,339. About 27% of
     the total population (or 66,531 individuals) is considered to be part of the Available Labor Pool
     (ALP).

     Of the ALP, an estimated 4,769 (7.2%) non-working and 13,773 (20.7%) working individuals
     are looking for new employment, while 8,800 (13.2%) non-working and 39,189 (58.9%)
     working individuals would consider new and/or different employment for the right
     opportunities.

     About 64% of the ALP has at least some college experience and almost 93% has at least a high
     school diploma. The average age for members of the entire ALP is about 42 years, and 58% of
     the ALP are women.

     Majorities of ALP members report having ―strong work skills‖ when it comes to working in
     groups and interpersonal relations (95%), writing (74%), management and supervision (71%),
     math (70%), and computers (56%).

     Approximately 6,370 members of the ALP are currently employed as general laborers,
     construction workers, or cleaners. An additional 1,766 report having experience or training in
     these fields.

     58,364 members of the ALP (or 88%) indicate that they are ―willing to work outside of their
     primary field of employment for a new or different employment opportunity.‖

     Almost 37% of the members (or 24,347 individuals) of the ALP will commute up to 45
     minutes, one way, for an employment opportunity. Almost 83% (or 55,167 individuals) will
     commute up to 30 minutes for employment.

     The most important desired benefits are good health benefits, on-the-job training, good
     retirement benefits, and good salary or hourly pay.

     About 44,079 people (66%) are interested in a new job at $16 an hour, 29,517 (44%) are
     available at $12 an hour, and 10,927 (16%) are available at $8 an hour.




                                                                                                  117
        Of the 52,962 members in the subset of employed members of the ALP, 28,032 (53%)
        consider themselves underutilized. Almost 70% of this subset of the ALP has some college
        experience, and a majority (89%) is willing to change jobs to improve their underutilized status.

        Of the 57,126 members in the subset of the ALP who do not own their own businesses,
        20,154 (35%) have considered starting their own businesses.



VI.I.     Primary industries

          Continued automation in the manufacturing process has helped drive up the demand for the
higher wages of skilled labor while requiring less employees to operate the systems. Pettis County’s
primary products include: processed poultry food products, steel and metal fabrication, commercial
food service products, chemical products, cellular glass insulation, playground equipment, bullets,
industrial cleaning tools, compressors, and fiberglass tanks.
          Employment within the county, as of Census 200, consists of 23.5% manufacturing,
19% education/health/ social services, 12% retail trade, and 7.3 % arts/ entertainment/ recreation/
accommodation. The remaining 38.2% consists of agriculture, forestry, fishing, mining,
construction, wholesale trade, transportation, utilities, information, real estate, finance, professional,
scientific, management, administrative, waste management services and public administration.

VI.J.     Access to employment: in-commuting and out-commuting
          The majority of Pettis County’s workforce works inside the county. Pettis County’s
commuting patterns show that 2,527 (13.8%) of the county’s workers work outside of the county.
See out-commuting chart below.




                                                                                                       118
                              Pettis County Out-commuting Patterns


                                                         Moniteau Co. 0.5%

                                                             Henry Co. 0.7%

                                                                 Benton Co. 0.9%

                                                                  Jackson Co. 1.3%

                                                                       Saline Co. 1.9%
                Johnson
                Co.
                4.9%

                                                                                     Pettis County
                                              Pettis                                 Johnson County
                                              Co.
                                              86.2%                                  Saline County
                                                                                     Jackson County
                                                                                     Benton County
                                                                                     Henry County
                                                                                     Moniteau County

                                                                                                       Produ
     ced from data derived from http://mcdc2.missouri.du/data/workflow/reports/MissouriRsort.(html/pdf)
                                                CHART 9

VI.K. Development trends
       Pettis County has seen some growth in the last ten years growing from a population 35,437
in 1990 to a population of 39,403 in the 2000 census. Within the county 37.8% of the population
live in rural areas. Of the counties population 66.2% live in urban housing. These units are located
primarily in or near Sedalia, Smithton, and La Monte. Smaller concentrations exist in Green Ridge,
Houstonia, and Hughesville.


VI,L. Roadways

       Roadways continue to be the main source of transportation within the region to support the
movement of people and goods along 1,351.97 miles of road. The Missouri Department of
Transportation (MoDOT) provides and maintains all federal and state roadways, 492.67 miles of
road, within the county while Pettis County maintains more than 859.30 miles of roadway in
unincorporated areas. Roughly 75.3% are either soil or gravel roads.



                                                                                                          119
        Within the county’s road network are three major transportation corridors. Pettis County is
located just south of Interstate 70. Interstate 70 is the main route across the State of Missouri
between St. Louis and Kansas City. US Highway 50 runs east-west across the county and US
Highway 65 runs North-South across the county.


VI.M. Railroads

        The main line of Union Pacific Railroad links the city of Sedalia to major markets to the east
and west. Piggyback to both coasts is available from the Kansas City terminal. Passenger service is
available through Amtrak with stations in Sedalia, Warrensburg and Jefferson City.


VI.N. Airports

        Sedalia Memorial Airport serves Sedalia and Pettis County and is owned by the City Of
Sedalia. The facility is at an elevation of 909 feet at a distance of about 2 miles from Sedalia.
        Sedalia Memorial Airport handles nearly 20,000 aircraft operations yearly. Its 5,000-foot
lighted concrete runway handles aircraft up to 48,000 pounds gross weight. A second crosswind
runway is 3,600 feet long. The 500-acre airport is home to more than 20 private and business
aircraft. Available services include: jet fuel, transportation, and mechanic.
        Corporate Air Express, established in 1996, is an on-demand air carrier service offering
charter flights from and returning to Sedalia Memorial Airport. Available services include: flight
training and aircraft rental.


VI.O. Public Transportation
        Public transportation in the county is provided by OATS, Inc. This publicly funded system
provides door-to-door transportation service with flexible schedules to meet the needs of those who
may have little or no alternative means of travel, regardless of age or disability.
        Sedalia Cab. Co. offers taxi service to the entire area. Mon-Thu 6am -11 pm, Fri-Sun 6am -2am.


VI.P. Telecommunications
        New infrastructures and services are enhancing county residents’ quality of life.                The
following list of communication facilities is not all-inclusive, but represents the major providers of
the county’s communications infrastructure.



                                                                                                         120
                                           Table 16
                              Pettis County Telecommunications
          Tele-            Wireless     Long Distance     Internet                  Television
    communication        Companies          Carriers       Service
        Providers                                        Providers
    Southwestern        AT&T Wireless AT&T            Southwestern               Charter Cable
    Bell                                              Bell (T-1)
    United              T-Mobile        MCI           Numerous dial-             Numerous
    Telephone                                         up service                 satellite service
                                                      providers                  providers
    Mid-Missouri        Voicestream     Sprint                                   No Local
    Telephone                                                                    Television
                                                                                 Stations
    All-Tel             US Cellular        Southwestern
                                           Bell
    AT&T                Sprint
                        Verizon
                        Wireless


VI.Q. Infrastructure, services and facilities
       Sewer and water
       The county continues to improve its ability to service residents and businesses with public
water and sewer. The cities of Sedalia, Green Ridge, Houstonia, Hughesville, LaMonte and
Smithton provide municipal sewer, while Sedalia, Green Ridge and LaMonte have municipal water
systems.

       Electricity and natural gas

       There are five providers of electric service for Pettis County, Central Missouri Electric
Cooperative, UtiliCorp United/Missouri Public Service, Rural Electric CO-OP, Aquila, and Kansas
City Power and Light.
       The natural gas providers of Pettis County are UtiliCorp United/Missouri Public Service,
Aquila, and the KPL Gas Company (Warrensburg). Natural gas service is available along Highway
50 west of Sedalia to Dresden and east of Sedalia to Otterville.




                                                                                                     121
           Solid waste disposal

           Steve Hauler Disposal, D & D Trash Service, Heaper Sanitation, E-Z Way Disposal Services
and Norris & Sons collect the county’s solid waste disposal. Waste is trucked to a landfill site in
Sedalia.


Law enforcement

           The Pettis County Sheriff’s office includes the sheriff and 8 patrol officers. The Pettis
County Sheriff has mutual-aid agreements with surrounding counties for augmentation of the
department. The towns of Sedalia, Green Ridge, La Monte, and Smithton maintain municipal police
departments.


           Emergency medical services

           Pettis County emergency medical services are provided by the following two medical
response companies: American Medical Response Incorporated and American Paramedical Services
Incorporated.


           Fire protection

           The following fire protection departments provide services for the entire county:

                  Pettis County Fire Department
                  Sedalia Fire Department
                  Green Ridge Fire Protection District
                  Houstonia Fire Department
                  Hughesville Fire Department
                  La Monte Fire Protection District
                  Smithton Rural Fire Protection District
                  Lake Creek Fire Department
                  Cole Camp Fire Department




                                                                                                       122
        Any development within five miles of a station and 1,000 feet of a hydrant is given an ISO
rating of 6. Rural areas that are beyond this type of service are given an ISO rating of 9. The ISO
rating can be reduced from 9 to 6 with enough water hauling capacity and sufficient mutual aid
response agreements with neighboring jurisdictions. It is the intent of the fire protection districts to
provide improvements that will allow most rural areas of the county to be granted the more
preferable ISO rating of 6, which would create a savings of 10 to 15 percent on insurance premiums
and mitigate the risk of fire damage.


