Transforming Discovery to Impact - School of Public Health

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					Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World
Self-Study Report
February 2007
An electronic copy of this Self-Study Report is available at http://www.sph.umn.edu/accreditation

University of Minnesota
Office of the Dean
School of Public Health
A302 Mayo Memorial Building
420 Delaware Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455-0381
Phone: (612) 624-6669
Fax: (612) 626-6931
http://www.sph.umn.edu


This Self-Study Report was prepared in response to the Accreditation Criteria provided by the Council on
Education for Public Health (CEPH), the independent accrediting agency recognized by the US Department
of Education to accredit schools of public health.

Council on Education for Public Health
800 Eye Street, NW, Suite 202
Washington, DC 20001-3710
Phone: 202-789-1050
Fax: 202-789-1895




   The University of Minnesota is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to its
  programs, facilities and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex,
       age, marital status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status or sexual orientation.
                                                                 Transforming Discovery to Impact:
                                                                 Public Health for a Healthier World


Executive Summary
The School of Public Health is one of the distinctive strengths of the University of Minnesota,
and it is unique in Minnesota and the region as the only school of public health. The School is
among the highest ranked schools of its kind nationally – a leader among its peers in public
health research, education and engagement in service to local, regional and global
communities. Its faculty and alumni are among the most esteemed and productive in their
fields. Partnerships that bring together the public health disciplines, professions and
communities yield excellent opportunities for the School to collaborate broadly in order to
improve public health and, in turn, inform the academy.
Since its last accreditation in 1999, the School of Public Health has undergone significant
transformation. Today, its vision – to move discovery to impact for the health of the public –
is clear. And its immense research, education and service resources are aligned to support the
vision. The School’s transformation is reflected in a variety of factors:
      Growth. Student enrollment is now more than 1,000, up from 346 in 1999;
      Curriculum reform. Curricula have become increasingly current and relevant:
      – School faculty, many of whom set the public health agenda through their research,
         have integrated their discoveries into teachings;
      – The School has heightened its sensitivity – and improved response to – the needs of
         the diverse audiences for public health education. The result is timely, topical courses
         presented in increasingly accessible learning formats and applied to the practice of
         public health;
      – The School has embraced and implemented competency-based learning opportunities
         that will be measured through the action of its alumni.
      Translating research discovery to public impact. The research program, which continues
      to grow and remains one of the most productive among schools of public health, focuses
      increasingly on translating findings for impact throughout the communities it serves.
      Extended reach. The reach of the School has been vastly extended through the use of
      digital technologies, more flexible offerings to meet the needs of working professionals
      and outcomes-based global partnerships.
Four watchwords – collaboration, inter-professional, global and digital – have been
fundamental to the School’s transformation – and will continue to be essential to expanding
its impact in the future.
Collaboration: In its 2002 report, “Who Will Keep the Public Healthy? Educating Public
Health Professionals for the 21st Century,” the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended
increased collaboration among schools of public health and other academic disciplines, health
departments and community organizations. Across programs within the School and across
colleges within the University, School administrators and faculty have embraced collaboration
as a means to improved educational and research outcomes. In fact, collaboration increasingly
defines the School’s culture. Today, few, if any, University of Minnesota schools can boast a
larger complement of active collaborations. The School’s dual degree programs and
participation in the campus-wide interdisciplinary initiatives led by the University President to
address critical societal issues are but two examples of the School’s embrace of collaboration.

                                                     University of Minnesota School of Public Health
                                                                          Self-Study, February 2007
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World

Collaboration also extends to the community, where the School has a growing portfolio of
community-based participatory research projects and where its connections with practicing
professionals are increasingly robust, a result owing in large measure to the School’s
innovative programs for lifelong learning geared for working professionals.
Inter-professional: Few, if any, fields encompass the number and variety of disciplines of
public health. But, according to IOM and others, to more effectively confront today’s pressing
health issues, public health’s principles, its emphasis on prevention and its perspective on
populations need to be integrated into the training of medical and health care professionals.
The School’s dual degree programs are a first step in this integration. The next step is an
emphasis on inter-professional education in which public health training becomes part and
parcel of completing a degree in the health sciences. As the School looks to increase its
impact, it is actively engaged in exploring models for inter-professional education, a priority
shared with the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, the administrative home of
the School and five other health science schools and colleges.
Global: Recognizing that public health is global, faculty have conducted research
internationally since the School’s founding in1944. As the world has grown smaller and more
interconnected through transportation and communications, the need for public health
partnerships across the globe has become more critical. To increase its impact, the School has
adopted a more coordinated, collaborative approach to its work globally. For example, the
School’s recent memorandum of understanding with India to assist in building a national
public health infrastructure and promote faculty and student exchanges promises to set a
successful precedent for the School’s outcome-oriented global focus.
Digital: Access to public health education – traditionally conducted in campus settings – has
long been a barrier to higher degrees and workforce training. Digital learning technologies,
enthusiastically embraced and adopted by the School, have effectively lowered the barrier.
With more than 3,000 online course registrations supported since 2002, the School is now a
central platform for public health education across the region and, increasingly, the world.
Today, some 50 percent of Minnesota public health workers have no formal public health
training and most are unable to leave jobs, homes and families for campus programs. Digital
delivery provides a channel through which to train these workers – and opens new
opportunities for students and communities to play a role in shaping the School’s research and
learning activities.
Collaboration, inter-professional, global and digital come together at the University of
Minnesota School of Public Health: Transforming Discovery to Impact for a Healthier
World.




University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Self-Study, February 2007
                                                                                        Transforming Discovery to Impact:
                                                                                        Public Health for a Healthier World

Table of Contents
                                                                                                                           PAGE
  Chapter 1: The School of Public Health
     1.1 Mission.................................................................................................................... 1
     1.2 Evaluation and Planning ........................................................................................ 7
     1.3 Institutional Environment .................................................................................... 15
     1.4 Organization and Administration ......................................................................... 20
     1.5 Governance ........................................................................................................... 27
     1.6 Resources ............................................................................................................. 40

  Chapter 2: Instructional Programs
     2.1 Master of Public Health Degree ........................................................................... 57
     2.2 Program Length .................................................................................................... 61
     2.3 Public Health Core Knowledge ............................................................................ 63
     2.4 Practical Skills ...................................................................................................... 66
     2.5 Culminating Experience ....................................................................................... 67
     2.6 Required Competencies ....................................................................................... 69
     2.7 Assessment Procedures ........................................................................................ 71
     2.8 Other Professional Degrees .................................................................................. 79
     2.9 Academic Degrees ................................................................................................ 79
     2.10 Doctoral Degrees................................................................................................. 82
     2.11 Joint Degrees ...................................................................................................... 84
     2.12 Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs .......................................... 86

  Chapter 3: Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge
     3.1 Research ............................................................................................................... 89
     3.2 Service .................................................................................................................. 98
     3.3 Workforce Development .................................................................................... 106

  Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students
     4.1 Faculty Qualifications ......................................................................................... 121
     4.2 Faculty Policies and Procedures ........................................................................ 125
     4.3 Faculty and Staff Diversity ................................................................................. 132
     4.4 Student Recruitment and Admissions ................................................................ 138
     4.5 Student Diversity................................................................................................. 145
     4.6 Advising and Career Counseling ........................................................................ 151




                                                                       University of Minnesota School of Public Health
                                                                                            Self-Study, February 2007
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World


Table of Contents – Figures & Tables
                                                                                                                       PAGE
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health
    Figure 1:   Abbreviated University Organizational Chart .................................................. 17
    Figure 2:   SPH Administration .......................................................................................... 21
    Figure 3:   School of Public Health Leadership and Governance ...................................... 28
    Table 1:    SPH Committee Membership – 2006-7 (effective 9/1/06, except as noted) ......... 35
    Table 2:    University Committee Membership.................................................................. 38
    Table 3:    University Senate – Public Health Representatives.......................................... 38
    Table 4:    University Committees – Public Health Representatives ................................. 39
    Table 5:    School of Public Health Revenue and Expenditures (Template A).................. 42
    Table 6:    Faculty Headcount (Tenured, Tenure Track and Contract) .............................. 43
    Table 7:    Faculty, Students, and Student/Faculty Ratios by Division (Template B) ....... 44
    Table 8:    Support Staff for Each Division or Office ........................................................ 46
    Table 9:    Total Support Staff............................................................................................ 46
    Table 10:   Space by Program and Purpose (in square feet) ............................................... 47
    Table 11:   Space by Building and Purpose ........................................................................ 48
    Table 12:   School Computing Resources ........................................................................... 51
    Table 13:   Outcome Measures by Which the School May Judge
                the Adequacy of Its Resources.......................................................................... 54

Chapter 2: Instructional Programs
    Table 14:   Instructional Matrix (Template C) .................................................................... 57
    Table 15:   MPH/MHA Degrees – Required Minimum Credits ......................................... 62
    Table 16:   Residents Completing the Academic Program ................................................. 67
    Table 17:   Capstone (Master’s) Project Requirements by M.P.H.
                and M.H.A Major Programs (Students Choose Option):.................................. 68
    Table 18:   Outcome Measure to Evaluate Student Achievement in Each Program........... 72
    Table 19:   Outcome Measure Related to Job Placement Experience................................. 72
    Table 20:   Destination of Graduates by Department or Specialty Area for
                Each of the Last 3 Years Master’s and Doctoral Degrees
                (excludes certificate completers) (Template D)................................................ 73
    Table 21:   Master’s and Doctoral Degree Totals —
                Percentage All Programs: 2 years 2004/5 and 2005/6 ...................................... 77
    Table 22:   Number of Active Students in Each Doctoral Degree Program ....................... 83
    Table 23:   Dual Degree Programs...................................................................................... 85



University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Self-Study, February 2007
                                                                                  Transforming Discovery to Impact:
                                                                                  Public Health for a Healthier World



Chapter 3: Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge
  Table 24: Outcome Measure by which the School May Evaluate Success
            of Research Activities .......................................................................................96
  Table 25: Outcome Measures of Service Program Success ............................................105
  Table 26: Growth in Continuing Education Courses and Registrations
            Online and On Campus 2000–2006 ................................................................107
  Table 27: Enrollment Data for Certificate Programs ......................................................115
  Table 28: Growth in Public Health Institute Courses, Registrations and Credits ...........116
  Table 29: Outcome Measures Related to Continuing Education Programs
            and Workforce Development ..........................................................................117

Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students
  Table 30: How Faculty Integrate Perspectives from the Field of Practice......................121
  Table 31: Outcome Measures by which to Judge Qualifications
            of Faculty Complement...................................................................................124
  Table 32: Summary Demographic Data – Current Core and
            Other Faculty (Template H) ............................................................................132
  Table 33: Summary Demographic Data – Full-Time Staff (Template I)........................133
  Table 34: Outcome Measure by Which to Judge Success in
            Achieving Diverse Faculty and Staff ..............................................................137
  Table 35: Program Applicants, Acceptances & Enrollment (Template J) ......................143
  Table 36: Outcome Measures by Which to Evaluate Success in
            Enrolling Qualified Student Body...................................................................144
  Table 37: Template L: Demographic Characteristics of Student Body ..........................149
  Table 38: Outcome Measure by Which to Evaluate Success in
            Achieving a Demographically Diverse Student Body ....................................150




                                                                  University of Minnesota School of Public Health
                                                                                       Self-Study, February 2007
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World



Table of Contents – Appendices
                                                                                                                     PAGE
Appendix Chapter 1 — The School of Public Health
  1.2.c. Outcome Measures ..............................................................................Appendix 1, 1
  1.5.b. Constitution..........................................................................................Appendix 1, 5
Appendix Chapter 2 — Instructional Programs
  2.4.a. Program-specific Policies and Procedures for Practice
         Experience ...........................................................................................Appendix 2, 1
  2.4.b. Field Experiences for MPH Students Enrolling
         Fall 2002 – Fall 2006.........................................................................Appendix 2, 19
  2.6.b.i. Core Public Health Courses Mapped to Core Competencies ..........Appendix 2, 41
  2.6.b.ii. Core Masters of Healthcare Administration Course
            Requirements Mapped To Core Competencies..............................Appendix 2, 49
  2.6.c. Competencies .....................................................................................Appendix 2, 57
             Biostatistics ...................................................................................Appendix 2, 57
             Clinical Research ..........................................................................Appendix 2, 74
             Community Health Education.......................................................Appendix 2, 78
             Environmental Health Sciences ....................................................Appendix 2, 81
             Epidemiology................................................................................Appendix 2, 91
             Health Services Research, Policy and Administration ...............Appendix 2, 106
             Healthcare Administration ..........................................................Appendix 2, 115
             Maternal Child Health.................................................................Appendix 2, 133
             Public Health Administration and Policy ...................................Appendix 2, 139
             Public Health Nutrition ...............................................................Appendix 2, 141
             Public Health Practice.................................................................Appendix 2, 149
             Public Health Certificate Programs ............................................Appendix 2, 159
             ISP Certificate Programs.............................................................Appendix 2, 170
  2.11.a Dual Degree Program Curriculum Sheets.......................................Appendix 2, 181
Appendix Chapter 3 — Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge
  3.1.c. Template E: Research Activity of Primary and Secondary
         Faculty .................................................................................................Appendix 3, 1
  3.2.b. Faculty Service ..................................................................................Appendix 3, 73
  3.3.c. Continuing Education Courses and Workforce Development ........Appendix 3, 105
Appendix Chapter 4 — Faculty, Staff and Students
  4.1.a. Template F: Faculty Who Support Degree Programs..........................Appendix 4, 1
  4.1.b. Template G: Other Faculty Used to Support Teaching
         Programs............................................................................................Appendix 4, 31
  4.4.e. Template K: Number of Students Enrolled in Each Degree
         Program ..............................................................................................Appendix 4, 49


University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Self-Study, February 2007
                              CHAPTER ONE




The School of Public Health
                                                                 Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                           Public Health for a Healthier World


1.0 The School of Public Health
   1.1   Mission
   1.2   Evaluation and Planning
   1.3   Institutional Environment
   1.4   Organization and Administration
   1.5   Governance
   1.6   Resources

Introduction
The University of Minnesota School of Public Health is a leader among its peers in public
health research, education and engagement in service to local, regional and global
communities.. As the only school of public health in Minnesota and North and South Dakota,
it is a vital contributor to the region’s public health infrastructure and quality of health and
life.
Established in 1944, the School is guided by a strong mission and well articulated goals and
objectives – all under girded by core values emphasizing excellence, integrity and
engagement. The School’s direction and course – as well as its programs and personnel – are
subject to regular evaluation, especially as they relate to the evolving public health
environment. Particularly important in the School’s ongoing evaluation is the accreditation
process, which, in 1999, helped spur a number of improvements, most notably stronger two-
way connections with the practice community. These links have proven especially critical in
view of new and increasingly complex public health practice challenges in the early 21st
Century.
The School is fortunate to be part of a leading academic institution, one that aspires to achieve
rank as one of the nation’s top three public research universities. While the University
provides a supportive environment, it grants broad governance and operational authority to
the School. The School’s administrative and committee structure promotes participation by
administrators, faculty, staff and students in decision- and policymaking. That said, the
School continually re-evaluates its internal structure with a view to increased effectiveness
and efficiencies.
The School is also fortunate to be part of an inter-professional team in the University of
Minnesota Academic Health Center, the administrative home of the School and five other
health science schools and colleges. This complement allows for greater opportunity for
collaboration not only in governance but in the education, research and engaged activities of
their faculty and students.
The School enjoys adequate resources to support its programs. While State funding is
declining, indirect cost recovery funds continue to provide a major portion of School
resources. Increases in tuition revenue, resulting from higher enrollment in distance learning
and continuing education programs, have diversified the School’s financial portfolio.
However, the dispersal of School facilities across some dozen University locations continues
to challenge organizational efficiency.