        Underground Infrastructure

        Due to homeland security concerns, underground utilities are not mapped in this plan. The
Missouri One Call utility location telephone number is 800-344-7483. Numerous companies have
underground lines running through Pettis County:


        Inventory of commercial/industrial facilities

        Several major manufacturing plants, a mix of both national and local companies, are located
within the county. These plants employ a minimum of 50 employees.



                                           Table 17
                   Pettis County Employers, More Than 50 Employees
        Company Name                          Product          City                   Emp.
Alcan Cable                      manufacturing            Sedalia                         230
Bothwell Regional Health Center care facility             Sedalia                         817
Duke Manufacturing               manufacturing            Sedalia                         240
Hayes Lemmerz International      vehicle parts            Sedalia                         743
Wal-Mart                         retail trade             Sedalia                         466
Inter-State Studio               Picture printing         Sedalia                         350
Cooperative Workshop             Various                  Sedalia                         270
Tyson Foods                      Chicken processor        Sedalia                       1,854
Waterloo Industries              manufacturing            Sedalia                         662
Wire Rope Corp of America        Wire rope                Sedalia                         202
Coca-Cola bottling               manufacturing            Sedalia                         135
State Fair Community College Community college            Sedalia                         425
State of Missouri/Pettis County underground storage       Sedalia                         303
Gardner-Denver                   machinery                Sedalia                         300




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                                                                       Table 18
VI.R. Housing                                            Inventory of Pettis County Housing
                                                                      Structures
          The housing market in Pettis County is
impacted by the presence of State Fair               Total Housing Units                  16, 963
Community College, Whiteman AFB in nearby
                                                     Year Structure Built
Knob Noster, MO, and patterns of growth. The         1999 to March 2000                       341
2000 Census noted 66.6% owner occupation             1995 to 1998                           1,043
                                                     1990 to 1994                           1,029
versus 25.2% rentals, with an 8.2% vacancy rate.     1980 to 1989                           1,974
A 2005 estimate places those rates at 67.1%,         1970 to 1979                           2,718
                                                     1960 to 1969                           2,288
26% and 6.9% respectively. The average               1950 to 1959                           2,334
dwelling unit in the county is approximately 37      1940 to 1949                           1,329
                                                     1939 or earlier                        3,907
years old.
                                                     Bedrooms
          Total inventory of structures              No bedroom                               151
                                                     1 bedroom                              1,591
                                                     2 bedrooms                             5,829
          The total Pettis County assessed
                                                     3 bedrooms                             7,003
valuation for 1997, including both real estate and   4 bedrooms                             1,953
personal property, was $1,773,900,026, according     5 or more bedrooms                       436

to Missouri Department of Revenue. Therefore,                  Gross Rent
the average assessed valuation was $53,931 per         Specified renter-occupied            4,112
                                                             housing units
parcel.                                              Less than $200                           245
                                                     $200 to $299                             443
                                                     $300 to $499                           1,999
                                                     $500 to $749                             957
                                                     $750 to $999                              89
                                                     $1,000 or more                            19
                                                     No cash rent                             360

                                                     Median (dollars)                           326
Pettis County Local Planning Documents

       As noted, only Pettis County has a comprehensive published strategic plan for economic
development. Sections of that plan noting development planning, provided by Economic
Development of Sedalia/Pettis County, follow:




                                                                                                124
Key Challenges/Barriers to Growth

As important as leveraging your strengths in your marketing efforts is addressing the
challenges facing Sedalia-Pettis County. Some of these are no different than those
being faced in other mid-sized communities.

Based on input from those surveyed, the local K-12 educational situation, lack of
aggressive support by the state (incentives), and issues related to a lack of a skilled
workforce dominated the opinions of both the Planning Team and Stakeholders.

Additionally there were some comments (concerns) related to an either a lack of a
progressive attitude or a pessimistic attitude (unwilling to change). Many called for a
more proactive, planned approach for growth.

Potential Opportunities for Growth and Development

Interviewees were asked to identify potential opportunities for growth and expansion,
specifically to identify business sectors that would offer the best fit/greatest opportunity
for growth. Responses included:

Manufacturing – small/light/heavy – 8 mentions
Tourism – 4 mentions
Health Care Services/Medical research or technology - 3 mentions
Agri-Products – 3 mentions
Technology - businesses that do not require presence in a metro area – 3 mentions
Retail – 3 mentions
Service industries/Automotive/Defense

When the interviewees were also asked what sectors would ―not be a good fit‖ for
Sedalia-Pettis County the largest concern was for companies that would negative
impact the environment or quality of life on the part of the planning team. Stakeholders
mentioned a concern that ―high tech‖ companies would not be a good fit (5 mentions).
There responses suggested their concern that the area labor force could not support
such companies.

The Competition for Economic Development Opportunities

The survey responders were asked to consider who the competition was for economic
development with Sedalia-Pettis County. Most agreed that rural Missouri and the rural
Midwest were the prime competitors for development. Several related to the comment
that ―in global economy everyplace is a competitor.‖

Several suggested more ―close to home‖ competitors such as Warrensburg, Columbia,
KC area, Jefferson City, Springfield, Marshall and St. Louis.




                                                                                          125
Of those who responded to the question, the answer was mixed as to whether the
Sedalia-Pettis County area competes effectively. Some believe that given the right
opportunity the area can compete with anyone. Others are not so sure. A few indicate
that the lack of a progressive State economic development effort as having a negative
impact on local efforts.

Goals/Objectives/Vision for Growth

Survey participants were asked that if the County economic development effort
could accomplish only one thing over the next two years, what they would like that to
be. Many indicated that the goals for economic development should center on
continuing to focus on business retention, expansion and recruitment.

One item of interest is the number of individuals (both Planning Team and
Stakeholders) who are looking for the one big ―home run.‖ These people are looking for
one industry with 100 to 500 jobs which would move to the area and grow. Other
responses included:

             Vibrant downtown
             New high school – 2 mentions
             To pull the County together and all work for economic development
             achievement
             Develop and execute a comprehensive marketing plan
             Implement a mutually agreed upon strategy to attract and retain the
             desired type of ED growth
             Become the economic and business center of west central Missouri

TARGET INDUSTRY ANALYSIS
Based on information gathered through the interviews with area stakeholders and
influencers, the overall analysis of the composition of the economy and input from the
Steering Committee, three broad industry sectors emerged as potential “best fit”
target industry investment opportunities for Sedalia-Pettis County:

                              Manufacturing
                              Business Services
                              Logistics

Manufacturing

A variety of manufacturing options would find a productive home in Sedalia-Pettis
County. The smaller to light manufacturing firms would be a very desirable target.
Additionally, those involved in manufacturing of agri-based products or equipment
(including testing, processing and production equipment) would also enjoy success in
the area.




                                                                                     126
Business Services

There are two segments of the business services sector:

   1. Technical Support Centers are sophisticated high-end call centers (customer
      care centers, tele-service centers and customer service centers) . . . operated by
      or for companies to provide ready access to expert telephone, web-based or
      email assistance with products or services . . . most functional categories are
      product-based or information-based.

   2. Administrative Service Centers are operations where administrative workers
      engage in corporate office support functions, such as processing orders, billings,
      claims and similar tasks.

Logistics

The logistics (warehouse/distribution) industry was recommended as a potential target
industry sector primarily because of the community’s access to major transportation
corridors including Highway 50/65 and Interstate 70 and close proximity to Interstate 35
and 44.


Suggested Target Industry Portfolio for Sedalia-Pettis County

1. Advanced manufacturing with an emphasis on firms that complement and build
   upon the existing industry base operating in the ―region‖ including:
      Suppliers of products and services outsourced.
      Advanced manufacturing entrepreneurial opportunities including spin-off ventures
      of existing businesses.
      Agricultural manufacturing or related businesses.

2. Business services with an emphasis on health-related/financial administrative
   service centers with a linkage to the region, technical support/service centers
   including government services.

3. Logistics industry.

STRATEGIC MARKETING PLAN

Goal

To generate new wealth and growth in Sedalia-Pettis County through the retention,
expansion and attraction of high-value, high-growth business investment opportunities
that will create quality employment opportunities and complement and add value to
existing businesses and the overall economic well-being of the community.



                                                                                     127
Tactic

Develop and maintain an internal target audience contact database (preferably with
email addresses) to serve as a mailing list to keep your stakeholders, investors,
economic development partners/allies, public officials and other key influencers
informed and engaged in the economic development strategy.


Broadly Stated Objectives

1. Get organized . . . get prepared . . . to promote and market Sedalia-Pettis County’s
   business location assets and to respond effectively to economic development
   investment opportunities.

2. Create a positive environment for business development and improve internal
   perceptions/attitudes of the product . . . to enhance Sedalia-Pettis County’s
   attractiveness as a business location.

3. Enhance the competitiveness of the product . . . to ―make the list‖ of candidate
   locations and compete more effectively for targeted investments.

4. Take care of your existing customers . . . Sedalia-Pettis County area business
   and industry . . . to retain existing business investments and employment. This
   remains a key priority for development efforts.

5. Aggressively market Sedalia-Pettis County’s business location
   assets/strengths among target internal and external audiences . . . to generate
   50 investment leads/prospects on an annual basis.

6. Develop strategic business relationships with target businesses . . . to
   generate 10 projects (clients considering Sedalia-Pettis County for investment), 4
   ―fact finding‖ site visits and 1 new investment on an annual basis.

7. Develop an entrepreneurial initiative . . . to grow your own businesses.

Sedalia-Pettis County Positioning Statement . . . Core Business Message

Sedalia-Pettis County’s key marketable assets and strengths were considered in
creating the core business message for Sedalia-Pettis County . . . including the
community’s strategic central U.S. location, assets and resources, and the Sedalia-
Pettis County quality of life.

         ―Whether you’re a small and new, mid-sized and growing or large and well
         established business, Sedalia-Pettis County, Missouri, is strategically located in
         the center of U.S. commerce and is the regional business center that
         demonstrates a proven track record for business development success


                                                                                        128
      based on the strong work ethic of its available and more than able
      workforce.‖


Strategies and Tactics

      S1.   “Get organized…get prepared.” Differentiate Sedalia-Pettis County
            from the competition by providing outstanding customer service and being
            responsive and flexible to the information and location/expansion needs of
            the client.

            T1.1 Continue to collect and catalog timely and accurate facts and
            information, employers’ testimonials and competitive cost comparison
            information to substantiate Sedalia-Pettis County ―Works for You.‖

            T1.2 Continually update the Location One Information System (LOIS)
            to ensure information is accurate and up-to-date, no gaps exist in the
            data/information and the narrative is reflective of Sedalia-Pettis County’s
            positioning statement/key messages.

            T1.3 Develop the marketing-sales tools to effectively communicate
            Sedalia-Pettis County ―Works for You.‖

                  T1.3.1 Utilize the theme ―Sedalia-Pettis County Works for You”. .
                  . and new logo design for Sedalia-Pettis County’s business
                  development marketing-communications materials. Fully integrate
                  into all print and electronic marketing-sales materials including
                  business cards, stationery, the Web site, signage, etc. to create a
                  consistent ―brand identity.‖

                  T1.3.2 Develop a “Sedalia-Pettis County Works for You”
                  marketing- brochure and presentation (PPT) to support Sedalia-
                  Pettis County’s marketing-sales strategies. The brochure and
                  presentation should clearly and concisely communicate Sedalia-
                  Pettis County’s positioning statement and key messages.

            T1.4 Focus the Sedalia-Pettis County Web site to better serve the
            business development prospect and promote the key messages.
            Following is a brief checklist for the Sedalia-Pettis County Web site.

                      Integrate the new logo, theme line and positioning/key
                      messages throughout the site.
                      Provide statistical data/information and testimonials in support
                      of the position/key messages.




                                                                                     129
                Utilize maps and images to reinforce the assets/strengths and
                overall vibrancy of the community, e.g. name brand and
                entrepreneurial businesses, skilled workers, etc.
                Be easy-to-navigate and utilize key words that are relevant to
                the business prospect, e.g. market access/transportation,
                utilities/infrastructure, workforce/training, local employers.
                Be rich in data and information relevant to the target audiences
                including providing a link to LOIS.
                Provide links to relevant sites for additional information, e.g.
                utilities, railroad, Department of Economic Development,
                education/training service providers, technology resources, etc.
                Promote the Web site address in all marketing and
                communications materials. Encourage stakeholders, local
                businesses, economic development partners . . . and others to
                provide a link to the site.

      T1.5 Organize the Sedalia-Pettis County Development Board into key
      taskforces to spearhead and direct implementation efforts. It is suggested
      that, at least, the following taskforces be implemented:

         Communications/Marketing – responsible for both internal and
         external communications programs, efforts and implementation.

         Existing Business Development – working on outreach and
         programs for existing businesses and entrepreneurial development in
         the County.

         Targeted Business Development – working to define, identify and
         direct actions against key business targets for the area.


S2. Build brand loyalty and support for the economic development strategy
among local constituencies including area public and private leaders and the
residents of Sedalia-Pettis County.

      T2.1 Provide sales training for the Sedalia-Pettis County economic
      development ―work team‖ . . . comprised of the leadership from the
      Chamber of Commerce, Economic Development Council and Cities . . . to
      be conversant on the focus and direction of Sedalia-Pettis County’s
      economic development strategy and to clearly and concisely articulates
      the key marketing-sales messages.

      T2.2 Generate enthusiasm and support for Sedalia-Pettis County’s
      economic development strategy by rallying the community around the
      position-driven theme line and key messages.



                                                                              130
        T2.2.1 Hold an event to launch the new theme line and to present
        the economic development strategy/Roadmap to Success. Invite
        key business leaders, community members and economic
        development partners/allies to the event. Maintain ongoing
        awareness of the brand throughout strategically targeted
        chamber/public communications mediums and signage directed at
        the residents of Sedalia-Pettis County.

        T2.2.2 Extend the reach and frequency of the Sedalia-Pettis County
        brand by encouraging businesses and other public and private
        entities to integrate the theme line and messaging . . . ―Sedalia-
        Pettis County Works for You‖ . . . into their internal and external
        marketing-communications.

 T2.3 Maintain support and consensus among local constituencies
 through an open and transparent multi-channel communications
 process.

        T2.3.1        Conduct semi-annual strategy sessions for
        community leaders and local constituency groups focused on
        Sedalia-Pettis County’s ―Works for You.‖ Utilize the sessions to
        report progress and successes in achieving objectives and gather
        input from the community on economic development issues.

        T2.3.2 Develop a quarterly Sedalia-Pettis County ―Works for You‖
        story to pitch to local and regional media including the regional
        newspapers. Story ideas could evolve around profiles of
        successful area businesses/entrepreneurs that have benefited from
        Sedalia-Pettis County’s ―winning combination of assets, resources
        and public-private leadership.‖


T2.4 Energize and mobilize area business and community leaders to be
your ambassadors and sales people. These efforts not only can help
stretch your marketing budget and reach considerably, but they also
increase the chances an existing business will stay in Sedalia-Pettis County
and expand operations.

T2.5 Recognize and reward local businesses and public and private
 leaders for contributing to Sedalia-Pettis County’s business development
 progress and success. Hold an Annual Sedalia-Pettis County ―Worked for
 Me‖ Awards Ceremony recognizing the individual ―drivers.‖ This is
 another opportunity to celebrate the renewed enthusiasm and optimism
 regarding Sedalia-Pettis County’s economy and to let local leaders know
 their efforts are appreciated.




                                                                         131
S3. Develop and implement an aggressive business outreach program to
establish and maintain a two-way dialogue with Sedalia-Pettis County’s most
important customers—existing businesses.

      T3.1 Conduct executive calls on all Sedalia-Pettis County businesses with
      an emphasis on manufacturers, business service operations, logistics and
      other major employers on at least a semi-annual basis or more frequently
      as needed and headquarter decision-makers on at least an annual basis.
      Utilize the calls to present Sedalia-Pettis County’s ―Top 10 Ways We Work
      for You‖ and to identify issues of concern impacting local operations,
      expansion plans and strategic growth plans, potential new development
      opportunities, e.g. buyer-supplier linkages and ―outsourcing opportunities.‖
      Develop internal tracking system to track existing business contacts,
      results and appropriate follow-up.

      T3.2 Engage existing businesses to support Sedalia-Pettis County’s
      marketing-sales efforts. Ask business leaders to identify potential
      business investment leads/prospects and provide referrals to buyers-
      suppliers and other businesses. Solicit testimonials for marketing-sales
      tactics promoting Sedalia-Pettis County as a prime location that ―Works for
      You.‖

      T3.3 To maintain communication and dialogue among and between
      business leaders facilitate and coordinate quarterly business
      roundtable/networking sessions involving local business leaders, industry
      resource experts and service providers. Utilize the sessions to discuss
      issues of importance to business growth/development, strategize on
      enhancements to Sedalia-Pettis County’s ―Work‖ and identify potential
      development opportunities.

S4. Be proactive . . . develop and implement a direct marketing strategy
focused on raising awareness and generating a ―buzz‖ that Sedalia-Pettis County
has a ―winning combination of assets, resources and leadership‖ that ―Works for
You.‖

To meet the objective of generating 50 investment leads/prospects on an annual
basis, Sedalia-Pettis County must implement a proactive, multi-channel
marketing approach. Sedalia-Pettis County must leverage limited marketing
dollars with programs of its economic development partners and allies including
the utilities, railroads and the state.

      T4.1 Schedule briefings with Sedalia-Pettis County’s partners/allies in
      economic development including the Department of Economic
      Development to present the community’s location advantages. Explore
      cooperative marketing activities that will help Sedalia-Pettis County



                                                                                132
achieve its development/marketing goals and objectives specifically
related to generating targeted business investment leads. Arm the
partners with the Sedalia-Pettis County brochure and encourage them to
take copies to trade shows and other industry events. Identify Web site
linkage opportunities.