                                                     University of Minnesota School of Public Health
                                                                          Self-Study, February 2007
                                                                Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                          Public Health for a Healthier World

Looking ahead, the School aspires to become the top-ranked public university school of
public health in the nation. The vision, the organization, the people and the determination in
place today will enable the School to achieve this goal.




University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Self-Study, February 2007
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                 Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

1.1 Mission
    1.1.a. Mission
            The University of Minnesota School of Public Health advances human health from
            scientific discovery to public impact in the prevention of disease and injury and the
            enhancement of population health through excellence in education, research and
            engagement with the global community.

    1.1.b. Goals
            To achieve its mission, the School has established the following goals related to its
            major functions of education, research and service:
               Prepare the next generation of public health professional, academic and
               scientific leaders.
               Advance the School’s global leadership in public health research and discovery.
               Advance population health by engaging with communities worldwide.
            The mission of the School reflects that of the University:
            “The University of Minnesota, founded in the belief that all people are enriched by
            understanding, is dedicated to the advancement of learning and the search for
            truth; to the sharing of this knowledge through education for a diverse community;
            and to the application of this knowledge to benefit the people of the state, the
            nation, and the world.”

    1.1.c. Objectives and Outcomes
            Goals, objectives and outcomes are identified below. Outcome Indicators and
            targets have been established to measure progress-to-goal and are noted, where
            possible, for a three-year period in the Outcomes Grid in Appendix 1.2.c. and
            within each section as appropriate. Some outcomes are not easily measured
            quantitatively or the current data systems may not be available. Thus, in addition
            to specific quantitative outcome indicators, stories of impact and outcome are
            integrated throughout this report.
            Targets for each outcome indicator were established by reviewing national norms
            and historical data from the School. Consensus by the Executive Team resulted in
            confirmation of the targets. In some instances the School has exceeded future
            targets in areas where national trends suggest outcomes will be challenged (e.g.
            sponsored grant dollars per full-time faculty member).

  Goal I: Prepare the next generation of public health professional, academic and
          scientific leaders.
        Objective 1. Recruit and admit students with strong potential for academic
        achievement and accomplishments in the field of public health.




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                                                                Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                          Public Health for a Healthier World

            Outcomes
            a. Master’s student graduation rate (within 3 years) by program (excluding dual
               degrees). (Outcome Indicator 2.7.b.)
            b. Job placement rates of graduates within 12 months of graduation (self report on
               graduate survey). (Outcome Indicator 2.7.c.)
            c. Number of trainees participating in continuing professional education
               (Outcome Indicator 3.3.c.)
            d. Number of applicants (Outcome Indicator 4.4.f.)
            e. Percent of students from diverse communities (international; racial and ethnic;
               and female/male) served by the School (Outcome Indicator 4.5.d.)
            f. Number of enrolled students with strong academic records (evidence may
               include grade point average, GRE or other standardized test scores)
            g. Number of enrolled students in dual-degree programs, such as D.V.M./M.P.H.,
               M.D./M.P.H.; J.D./M.P.H.; M.B.A./ M.P.H.; M.S.N./M.P.H.; Graduate School
               (Ph.D./M.P.H.) as percentage of all students
            h. Number of participants who use technology-enhanced learning modalities
            i. Number of students in academic certificate programs
         Objective 2. Provide innovative, high-quality educational experiences for
         continuous learning across the public health career continuum.

            Outcomes
            a. Extramural funding (training grants) as a percentage of total budget (Outcome
               Indicator 1.6.m.)
            b. Ratio of degree-seeking students (head count admissions) to faculty (head
               count). (Outcome Indicator 4.4.f.)
            c. Number of continuing professional education courses (online and on-site)
               across a broad spectrum of public health (Outcome Indicator 3.3.c.)
            d. Level of student satisfaction with the School’s academic educational
               experience, as measured through course evaluations and annual student surveys
            e. Level of student satisfaction with continuing professional education experience,
               as measured through course evaluations
            f. Innovative curricula and programs available to meet needs of students across
               the span of a public health career (e.g., Executive Program in Public Health
               Practice, M.H.A. Part-Time program, cross-cutting focus areas)
            g. Diversity of modalities through which lifelong, continuous learning courses and
               programs are delivered (i.e., classroom; online, including both academic and
               professional education; video-on-demand; podcasts; distance-learning
               opportunities, etc.)
            h. Number of mentors available to serve students
            i. Number of academic credits taken through a distance-learning format, such as
               online or through the Public Health Institute


PAGE 2                                             University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

            j. International involvement through student and faculty exchange
        Objective 3. Recruit, retain and reward outstanding faculty
            a. Percentage of eligible faculty who receive promotion from assistant to full
               professor within 11 years (Outcome Indicator 4.1.d.)
            b. Proportion of racially and ethnically diverse and female/male faculty (Outcome
               Indicator 4.3.f.)
            c. Percent of contract to tenured/tenure track faculty
            d. Number of adjunct faculty who are working in the public health professions
            e. Above-average compensation based on national salary norms at other schools of
               public health
            f. Number of faculty honors and awards
        Objective 4. Provide educational support through quality staff, resources and
        infrastructure.

            Outcomes
            a. Institutional expenditures per full-time-equivalent student (Outcome Indicator
               1.6.m.)
            b. Proportion of racially and ethnically diverse and female/male staff (Outcome
               Indicator 4.3.f.)
            c. Staff participation in internal in-service training (e.g., Regents’ Scholarship)
            d. Investment in facilities and learning technologies (e.g., wireless classrooms,
               Web-based technologies, libraries, etc.)
            e. Annual amount of financial aid, such as loans, scholarships and other subsidies,
               maintained
            f. Number of technology-enhanced classrooms
            g. High-quality library services
            h. Communication portal availability for students and faculty

Goal II: Advance the School’s global leadership in public health research and
         discovery.
        Objective 5. Support opportunities for scientific discovery.

            Outcomes
            a. Amount of sponsored grant dollars per full-time faculty member (Outcome
               Indicator 3.1.d.)
            b. Number of annual sponsored-grant awards
            c. Number of junior faculty participating in formal mentorship program (e.g.,
               annual workshop on grantsmanship, senior faculty teaming)
            d. Number of faculty participating in formal faculty development program
            e. Number of Ph.D. students per FTE faculty


Self-Study, February 2007                                                               PAGE 3
                                                                 Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                           Public Health for a Healthier World

            f. Number of students participating in research
         Objective 6. Disseminate research findings and results of the efficacy of public
         health practice programs.

            Outcomes
            a. Number of peer-reviewed publications per faculty member
            b. Number of communications by the School regarding research and its
               application (e.g., newsletters, news media interviews, etc.)
         Objective 7. Engage the community and public health practitioners from outside
         the School in research.

            Outcomes
            a. Number of students, including those involved in master’s projects, participating
               in practice-based research
            b. Number of faculty with dual/joint appointments with other schools and/or
               departments
            c. Opportunities for community-based participatory research

Goal III: Advance population health by engaging with communities worldwide.
         Objective 8. Foster collaborative leadership through a partnership network.

            Outcomes
            a. Number of faculty involved in editorial review (Outcome Indicator 3.2.c.)
            b. Recognition of community partners through adjunct appointments within the
                University and within external communities (Outcome Indicator 4.1.d.)
            c. Percent of faculty involved in other (non-editorial review) service activities
                (Outcome Indicator 3.2.c.)
            d. Number of faculty serving in leadership roles in professional associations
            e. Number of programs advancing inter-professional leadership
            f. Proportion of faculty engaged in international collaborations in research,
                education and service
         Objective 9. Reward faculty and student participation in programs of service to
         public health practice.

            Outcomes
            a. Number of University/School faculty and student awards presented for
               excellence in service to public health practice
            b. Applications for faculty awards from national or regional associations
               recognizing faculty service and accomplishments




PAGE 4                                              University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                 Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

    1.1.d. Manner in which the mission, goals and objectives and vision are measured,
           revised and made available to the public
            The mission, goals, objectives and outcome statements as well as the vision
            statement are developed, and periodically revised, through a process of consensus
            building that begins with the Executive Team, which is chaired by the Dean.
            Following the discussion of possible statements, the members of the team refine
            and revise them for consideration by the rest of the School and community
            partners. Stakeholder review finalized the most recent process that culminated with
            a presentation to the School Policy Council. School documents
            (http://www.sph.umn.edu) are available online for public review and comment.

    1.1.e. Values that guide the School
            The School envisions a world that cherishes and secures health and well-being as a
            human right, possession and responsibility of all. The School commits to this
            vision daily as one of the world’s leaders in public health research, education and
            service on behalf of this common good. The School unites globally and locally
            with people, communities and institutions that share and advance the values of
            progress in the growth of human potential and achievement.
            As a public health leader in a land-grant research university, the School bears
            unique responsibility for:

            Education that:
              Prepares the next generation of public health professionals, scientists and
              leaders in the competencies of their disciplines and the values, norms and
              culture of their career choices;
              Provides learning opportunities to students across the health sciences in public
              health disciplines, competencies and skills important to their professions;
              Teaches methods of scientific and critical discovery, inquiry, and innovation
              and their application in public health settings;
              Affords students diverse learning opportunities, excellence in instructional
              design and technology, and values student collaboration in curriculum
              development and quality assurance;
              Inspires students to reflect upon public health values as essential to human
              growth, security and progress;
              Instills values of lifelong learning, inquiry and public service.

            Research that:
              Bridges biology, the physical environment, social, political, cultural and
              economic factors to discover, understand, and improve the health of
              populations, communities, and societies;
              Advances statistical and other methods of scientific inquiry;




Self-Study, February 2007                                                                  PAGE 5
                                                                 Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                           Public Health for a Healthier World

             Analyzes social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and
             processes, health technologies, and policies that affect access to health care, its
             quality and cost and public health infrastructure;
             Applies principles of preparedness and protection to public health practice;
             Evaluates effective methods of learning and disseminating evidence-based
             practice to health professionals, community leaders and the public.

           Service that:
             Engages diverse communities, leaders, professionals, and other stakeholders
             within and beyond the University as partners in the mission of public health;
             Creates opportunities for the continuous education and lifelong learning of
             public health and health professional work forces;
             Acts as a public forum for open and free exchange of ideas about challenging
             public health issues;
             Communicates effective evidence-based practice, strategies and knowledge to
             health professionals, policy-makers and the public;
             Fosters collaborative leadership through a network of academic, public, private
             and practice partnerships.

    1.1.f. This criterion is met.
           The School has been successful in articulating a clear mission with supporting
           goals, objectives and outcomes. Mission, goals, objectives and outcomes have
           been reviewed and revised through an inclusive strategic planning process in
           keeping with the vision of the University and School.

           Strengths
              The School has a clearly articulated mission and goals and objectives that
              support its mission – and has identified Outcome Indicators by which to
              measure progress towards goals.
              The School provides opportunities for faculty, staff, students, partners and
              community members to comment on its goals and objectives.

           Weaknesses
            The process of review and revision of goals and objectives typically begins with
            the Executive Team. Its recommendations are then presented to the rest of the
            School and to community partners for consideration. This approach may
            inadvertently discourage creative thinking and open input from faculty and
            other constituents if the recommendations appear to be all but complete.
            All members of the public and faculty may not be aware of the opportunity to
            participate in the review process.




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            Recommendations
              Enhance internal and external communications to inform potential participants
              that the review process is being undertaken and invite their input

1.2 Evaluation and Planning
    1.2.a. Evaluation procedures and planning processes
            The School employs a year-round, multi-level planning and evaluation process.
            This includes active participation in the University’s strategic planning and
            Compact processes, School Unit or Division reviews and personnel reviews, as
            well as the annual faculty retreat and ad hoc planning groups. Faculty and
            administration undergo several levels of evaluation, some at the University and
            School levels and others at the Division and academic major level.
            University-level evaluation and planning processes
            The University’s Strategic Planning Process: Transforming the University
            (http://www1.umn.edu/systemwide/strategic_positioning/) is a planning process aimed at moving
            the University and School toward a broad, innovative vision of the future. Many
            School faculty and staff have participated as members and chairs of task forces in
            the process, which aims, among other things, to transform the University into one
            of the top three public research universities in the world. Over 300 University and
            community partners worked from November 2005 to May 2006 to gather data and
            formulate recommendations for action. The Academic Health Center (AHC), of
            which the School is a part, led four of the task force initiatives (Knowledge
            Management, Clinical Science Enterprise, Health Professionals Workforce and
            Precinct Plan). In all efforts, internal and external stakeholders were involved as
            members and reviewers, with public comment solicited online.
            The University has begun implementing recommendations submitted by these task
            forces, with collateral efforts at the AHC and School levels. Leaders continue to
            evaluate all recommendations to identify key transformational initiatives that will
            propel the University toward its vision.
            The University’s Annual “Compact Process,” in place since 1999, coordinates
            planning and accountability to achieve critical institutional and unit goals. The
            resulting Compact document is a written agreement – available to the public –
            between the University’s management and the School (or other college or support
            unit) that aligns broad University goals with the directions, investments and
            actions of the School. The Compact Process:
               Identifies strategies and partnerships to achieve University-wide goals and
               priorities using available resources
               Identifies areas for investment and/or reallocation
               Updates long-range capital and space plans and priorities
               Provides a basis for accountability in evaluating performance.




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         The annual Compact document includes:
            A summary of the School’s progress during the previous year
            Major goals for the coming year(s)
            Action plans to achieve the goals
            Descriptions of key University issues as they affect the School.
         Review of and input on Compact priorities and action are solicited from the
         School’s Executive Team and faculty.
         School-level evaluation and planning processes
         Five-Year Strategic Plan. The School regularly conducts a planning and
         evaluation process that looks five years into the future. In the 2004-2005 academic
         year, having accomplished the essence of the goals set out in the 1999 strategic
         plan, the School, under the leadership of then Interim Dean John Finnegan, began
         a new strategic planning process. In January 2005, a stakeholders retreat brought
         together faculty and community partners to lay the groundwork for strategic
         planning. Data gathered through focused discussions were considered by a School
         Futures Committee, made up of faculty and a representative from the Minnesota
         Department of Health. The Futures Committee was established to: develop specific
         recommendations for investments in critical research areas; consider the School’s
         inter-disciplinary position and role in the health sciences, the University and the
         community; and to weigh how investments could strengthen the academic and
         training programs of the School and the Academic Health Center. Using
         recommendations from the Futures Committee, the Office of the Dean established
         new directives to address strategic priorities, including expanding faculty from 95
         to a projected 130 members and achieving future excellence through appropriate
         prioritizing, aimed at strengthening traditional areas of education, research and
         service and building new ones.
         School and Dean. The performance of the Dean and the School is reviewed every
         five years by a group appointed by the Senior Vice President for Health Sciences,
         with comments solicited from internal and external stakeholders. This review
         focuses on all aspects of the School’s performance as expressed in the School’s
         mission, goals and objectives, and tends to be global in its scope. In addition to
         this extensive evaluation, the Dean also receives an annual performance evaluation
         by the Senior Vice President for Health Sciences, with written input from the
         School’s Executive Team. Evaluation results are used by the Dean to adjust and
         align operations to accomplish the School’s mission, goals and objectives.
         The Executive Team and faculty members have multiple opportunities to provide
         comments on the School’s direction and the Dean’s performance through bi-
         monthly planning meetings and access to the Senior Vice President for Health
         Sciences.
         Division and Division Heads. Reviews of the School’s Divisions, and a major
         review of each Division Head, are conducted every five years or earlier, if directed
         by the Dean.