T4.2 Develop and implement a direct marketing effort targeting specific
businesses within the target industry sectors and site location consultants
as identified through market research, existing business outreach and
networking with partners/allies. Focus on a ―short list‖ of companies to
ensure quality, timely follow-up. Utilize the direct mail to co-brand
Sedalia-Pettis County with its leading successful brand name companies
and entrepreneurs and raise awareness of Sedalia-Pettis County’s ―Top
10 Working for You.‖

T4.3 Establish an ongoing, positive working relationship with local,
regional, state and business media to raise awareness of the Sedalia-
Pettis County brand and economic development activities/successes.
Additionally, use this PR effort to focus on key target industry influencing
business publications.

       T4.3.1 Develop a target list of local/regional/state/business media
       and identify specific editors with a focus/interest in economic and
       business development news.

       T4.3.2. Develop a media kit for use with the media including a
       background on the Sedalia-Pettis County’s cooperative approach to
       economic development and the Sedalia-Pettis County
       brand/position.

       T4.3.3 Schedule one-on-one interviews with targeted media to
       introduce Sedalia-Pettis County’s approach to economic
       development, to brief the media on the Sedalia-Pettis County
       brand/position and to establish Sedalia-Pettis County Development
       as a resource on economic development in the county/region/state,
       specifically, as a ―leader‖ in county-wide/regional economic
       development collaboration.

       T4.3.4 On at least a quarterly basis, present news and updates to
       select media on Sedalia-Pettis County Economic Development
       Council activities and successes. Personally follow-up on all news
       releases to identify specific information needs.

       T4.3.5 Post news and information updates on the Sedalia-Pettis
       County Development Web site.




                                                                           133
S5. Develop strategic business relationships with qualified business
prospects and site location consultants and other project multipliers that will
result in Sedalia-Pettis County making the list of locations considered for
expansion/location.

       T5.1 Phone calls . . . flag the database to remind you to call the
       prospect/consultant on a periodic basis.

       T5.2 E-mail or snail mail . . . whatever is preferred by the executive.
       Include updates on programs and news relevant to the prospect’s
       business interests.

       T5.3 Visit them…as the relationship progresses; you will want to make
       another personal call on the decision-maker.

       T5.4 Visit you...your primary objective is to get the prospect to visit
       Sedalia-Pettis County. Mobilize your community leaders to serve as hosts
       for these fact finding and/or confirmation site visits.

       T5.5 Maintain contact with all qualified prospects on at least an annual
       basis.


S6. Develop and implement an entrepreneurial initiative to grow your own
businesses. A large part of economic expansion is the retention and growth of
homegrown businesses…the third leg of the economic development stool.
Working closely with the resources of the area community college could greatly
assist this and other business development tactics.

       T6.1 Develop profiles of successful area entrepreneurs . . .
       entrepreneurial businesses . . . to document and promote Sedalia-Pettis
       County’s entrepreneurial spirit.

       T6.2 Inventory local, regional and state technical and financial
       entrepreneurial assistance programs and identify area entrepreneurs
       willing to serve as mentors to start-up entrepreneurial businesses . . .
       package and promote the programs and mentoring assistance.

       T6.3 Identify entrepreneurial product enhancements and develop a plan
       of action to enhance the competitiveness of Sedalia-Pettis County for the
       entrepreneurial business, e.g. Angel Investor Fund.

       T6.4 Develop entrepreneurial training/education workshops for area
       entrepreneurs. Identify a co-sponsor(s) for the workshops, e.g. local




                                                                                  134
      banks. Follow-up with entrepreneurs attending workshops to present
      Sedalia-Pettis County’s ―Working for Your Entrepreneurial Success.‖

      T6.5 Through the existing business outreach program, networking with
      local business leaders and other marketing-communications channels,
      newsletter, presentations, etc., promote Sedalia-Pettis County’s
      entrepreneurial spirit, programs and services that can help entrepreneurs
      turn ideas into successful businesses.

S7. Evaluate what’s working/what’s not working . . . and be accountable.
Monitor and track business development marketing-sales activities including
tracking business development prospect leads/referrals, visits and
locations/expansions. Based on results, refine the plan to achieve greater
effectiveness. Promote and celebrate progress and successes.

      T7.1 As previously recommended, develop a marketing/sales pipeline
      database. Utilize the database to track the conversion of leads/contacts to
      prospects to visits to business locations/expansions and evaluate
      effectiveness of marketing strategies. Refine strategies as needed.

      T7.2 Utilize Web tracking reports to monitor the Web site and track
      peaks in user sessions. Correlate with marketing activities to further
      evaluate the effectiveness of marketing strategies.

      T7.3 Celebrate progress and successes with stakeholders, investors and
      economic development partners and the public. Promote
      successes throughout the community.




                                                                               135
VI.S. City Profiles

Green Ridge
    Total population                      445
    Classification                        Village-fourth class
    Leadership structure                  Chairman/Trustees
    Median household income, 2000         $36,750
    Total housing units                   187
    Housing unit, median year built       1955
    Median gross rent                     $400
    Median owner-occupied housing value   $63,672
    Master plan                           no
    Emergency Operations Plan             no
    Zoning regulations                    yes
    Building regulations                  yes
    Subdivision regulations               no
    Storm water regulations               no
    Floodplain regulations                yes
    Water service                         yes
    Sewer service                         yes
    Electric service                      Aquila
    Fire service                          yes
    Ambulance service                     no
    Rivers, streams                       no
    Major arterials                       Mo. Hwy. 127, B




                                                                 136
                                    Houstonia
Total population                           275
Classification                             Village-fourth class
Leadership structure                      Chairman/Trustees
Median household income, 2000              $34,219
Total housing units                        105
Housing unit, median year built            1985
Median gross rent                          N/A
Median owner-occupied housing value        $48,992
Master plan                                no
Emergency Operations Plan                  no
Zoning regulations                         no
Building regulations                       no
Subdivision regulations                    no
Storm water regulations                    no
Floodplain regulations                     no
Water service                              yes
Sewer service                              yes
Electric service                           yes
Fire service                               yes
Ambulance service                          no
Rivers, streams                            no
Major arterials                            no




                                                                  137
                                    Hughesville
Total population                            174
Classification                              Village-fourth class
Leadership structure                        Chairman/Trustees
Median household income, 2000               $30,833
Total housing units                         78
Housing unit, median year built             1985
Median gross rent                           $350
Median owner-occupied housing value         $44,167
Master plan                                 yes
Emergency Operations Plan                   yes
Zoning regulations                          no
Building regulations                        yes
Subdivision regulations                     yes
Storm water regulations                     no
Floodplain regulations                      no
Water service                               yes
Sewer service                               yes
Electric service                            yes
Fire service                                yes - volunteer
Ambulance service                           yes-Sedalia
Rivers, streams                             no
Major arterials                             no




                                                                   138
La Monte (see Figure 53, Appendix C for map)
   Total population                            1,064
   Classification                              Village-fourth class
   Leadership structure                        Chairman/Trustees
   Median household income, 2000               $28,688
   Total housing units                         468
   Housing unit, median year built             1985
   Median gross rent                           $405
   Median owner-occupied housing value         $48,900
   Master plan                                 yes
   Emergency Operations Plan                   yes
   Zoning regulations                          yes
   Building regulations                        yes
   Subdivision regulations                     yes
   Storm water regulations                     yes
   Floodplain regulations                      yes
   Water service                               yes
   Sewer service                               yes
   Electric service                            yes
   Fire service                                yes
   Ambulance service                           yes - Sedalia
   Rivers, streams                             no
   Major arterials                             no




                                                                      139
Sedalia
    Total population                      20,399
    Classification                        Village-fourth class
    Leadership structure                  Chairman/Trustees
    Median household income, 2000         $28,641
    Total housing units                   9,419
    Housing unit, median year built       1985
    Median gross rent                     $430
    Median owner-occupied housing value   $59,600
    Master plan                           yes
    Emergency Operations Plan             yes
    Zoning regulations                    yes
    Building regulations                  yes
    Subdivision regulations               yes
    Storm water regulations               yes
    Floodplain regulations                yes
    Water service                         yes
    Sewer service                         yes
    Electric service                      yes
    Fire service                          Sedalia
    Ambulance service                     Sedalia
    Rivers, streams                       no
   Major arterials                        US 65




                                                                 140
Sedalia



          141
Smithton
    Total population                      510
    Classification                        Village-fourth class
    Leadership structure                  Chairman/Trustees
    Median household income, 2000         $32,312
    Total housing units                   212
    Housing unit, median year built       1953
    Median gross rent                     $418
    Median owner-occupied housing value   $53.300
    Master plan                           no
    Emergency Operations Plan             no
    Building regulations                  yes
    Subdivision regulations               yes
    Storm water regulations               no
    Floodplain regulations                yes
    Water service                         yes
    Sewer service                         yes
    Electric service                      yes
    Ambulance Service                     no
    Fire service                          yes
    Rivers, streams                       Lamine River
   Major arterials                        no




                                                                 142
SECTION VII:           SALINE COUNTY


VII.A. County Profile
       Saline County covers approximately 755 square miles and is located in West Central
Missouri. Saline County is bordered by six counties: Chariton, Carroll, Lafayette, Pettis, Cooper and
Howard Counties. Saline County is approximately 170 miles west of St. Louis and 80 miles east of
Kansas City. Other nearby communities which impact the local economy include: Sedalia, 30 miles
south of Marshall: Carrollton, 15 miles northwest of the county; Boonville, 30 east; Columbia, site of
the main campus of the University of Missouri, 50 east; and Jefferson City, the State Capital,
approximately 80 miles southeast of Saline County.
                                            Table 19
                                Saline County Population Density
                 Population Density          Number         Percent
                 Total Persons               23,756         100
                 Urban Population            12,658         53.3
                 In Urban Clusters           12,658         53.3
                 Rural Population            11,098         46.7
                 Persons Per Square Mile     31             -
                 (764.59 square miles)
                                Source: 2000 U. S. Census, Summary File 1


       The county is served by major transportation corridors which have all had a significant
impact on its development. The Missouri River creates the northern boundary, with Saline County
having the most shoreline of any Missouri county. Interstate 70 runs along the southern edge, US
Highway 65 bisects the county from north to south, with US 240 running east to west. Missouri
Highways 20 and 41 also pass through Saline County.
       There are twelve incorporated cities in Saline county (see following map). Of the
incorporated cities, Marshall, Slater and Sweet Springs are the largest, with populations of 12,433,
2,083, and 1,628 respectively. Total population in the county is 23,756 (2000 Census data). The City
of Marshall is the county seat and is centrally located within the county. The remainder of the
county is sparsely populated.
       Saline County was established on November 25, 1820, by an act of Missouri’s General
Assembly, which separated the county from the Territory of Cooper County. It was named Saline
because of the large number of natural springs in the county that contained common salt. As the
land was developed, the area was found to contain very deep brown loam soil, which produces


                                                                                                       143
abundant crops. This contributed to a thriving commercial agriculture market, with Saline ranking
as one of the top producers of corn in Missouri.
                     Table 20                                  Agriculture has been the main
        Saline County Population by Age
                                                               economic enterprise for Saline County.
Age             Population         Percent
Under 5         1,499              6.3%                        Soybeans, corn and winter wheat are the
5-9             1,694              7.1%                        major crops, and beef cattle and hogs
10-14           1,636              6.9%
15-17           964                4.1%                        are the principal kinds of livestock.
18-19           981                4.1%                        More than half of the county borders
20-24           1,797              7.6%
25-34           2,577              10.8%                       the Missouri River, which has
35-44           3,527              14.8%                       concomitant bottom lands that are
45-54           3,031              12.8%
                                                               agriculturally productive, a habitat for
55-59           1,224              5.2%
60-64           974                4.1%                        both flora and fauna, and subject to
65-74           1,754              7.4%
                                                               periodic flooding. The river’s flood
75-84           1,440              6%
Over 85         658                2.8%                        plains are used for cultivated crops.
The steeper areas are used mostly for pasture, hay, woodland, or orchards.
        In the early 1800’s the county was characterized as a ―hunter’s paradise‖ with plentiful game
of several species and wide expanses of prairie and substantial woodlands.
The county courthouse was located in three different locations prior to the decision in 1839 to
locate it in the geographic center of the county on a site given to the county by an early settler,
Jeremiah Odell. When the county court decided to locate the courthouse at this site they also
decided to name the town Marshall, in honor of the U. S. Supreme Court Chief Justice, John
Marshall. The current courthouse is the third structure in Marshall built to house the county
government. The first one was built in 1841.
        Services, manufacturing and government account for nearly 60 percent of the employment
base in Saline County according to the 2000 census. Commerce and industry are growing sources of
income in Saline County. Some of these industries include: meat packing, food processing, and feed
and seed enterprises.
        In the first census taken in the county in 1821, there were 1,176 people. By, 1880, the
population had increased to 29,938. Saline County hit a high population of 33,703 in 1900, which
has declined at a slow pace ever since to 23,756 in 2000. However, the population is expected to
increase at a modest rate of about 1.3 percent per year over the next decade because of a projected
increase in jobs.


                                                                                                       144
                                               CHART 10
                  40000
                          Historic Population Trend of Saline County, 1900-2000

                  35000



                  30000



                  25000
   # of Persons

                  20000



                  15000



                  10000



                  5000



                     0
                          1900   1910   1920   1930   1940   1950   1960   1970   1980   1990   2000
                                                             Year



          The incorporated cities (including population) within the county are: Arrow Rock (79),
Blackburn (Saline County-261, Lafayette County-23), Emma (Saline County-144, Lafayette County-
99), Gilliam (229), Grand Pass (53), Malta Bend (249), Marshall (12,433), Miami (160), Mount
Leonard (123), Nelson (212), Slater (2,083), and Sweet Springs (1,682).

VII.B. Geography, geology and climate

          Saline County is located in the north central part of the state in the Pioneer Trails Regional
Planning Commission. Counties bordering Saline County are Lafayette to the west, Pettis to the
south, and Cooper to the southeast. The Missouri River borders the county on the north and east.
Saline County is comprised of a land area of 755.55 square miles (483,000 acres) and a water area of
9.04 square miles. It has a total population of 23,756 people, which accounts for a population
density of 31 people per square mile. Topography varies from river bottoms to some rough hilly
terrain to a predominate land cover of rolling hills and prairie.

VII.C. Form of government
       Saline County is classified as a 4th class county. Its county seat is in Marshall. The county is
governed by a three-member County Commission led by the Presiding Commissioner. The county
government is divided into the following departments and divisions: Assessor’s Office, Auditor’s


                                                                                                       145
Office, Circuit Court Clerk, County Clerk, County Commission, Public Administrator’s Office,
Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, Recorder, Sheriff’s Department, and Treasurer’s office.

VII.D. Significant cultural/social issues
        The county’s rural culture remains strong. The English as a second language population is
growing placing strong translation burdens on service, health care, and emergency providers. There
are some communities that have no health care providers so the need in those instances increases
dramatically.

VII.E. Media

        The Marshall Democrat-News is the official newspaper of Saline County. In addition, the Sweet
Springs Herald covers news in Sweet Springs and the surrounding areas
        KMMO is the only radio station based in Saline County and broadcasts on AM 1300/FM
102.9. This station covers local issues in depth. Various Kansas City broadcast media provide area
reports. The list of pertinent media outlets is included below.
Newspapers
    Marshall Democrat-News
    Sweet Springs Herald
    Kansas City Star

Radio stations
   KMMO, AM 1300/FM 102.9, Marshall
   KXEO, AM 1340, Mexico
   KWIX, AM 1230, Moberly
   KCMO-FM Kansas City
   KMBZ-FM Kansas City

Television stations
    WDAF-TV, Channel 4, NBC, Kansas City
    KCTV-TV, Channel 5, CBS, Fairway, KS
    KMOS, Channel 6, PBS, Sedalia
    KMBC-TV, Channel 9, ABC, Kansas City
    KOMU-TV, Channel 8, NBC, Columbia
    KRCG-TV, Channel 13, CBS, Jefferson City
    KMIZ-TV, Channel 17, ABC, Columbia
    KCPT, Channel 19, PBS, Kansas City
    KSHB, Channel 38, IND, Kansas City
    KSMO, Channel 62, WB, Kansas City




                                                                                                  146
        News releases are distributed by PTRPC and other sources as the particular situation
warrants.

VII.F. Demographic information
       As with many agriculturally based counties, Saline County has experienced a steady decline,
or stagnation, of population for several decades. County population taken at the 1990 census was
23,523, a 5.6% loss from the 1980 figure. The 2000 Census shows a slight countywide increase from
23,523 to 23,756, although most towns showed a decrease in population.
        47.5% of the population falls in the 25-64 age bracket with only 26.3% in the county under
the age of 24. The ethnic make-up of the county is 90% white, with 10% non-white. Median
household income continues to decline taking into consideration both actual dollar amounts and
comparisons against the State of Missouri as a whole. Although Saline County has had very low
unemployment rates for many months before the restructuring of two plants in the summer of 2001,
income levels are not rising and the quality of life will decline if this problem is not addressed. The
educational attainment for persons age 25 or older in Saline County increased from 56.3 in 1980 to
67.3% in 1990 should increase again when the 2000 numbers are completed.
        Civilian Labor Force (CLF) figures for Saline County in 2000 show 11,985 in the CLF.
Declining wage rates in many jobs contributed to more families adding a second worker to maintain
family income. The number of women in the work force continues to increase, although not as fast
as the increase in men. In 2000, men comprised 55% of the CLF and women 45%
        The 2000 U.S. Census was used to construct a profile of the average Saline County resident.
Statistically, this average person is between age 35 and 44, has an income of $16,132 and lives in a
rural single-family home within a mile of 31.4 other people. The average $59,700 home is maintained
with a household income of $32,743. This person has at least a high school diploma or its
equivalent; lives in Saline County; works in the county; and drives to work alone in less than 17
minutes.
        Although Saline County remains predominantly white in the 2000 Census, the diversity of
the population has increased. Historically, diversity has been scarce. However the 2000 Census
showed the presence of non-white races increased to 3.4% of the total population. The portion of
the county’s Hispanic population in particular grew significantly. Between 1990 and 2000, the
county’s Hispanic population increased from 196 to 1,000, a 500% increase. The county’s increase
exceeded the state’s 92.2% increase.