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            In addition, the performance of each of the Division Heads is evaluated annually
            by the Dean. This assessment includes feedback from Division faculty, alumni,
            students, staff, and external constituents, along with an assessment of
            accomplishments.
            Division reviews are assigned to a committee appointed by the Dean and
            consisting of faculty and staff from the Division, other School Divisions, other
            University collegiate units and individuals from outside the University (such as
            local health practitioners, staff from the Minnesota Department of Health, alumni,
            faculty from other Universities, etc.). Each review is conducted over several
            months, and a written report of the Division’s performance, its ability to meet the
            needs of public health and the performance of the Division Head is submitted to
            the Dean. Division reviews provide valuable information about the management of
            the Division and its abilities to meet current and future challenges as it addresses
            its respective components of public health.
            Majors. Reviews of academic programs, are conducted by the Graduate School
            every five to seven years. The reviews strengthen the instructional and research
            components of the graduate programs and often provide recommendations that
            benefit other School programs.
            Reviews of professional degree programs are conducted periodically by the
            School’s Educational Policy Committee (EPC) with recommendations to the
            Major Chair and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for revision. Competency-
            based curricula review is ongoing by EPC to ensure alignment of course learning
            objectives with major program competency sets.
            All courses offered for graduate credit in the School, excluding thesis credits and
            independent studies, are evaluated with written forms provided to each student.
            Completed forms are returned to the Student Services Center for the compilation
            of responses. Faculty use course evaluations to modify content and teaching
            methods and address student concerns. Practicum are evaluated as identified by
            contract on an individual basis; recommendations are addressed by faculty
            practicum advisers.
            New online course evaluation and practicum tracking systems offer the
            opportunity for rapid and timely course adjustments.
            Faculty. Annual faculty performance evaluations conducted by the Division
            Heads provide feedback to the individual faculty member about his or her
            performance against Division and School goals and objectives. Tenure-track
            faculty are reviewed annually by the School’s Academic Appointment, Promotion
            and Tenure (APT) Committee for promotion considerations. Tenured faculty are
            reviewed by the APT Committee every five years under a standardized process
            known as Post-Tenure Review.
            School Staff. Members of the staff receive annual reviews for performance. Their
            representation at committees allows opportunities for their input into institutional
            planning and evaluation.
            Alumni. The School’s Student Services Center routinely surveys recent graduates
            for their opinions and comments about the quality of education provided by the


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          School and the applicability of their programs of study to subsequent jobs. Student
          Services also informally tracks the employment success of recent graduates.
          Students. Student course evaluations provide valuable feedback for evaluating
          School performance and planning future improvements. Informal feedback
          solicited from students during the advising process, periodic focus group
          discussions, exit interviews with graduating students and documentation of
          positions in which graduates are employed also provide important information for
          planning.
          Practice Community. The School uses multiple strategies through which it
          engages the community in evaluation and planning. Among them are:
             Needs assessments conducted in a variety of diverse settings:
             – A comprehensive needs assessment was completed by the School’s Centers
                for Public Health Education and Outreach (CPHEO) in 2003-2006 to identify
                gaps in the knowledge of public health practitioners in Minnesota, Wisconsin
                and North Dakota in core public health and emergency readiness
                competencies.
             – Ongoing inquiry into the practice and emerging training and education needs
                is conducted through discussions with members of the advisory boards to the
                School’s majors and centers and with attendees at major national and
                regional conferences at which the School exhibits.
             An annual survey is conducted of public health professionals (half of whom are
             alumni) who serve in the School’s mentor program for feedback and program
             improvement.
             A query of advisory board members is conducted during programmatic
             meetings.
             The School formed the Public Health Research and Education Advisors
             Partnership (REAP) in 2006 to add another venue for community input for
             evaluation and planning. Those invited to participate include representatives of
             health systems and a range of communities from the public and private sectors
             engaged in public health.

   1.2.b. How the results of evaluation and planning are used to enhance the quality of
          programs and activities.
          The School’s evaluation and planning processes are used to enhance the quality of
          its programs in a variety of ways:
             Establish new directives to address strategic priorities and achieving future
             excellence through appropriate prioritizing, aimed at strengthening traditional
             areas of education, research and service and building new ones.
             Continually improve the management and operations of the School and
             administrative units.
             Review of academic programs to strengthen the instructional and practicum
             components of the programs.



PAGE 10                                           University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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               Competency based curricula review has ensured alignment of course learning
               objectives with major program competency sets.
               Review of faculty and staff allows for personnel development and alignment of
               performance
               New online course evaluation and practicum tracking system offers the
               opportunity for rapid and timely course adjustments.
               Feedback obtained from alumni and students during the advising process, focus
               groups and exit interviews provide information used in planning and continuous
               quality improvement.
               Ongoing inquiry into the emerging training and education needs of the public
               health workforce provides essential information for new program development.
            Please see 1.2.a. above for more information regarding the use of evaluation and
            planning under each area of review.

    1.2.c. Outcome measures to monitor School effectiveness in meeting its mission,
           goals and objectives.
            Outcome Indicators and targets have been established to measure progress-to-goal
            and are noted, where possible, for a three-year period in the Outcomes Grid in
            Appendix 1.2.c. and within each section as appropriate. Some outcomes are not
            easily measured quantitatively or current data systems may not be available. Thus,
            in addition to quantitative measures, stories of impact and outcome are integrated
            throughout this report. Targets for each outcome indicator were established by
            reviewing national norms and historical data from the School. Consensus by the
            Executive Team resulted in confirmation of the targets. In some instances the
            School has exceeded future targets in areas where national trends suggest
            outcomes will be challenged (e.g. sponsored grant dollars per full-time faculty
            member).

    1.2.d. An analytical self-study document that provides a qualitative and quantitative
           assessment of how the School achieves its mission, goals and objectives and
           meets all accreditation criteria
            The School has found the self-study to be an excellent evaluation process, enabling
            a review of the organization and consideration of strengths, weaknesses and action
            steps. Included at the end of every section is the self-assessment summary of
            School strengths and weaknesses in reference to the accreditation criteria.

    1.2.e. An analysis of the School’s responses to recommendations in the last
           accreditation report (if any).
            Criterion IV met with commentary: The School shall have resources adequate to
            fulfill its mission, goals and objectives.
            The School has adequate resources to meet its mission, goals and objectives.




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            The School continues to be challenged by its physical dispersion, but it
            manages and functions well through electronic communications and shuttle
            service connecting dispersed locations.
            State funding continues to be limited, but tuition income has more than doubled
            over the past five years. In addition, enrollment, a concern during the last
            accreditation, is now more than 1,000, up from 346 in 1999
          Criteria V.B. merits commentary on practice experience: Each professional degree
          program shall assure that each student develops understanding basic to public
          health, acquires skills and experience in applying public health concepts and
          demonstrates knowledge through a culminating experience.
          The School’s Student Services Center and program coordinators have strengthened
          and unified the policies and procedures for field placement. A new online field
          placement Web site has also served as a driving force in developing unified
          requirements, clear guidelines and an excellent tracking and feedback system. The
          School has addressed concerns cited regarding variability of field experience
          documentation.
          Criteria V.C. met with commentary: Each program and area of specialization
          shall have clear learning objectives.
          The School has continued to develop a competency-based curricula. All majors
          have identified a set of specialty competencies that build upon the core
          competencies required of all professional students. Learning objectives are
          identified in all course syllabi and practicum experiences that contribute to
          attainment of competencies. These objectives are required for all students within
          an area of study and are available in the student guidebook as curricula sheets and
          as a competency matrix online.
          VII partially met: The School shall pursue an active service program.
          In response to the CEPH accreditation report, the School invested substantial time
          and money to establish a central, coordinated professional service and outreach
          program. The result of this process, the Centers for Public Health Education and
          Outreach (CPHEO), has become the School’s chief platform connecting public
          health research, education and practice, particularly for the states of Minnesota,
          North Dakota and Wisconsin. In addition to investment of School resources during
          the past five years, faculty and public health professionals have collaborated to
          secure funding for workforce development amounting to approximately $2.5
          million annually. The School has served over 50,000 students and community
          members through professional development and outreach activities in the past five
          years.
          VIII.C. met with commentary: The School shall recruit, retain and promote a
          diverse faculty.
          The School has policies and guidance in place to assure equal opportunities to all
          persons. These are based on the essential principle that the School should
          appropriately reflect the diversity of the society it serves. This principle is
          manifested in guidance that aggressively seeks qualified candidates from under-


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            represented populations through publication of special notices, network
            dissemination, committee make-up of diverse constituents and ongoing dialogue to
            enhance School culture. The School has made substantial progress in gender
            diversity with approximately 45 percent of the faculty now female. Ethnic
            diversity continues to be a challenge in a state where people of color are 11 percent
            of the population.
            Criteria X.A. met with commentary. The School shall have explicit processes for
            evaluating its efforts.
            Assessment and evaluation occur at the Division level on a continuous basis
            through monthly faculty meetings. As suggested in the last review, the Compact
            Process instituted in 1999 has provided a successful mechanism for School-wide
            assessment and evaluation. The Compact Process provides opportunities to tie
            planning to resources and to achieve an integrated School-wide perspective. In
            addition, the University’s recent “Transforming the University” strategic planning
            process has engaged the School as an active partner in this extensive evaluation,
            providing a means by which the School, Divisions and partners can engage.

    1.2.f. Description of the process used for the self-study
            The self-study process began in November 2005 with the Dean’s appointment of
            the School’s Accreditation Working Group and the assignment of staff. A four-
            phase process ensued:

            Phase One
            January 2006: Data gathering and development of self-study draft.
            Each member of the Working Group took responsibility for gathering information
            to address specific accreditation criteria. Meetings throughout this phase were
            generally one-on-one, small groups and regular meetings of the Executive Team.

            Phase Two
            June 2006: Critical review of the School and the draft self-study document.
            Review meetings were held with Accreditation Working Group members and the
            Executive Team to discuss content changes and to review the School’s strengths,
            weaknesses and action steps for improvement. Suggested changes were made to
            the document and current processes of the School.
            July – October 2006: Wide audience review and stakeholder discussions.
               Faculty, staff, students and the larger public health community were invited to
               review and comment on the self-study document. Drafts were available on the
               School’s Web site, and print versions were provided for those who requested a
               copy. Comments were solicited and inserted into the final document.
               School committee reviews included the following:
               – The Educational Policy Committee (which includes Major Chairpersons),
                  along with Directors of Graduate Studies for the various academic degree
                  programs, reviewed educational components during the process and the


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               entire document prior to completion. They contributed to the production of
               portions of the report relevant to the respective curricula.
             – The Policy Council reviewed the self-study for vision and mission alignment
               with School priorities.
             – The Faculty Consultative Committee reviewed sections of the final draft for
               accuracy and policy.
             – The Research and Education Advisory Partnership also reviewed the
               document for community stakeholder evaluation.

          Phase Three
          September-October, 2006: Refinement of the preliminary self-study and
          development of web-based materials.

          Phase Four
          November 2006-January 2007: Preliminary self-study under review by CEPH
          January – March 2007: Refinement of the final self-study document, final approval
          by the Dean and Executive Team, print and web-based resources final, highlights
          and invitation for comment online and sent to faculty, staff, students, community
          partners and alumni email list.
          The School’s Accreditation Working Group:
             John Finnegan, Jr., Dean
             Debra Olson, Associate Dean and Accreditation Director
             Judith Garrard, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research
             William Riley, Associate Dean for Student Affairs
             Joe Weisenburger, Director for Finance
             Joan Pasiuk, Director, Student Services Center
             Judith Peterson, Administrative Director for Human Resources
             Rickey Hall, Director of Recruitment and Multicultural Services through 2006
             Joe Mayo-Cullen, Marketing and Business Manager, Centers for Public Health
             Education and Outreach
             Diana Harvey, Director of Advancement Services
             Mary Hourigan, Privacy Officer and Staff on Accreditation through 2006
             Amy Scheller, Assistant Ed Specialist and Lead Staff on Accreditation

   1.2.g. This criterion is met.

          Strengths
             The School is actively and continually involved in evaluation and planning. All
             constituents are involved for continuous improvement. The School has fully
             responded to recommendations in the last accreditation report.



PAGE 14                                          University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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               Evaluation and planning are carried out at multiple levels year-round:
               University, Academic Health Center, School, Division, academic major and
               individual. Every five years, the School conducts a comprehensive strategic
               planning process. And every seven years, it conducts an in-depth self-study as
               part of the accreditation process.
               The School achieved the essence of all of the goals set forth in its 1999 strategic
               plan – and it has implemented changes based on all recommendations made in
               the last accreditation report.

            Weaknesses
             Methods for gathering evaluation and planning input from public health
             employers is not formalized across the School.
             Limited data collection systems restrict the School’s ability to quantify
             progress – and set measurable Outcome Indicators – in some areas.

            Recommendations
              Implement structured methods, such as regular surveys of public health
              employers, to increase opportunities for input on School outcomes.
              Explore expanded easy-to-use digital technologies to increase response to
              evaluation and planning efforts.
              Review integration of data systems for compilation and coordination of
              assessment and evaluation

1.3. Institutional Environment
    1.3.a. The School’s institutional home
            The University of Minnesota, founded in 1851, is one of the most comprehensive
            public universities in the United States and ranks among the most prestigious. It is
            both the state land-grant university, with a strong tradition of education and public
            service, and the state’s primary research university, with faculty of national and
            international reputation. Through world-class research, scholarship and public
            engagement, the University aims to solve challenges facing the state, nation and
            world and provide broad access to programs and resources.
            The University offers myriad educational opportunities for its 60,000 students in
            more than 370 fields of study. The Twin Cities campus is the flagship campus of
            the University and home to 20 colleges, including the School. It has one of the
            most comprehensive academic programs in the world and its enrollment is the
            nation’s second largest. The University also includes three coordinate campuses
            (Crookston, Duluth and Morris), UMN Rochester campus, a statewide Extension
            Service and research and outreach centers.
            In 1851, the seeds of the Academic Health Center were planted with territorial
            legislation that created the University of Minnesota and named medicine and
            science among five original academic disciplines. The AHC now comprises the six



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          schools and colleges of medicine, public health, nursing, dentistry, pharmacy, and
          veterinary medicine as well as allied health programs.
          Founded in 1944, the School is one of the six health sciences schools that form the
          University’s Academic Health Center (AHC)
          (http://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/7617/AHC_ORG_Chart-013106.pdf). Fifteen research and
          education centers help define the AHC’s interdisciplinary nature. The School is
          actively engaged in more than half of the centers, including: the Cancer Center;
          Obesity Prevention Center; Center for Infectious Disease, Research and Policy;
          Bio-Medical Genomics Center; Center for Computational Genomics and
          Bioinformatics; National Center for Food Protection and Defense; Center for
          Bioethics; and the Center for Spirituality and Healing.
          Several AHC-wide ancillary units provide administrative enhancements to the
          School, including Financial Affairs, Legal Affairs, Human Resources, Facilities
          Management, Communications and Legislative Relations, as well as the Allied
          Health Professions. The School is actively involved in AHC committees and
          advisory boards.
          Accrediting bodies to which the institution responds include:
            The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools recently reviewed and
            fully accredited the University, Twin Cities Campus. Next review: 2015.
            The Master’s in Healthcare Administration Program was accredited by the
            Commission on Accreditation in Healthcare Management Education in 2001 for
            seven years. Next review is 2008.
            All Schools and Colleges within the AHC are fully accredited and current
            through their individual accrediting organizations.
            The Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs
            awarded accreditation to the University in the spring of 2004.
            The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology awarded the
            Industrial Hygiene program accreditation for six years in 2002.