                                                                                                     147
                                              Table 20
                                      Saline County Diversity
      Race                            Census                 % of Change                % of Total
                                     1990                 2000             1990-2000               2000
White                               22,065              21,469                   -3.4              92%
Black                                1,299               1,136                   -0.7               5%
American                                40                 112                    0.3               1%
Indian/Alaska
Native
Asian Pacific                          75                   19                   0.3                 1%
Islander
Other                                 44                   382                   1.4                 1%
2 or more races                      N/A                   515                  N/A                  2.2



VII.G. Economy, employment and industry
        The 2000 U.S. Census reported that Saline County had a labor force (workers 16 and over)
population of 18,619 people or 78% of the county’s total population. Of this population, 11,341
people are employed, 542 are unemployed, and 37 people are in the armed forces. 35.9% of this
population were not active in the labor force. The 2000 unemployment rate was 4.6%, slightly
better than Missouri’s 2000 rate of 4.7%. The average wage for the first quarter of 2000 was $310
per week. Nearly 13.2% of the population, or 2,899 persons, were below the federal poverty level.




                                               Table 21
                                  Saline County Economic Indicators

                  Employment Status                                         Number Percent
                  Population in labor force                                   11,930   64.1
                             Civilian labor force                             11,893   63.9
                             Employed                                         11,341     61
                             Unemployed                                          542    2.9
                                         Percent of civilian labor force                4.6
                             Armed Forces                                         37    0.2
                  Not in labor force                                           6,689   35.9

                  Per capita income (dollars)                                  16,132 (X)
                  Individuals below poverty level                               2,899 (X)
                                      Percent of total population                           13.2




                                                                                                           148
VII.H. County Labor Survey
       The Saline County Labor Basin includes Carroll, Chariton, Cooper, Howard, Johnson,
Lafayette, Pettis, and Saline Counties in Missouri. The purpose of this report is to assess the
―Available Labor Pool‖ in this labor basin. The ―Available Labor Pool‖ represents those who
indicate that they are looking for employment or would consider changing their jobs for the right
employment opportunity.

       The Docking Institute’s independent analysis of this labor basin shows that:

     The population of the Saline County Labor Basin is estimated to be 192,085. About 27% of
     the total population (or 52,058 individuals) is considered to be part of the Available Labor Pool
     (ALP).

     Of the ALP, an estimated 3,584 (6.9%) non-working and 11,276 (21.7%) working individuals
     are looking for new employment, while 6,717 (12.9%) non-working and 30,480 (58.6%)
     working individuals would consider new and/or different employment for the right
     opportunities.

     About 65% of the ALP has at least some college experience and almost 94% has at least a high
     school diploma. The average age for members of the entire ALP is about 42 years, and 55% of
     the ALP are women.

     Majorities of ALP members report having ―strong work skills‖ when it comes to working in
     groups and interpersonal relations (95%), writing (74%), management and supervision (72%),
     math (71%), and computers (57%).

     Approximately 6,914 members of the ALP are currently employed as general laborers,
     construction workers, or cleaners. An additional 1,344 report having experience or training in
     these fields.

     46,514 members of the ALP (or 89%) indicate that they are ―willing to work outside of their
     primary field of employment for a new or different employment opportunity.‖

     Almost 36% of the members (or 18,699 individuals) of the ALP will commute up to 45
     minutes, one way, for an employment opportunity. Almost 81% (or 42,202 individuals) will
     commute up to 30 minutes for employment.

     The most important desired benefits are good health benefits, on-the-job training, good
     retirement benefits, and good salary or hourly pay.

     About 34,438 people (66%) are interested in a new job at $16 an hour, 24,491 (47%) are
     available at $12 an hour, and 9,326 (18%) are available at $8 an hour.




                                                                                                    149
     Of the 41,389 members in the subset of employed members of the ALP, 22,368 (54%)
     consider themselves underutilized. About 72% of this subset of the ALP has some college
     experience, and a majority (90%) is willing to change jobs to improve their underutilized status.

     Of the 44,205 members in the subset of the ALP who do not own their own businesses,
     16,508 (37%) have considered starting their own businesses.




VII.I. Primary Industries
         Saline County’s primary products include frozen food products, air pollution control
equipment, developmental disabilities services, and retail trade.
         The 2000 Census reported that most employed citizens work in management occupations,
with service and sales occupations following closely behind. Employment by industry within the
county consists of 25.7% education/health/social services, 19.6% manufacturing, 10.7% retail trade,
5.8% construction, and 4.7% public administration. The remaining 34% includes: finance, insurance,
real estate, transportation, and public utilities, wholesale trade, agricultural, forestry, fishing and
mining




                                             Table 22

                   Saline County Workforce Population by Occupation
                     (Employed civilian workforce 16 years and over)
                      Occupation                          Number                       Percent
Management, Professional, and related occupations           3,060                        27
Service Occupations                                         2,150                       18.9
Sales and office occupations                                2,258                       19.9
Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations                   202                         1.8
Construction, extraction, and maintenance occupations       1,083                        9.5
Production, transportation, and material moving             2,598                       22.9
occupations




                                                                                                          150
                                                                CHART 11
                                                  Saline County Employment by Industry
                                                             (Census 2000)


                   Other services (except public administration)              432

                Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation                            778

                                     Educational, health, social                                                                2,914

     Professional, scientific, management, administrative, waste
                                                                              417
                        management services

                         Finance, insurance, real estate, leasing         361

                                                     Information        200

                                 Transport, warehouse, utilities                    593

                                                     Retail trade                                 1,213

                                                Wholesale trade          298

                                                  Manufacturing                                                       2,230

                                                   Construction                      654

                           Agriculture, forestry, fishing, mining                     731

                                                                    0         500          1000     1500     2000       2500   3000     3500
                                                                                                  Number of Workers




VII.J. Access to employment: In-commuting and Out-commuting
        The majority of Saline County’s workforce works inside the county. Most commuters travel
to Lafayette County to the northeast or Pettis County to the south. In the event of a natural disaster
confined to Saline County, the county’s out-commuters are likely to retain their access to
employment.




                                                                                                                                               151
Development trends
According to the Saline County Baseline Report, Saline County’s population will increase to over
26,000 by 2007, with an annual growth rate of 1.3 percent. This growth will be stimulated by the
addition of nearly 2,000 local jobs. As a result, there will be an increase in the housing demand by
approximately 1,500 units as well as the addition of nearly 600 students to the Saline County public
schools. Per capita income is also expected to grow by 1.2 percent annually, and total personal
income will experience a real growth rate of 2.6 percent per year.
                                                   Table 10
                                       Saline County and Incorporated Areas
                                            Historical Population Trends
Jurisdiction        1900     1910     1920      1930      1940    1950   1960     1970     1980     1990     2000
Arrow Rock           358      336      286       304       247      170    245       81       82       70       79
Blackburn            458      289      333       292       314      306    310      294      314      308      284
Emma              ***      ***      ***       ***       ***     ***        202      224      267      194      243
Gilliam              347      299      404       404       308      306    249      248      227      212      220
Grand Pass        ***      ***      ***          168       115      124    120       72       71       53       51
Malta Bend           431      399      442       429       355      414    338      342      292      289      249
Marshall           5,086    4,869    5,200     8,103     8,533    8,850  9,572   12,051   12,781   12,711   12,433
Miami                581      431      372       347       275      217    156      205      177      142      155
Mount Leonard     ***         167      174       160       150      142    147      139      131       96      122
Nelson               476      480      639       337       334      297    126      230      248      181      211
Slater             2,502    3,238    3,797     3,478     3,070    2,836  2,767    2,576    2,492    2,186    2,083
Sweet Springs      1,080    1.122    1,177     1,164     1,413    1,439  1,452    1,716    1,694    1,694    1,628
Saline County     33,703   29,448   28,826 30,598 29,416 26,694 25,148           24,633   24,919   23,523   23,756


Source: U.S. Census 2000



Roadways
Roadways continue to be the main source of transportation within the region to support the
movement of people and goods along 1,260.67 miles of road. The Missouri Department of
Transportation (MoDot) provides and maintains all federal and state roadways, which consists of
344.34 miles or 27.3% of the county’s roads. Saline County itself maintains more than 794 miles of
roadway throughout the county. Incorporated areas maintain a total of 121.63 miles within their
jurisdictions.
Within the county’s road network are two major transportation corridors. Interstate 70 sits on the
southern border of the county in an east-west direction with a traffic volume averaging between
30,000 to 40,000 vehicles per day. Interstate 70 is the main route across the State of Missouri


                                                                                                              152
between St. Louis and Kansas City. State Highway 65 runs north-south through the center of the
county.
Railroads
The Union Pacific and the Chicago Missouri Western have routes through Saline County. No
passenger service is available within the county.
Airports
Marshall Municipal Airport is located in Marshall. The airport serves predominantly single engine
and antique aircraft. Commercial airline travel is accessible within 90-minute drive from most
locations in Saline County. Kansas City International Airport is located approximately 90 miles to
the east. Columbia Regional Airport in Columbia also provides limited commercial service.
Public Transportation
OATS, Inc provides public transportation in the county. This publicly-funded system provides
door-to-door transportation service with flexible schedules to meet the needs of those who may
have little or no alternative means of travel, regardless of age or disability.