PAGE 16                                            University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                                                 Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

     1.3.b Organizational Charts

      Figure 1: Abbreviated University Organizational Chart

                                                                     Board of Regents




                                                                     Robert H Bruininks
                                                                         President




                                Charles Casey                          Tom Sullivan                             Robert Jones
                                                                     Sr. Vice President
                                  Chancellor                         Academic Affairs                    Sr. Vice President System
                              U of MN, Crookston                         & Provost                       Academic Administration


                                                                                                               Rusty Barceló
                               Kathryn A. Martin                   Richard Pfutzenreuter                    Vice President, Vice
                                  Chancellor,                         Vice President,                        Provost for Equity
                                U of MN, Duluth                       CFO, Treasurer
                                                                                                               and Diversity


                              Jacqueline Johnson                        Carol Carrier
                                  Chancellor,                      Vice President Human                      Mark B. Rotenberg
                                                                                                              General Counsel
                                U of MN, Morris                          Resources



                                                                    R. Timothy Mulcahy                        Kathleen O'Brien
                                                                  Vice President Research                 Vice President University
                                                                                                                  Services

                                                                      Frank B. Cerra
                                                                    Sr. Vice President                         Karen L. Himle
                                                                     Health Sciences                      Vice President University
                                                                 (Academic Health Center)                         Relations




    John R. Finnegan, Jr.,                               Medical School                                                               College of Veterinary
            Dean                   School of Dentistry    T.C. & Duluth            School of Nursing   College of Pharmacy                  Medicine
    School of Public Health




             The Twin Cities campus is composed of 17 academic colleges and professional
             schools (listed below).
                        Biological Sciences, College of
                        Continuing Education, College of
                        Dentistry, School of
                        Design, College of
                        Education and Human Development, College of
                        Graduate School
                        Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences, College of
                        Law School
                        Liberal Arts, College of
                        Management, Carlson School of
                        Medical School
                        Nursing, School of



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            Pharmacy, College of
            Public Affairs, Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of
            Public Health, School of
            Technology, Institute of
            Veterinary Medicine, College of

   1.3.c. Brief description of University practices (accountability, academic unit
          prerogatives, budgeting, recruitment, selection and advancement, academic
          standards)

          Accountability and Academic Unit
          The President of the University reports to the University Board of Regents. The
          University’s senior administration consists of the president and an executive team
          of three senior vice presidents, an executive associate vice president, the
          chancellors of the three coordinate campuses and the provost of the Rochester
          campus, seven vice presidents, two associate vice presidents, the general counsel,
          and the director of intercollegiate athletics.
          The president and most of his executive team have Twin Cities campus
          responsibilities as well as University-wide responsibilities. The University does
          not have a separate system-wide office. Two of the three senior vice presidents
          and the 21 deans who report to them provide the central academic leadership on
          the Twin Cities campus. Fifteen deans report to Senior Vice President and Provost
          Sullivan, while six deans in the Academic Health Center on the Twin Cities
          campus report to Senior Vice President Frank Cerra. The provost is supported by
          five vice provosts. In addition, a number of key Twin Cities campus administrative
          functions and centers report to Senior Vice President Robert Jones.
          The Senior Vice President for Health Sciences, who oversees the Academic Health
          Center (AHC), is directly accountable to the President. Revenues generated by the
          AHC represent about 40 percent of the total revenue at the University. About 38
          percent of AHC funding comes from sponsored projects and research, primarily
          federal grants, which support the work of more than 1,400 faculty researchers.
          The Dean of the School and all other deans in the AHC report to the Senior Vice
          President for Health Sciences. All AHC Deans and Directors meet twice monthly
          with the Senior Vice President to discuss administrative, funding and policy
          issues. The Dean and AHC Senior Vice President meet monthly to discuss School-
          specific opportunities and concerns.
          The Dean is a member of the Twin Cities Deans’ Council, which meets monthly
          with the President and other Central Officers on the Twin Cities campus to address
          issues of concern. In addition, the School’s Associate Deans participate equally in
          several AHC and University-wide committees and form an AHC Education
          Associate Deans Council, providing leadership and operations oversight for inter-
          professional education.




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            The University has an active Faculty Senate and the School elects five faculty
            members as senators. Numerous Senate committees deal with resource allocation,
            academic standards, tenure and other issues.
            The Graduate School functions as an administrative and support unit for all
            academic graduate degree (M.S., Ph.D.) programs. Its governance structure
            includes six Policy and Review Councils consisting of graduate faculty and student
            representatives. These councils, together with an Executive Committee that
            includes the Chairs of the policy and review councils, are responsible for making
            general policy for the Graduate School and programs it administers. Each
            Graduate School program in the School has a representative on the Health
            Sciences Policy and Review Council and each elects a Director of Graduate
            Studies (DGS). The DGS serves as the liaison between the graduate faculty of the
            degree program and the Graduate School and is responsible for reviewing
            individual student programs of study, among other responsibilities.
            The School operates under the same administrative framework as other AHC and
            University colleges. Specific administrative procedures will be discussed in
            subsequent sections.

            Perogative
            Within the framework of the broader University, the School has wide latitude in
            organizing its operations, assigning titles and developing programs or units. The
            School Dean and faculty have the same rights, responsibilities and privileges
            afforded to other University deans and faculty.

            Budget
            The School handles annual budgeting and resource requests through the “Compact
            Process,” the University’s resource allocation process. School requests are
            submitted to the Senior Vice President for Health Sciences and reviewed with all
            other AHC requests to fund strategic investments. See 1.6 for details on budget
            process.

            Selection and Advancement
            School Division Heads handle recruitment and hiring decisions with final approval
            by the Dean. The University supports a centralized online system for posting of
            job opportunities. See 1.5 for more specific information on faculty selection and
            advancement.

            Academic Standards
            Development of School-specific policies and procedures is the prerogative of the
            School, under the broader policy guidelines of the University and AHC. The
            University sets minimum standards and units are free to extend the standards to
            meet organizational needs.




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   1.3.d. Identification of processes that are different for the School than for other
          professional schools.
           No processes are different.

   1.3.e. If a collaborative program, a copy of the formal written agreement.
           Not applicable.

    1.3.f. This criterion is met.

           Strengths
              The School has organizational status equal to that of other schools and colleges
              in the University.

           Weaknesses: None

1.4 Organization and Administration
   The School’s culture reflects its commitment to interdisciplinary approaches to
   challenging public health issues. The School’s divisional structure also reflects the multi-
   dimensional nature of the field by its core disciplines: Biostatistics, Environmental Health
   Sciences, Epidemiology and Community Health (comprised of core faculty in biological
   epidemiology and social and behavioral sciences) and Health Policy and Management.
   Today the School successfully incorporates and integrates the three goals of the
   University mission, and cherishes excellence in each. Moreover, its organization in core
   disciplines reflects its obligation as a nationally accredited school to deliver professional
   and academic education in each of these fields as the minimum expected of a school of
   public health. The School, of course, far exceeded these minimums in each area as it grew
   and expanded through the 1990s. While each discipline embodies a primary focus, the
   complexity of public health issues propels natural collaborations across the divisions and
   partnerships with other collegiate units. That said, the School is continually re-evaluating
   its internal structure with a view to increased effectiveness and efficiency.




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    1.4.a. School administrative organization

     Figure 2: SPH Administration

                                               Dean
                                          (J. Finnegan)


                Research                                                  Finance
           & Academic Affairs            Division Heads
                                       Biostat (J. Connett)            Administration
              (J. Garrard,
                                        EHS (W. Toscano)          (J. Weisenberger, CFO)
            Sr. Assoc Dean)
                                       Epi&CH (B. Harlow)
                                       HPM (I. Moscovice)
              Public Health                                           External Affairs,
           Practice Education                                          Advancement
         (D. Olson, Assoc Dean)                                   (D. Harvey, Asst. Dean)


                                                                    Human Resources
             Student Affairs
                                                                    Equal Opportunity
         (W. Riley, Assoc Dean)
                                                                  (J. Peterson, Director)

            A chart of the School’s Instructional Units (Majors) is provided in Table 14:
            Instructional Matrix (Template C) in section 2.1.a.

    1.4.b. Roles and responsibilities of major units in the organizational chart
            Office of the Dean: The Dean’s Office has overall responsibility for School
            instructional, research and service programs, public health practice and workforce
            development, student support services and administration, including
            communications, alumni affairs and development activities.
               Academic Affairs: Faculty affairs and educational policy and operations
               affecting professional and graduate programs and faculty development.
               Research: Oversight of research, including approval of all grant proposals.
               Liaison with research administration at the Academic Health Center and
               University Office of the Vice President for Research.
               Public Health Practice Education: Lifelong learning opportunities for the
               public health practice community, workforce development, distance education
               and interprofessional and interinstitutional education.
               Centers for Public Health Education and Outreach (CPHEO): The School’s
               coordinated, centralized platform for continuing professional education and
               outreach. Reports to the Associate Dean of Public Health Practice Education.
               Student Affairs: Student services, student development, recruitment and multi-
               cultural student affairs.


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            Student Services: Centralized office for student support across all majors,
            including orientation, commencement, degree clearance, career services,
            student tracking, scholarships, application processing, student communication
            (portal, Web pages) and course scheduling. Liaison for all University and AHC
            student functions. Reports to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs.
            Recruitment and Multicultural Services: Works with Student Services, the
            academic programs, the Advancement Staff and alumni to recruit intellectually
            vibrant candidates who are racially, ethnically and geographically diverse.
            Reports to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs.
            Human Resources and Equal Opportunity: Human resource management,
            recruitment services and EEOC.
            External Affairs and Advancement Services: Reaches out to critical external
            constituencies through the practices of communications, alumni relations and
            development.
            Finance Administration: Financial management, payroll accounting
            compliance and the allocation of resources, coordination of annual budgeting
            and planning process.
          Divisions: The School, which recognizes the multi-dimensional nature of public
          health issues, is organized into four divisions: Biostatistics; Environmental Health
          Sciences; Epidemiology and Community Health; and Health Policy and
          Management. Each Division integrates the education, research and service
          missions of the School. Managed by Division Heads who are charged with setting
          direction and assuring the financial stability of the units, the Divisions are the
          primary vehicle through which the School carries out its mission and achieves its
          goals. Division Heads report to the Dean.
          Major Programs: Major programs within each Division and the Office of the
          Dean offer areas of study (academic and professional) that prepare students in
          specific competencies credentialed through one of two professional degrees
          (M.H.A, M.P.H.) awarded by the School or two academic degrees (M.S., Ph.D.)
          awarded by the Graduate School . Each area of study is overseen by a Major Chair
          (M.P.H. and M.H.A.) or Director of Graduate Studies (M.S., Ph.D.) and is
          complemented by faculty with expertise in the designated area of emphasis. The
          School currently has 11 major programs (six offer only professional degrees, three
          offer both professional and academic degrees, and two offer only academic
          degrees). See Chapter 2 for details on Major programs.

   1.4.c. Manner in which interdisciplinary coordination, cooperation and
          collaboration are supported
          The School supports collaborative efforts both across Divisions within the School
          and across the University – from architecture to veterinary medicine. It
          collaborates with faculty, students and departments on research, community
          outreach, teaching and training. Notably, School faculty are recognized as
          productive researchers with a high success rate in receiving extramural support and
          are often sought by other units as collaborators because of their quantitative


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            expertise and range of interests. In some cases, collaborations with other units are
            formalized through adjunct (joint) faculty appointments.
            The School has embraced the University-wide strategic planning processes calling
            for inter-professional education, creating new partnerships, endorsing faculty
            exchange with other departments and fostering collaboration. In a September 2005
            letter to the Transforming the U taskforce reviewing the “Health Professional
            Workforce,” the Senior Vice President for Health Sciences (the Academic Health
            Center (AHC)) charged the group to consider the role of inter-professional
            education in training the next generation of health professionals. In response to
            that charge, the AHC Academic Council, made up of the education associate
            deans, including those from the School, have taken a leadership role in designing a
            Center for Inter-professional Education and overseeing a continuum of inter-
            professional courses and other activities for the health sciences schools and
            colleges.
            Currently, the School’s most visible collaborative efforts occur in its active
            participation in more than half of the 15 Interdisciplinary Centers housed in the
            AHC. This includes the Obesity Prevention Center, a partner in the National
            Cancer Institute’s $54 million initiative to understand the relationship between
            obesity and cancer. It also includes the Center for Infectious Disease Research and
            Policy, which connects scientific research to real-world action through
            communications and public policy recommendations.
            The School is host to nationally and internationally recognized interdisciplinary
            centers focused on high-caliber research, outreach and training. These centers
            facilitate a high degree of collaboration among faculty and students in the School
            and with units beyond its walls. For a list of the centers, see
            http://www.sph.umn.edu/about/centers/home.html

            Both the University and the AHC support collaboration through seed grants for
            planning future academic and research centers of excellence. Typically for one or
            two years, these grants allow faculty from different units to explore common
            goals, with the aim to create new centers of excellence and bring together faculty
            who contribute diverse skills and experience.

            Presidential Initiatives
            To take advantage of the University’s remarkable breadth, the President has
            created a series of interdisciplinary conferences and eight interdisciplinary
            initiatives. The School has opportunities to be involved in at least six of the
            initiatives:
               Children, Youth and Families
               Translational Research in Human Health
               Brain Function Across the Lifespan
               Environment and Renewable Energy
               Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives
               Law and Values in Health; Environment and the Life Sciences



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          The President’s Interdisciplinary Conference series nurtures academic work across
          the disciplines and builds new connections between the University and the
          community.

          Dual degree programs
          Participation in dual degree programs affords many opportunities for collaboration
          among faculty and students. The School has formal degree arrangements with
          seven University units and grants 30 dual degrees, demonstrating the high demand
          for population science across the University and community.

          Regional presence
          The School, the only accredited school of public health in Minnesota, North
          Dakota and South Dakota, supports regional collaborations through both formal
          and informal exchanges. For example, the Mayo Medical School and the
          University of North Dakota in Grand Forks are active partners in offering the
          Public Health Medicine (PHM) M.D./M.P.H., with faculty from all the institutions
          serving on the PHM admissions committee and through reciprocal adjunct
          appointments.
          The Veterinary Public Health Program fosters collaboration, not just with the
          University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, but also with 11 other Colleges of
          Veterinary Medicine which send students to the School’s program to earn an
          M.P.H. as a distance-education program coordinated with D.V.M. curricula. A
          formal memorandum of agreement has been signed with Michigan State
          University, which has the largest group of students participating in the Veterinary
          Public Health program outside the University. Because the School’s core public
          health courses are available online, North Dakota State, serving a rural population,
          now encourages Human Development and Education students to take public health
          courses online through the School.
          In December 2004, the School began a collaboration with Metropolitan State
          University’s Master of Science in Nursing program leading to an M.S.N. in
          Leadership and Management in Nursing: Public Health Focus. (Metropolitan State
          is an urban-based University serving a diverse community of students.)
          Application is made separately to each program, and the program begins by
          completing the Public Health Certificate in Core Concepts at the School. The
          collaboration allows student access to the expertise of each school without the
          need to navigate through institutional challenges, such as tuition-sharing and
          tracking. Through the joint effort, the two institutions are addressing an important
          public health workforce need as Minnesota faces a 58.5 percent public health nurse
          retirement rate in the next 10 years (36 percent in just five years), the highest rate
          of any public health professional job classification.
          The Vice Provost of the University and the Vice Chancellor of the Minnesota State
          Colleges and University (MnSCU) system requested that the School collaborate
          with the MnSCU system to develop a Web course called Alcohol and College
          Life. This course is offered on three University campuses, and more than 2,500
          students have taken it. Arrangements and revisions were made during the 2005-



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            2006 academic year and two MnSCU schools began pilot programs in Fall 2006.
            One is Minnesota State University at Moorhead, where all 1,100 freshmen are
            required to take the course. The other is Inver Hills Community College, where it
            will be offered as an elective. This first-time collaboration between systems is
            expected to expand to several other MnSCU schools over the next few years.

            Adjunct faculty appointments
            Many faculty whose primary appointment is in the School also have adjunct status
            in other units within the AHC, across the University and at other institutions,
            creating a lively cross-disciplinary perspective, as well as opportunities to
            collaborate on research. Specifically School faculty have 35 adjunct appointments
            in the AHC and other University units, and 39 AHC or other University faculty
            serve as adjuncts in the School. Currently, the School engages approximately 180
            faculty from across the University and community as adjunct faculty.
            The Center for Health Inter-professional Programs (CHIP)
            (http://www.chip.umn.edu) is a center for inter-professional initiatives created by
            students, for students at the AHC level. CHIP brings students together in social,
            learning, service and leadership development opportunities. Several CHIP
            committees address areas of cross-disciplinary interest. For example, the
            International Health Committee brings a global perspective to Twin Cities’
            students through seminars and events fostering global health awareness.
            School governance designed to foster collaboration. The School governance
            structure described in Section 1.5 creates multiple opportunities for coordination,
            cooperation and collaboration within the School. Examples include the Executive
            Team, representing all Divisions in the daily operation of the School, and the
            Policy Council, comprised of members of the School faculty, staff and students.
            Communication through monthly newsletters encourages participation in seminars
            and events across disciplines.

    1.4.d. Identification of written policies that are illustrative of School’s commitment
           to fair and ethical dealings.
            The School is committed to fair and ethical practices and abides by policies set by
            the University Board of Regents and the Office of Equal Opportunity and
            Affirmative Action, as well as other policies, including:
               Academic Freedom and Responsibility
               Code of Conduct
               Conflict of Interest
               Diversity, Employment Opportunity, and Affirmative Action
               Faculty Tenure
               Grievance Policies (student, employee, faculty)
               Intellectual Property
               Research Involving Human Subjects
               Research Involving Recombinant DNA and Hazardous Biological Materials


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             Student Academic Grievance
             Sexual Harassment
             HIPAA federal data privacy regulations
             FERPA student privacy regulations
          Notifications of policies and revisions to policies are communicated to all students,
          faculty and staff through letters and newsletters from the Dean, School and/or
          University Web sites and University bulletin board postings.
          Data security, privacy, HIPAA and FERPA
          The School, working with the AHC, has implemented HIPAA federal privacy
          regulations and the required trainings and has embraced larger efforts (i.e.,
          additional education and technical support) to protect research participant data and
          uphold FERPA student privacy regulations. Faculty and students are notified of
          new training and refreshers through an automated system linked to online training
          modules. Documentation of successful completion of the trainings is provided in
          individual training portfolios. A self assessment based on job functions determines
          level and schedule of training required.

   1.4.e. Manner in which student grievances and complaints are addressed
          Individual faculty, Student Services staff and/or the Dean’s Office work with
          students to address concerns or direct them to University resources, including:
             The Student Conflict Resolution Center (http://www1.umn.edu/sos/contactus.htm)
             The Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action
             (http://www.eoaffact.umn.edu/)

          The Office of the Ombudsman in the Student Conflict Resolution Center
          (http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/chairing/practices/student/dispute.html) provides a full range of services
          to students with campus-based complaints or concerns. The Center assists students
          with University regulations and policies, or misunderstandings between students
          and instructors or administrators. An ombudsman helps students resolve problems
          informally and advocates assist students in formal grievance or disciplinary
          hearings. The Center does not keep a database of complaints or informal
          resolutions by college unless they are filed as formal grievances. Over the past
          three years, only one formal grievance has been documented for the School. This
          grievance was handled through the General Counsel’s office.
          The Office of Student Judicial Affairs (http://www.sja.umn.edu/conduct.html) handles
          complaints and charges of academic misconduct. It is responsible for the creation,
          revision and review of policies and procedures that provide for the administration
          of a procedurally fair and lawful system of student discipline. It handles most
          complaints on an informal, person-to-person basis with emphasis on educational
          development whenever possible.
          Campus Committee on Student Behavior (CCSB)
          (http://www1.umn.edu/usenate/ccsb/ccsbhrgproc.html) is a discipline body (not a substitute
          court with prerogatives, powers and obligations of an independent judiciary branch
          of government). With authority delegated to it by the University Regents, CCSB


PAGE 26                                                  University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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            calls for an accounting of students and student organizations accused of violating
            University standards. The CCSB’s task is more than determining guilt and
            assigning a penalty; it is also assessing the qualifications for continuing
            membership in the University community.

    1.4.f. This criterion is met.

            Strengths
               The University and School environments are organized for building effective
               and efficient relationships, fostering collaboration, subscribing to high
               standards for ethical and fair treatment of all and maximizing the School’s
               ability to achieve its mission.
               Roles and accountabilities are clearly defined.
               Interdisciplinary collaboration is strongly encouraged and supported through:
               – A School structure that allows for both focus and depth in key disciplines
                  and collaborations across divisions and University units
               – An active role in initiatives at the University level
               – Interdisciplinary Centers within the Academic Health Center
               – Dual degree programs
               – The engagement of adjunct faculty
               – Service to the region as the only School of Public Health

            Weaknesses: None

1.5 Governance
    1.5.a. Description of the School’s governance and committee structure and
           processes
            School governance and administration are in accordance with its Constitution and
            University guidelines.
            Responsibility for the creation, review and approval of policies is shared by the
            Dean and several bodies, including the Executive Team, Policy Council, faculty
            committees and, in some cases, staff and students. Ultimately, the Dean is
            responsible for the School, its policies and direction.




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    Figure 3: School of Public Health Leadership and Governance

                                        Dean
                                  Executive Team
                                  Division Heads (4)
                                 Associate Deans (3)
                              Chief Financial Officer (1)
                             Asst Dean External Affairs (1)

                               Standing Committees
                         Appointments, Promotion & Tenure (8)
                                Educational Policy (15)
                               Research Committee (6)
                          Faculty Consultative Committee (7)
                           Recognition, Awards & Honors (9)

                                Policy Council (20)
                                Dean, Executive Team
                         Standing Committee Representatives
                           Faculty at-large Representatives
                            P&A Senate, Staff Association
                                   Student Senate


            Executive Team: The Dean, Associate Deans, Division Heads, Chief Financial
            Officer and Assistant Dean for External Affairs comprise the School’s
            Executive Team, which meets twice monthly to address administrative and
            financial matters, strategic and operational planning, policies and procedures,
            resource requests and allocations, performance in relation to mission and goals
            and coordination of the School’s education, research and service programs.
            Dean: As the “chief executive officer,” the Dean has general administrative
            responsibility over School affairs in the following areas: educational policy,
            budgets, human resources and space. Accountable to the Senior Vice President
            for Health Sciences and the President of the Board of Regents, the Dean is
            responsible for development and implementation of the School’s mission, goals
            and objectives. The Dean, in consultation with the Policy Council, develops and
            implements the School’s organizational structure to further the School’s
            mission. The Dean and Associate Deans meet weekly to discuss policy and
            management matters.



PAGE 28                                         University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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               Associate Deans (appointed by the Dean upon recommendation of an internal
               search committee.)
               – The Senior Associate Dean for Research and Academic Affairs oversees
                  research, faculty affairs and educational policy and operations affecting
                  professional and graduate programs across the School.
               – The Associate Dean for Public Health Practice Education is responsible
                  for lifelong learning opportunities for the public health practice community,
                  workforce development, distance education and interprofessional and
                  interinstitutional education.
               – The Associate Dean for Student Affairs manages student services, student
                  development, recruitment and multicultural student affairs.
               Assistant Dean for External Affairs oversees development, communications
               and external relations.
               The Chief Financial Officer oversees financial management, payroll
               accounting compliance and the allocation of resources, as well as coordination
               of the annual budgeting and planning process that leads to a written agreement
               between the Dean and the Senior Vice President for Health Sciences (the
               School’s “Compact”).
               Division Heads: The School’s four divisions are led by individuals responsible
               for implementing the School’s mission and goals and assuring the financial
               stability of their units. They also play a critical role in facilitating collaboration
               among the divisions and determining School progress and direction. The Dean
               appoints Division Heads after faculty consultation, including a secret ballot of
               division faculty. In addition to serving on the Executive Team, Division Heads
               serve as the Advisory and Review Management Subcommittee of the Policy
               Council, providing recommendations on management and administrative
               matters.
               Policy Council: The Policy Council consults with and advises the Dean
               regarding policies governing the School, including the mission, vision and
               goals, programming priorities, strategic plan, organizational structure, and
               strategies for funding and resource allocation. The School’s Constitution
               requires that the Dean consult with the Policy Council on a wide range of policy
               matters, including allocation of resources and changes to the School’s
               organizational structure. Chaired by the Dean, the Policy Council comprises
               voting members made up of the Division Heads, elected representatives from
               the faculty, civil service/bargaining unit staff, professional and academic staff
               and student body. Non-voting members include the Associate Deans and one of
               the School’s elected representatives to the University Senate. Major
               administrative policies are brought before the Policy Council for discussion.
               Administrative matters brought before the Policy Council usually originate as
               proposals from the Dean. The School’s Constitution stipulates that issues that
               must be discussed by the Policy Council include the creation or elimination of
               Divisions or Major programs, the allocation of resources, strategic planning and
               other major policy issues affecting School structure and functions.


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            Faculty Consultative Committee (see Chapter 1.5.c.) represents faculty
            interests and concerns to School administration, the AHC and the University.
            Faculty members elected to the Policy Council – Division and at-large –
            comprise the Faculty Consultative Committee (FCC). The Dean, on an ad hoc
            basis, requests the FCC to address specific faculty-related matters (i.e.,
            formulation of a School-wide workload policy and development of metrics for
            distribution of salary increases across the Divisions.) The faculty sets and
            monitors the promotion and tenure standards in accordance with University
            regulations.
            Standing Committees: Please see Section 1.5.c. for additional information on
            the Standing Committees and their roles in governance.
            Academic Professional and Administrative (P&A) Senate: The P&A Senate
            represents School employees in professional positions that require either
            academic or administrative expertise. The Chair of the P&A Senate is a voting
            member of the Policy Council.
            Staff Association: The Staff Association addresses issues pertinent to all of the
            School’s civil service and bargaining unit employees. The Association conducts
            staff development seminars during the year and is called upon to develop
            recommendations or responses regarding employment issues. In addition, staff
            are also involved with School, AHC and University committees. The president
            of the Staff Association is a voting member of the Policy Council.
            Student Senate: The Student Senate represents each educational major and
            addresses student interests within the School, the AHC and the University. Its
            president is a voting member of the Policy Council. The group elects its own
            president and selects student representatives to serve on other School
            committees.

          Policy development
          The process is interactive, with the Dean and the Executive Team often offering
          draft policies or priorities to the faculty for discussion. The Policy Council
          consults and advises the Dean regarding policies governing the School, including
          the mission, vision and goals; programmatic priorities; the strategic plan; the
          organizational structure; and strategies of funding and resource allocation.

          Planning
          Planning is generally a broad, interactive process involving all relevant
          committees, faculty retreats and appropriate community engagement, as well as
          significant direction from the Executive Team. The Policy Council is charged with
          advising the Dean on strategic planning and approval of programmatic structure.
          The School’s planning and evaluation process is discussed in Chapter 1.2.




PAGE 30                                          University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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            Budget and resource allocation
            The budget is developed by the Dean and CFO, extensively discussed with the
            Executive Team and presented to the faculty for review. The School’s budgeting
            process is discussed in Chapter 1.6.

            Student recruitment, admission and award of degrees as well as academic
            standards and policies
            The Educational Policy Committee (EPC) is responsible for studying and making
            recommendations to the Dean regarding modification of or additions to the
            School’s Educational Policies, as well as educational issues of School-wide
            importance. These may include periodic review of core area education
            requirements, review and monitoring of existing courses, approval of proposed
            courses, review of proposed degree programs and course requirement issues.
            The EPC, composed of faculty serving as Major program chairs and a student
            representative, regularly discusses and reviews recruitment issues, advising the
            Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Student Services Center on policy,
            plans and resource allocation.
            Student recruitment, admission to professional programs and award of
            professional degrees are organized under the office of the Associate Dean for
            Student Affairs. It is assisted in these functions by a School-wide Student Services
            Center, faculty chairs of each educational program and program coordinators.
            Student recruitment, admission to academic programs and award of academic
            degrees are organized under the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School,
            assisted by program coordinators and Directors of Graduate Studies. The School’s
            Office of Recruitment Services aims to recruit intellectually vibrant candidates
            who are racially, ethnically and geographically diverse, by working with student
            affairs, academic programs, the advancement staff and alumni. Student recruitment
            and admissions are discussed in Chapter 4.4.

            Faculty recruitment, retention, promotion and tenure
            The parameters for newly tenured/tenure-track hires are agreed upon by the Dean
            and the Senior Vice President for the Health Sciences. Parameters for contract
            faculty are determined by academic priority and reviewed by the Dean and
            Division Heads.
            The responsibility for delineating faculty recruitment priorities falls to the Division
            Heads following discussions with their respective faculties. The Policy Council is
            also involved in advising the Dean on general School-wide directions and
            priorities. Strategic investment and priorities for hire of new faculty were most
            recently reviewed in 2005 through the “Futures Committee and Stakeholders’
            Retreat” (see Chapter 1.2.a).
            Faculty recruitment is initiated at the Division level. The Division Head, with the
            approval of the Dean, appoints a search committee. The hiring authority and
            search committee prepare the job description and recruitment/advertisement plan,
            which must be approved by the School’s Equal Opportunity Officer and the Dean.