Major                Pipelines                  Rail Lines                        Waterways
Highways
I-70                 GSC-KCPL Gas               UP - Union Pacific                Missouri River
                     Service
US 65                UE- Union Electric         CMW-Chicago MO
                                                Western
MO 41                MPS- Aquila
MO 240               WNG- Williams
                     Natural Gas Co
                     Arco (crude oil)

Telecommunications
New infrastructures and services are enhancing county residents’ quality of life. The following list of
communication facilities is not all-inclusive, but represents the major providers of the county’s
communications infrastructure.


Telecommunication Service Providers
Southwestern Bell Telephone
United Telephone Co.
Mid-Missouri Telephone

Wireless Communications Companies


                                                                                                    153
AT&T Wireless Services
Cingular Wireless
Sprint PCS
T Mobile Wireless
Voice Stream Wireless
Southwestern Bell Wireless
Verizon Wireless

Long Distance Carriers
Sprint
Southwestern Bell
AT&T
MCI

Internet Service Providers
Southwestern Bell (T-1)
Numerous dial-up service providers

Television Communications
Six Kansas City based broadcast television stations
Marshall Cable
Douglas Cable
Galaxy Cable
Numerous satellite television service providers.


Sewer and water facilities
The county continues to improve its ability to service residents and business with public water and
sewer. Four separate water supply districts serve portions of the county: Saline County Public Water
Supply District No. 1, Saline County PWSD No. 2, Saline County PWSD No. 3, and
Lafayette/Saline/Johnson PWSD No. 4.

Public water and sewer service is available within Marshall, Blackburn, Malta Bend, Slater, Emma,
and Sweet Springs. Wastewater needs are serviced by either private sewer systems or individual
septic tanks.


Saline County PWSD No. 1
Saline County PWSD No.2
Saline County PWSD No. 3
Lafayette/Saline/Johnson Counties PWSD No. 4




                                                                                                 154
Electricity and natural gas
There are four providers of electrical service for the county: Kansas City Power and Light, Union
Electric, City of Slater, and City of Marshall Municipal Utilities.
Natural gas providers are Kansas Power and Light and Missouri Public Service.
Solid waste disposal
City of Marshall Municipal Utilities, City of Slater, and Waste Management collect the county’s solid
waste disposal. Waste is trucked to a landfill site in Marshall or Slater.
Law enforcement
The Saline County Sheriff’s Office includes the sheriff and 8 patrol officers. The department
participates in mutual aid agreements with all incorporated areas of the county. The department out
of the headquarters in Marshall covers the entire county. The towns of Marshall, Sweet Springs, and
Slater maintain municipal police departments.
Emergency medical services
Ambulance service for Saline County is provided through 3 districts located at Marshall, Slater and
Sweet Springs. The ambulance services are dispatched as follows:
       Slater Ambulance District No. 1 - dispatched through the Slater Police Department.
       Sweet Springs Ambulance District No. 2 - dispatched through the Sweet Springs Police
       Department.
       Saline County Ambulance District No. 3-dispatched by Marshall Police Dispatch (E-911).

No. 1—Slater Ambulance District
No. 2—Sweet Springs Ambulance District
No. 3—Saline County Ambulance District


Fire protection
The following fire protection departments provide services for the entire county:
    Arrow Rock Volunteer Community Fire Department
    Blackburn Fire Department
    Malta Bend Fire Protection District
    Marshall Fire Department/Saline County Rural Fire Protection District
    Slater Volunteer Fire Department
    Sweet Springs Volunteer Fire Department


Any development within five miles of a station and 1,000 feet of a hydrant is given an ISO rating of
6. Rural areas that are beyond this type of service are given an ISO rating of 9. The ISO rating can
be reduced from 9 to 6 with enough water hauling capacity and sufficient mutual aid response
agreements with neighboring jurisdictions. It is the intent of the fire protection districts and fire


                                                                                                        155
departments to provide improvements that will allow most rural areas of the county to be granted
the more preferable ISO rating of 6, which would create a savings of 10 to 15 percent on insurance
premiums and mitigate risk of fire damage.
Emergency services (911)
The Saline County Sheriff’s Office is responsible for providing backup dispatching for the Saline
County Ambulance District, which is usually self-dispatched.
     The City of Marshall has an emergency 911 system.
      The fire departments of Arrow Rock, Blackburn, and Malta Bend are self-dispatched.
Underground Infrastructure
Due to homeland security concerns, underground utilities are not mapped in this plan. According to
the Missouri One Call System, Inc. as of January 2, 2004, the following companies maintain
underground utility lines within Saline County.
The following companies have underground lines running through Saline County:
Amerenue
Aquila
AT&T Corp.
B P Products N America Inc.
Central Missouri Power COOP
Central Missouri Electric COOP
Centurytel
Chariton Valley Telephone
City of Slater
Galaxy Cablevision
Kansas City Power & Light
Lafayette-Johnson Co PWSD 2
Lightcore
Marshall Municipal Utilities
Mid Missouri Cellular
Mid Missouri Telephone Co.
Missouri Gas Energy
SBC (Southwestern Bell)
Southern Star Central Gas
Sprint Local
Time Warner Cable

The Missouri One Call utility location telephone number is 800-344-7483.
Large industrial/commercial centers
Several major manufacturing plants, a mix of both national and local companies, are located within
the county. These plants employ a minimum of 50 employees. The table below also includes the
area’s retail and commercial centers.




                                                                                                    156
                                      Table 19
Saline County Employers, More Than 50 Employees
Company Name                Product/Service                         City            Total
                                                                                    Employees
AmeriCold Logistics             Cold Storage Plant                  Marshall                75
BHA Group, Inc                  Air Pollution Control               Slater                 193
                                Equipment
Big Bend Retreat                Nursing Care Facility               Slater                  57
Butterfield Youth Services      Child & Adolescent Treatment        Marshall               100
Center for Human Services       Supported Employment Service        Marshall               106
                                for adults with disabilities
Central Missouri Agri Service   Grain Storage                       Miami                   90
City of Marshall                Municipal Service                   Marshall               125
Con Agra Frozen Foods           Frozen Foods                        Marshall               900
Eastman House                   Mattress/Box Spring                 Sweet Springs           50
                                Manufacturer
Excel Corporation               Case Ready Pork/Beef Facility       Marshall               533
Fitzgibbon Hospital/Living      Acute Care & Outpatient             Marshall               520
Center/Clinics                  Services
GENCOM, Inc.                    Trucking Company                    Marshall                57
Kays Engineering, Inc.          Design & Build Custom &             Marshall                50
                                Automated Machines
Mailings Clearinghouse, Inc.    Direct Mail and Mailing List        Sweet Springs           80
                                Clearing House
Marshall Habilitation Center    State Education Center              Marshall               881
Marshall Municipal Utilities    Provider of Electrical, Water and   Marshall                91
                                Wastewater Treatment
Marshall Public Schools         Education                           Marshall               353
Missouri Valley College         Four Year Liberal Arts Co-          Marshall               140
                                Educational
Missouri Valley Human           Private Non-Profit Corporation Marshall                    150
Resource Community Action
Agency
Rinker Materials               Precast & Prestressed Concrete Marshall                     100
Salt Fork YMCA                 Community Center                Marshall                     65
Wal-Mart                       Discount Store                  Marshall                    300
W.B. Young                     Metal Fabrications              Marshall                     50
Source: Saline County Development
*Wal-Mart has plans to replace the current Marshall location with a Super Center store.




                                                                                          157
Inventory of housing structures
There are a total of 10,161 housing units in Saline County, of those units over 50% are rural
units, 88.7% are occupied, 61% are owner occupied, 80% are single-family units, 8% are mobile
homes, and only 10% are multi-family units.
                                                          Figure 15
                                                   Saline County Housing Types
                                                           (Census 2000)



                            10
 Miscellaneous types




                                 811
      Mobile homes




                                    1,039
         Multi-family




                                                                                                             8,159
       Single-family




                        0        1000       2000       3000      4000        5000       6000   7000   8000           9000
                                                              Number of Housing Units




With a total of 9,015 households and 1,116 vacant units, the county would have a 11% margin
in dwelling units to accommodate changing residential needs.
Of the county’s 10,161 residential structures, 63% were constructed before 1970, therefore the
average structure in Saline County is 40 years old or older.




                                                                                                                       158
                                                           Figure 16

                                   Saline County Housing Structure Age

                                               1995-1998    1999-2000
                                   1990-1994
                                                  .05%         .02%
                                      .02%                              Pre- 1930
                       1980-1989                            203              .25%
                                        275      502
                          .09%
                                                                          2,585
                             934




                   1,927
               1970-1979
                  19%
                                                                            2,160
                                                                           1940-1959
                                               1,433                           21%
                                               1960-1969
                                                  14%




Total inventory of structures
The total Saline County assessed valuation for 2003, including both real estate and personal
property, was $222,845,976, according to Missouri Department of Revenue. Rural parcels
totaled $94,599,741 or 51% of the county’s assessments. Urban assessed values were
$920,842,860 or 49% of county’s assessments.