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          Tenured and tenure-track positions must be publicized nationally. The search
          committee must prepare a summary of the applicant pool in terms of protected
          classes. Approval of the pool is required prior to candidate selection. A guidance
          for diversity in hiring, issued by the Dean in November 2004, reinforced a
          commitment to, and expectations regarding, diversity in national searches.
          The School’s Academic Appointment, Promotion and Tenure Committee (APT)
          reviews the recommended candidate’s credentials for appropriateness to the
          proposed rank and forwards the documentation to School faculty eligible to vote.
          Subsequent to a positive vote from the eligible faculty and compliance with
          affirmative action guidelines, the Dean may extend an offer of employment.
          Between July1, 2004, and July 1, 2006, the School hired 12 new regular
          (tenured/tenure-track) faculty and 15 contract faculty.
          Retention decisions are initiated at the Division level and include discussions
          between the Division Head and relevant faculty. If the Dean agrees with a
          retention recommendation for tenured or tenure-track faculty, appropriate
          information, including the external letter of offer, is forwarded for action to the
          Senior Vice President for Health Sciences. A Provost pool for “preventive
          retention” is available to encourage retention of highly productive faculty. All
          requests by the School to reward nationally competitive faculty have been funded.
          The School follows University guidelines regarding faculty tenure and promotion
          spelled out in the Academic Appointment, Promotion and Tenure Policy. It
          includes information on types of appointments, terms of employment, personnel
          decisions regarding probationary faculty and appeal procedures. The APT
          Committee is responsible for implementing the policy. (A copy is available online
          at http://www.sph.umn.edu/about/policies/apt/home.html.) The APT policy statement is
          reviewed every two years by the faculty and modified as needed. An ad hoc
          committee is charged with reviewing the document and preparing
          recommendations for School-wide faculty vote.
          Probationary faculty are reviewed annually – first at the Division level, then by the
          APT Committee, which formulates a recommendation to School-wide faculty
          eligible to vote. The choices are to continue the faculty member on probationary
          status, to promote with tenure or terminate the appointment after the next academic
          year. The Dean forwards the faculty vote to the Senior Vice President for Health
          Sciences along with the Dean’s own recommendation regarding continuation,
          promotion or tenure.
          Contract faculty have the same opportunity for promotion as tenured and tenure-
          track faculty, although they are not eligible for tenure. These faculty members may
          compete along with other candidates for available tenured/tenure-track positions.




PAGE 32                                           University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                     Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

            Academic standards and policies
            Academic standards and policies are set and enforced in three categories:
               The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Student Services staff
               monitor the maintenance of a 3.0 GPA for continued enrollment and graduation
               of M.P.H. students, while the Graduate School performs the same functions for
               M.S. and Ph.D. students.
               The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, in conjunction with the Educational
               Policy Committee, advises the Dean on the means of satisfying and completing
               core area requirements.
               Faculty of the majors – both School and Graduate School – develop and review
               all standards and policies such as curricular requirements and course content
               used to ensure integrity.

            Research and service expectations and policies
            All faculty members are required to participate directly in research activities that
            relate to the generation or interpretation of knowledge and application through
            service that will enhance the well-being of the public. The School’s Academic
            Appointment Promotion and Tenure document
            (http://www.sph.umn.edu/about/policies/apt/home.html) describes the expectations for scholarly
            activity.
            Research and service expectations are also part of the School’s stated mission,
            goals and objectives. They are rewarded through the University system of merit,
            promotion and tenure.
            Policies governing research can be found in Section 3.1. and those governing
            service in Section 3.2.

    1.5.b. Constitution, bylaws or other policy documents
            Please see Appendix 1.5.b. The Constitution is also available at
            http://www.sph.umn.edu/img/assets/9103/CONSTI95.html#ARTICLE%20I.%20GENERAL%20POWERS

    1.5.c. Standing and important ad hoc committees
            The School’s governance is well supported by a committee structure as outlined in
            the School’s Constitution, with ad hoc committees and officers appointed by the
            Dean or elected by faculty, as appropriate. Committee membership includes
            faculty, students, staff and alumni as appropriate for the committee. All committee
            appointments are made with consideration for diversity of membership, including
            gender, expertise, disciplinary background and other factors.
            Standing committees are described below:
               The Academic Appointment, Promotion and Tenure Committee (APT)
               reviews and makes recommendations to the faculty eligible to vote on
               appointments, promotions/tenure and continuation of probationary tenure-track
               appointments. It also serves as a screening committee for faculty development


Self-Study, February 2007                                                                         PAGE 33
                                                              Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                        Public Health for a Healthier World

            leaves and is the review committee for post-tenure reviews of faculty. All
            documents regarding faculty continuations, promotions and tenure decisions are
            reviewed by the APT Committee and recommendations are communicated to
            the faculty and the Dean. Membership consists of two faculty members from
            each division, of which at least one is a full professor, elected by the eligible
            members of that division. Division heads are not eligible for membership.
            Members shall be elected for two-year terms and may be elected for a
            maximum of two consecutive terms.
            The Educational Policy Committee (EPC) represents the academic programs
            and reviews and makes recommendations on educational policies, existing and
            proposed new courses, core area educational requirements and issues regarding
            course requirements. The Chair is a voting member of the Policy Council.
            Academic policies relating to the School’s educational programs are addressed
            by the EPC, which is made up of all Major Chairs, a student representative and
            representatives from the Student Services Center.
            The Faculty Consultative Committee (FCC) is responsible for studying and
            making recommendations regarding matters of concern to the faculty. All
            members of the FCC are voting members of the Policy Council. Members
            consist of faculty members elected to the Policy Council.
            The Recognition, Awards and Honors (RAH) Committee seeks the
            recognition of faculty, students, alumni, staff and public health professionals
            through a program of nominations and/or selection of award recipients for
            School and University awards, as well as those proposed by groups such as the
            Minnesota Public Health Association and the American Public Health
            Association. Membership consists of one faculty member from each division,
            one student, one civil service/bargaining unit staff, one academic professional
            and administrative staff, and a representative of the alumni society.
            Appointments are made by the Dean upon recommendation of the respective
            division heads, president/chair of the Student Senate, Staff Association, P&A
            Senate and Alumni Society.
            The Research Committee is responsible for recommendations to the Dean
            regarding distribution of research funding received through special grants, such
            as from the Minnesota Medical Foundation. Membership consists of one faculty
            member from each division, two students, and one academic professional and
            administrative staff. Appointments are made by the Dean upon recommendation
            of the respective division heads, Student Senate president, and P&A Senate
            Chair.
            The Research and Education Advisors Partnership (REAP) was formed in
            2006 to add another venue for community input for School evaluation and
            planning. REAP aims to better link community stakeholders with the School’s
            research and education missions by building opportunities and capacity for
            institutional partnerships to advance public health science, learning and work
            force development; shaping innovative interdisciplinary and collaborative
            strategies and projects to advance the next generation of public health research


PAGE 34                                          University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                         Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

               and learning; and sharing information about public health science and learning
               needs, directions and progress. Invited partners include health system,
               university, community and industry participants representing diverse
               communities engaged in public health.
            Officers appointed for specific needs include:
               Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Officer: Judy Peterson
               Laboratory Safety Officer: Dawn Errede
               Privacy Officer: Mary Hourigan
               Research Safety Officer: Dawn Errede
            A complete list of committee membership is included below and on the Web at
            http://www.sph.umn.edu/about/policies/committees/home.html.

           Table 1: SPH Committee Membership – 2006-7 (effective 9/1/06, except as noted)
                       Appointment, Promotion and Tenure Committee (APT) (eff. 9/15/06)

               Bruce Alexander (EnHS; year 1)                   Kathleen Call (HPM; year 2)

               Bryan Dowd (HPM; year 2) (CHAIR)                 Harry Lando (EPICH; year 2)

               Chap Le (BIO; year 1)                            Leslie Lytle (EPICH; year 2)

               Gurumurthy Ramachandran (EnHS; year 1)           Melanie Wall (BIO; year 1)

               Judith Peterson (staff)


                                   Educational Policy Committee (EPC) (eff. 7/1/06)

               Lynn Blewett (PHAP; year 2)                      Shelley Cooksey (major coordinator)

               Sudipto Banerjee (BIO; year 3; serving out       DeAnn Lazovich (EPICH; year 3)
               term of Lynn Eberly)

               William Lohman (PHP; year 3) (CO-CHAIR)          Kate Nygaard (student senate rep.)

               Charles Oberg (MCH; year 4)                      Sandra Potthoff (MHA; year 2)

               William Riley (DO; ex officio)                   Matt Simcik (Fall);
                                                                John Adgate (Spring-Summer) (EH; year 1)

               Jamie Stang (NUTR; year 1)                       Traci Toomey (CHE; year 3) (CO-CHAIR)

               TBD (staff)




Self-Study, February 2007                                                                               PAGE 35
                                                                             Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                                       Public Health for a Healthier World


          Table 1: SPH Committee Membership – 2006-7 (effective 9/1/06, except as noted)
          (continued)
                                       Faculty Consultative Committee (FCC)

             Timothy Church (EnHS div. rep.; year 2)             Chap Le (BIO div. rep.; year 3)

             Russell Luepker (fac. at large rep.; year 3)        George Maldonado (fac. at large rep.; year 1)
                                                                 (CHAIR)

             Traci Toomey (EPICH div. rep.; year 2)              Elizabeth Wattenberg (fac. at large rep.;
                                                                 year 2)

             Douglas Wholey (HPM div. rep.; year 1)


                                                         P & A Senate

             Mary Hourigan (central offices; year 1)             Peg Krieser (EPICH; year 1 of 1-year term)
                                                                 (CHAIR)

             Patricia Homyak (HPM; year 1)                       William Patrek (BIO; year 2)

             Gavin Watt (EnHS; year 2)


                                                         Policy Council

             Timothy Church (EnHS div. rep.; year 2)             John Connett (div. head)

             Denise Feda (student senate pres.)                  John Finnegan (dean) (CHAIR)

             Judith Garrard (sr. assoc. dean; ex officio)        Bernard Harlow (div. head)

             Chap Le (BIO div. rep.; year 3)                     Russell Luepker (fac. at large rep.; year 3)

             George Maldonado (fac. at large rep.; year 1;       Ira Moscovice (interim div. head)
             also AHC FCC rep.)

             Debra Olson (assoc. dean; ex officio)               William Riley (assoc. dean; ex officio)

             Traci Toomey (EPICH div. rep.; year 2)              William Toscano (div. head)

             Elizabeth Wattenberg (fac. at large rep.;           Douglas Wholey (HPM div. rep.; year 1)
             year 2)

             William Lohman (EPC chair)                          Peg Krieser (p&a senate chair)

             TBD (staff assoc. rep.)                             Barbara Cook (staff)




PAGE 36                                                       University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                         Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

           Table 1: SPH Committee Membership – 2006-7 (effective 9/1/06, except as noted)
           (continued)
                                Recognition, Awards and Honors (RAH) Committee

               Donna Anderson (alumni society rep.)            Lynn Blewett or Charles Oberg (previous
                                                               Schuman award recipient)

               Andrea Jones (student senate rep.)              Jennifer Linde (EPICH; year 2) (CHAIR)

               Lisa Peterson (EnHS; year 1)                    Will Thomas (BIO; year 2)

               Robert Town (HPM; year 3)                       TBD (p&a senate rep.)

               TBD (staff association rep.)                    Judy Peterson (staff)


                                              Research Committee (Chair TBD)

               James Begun (HPM; year 2 of 3-year term)        John Himes (EPICH; year 1 of 3-year term)

               James Hodges (BIO; year 3 of 3-year term)       Gurumurthy Ramachandran (EnHS; year 2 of
               (CHAIR)                                         2-year term)

               TBD (2 student senate reps.)                    Mary Hourigan (Dean’s Office; ex officio)


                                                     Staff Association

               Patty Bollenbeck (BIO; year 2) [Michelle        Allison Iwan (EnHS; year 2) (Co-President)
               George (BIO alternate)]

               Jan Olson (EnHS; year 2) (Co-President)         Melissa Wuori (central offices; year 1)

               Sadaquijada Quijada (EPICH; year 1)             Sarah Shorma (EPICH; year 1)

               TBD (HPM; year 1)


                                                      Student Senate

               Stephanie Ball (Vice President)                 Denise Feda (President)

               Katie Loth (Secretary)                          Julie Sanem (Treasurer)


                                              School of Public Health Officers

               Equal Opportunity Officer: Judith Peterson      Laboratory Safety Officer: Dawn Errede

               Privacy Officer: Mary Hourigan                  Research Safety Officer: Dawn Errede



Self-Study, February 2007                                                                                PAGE 37
                                                                        Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                                  Public Health for a Healthier World


   1.5.d. Faculty who hold membership on University committees
          School faculty serve on several official University committees, including AHC
          Committees. Currently, five members serve on the University-wide Senate, and
          seven faculty, students or staff are on University Committees.
          In addition to participation on University-wide governing bodies and committees,
          faculty serve on many University internal advisory boards and ad hoc task forces
          and many AHC interdisciplinary committees.
          It is of note that many members of the School played key roles in “Transforming
          the U” strategic planning taskforce groups, including: Co-chair, Knowledge
          Management (Olson); Precinct Plan (Finnegan); Health Professionals Workforce
          (Dowd); Clinical Science Enterprise (Neaton); Collaborative Research (Connett);
          and International University (Greaves). In addition, School faculty, staff, students
          and community engaged in review and dialogue through public forums and online
          feedback on taskforce reports. Faculty and the University and AHC committees on
          which they serve are listed below:

          Table 2: University Committee Membership
            Academic Health Center Faculty Consultative Committee (AHC FCC) representative

           George Maldonado (serving through 2009)


                                        University Senate Representatives

             Tim Church (serving through 2009)                     Susan Foote (2008)

             Russell Luepker (2007)                                Michael Oakes (2007)

             Will Thomas (2009)


          Table 3: University Senate – Public Health Representatives
                  Type of Senate Service                   Name

             Academic Professional Senator,          Emily Finch
             Twin Cities                             Term: 05-07

             Ex Officio Member, Twin Cities          Gavin Watt
                                                     Term: 04-07

             Student Senators, Twin Cities           Alissa Ausan
                                                     Term: 05-06




PAGE 38                                                 University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                      Chapter 1: The School of Public Health


     Table 4: University Committees – Public Health Representatives
                 Committees                  Name                 Type of Service       Term

       Council of Academic Professionals Mary Hoeppner    Representatives, Academic     05-08
       and Administrators                                 Professional

       AHC Student Consultative          Karen Joye       Representatives, Student      05-06
       Committee

       Council of Academic Professionals Rich Portnoy     Representatives, Alternates   05-08
       and Administrators

       Benefits Advisory Committee       Gavin Watt       Chair                         01-07

       SCFA Retirement Subcommittee      Gavin Watt       Representatives, Academic     02-07
                                                          Professional

       Council of Research Associate     Judy Garrard     Chair                         05-08
       Deans


    1.5.e. Student roles in governance
            Students are involved in governance at several levels: At the major or Divisional
            level and at the School level on the Policy Council and the Educational Policy
            Committee. Students also serve on many School-wide task forces and actively
            engage in the Student Senate. Composed of graduate students of the School, the
            Student Senate (http://www.sph.umn.edu/current/studentsenate/home.html) is an official
            organization of the School that provides representatives to serve on several
            University committees.

    1.5.f. This criterion is met.

            Strengths
               The University and School have a long tradition of shared governance. This
               tradition allows the School administration, faculty, staff , students and
               community partners sufficient flexibility to ensure integrity of mission with a
               participatory voice in campus governance.
               School governance is structured for effective, timely decision-making.
               Governance includes high representation and participation of faculty and
               students.
               Faculty members are involved in – and lead – standing committees and
               important ad hoc committees.
               Governance and other processes – student recruitment and admission, faculty
               recruitment, retention, promotion and tenure, academic standards, etc. – are



Self-Study, February 2007                                                                       PAGE 39
                                                               Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                         Public Health for a Healthier World

            established, and roles and responsibilities for carrying out those processes are
            clearly delineated.
            Students are well represented on governance committees at the major, Division
            and School levels.

          Weaknesses
           The School Constitution, drafted in the 1990s, gives committee oversight for
           administrative functions that go beyond current University guidelines.

          Recommendations
            Rewrite School Constitution for alignment with University guidelines on
            administrative oversight.

1.6 Resources
   1.6.a. Budget and resource allocation
          The University’s annual “Compact Process” is central to the School’s overall
          budget and resource allocation process. After consultation with the Executive
          Team and an assessment of the School’s priorities, the Dean, working with the
          CFO, incorporates budget priorities into a School Compact. Along with a complete
          budget analysis, the Compact is a brief statement of achievements during the past
          year, goals and objectives for the coming year, performance measures and related
          budget requests.
          The Compact, analyses of the School’s finances and requests for additional funds
          to support new initiatives are submitted to the Senior Vice President for Health
          Sciences. The Dean, the Senior Vice President for Health Sciences and central
          administrators discuss the content of the Compact, the level of new funding that
          may be forthcoming, financial reports and other deliverables to be provided to the
          Senior Vice President for Health Sciences in the coming year. The final
          “Compact” is an agreement between the Dean and the Senior Vice President for
          Health Sciences.
          Since 1997 the University has operated under a responsibility-centered
          management system. University funding allocated to the School draws mainly
          from state funds (including state special appropriations), tuition income which the
          School earns; and indirect cost (facilities and administrative, also known as F&A)
          recovery funds generated by sponsored projects.
          From the total funds, the Dean allocates to each Division state-appropriated funds
          based on 25 percent of all faculty salaries and fringe benefits, 82 percent of the
          respective tuition, and 77 percent F&A recovery returned to the School. State
          special funds are allocated according to the legislative appropriation. Unallocated
          funds are retained by the Dean to support targeted initiatives, new faculty hires and
          the Dean’s Office, the Student Services Center, the Advancement Team and other
          central functions as well as to fund a reserve for fluctuations in sponsored and
          tuition revenue.



PAGE 40                                           University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                Chapter 1: The School of Public Health

            This responsibility-centered management system is built on a percentage of money
            earned being returned to the School, with a taxation system to support central
            administration. Starting in 2006 another step was taken in the evolution to a full-
            recovery, full-cost model, under which the University passes through the full value
            of income earned as well as its full cost of services.




Self-Study, February 2007                                                              PAGE 41
                                                                           Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                                     Public Health for a Healthier World


    1.6.b. A clearly formulated School budget statement
               Budgets from FY2000 to FY2006 are shown below in Template A: Revenue and
               Expenditures.

Table 5: School of Public Health Revenue and Expenditures (Template A)
                          1999/       2000/       2001/        2002/      2003/       2004/       2005/
                          2000        2001        2002         2003       2004        2005        2006

   Sources of Funds

   Tuition & Fees        2,218,655   2,743,004   3,405,202    4,477,547   5,350,297   6,174,770   8,678,646

   State
   Appropriation         4,695,711   5,579,687   5,851,351    5,532,280   5,184,424   5,017,087   5,346,076

   University Funds      4,394,537   7,482,600   5,401,037    6,373,737   4,600,696   5,291,027   4,691,772

   Grants/Contracts     43,064,421 56,107,437 69,251,525     68,656,114 71,521,448 68,941,714 65,939,828

   Indirect Cost
   Recovery              2,254,614   5,476,141   6,110,968    6,253,717   5,705,660   5,637,080   5,697,512

   Endowment               249,080    680,086     563,782      446,806     550,927     611,403     639,183

   Gifts                   413,391    595,254     450,343      612,625     610,058     675,678    2,534,983

   Net Transfers         1,510,247   1,285,491   1,359,839    1,360,274    804,458     395,907    1,169,764

       Total Revenue 58,800,656 79,949,700 92,394,047        93,713,100 94,327,968 92,744,666 94,697,764

   Expenditures

   Faculty Salaries &
   Benefits             10,732,422 11,621,496 13,081,020     13,737,751 13,494,990 13,361,531 15,702,985

   Staff Salaries &
   Benefits             20,147,723 24,165,358 27,660,056     29,416,436 28,165,901 28,294,946 29,087,786

   Operations           24,506,141 34,199,330 43,375,828     38,458,330 42,896,310 43,432,563 39,858,380

   Travel                1,282,237   1,311,519   1,309,749    1,573,131   1,488,839   1,406,239   1,359,502

   Student Support       3,579,666   4,617,726   5,590,390    6,350,577   5,473,121   5,390,806   6,065,263

   University Tax          232,644    424,408     780,482     1,357,949   1,543,682   1,702,509   2,067,270

                  Total
           Expenditures 60,480,833 76,339,837 91,797,525     90,894,174 93,062,843 93,588,594 94,141,186




PAGE 42                                                      University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                       Chapter 1: The School of Public Health


    1.6.c. Not applicable.

    1.6.d. Number (headcount) of faculty (tenured, tenure track and contract) in each of
           the five core areas of public health (Source: Human Resource Tracking
           System, September 2006)

            Table 6: Faculty Headcount (Tenured, Tenure Track and Contract)
                         Concentration Area                   2003–2004       2004–2005       2005–2006

                Biostatistics                                            15             18              20

                Environmental Health Sciences                            18             18              20

                Epidemiology and Community Health*                       38             43              47
                  Epidemiology*                                                                        (21)
                  Social and Behavioral                                                                (26)
                  Sciences*

                Health Policy and Management                             23             27              26

                Other (e.g., Public Health Practice**)                    1              1               3

              * The School of Public Health faculty are traditionally aligned by administrative unit but to
                provide an overview of faculty 2005-2006 with responsibilities in the core concentration
                areas of epidemiology and social/behavioral sciences the faculty of the Division of
                Epidemiology and Community Health have been divided according to greatest percent effort
                in area of concentration.
             ** Public Health Practice engages the School faculty as a whole across all Divisions as
                academic and project advisers. Core faculty with cross-disciplinary skills are engaged in the
                School for practice-specific expertise due to the high demand.




Self-Study, February 2007                                                                           PAGE 43
                                                                            Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                                      Public Health for a Healthier World


    1.6.e. Faculty, students and student/faculty ratios, organized by division
 Table 7: Faculty, Students, and Student/Faculty Ratios by Division (Template B)
 (Faculty are defined as tenure, tenure track and contract. Adjunct as Other faculty are not recorded as a percentage
 of effort thus are not calculated for this table)

                                                                                                        SFR by
                                                HC Core        FTEF           HC           FTE           Core
                      2006                      Faculty        Core        Students      Students        FTEF

   Biostatistics                                        20          19.8           61           64.7           3.27

   Environmental Health Sciences                        20          17.9           99          132.4           7.40

   Epidemiology and Community Health*                   47          46.4          319          318.5           6.86
       Epidemiology                                     21          21.0          145          145.2           6.91
       Social and Behavioral Sciences                   26          25.4          174          173.3           6.82

   Health Policy and Management                         26          25.8          193          223.3           8.66

   Public Health Practice and Other**                    3           1.3           64           29.7            NA

                                        TOTAL          116         111.2          736          768.6           6.91


                                                   HC                                                   SFR by
                                                  Core         FTEF           HC           FTE           Core
                      2005                       Faculty       Core        Students      Students        FTEF

   Biostatistics                                        17          16.8           52           61.2           3.64

   Environmental Health Sciences                        18          16.7          110          101.9           6.10

   Epidemiology and Community Health*                   43          42.7          289          286.2           6.70
       Epidemiology                                     21          21.0          129          124.3           5.92
       Social and Behavioral Sciences                   22          21.7          160          161.9           7.46

   Health Policy and Management                         27          27.0          177          201.9           7.48

   Public Health Practice and Other**                    1           1.0           60           30.1            NA

                                        TOTAL          106         104.2          688          681.3           6.54




PAGE 44                                                      University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                             Chapter 1: The School of Public Health


 Table 7: Faculty, Students, and Student/Faculty Ratios by Division (Template B)
 (continued) (Faculty are defined as tenure, tenure track and contract. Adjunct as Other faculty are not recorded
 as a percentage of effort thus are not calculated for this table)

                                                     HC                                                  SFR by
                                                    Core             FTEF        HC         FTE           Core
                      2004                         Faculty           Core     Students    Students        FTEF

    Biostatistics                                          13          12.8         52           59.1           4.62

    Environmental Health Sciences                          19          17.7         97           89.8           5.07

    Epidemiology and Community Health*                     38          36.8        236          252.7           6.87
       Epidemiology                                        18          18.0        113          115.7           6.43
       Social and Behavioral Sciences                      20          18.8        123          137.0           7.29

    Health Policy and Management                           23          22.5        110          125.0           5.56

    Public Health Practice and Other**                      1           1.0         39           27.4             NA

                                         TOTAL             94          90.8        534           554            6.10


Data Source: Data Warehouse. Student data for this table are calculated Fall of each year as a snapshot in time.
Thus the table may reflect a smaller number of students than total registrants for the calendar year especially for
the distance students concentrated in the PHP major. PT FTE is calculated by dividing PT student credits by 9.

Core Faculty Data Source: September 2004-2006 Human Resources Tracking System

    * The School of Public Health faculty are traditionally aligned by administrative unit but to provide an
      overview of faculty 2005-2006 with responsibilities in the core concentration areas of epidemiology and
      social/behavioral sciences the faculty of the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health have been
      divided according to greatest percent effort in area of concentration. Students are divided by major with
      Epi MPH and PhD considered Epidemiology and CR, CHE, MCH, Nutr considered Social and
      Behavioral Sciences

   ** Public Health Practice engages the School faculty as a whole across all Divisions as academic and
      project adviser. Core faculty with cross-disciplinary skills are engaged in the School for practice-specific
      expertise due to the high demand. Degree seeking students, not certificate students, are included in the
      student counts.




Self-Study, February 2007                                                                                PAGE 45
                                                                        Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                                  Public Health for a Healthier World


1.6.f. Other personnel
              The School is well staffed with a talented and diverse workforce in support of its
              goals and mission.

Table 8: Support Staff for Each Division or Office
                                           Civil Service                                           Graduate
                              Academic     Bargaining &                                            Assistants
                            Professional & Hourly Unit        Temp/Casual         Hourly         (RA, TA, Adm.
                             Admin. Staff      Staff             Staff           Students           Fellow)

 Biostatistics                              27          32                  2               2                 29

 Environmental Health
                                            17          57                 15               9                 17
 Services

 Epidemiology &
                                            41          193                46               25                45
 Community Health

 Health Policy &
                                            40          73                  6               12                30
 Management

 Dean’s Office, Student
 Services Center,                           61          36                 13               4                  6
 CPHEO, PHP, etc.

              Total Staff
                                            186         391                82               52                127
            Per Category


Numbers from August 2006

Table 9: Total Support Staff
   Total Academic Professional/
   Administrative and Civil Service staff         577

   Temporary/Casual Staff                         82

   Total of Student Categories                    179

          Grand Total: Support Staff              838




PAGE 46                                                    University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                   Chapter 1: The School of Public Health


    1.6.g. Space available by purpose, program and location
            The School’s administration is centralized in the Mayo Memorial Building on the
            University’s Minneapolis East Bank Campus. Its Divisions and programs are,
            however, dispersed across 10 locations on- and off-campus in University-owned
            and rental property that totals 207,000 square feet. Although most of the School’s
            space is within walking distance, a shuttle service is maintained by the School to
            transport faculty, students and staff between the Mayo Building and one of its
            other locations on the edge of University’s Minneapolis West Bank Campus,
            approximately one mile away.
            The table below details the space arrangements for the School. Included are 13,243
            square feet of space for students, of which 7,400 square feet are devoted to a new
            student commons with a computer lab and other up-to-date amenities. This also
            includes four classrooms used almost exclusively by the School as student study
            spaces and for computing resources. In addition, the School has access to all of the
            4,400 square feet of classroom space available within the Academic Health Center,
            and students make frequent use of the 1,226 square feet of space in the CHIP
            student lounge area.