                                                                                               159
City profiles
Arrow Rock
      Total population                      79
      Classification                        Village
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $45,000
      Total housing units                   63
      Housing unit, median year built       1943
      Median gross rent                     $450
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $115,600
      Master plan                           no
      Emergency Operations Plan             yes
      Zoning regulations                    yes
      Building regulations                  yes
      Subdivision regulations               yes
      Stormwater regulations                yes
      Floodplain regulations                no
      Water service                         Saline County PWSD No.2
      Sewer service                         private
      Electric service                      Kansas City Power and Light
      Fire service                          Arrow Rock
      Ambulance service                     First Responders
      Rivers, streams                       Missouri River
      Major arterials                       Mo. Hwy. 41




                                                                          160
Blackburn
      Total population                      261
      Classification                        City-fourth class
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $35,313
      Total housing units                   121
      Housing unit, median year built       1949
      Median gross rent                     $363
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $36,300
      Master plan                           no
      Emergency Operations Plan             no
      Zoning regulations                    no
      Building regulations                  no
      Subdivision regulations               no
      Stormwater regulations                no
      Floodplain regulations                       no
      Water service                         Lafayette/Saline/Johnson Counties PWSD No. 4
      Sewer service                         private
      Electric service                      Kansas City Power and Light
      Fire service                          Blackburn
      Ambulance service                     Sweet Springs
      Rivers, streams                       no
      Major arterial                        Mo. hwy 20




                                                                                           161
Gilliam
      Total population                      229
      Classification                        Village
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $27,813
      Total housing units                   109
      Housing unit, median year built       1948
      Median gross rent                     $245
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $27,500
      Master plan                           no
      Emergency Operations Plan             no
      Zoning regulations                    no
      Building regulations                  no
      Subdivision regulations               no
      Stormwater regulations                no
      Floodplain regulations                        no
      Water service                         Saline County PWSD No. 2
      Sewer service                         private
      Electric service                      Kansas City Power and Light
      Fire service                          Slater
      Ambulance service                     Slater
      Rivers, streams                       Missouri River
      Major arterials                       Mo. Hwy O, PP, 240




                                                                          162
Grand Pass
      Total population                      53
      Classification                        Village
      Leadership structure                  Chairman/Trustee
      Median household income, 1999         $40,313
      Total housing units                   29
      Housing unit, median year built       1944
      Median gross rent                     not available
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $36,300
      Master plan                           no
      Emergency Operations Plan             no
      Zoning regulations                    no
      Building regulations                  no
      Subdivision regulations               no
      Stormwater regulations                no
      Floodplain regulations                        no
      Water service                         Lafayette/Saline/Johnson Counties PWSD No. 4
      Sewer service                         private
      Electric service                      Kansas City Power and Light
      Fire service                          Blackburn-Waverly-Malta Bend
      Ambulance service                     Sweet Springs
      Rivers, streams                       Missouri River
      Major arterials                       Mo. Hwy 65, RR




                                                                                           163
Malta Bend
      Total population                      251
      Classification                        City-fourth class
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $27,250
      Total housing units                   103
      Housing unit, median year built       1949
      Median gross rent                     $329
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $35,600
      Master plan                           no
      Emergency Operations Plan             no
      Zoning regulations                    no
      Building regulations                  no
      Subdivision regulations               no
      Stormwater regulations                no
      Floodplain regulations                       no
      Water service                         Lafayette/Saline/Johnson Counties PWSD No. 4
      Sewer service                         private
      Electric service                      Kansas City Power and Light
      Fire service                          Blackburn
      Ambulance service                     Marshall
      Rivers, streams                       Missouri River
      Major arterials                       MO hwy 65




                                                                                           164
Marshall
     Total population                      12,471
     Classification                        City-third class
     Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
     Median household income, 1999         $31,649
     Total housing units                   5,137
     Housing unit, median year built       1961
     Median gross rent                     $410
     Median owner-occupied housing value   $67,500
     Master plan                           yes
     Emergency Operations Plan             yes
     Zoning regulations                    yes
     Building regulations                  yes
     Subdivision regulations               yes
     Stormwater regulations                in development
     Floodplain regulations                        yes
     Water service                         Marshall
     Sewer service                         Marshall
     Electric service                      Marshall
     Fire service                          Marshall
     Ambulance service                     Marshall
     Rivers, streams                       no
     Major arterials                       MO hwy 65




                                                              165
Miami
        Total population                      163
        Classification                        Special Charter
        Leadership structure                  according to charter
        Median household income, 1999         $27,500
        Total housing units                   65
        Housing unit, median year built       1948
        Median gross rent                     $225
        Median owner-occupied housing value   $18,800
        Master plan                           yes
        Emergency Operations Plan             yes
        Zoning regulations                    yes
        Building regulations                  yes
        Subdivision regulations               yes
        Stormwater regulations                yes
        Floodplain regulations                        yes
        Water service                         Saline County PWSD No. 3
        Sewer service                         private
        Electric service                      Kansas City Power and Light
        Fire service                          Marshall
        Ambulance service                     Marshall
        Rivers, streams                       Missouri River
        Major arterials                       Mo. hwy 41




                                                                            166
Mount Leonard
     Total population                      157
     Classification                        Village
     Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
     Median household income, 1999         $20,833
     Total housing units                   52
     Housing unit, median year built       1961
     Median gross rent                     $438
     Median owner-occupied housing value   $27,500
     Master plan                           no
     Emergency Operations Plan             no
     Zoning regulations                    no
     Building regulations                  yes
     Subdivision regulations               no
     Stormwater regulations                no
     Floodplain regulations                        no
     Water service                         Lafayette/Saline/Johnson Counties PWSD No. 4
     Sewer service                         private
     Electric service                      Kansas City Power and Light
     Fire service                          Blackburn
     Ambulance service                     Sweet Springs
     Rivers, streams                       no
     Major arterials                       MO. hwy. 127




                                                                                          167
Nelson
         Total population                      211
         Classification                        City-fourth class
         Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
         Median household income, 1999         $28,214
         Total housing units                   106
         Housing unit, median year built       1951
         Median gross rent                     $238
         Median owner-occupied housing value   $20,500
         Master plan                           no
         Emergency Operations Plan             no
         Zoning regulations                    no
         Building regulations                  no
         Subdivision regulations               no
         Stormwater regulations                no
         Floodplain regulations                        no
         Water service                         Saline County PWSD No 3
         Sewer service                         private
         Electric service                      Kansas City Power and Light
         Fire service                          Marshall
         Ambulance service                     Marshall
         Rivers, streams                       Lamine River
         Major arterials                       MO. hwy. H




                                                                             168
Slater
         Total population                      2,098
         Classification                        City-third class
         Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
         Median household income, 1999         $25,270
         Total housing units                   1,077
         Housing unit, median year built       1951
         Median gross rent                     $291
         Median owner-occupied housing value   $32,300
         Master plan                           N/A
         Emergency Operations Plan             yes
         Zoning regulations                    N/A
         Building regulations                  N/A
         Subdivision regulations               N/A
         Stormwater regulations                N/A
         Floodplain regulations                        N/A
         Water service                         Slater
         Sewer service                         Slater
         Electric service                      Slater
         Fire service                          Slater
         Ambulance service                     Slater
         Rivers, streams                       Missouri River
         Major arterials                       MO. hwy 240




                                                                  169
Sweet Springs
      Total population                      1,616
      Classification                        City-fourth class
      Leadership structure                  Mayor/Council
      Median household income, 1999         $33,819
      Total housing units                   720
      Housing unit, median year built       1952
      Median gross rent                     $367
      Median owner-occupied housing value   $47,300
      Master plan                           no
      Emergency Operations Plan             yes
      Zoning regulations                    yes
      Building regulations                  yes
      Subdivision regulations               yes
      Stormwater regulations                no
      Floodplain regulations                       yes
      Water service                         Sweet Springs
      Sewer service                         Sweet Springs
      Electric service                      Kansas City Power & Light
      Fire service                          Sweet Springs
      Ambulance service                     Sweet Springs
      Rivers, streams                       Blackwater, Davis Creek, Harpers Branch
      Major arterials                       MO. hwy. 70




                                                                                  170
All cities
        Total population                      17,733
        Classification                        various
        Leadership structure                  various
        Median household income, 1999         $31,428
        Total housing units                   7,829
        Housing unit median year built        1950
        Median gross rent                     $351
        Median owner-occupied housing value   $43,992
        Master plan
        Emergency Operations Plan
        Zoning regulations
        Building regulations
        Subdivision regulations
        Stormwater regulations
        Floodplain regulations
        Water service
        Sewer service
        Electric service
        Fire service
        Ambulance service




                                                        171
Saline County
       Total population                          23,756
       Classification                            County-fourth class
       Leadership structure
       Median household income, 1999             $32,743
       Total housing units                       10,019
       Housing unit median year built            1958
       Median gross rent                         $391
       Median owner-occupied housing value       $59,700
       Master plan
       Emergency Operations Plan                 yes
       Zoning regulations                        yes
       Building regulations                      yes
       Subdivision regulations                   no
       Stormwater regulations                    no
       Floodplain regulations                             no
       Water service                             various
       Sewer service                             various
       Electric service                          Kansas City Power & Light, Slater,
       Marshall
       Fire service
       Ambulance service
       Rivers, streams                           Missouri River, Blackwater River
       Major arterials                   Interstate I-70, Hwy. 65




                                                                                      172

				
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