    Table 10: Space by Program and Purpose (in square feet)
                                                                  Lab/
                                          Clinical                Lab
               Unit            Education Research     Office     Service    Other     Total

      Biostatistics                1,631                29,712        336       557      32,235

      Environmental Health
      Sciences                        352               21,309      6,706       120      28,487

      Epidemiology and
      Community Health                       11,896     75,709        968       697      89,270

      Health Policy and
      Management                   1,334                29,343                  482      31,159

      Dean’s Office/Admin
      and programs                 9,926                15,785                           25,711

                      Totals      13,243     11,896    171,859      8,010     1,856     206,864




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   Table 11: Space by Building and Purpose
                              Clinic/              Office/                 Research
                              Clinical              Office                 Lab/Lab
           Building          Research Education    Service      Other       Service      Total

     849 South Smith
     Street (Leased)             1,162                1,416                                  2,578

     925 Delaware St. SE
     (Leased)                                         4,957                                  4,957

     Boynton Health
     Service                                252         482                     3,273        4,007

     Mayo Building &
     Additions                            12,718     41,307         485         3,433       57,943

     McNamara Alumni
     Center (Leased)                         49      12,768                                 12,817

     Moos Health Sciences
     Tower, Malcolm                                   4,146         321          968         5,435

     Opus Building
     (Leased)                   10,734                6,499         376                     17,609

     Phillips-Wangensteen
     Building                               100       2,750           69                     2,919

     University Office
     Plaza                                           33,886         605          336        34,827

     West Bank Office
     Building                               124      63,648                                 63,772

               Total Space      11,896    13,243    171,859        1,856        8,010      206,864


   1.6.h. Laboratory space (kind, quality and special features or special equipment)
           A total 8,010 square feet are dedicated to teaching and research laboratories, as
           well as adjacent lab support areas. Laboratory space is included in the inventory
           for the Divisions of Environmental Health Sciences and Epidemiology and
           Community Health.
           Toxicology and environmental chemistry laboratories are located in the Mayo
           Building within the Division of Environmental Health Sciences. Industrial
           hygiene, radiation, and environmental microbiology laboratories, also maintained



PAGE 48                                             University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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            by that Division, are located in the Boynton Health Service Building, adjacent to
            faculty offices.
            Two clinical research service labs are located in the Division of Epidemiology at
            the MESA study site in West St. Paul and at the Epidemiology Clinical Research
            Center in Minneapolis.
            A multi-level partnership with the Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota
            Department of Agriculture and the Academic Health Center has been formed to
            provide BSL-3 (enhanced) laboratory space for researchers, including SPH faculty.
            Please see Chapter 1.6.k. for more information.
            Environmental Health Sciences Labs
            The Environmental Health Sciences Environmental Chemistry Lab, with more
            than 600 square feet of space, is located on the 11th floor of the Mayo Building
            and is equipped with extraction and processing equipment for trace analysis of
            environmental samples. The space includes three GC/MS, one LC/MS, a GC/ECD
            and a scintillation counter.
            The Environmental Health Sciences Industrial Hygiene Lab occupies 1,500 square
            feet of space in the Boynton Health Services Building. It is equipped with
            instrumentation for measurement of gases, vapors and particulate matter. The
            laboratory has 10 Dust-Trak nephelometers, 15 gravimetric PM2.5 indoor and
            personal samplers, Condensation Particle Counters, portable-sized distribution
            measuring devices, microbalances and a gas chromatograph with a flame
            ionization detector. Major test apparatuses include a filter tester, a wind tunnel, a
            calm air chamber, three laboratory hoods and two biosafety cabinets. It also has
            equipment for calibration of the sampling instrumentation (such as the Gilian
            calibrators) and a wide range of pumps for use with the various sampling devices.
            The Environmental Health Sciences Toxicology Lab has 1,200 square feet and is
            located on the 11th floor of the Mayo Building. It is equipped with: tissue culture
            facilities; high speed centrifuge; rotors; microfuges; speed vac; environmental
            shaker; visible and UV spectrophotometer; fluorimeter; luminometer polymerase
            chain reaction (PCR); liquid scintillation counter; dark room; electrophoresis and
            electroblotting equipment for protein and nucleic acid purification; Bio-Rad Econo
            System; and a chromatography cabinet for doing work at four degrees Centigrade.
            Epidemiology and Community Health Labs
            The Epidemiology Clinical Research Center (ECRC) site has 406 square feet of
            lab space designated for clinical research studies. The lab functions primarily as a
            phlebotomy site and processing lab where study participants’ blood and urine are
            collected and prepared for shipping to outside laboratories, including accredited
            clinical diagnostic labs, contracted clinical trial labs or research labs. The Lab has
            the following equipment: refrigerated centrifuges; refrigerators; ultra low freezers;
            and pre-packaged test kits.
            The MESA Study Lab in West St. Paul has 600 square feet of space and
            essentially the same equipment and operations as the ECRC.




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    1.6.i. Computer facilities and resources for students, faculty, administration and
           staff.
          An extensive array of state-of-the-art facilities and equipment is available through
          the University and School. The University’s Office of Information Technology
          (http://www.umn.edu/oit) manages the centrally provided computer, network, phone and
          other information technology systems. It also provides a comprehensive range of
          services to students, faculty, staff and departments through its service units:
             Academic & Distributed Computing Services (ADCS) (http://www.umn.edu/adcs/)
             provides leadership for the use of information technology in academic areas
             (teaching and learning, research and discovery and some aspects of outreach
             and service) and supports students, faculty and staff in anticipating information
             technology needs and responding to them with appropriate infrastructure,
             applications and services. Services include technology training short courses,
             technology helplines and the rent-a-guru program.
             The Faculty Technology Resource Center, or Digital Media Center (DMC)
             (http://dmc.umn.edu) promotes the innovative use of learning technologies and
             supports faculty developing multimedia (including Internet) learning projects.
          The School provides students, faculty and staff with extensive computer facilities
          and support staff. Because the School is geographically dispersed, the Office of the
          Dean and each Division separately maintain computing systems which are
          regularly upgraded. Students are provided with computing access through a main
          student computer room and student computing labs in each Division and support
          within resource constraints. The School and AHC provide several fully wired
          classrooms of instructional computing resources. Students have full wired and
          wireless access to computing resources and software through the University.




PAGE 50                                           University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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Table 12: School Computing Resources
                            Desktops                                         Student              Other
            Unit            & Laptops                Servers              Computer Room          & Notes

  Biostatistics                       50    10 Sun workstation            2 rooms: 12          Over 100 x-
                                            servers                       computer stations    terminals
                                            10 Linux servers

  Environmental Health                80    Windows NT                    2 computers
  Sciences                                  Windows 2003
                                            Linux

  Epidemiology and                    300   10 servers                    4 computers with
  Community Health                                                        technical software

  Health Policy and                   215   1-testing/backup web          4 computers          45 computer
  Management                                server                                             interviewer
                                            1-live Web server                                  workstations
                                            3 domain controllers and
                                            file servers
                                            3 file servers
                                            1 database servers
                                            8 servers for server center

  Dean’s Office/                      47    Served by AHC –IT             9 computers
  Admin and programs                        services
                                            CPHEO: 6 servers


             The School’s Digital Learning Group, organized as part of the Centers for Public
             Health Education and Outreach (CPHEO), provides Internet-related services such
             at HTML authoring; WebCT Vista course management support; Web site
             development, maintenance and hosting; live video Webcasting; video storage;
             video and audio editing; and database management. Web-based database
             integration functions (e.g., online directories, course catalogues, registration,
             needs-assessment surveys) are also available through CPHEO. The School has
             extensive experience with implementing Webcasts, including the option for
             questions to be e-mailed and answered in real time.
             One of the early activities undertaken by the School was development of a Web
             portal to help communicate the availability of a range of learning opportunities and
             resources for the community. The portal, http://www.publichealthplanet.org, provides
             information about continuing education and online academic training options. The
             site also hosts an impressive array of information resources.
             At times, the logistical requirements of an event may require additional service.
             For this, the School turns to the extensive array of state-of-the-art facilities and
             equipment available through the University’s Digital Media Center. University


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          classrooms and state-of-the-art facilities are used to host on-campus functions.
          Each of these venues is supported with a full-service technology support team.

    1.6.j. Library/information resources
          Faculty, staff and students have access to extensive library and information
          resources. (http://www.lib.umn.edu/)
          The University of Minnesota Libraries, the 16th largest research library in North
          America, comprise more than 6 million print volumes, 37,000 current serial
          subscriptions and significant online resources, including more than 22,000
          electronic journals, nearly 200,000 electronic books (including government
          documents) and many locally created digital image, sound and text files. The
          Libraries’ online network provides computerized access to its collections and
          serves as a gateway to local, national and global information sources. The
          Libraries employ 312 staff, 100 of whom are librarians.
          The Health Sciences Libraries (HSL) consist of the Bio-Medical Library, the
          Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine, and the Veterinary
          Medical Library. The Bio-Medical collection contains over 490,000 volumes,
          1,600 current print journal subscriptions, 1,500 electronic journal subscriptions,
          2,300 curriculum-related and self-instructional media and computer programs, as
          well as a variety of full-text and bibliographic electronic databases. An assigned
          librarian acts as a “liaison” between HSL and the School to deliver specialized
          instruction to faculty, staff and students, perform literature reviews and collect
          materials in public health for the library’s collection.
          The HSL’s public health collection is particularly strong in epidemiology,
          bioinformatics and public health administration. The Veterinary Medical Library
          holds a strong collection in emerging infections, animal disease vectors and
          pandemics. In addition, the School is part of an exchange program with India
          through which it is collecting documents relating to Indian public health initiatives
          and research.
          The HSL maintains state-of-the-art technologies to provide access to print and
          non-print biomedical knowledge-based information resources. It has more than 80
          public computers providing access to the library’s electronic resources,
          productivity software and several online training classrooms. HSL technologies
          provide Web access to a broad range of bibliographic databases and aggregated
          resources including PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, MICROMEDEX, PsycInfo
          and the Cochrane databases.
          The University recently added $2 million in recurring funds to the Libraries’
          budget for new acquisitions. This funding will increase its ability to purchase new
          materials in developing areas of interest in public health.

   1.6.k. Community resources available for instruction, research and service,
          indicating those where formal agreements exist.
          The School maintains relationships with a number of external groups and entities
          on the local, national and global levels. Collaboration with these entities includes



PAGE 52                                            University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
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            research, student placements, and expert consultation, as well as continuing and
            professional education and community service.
            In these activities, the School leads in partnership with the departments of health in
            the Upper Midwest, most notably the Minnesota Department of Health, local and
            federal health agencies and non-governmental organizations. For example, over 50
            students each year work in paid and unpaid internships at the Minnesota
            Department of Health, most notably as members of “Team D” participating in
            surveillance of infectious diarrheal disease in Minnesota.
            A multilevel partnership with the Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota
            Department of Agriculture and the Academic Health Center (especially the School,
            the School of Medicine and the College of Veterinary Medicine) has been formed
            to provide BSL 3-(enhanced) laboratory space, which is being supported through
            state bonding authority and legislative appropriations, for research on emerging
            infectious diseases, many of which are zoonoses (diseases transmitted to humans
            from animals).
            The unique relationship between the School and the Department of Health has
            been enhanced through close geographic proximity (within three blocks of each
            other) in previous years. With the move of all government offices, including the
            Health Department, to St. Paul, the Commissioner and Dean convened a joint
            committee of assistant commissioners, associate deans and other committed
            partners across the academic and health department staff to develop strategies to
            prevent interference due to the new distance barrier. Strategies implemented to
            facilitate ongoing exchange included a shuttle bus that runs twice a day between
            the School and Department during the regular school year so students, faculty and
            staff have easy access to facilities, the arrangement of dedicated parking spaces
            and availability of ‘zip cars’ for transport.
            The School also has entered into a memorandum of understanding for
            collaborative programming on global initiatives with the Manipal Academy of
            Higher Education (India), and One World and St. Johns Academy (Bangalore,
            India), allowing for representation on governing boards, faculty and student
            exchange and joint arrangements for program development. In 2005, another
            partnership was forged in Hong Kong with the opening of a School affiliate office,
            ISP Asia Inc., for delivery and marketing of the certificate programs of ISP in
            Management Studies.
            A unique research opportunity for student involvement has also emerged with the
            Reden & Anders Fellows Program, a School-wide program initiated in January
            2006 for one or more graduate research assistants. (Reden & Anders, Ltd., is a
            company owned by Ingenix and located in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. See
            www.reden-anders.com for further information.) In this program, Reden & Anders
            provides funding to support a half-time position for fall and spring semesters with
            an option of full-time employment during the summer. The funds for this program
            include student salary support plus fringe benefits. Rather than the company hiring
            the student directly, funding via the School provides the student with the additional
            benefits of tuition and health care benefits. This pre-doc fellowship is with the
            Reden & Anders Health Technology Pipeline; the supervisor is a Reden & Anders


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              senior consultant. The Health Technology Pipeline staff offers consulting services,
              analyses and tools to assist clients in understanding the impact on their
              organizations of “disruptive events” in health care practice (i.e., a new device,
              drug, therapy, standard of care, etc. that will change the context in which health
              care services are delivered, the utilization of services, expected quality outcomes
              and health care spending). In January 2006, there were 17 School applications
              from M.P.H., M.S., and Ph.D. students. One appointment was made for the 2006-
              2007 academic year. This is a new model that is being explored to increase pre-doc
              funding of students.
              Additional partnerships are available for student internships. For example, the
              research and policy concentration of the M.S. program in Health Services
              Research, Policy and Administration has developed relationships with multiple
              organizational sponsors for paid internships. Students are placed at community
              organizations where they receive ‘hands on’ experience in health services research,
              are mentored and have opportunities to contribute to projects. Students apply skills
              learned from the program to their internship. Among the sponsors are Stratis
              Health, Halleland Health Consulting, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of
              Minnesota, Ingenix Inc., Minneapolis Department of Health and Family Support,
              Medtronic Inc., Hennepin County Community Health, Center for Chronic Disease
              Outcome Research, Fairview Health Services, Park Nicollet Research Institute,
              Minnesota Department of Health, UCare Minnesota and the Minnesota
              Department of Administration.

   1.6.l.     “In-kind” academic contributions
              Not applicable.

  1.6.m. Outcome measures by which the School may judge the adequacy of its
         resources (See Chapter 3.1.d. for Outcome Indicators based on sponsored
         grant dollars per FTE faculty)

   Table 13: Outcome Measures by Which the School May Judge the Adequacy of
   Its Resources
                                                                                    Year      Year      Year
                                                                 Target            2003/4    2004/5    2005/6

          Objective 4.a.: Institutional expenditures per   *Decrease as student    234,711   217,496   194,226
          full-time-equivalent student                      body increases to a
                                                            resource utilization
                                                                 balance

          Objective 2.a.: Extramural funding (training             10%             6.75%     7.85%      9.14%
          grants) as a percentage of total budget

    * No quantitative target has been established. The University budget model is currently under revision and
      the revision is expected to affect parameters.




PAGE 54                                                      University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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    1.6.n. This criterion is met.

            Strengths
               The School has resources adequate to fulfill its mission and goals and Outcome
               Indicators in education, research and service.
               The School is in sound financial health. Its budget has increased annually
               primarily through funds generated by indirect cost recovery, per-credit tuition
               increases and increased revenues from growing enrollment, most notably
               through its expanded distance-learning opportunities.
               The faculty continues to grow, up to 117 in September 2006 from 95 in
               September 2004.
               The School employs a well-qualified, diverse full-time professional,
               administrative and civil service/bargaining unit support staff.
               The School has adequate laboratory space, an extensive array of computer
               facilities and equipment and outstanding library and information resources.
               The School enjoys highly productive relationships with departments of health
               and other organizations in the Upper Midwest that have led to opportunities for
               student fieldwork, research collaborations and continuing education
               partnerships.

            Weaknesses
             State funding for the University system has been challenging due to numerous
             competing demands on state resources.
             The School is dispersed among some dozen locations on the University campus.

            Recommendations
              The School will continue to make a strong case to the University for facilities
              large enough to house its operations under a single roof.




Self-Study, February 2007                                                              PAGE 55
                                                      Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 1: The School of Public Health                Public Health for a Healthier World




PAGE 56                                  University of Minnesota School of Public Health
                         CHAPTER TWO




Instructional Programs
                                                                Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 2: Instructional Programs                               Public Health for a Healthier World



2.0 Instructional Programs
   2.1   Master of Public Health Degree
   2.2   Program Length
   2.3   Public Health Core Knowledge
   2.4   Practical Skills
   2.5   Culminating Experience
   2.6   Required Competencies
   2.7   Assessment Procedures
   2.8   Other Professional Degrees
   2.9   Academic Degrees
  2.10   Doctoral Degrees
  2.11   Joint Degrees
  2.12   Distance Learning or Executive Degree Programs

Introduction
The School’s education programs reflect its commitment to the scholarship of discovery,
inter-professional and lifelong learning, and professional and academic teaching. While the
School does not have an undergraduate program, each year School faculty instruct more than
3,000 undergraduate students in public health courses taken to fulfill the requirements of other
degrees or as part of an undergraduate concentration in public health. Some two-thirds of its
approximately 1,000 graduate students engage in nine Major programs offering professional
study and the remaining one-third pursue master of science or doctoral training in five
Graduate programs.
The School makes available to its graduate students dual degree opportunities in business,
journalism, law, medicine, nursing, public policy, social work and veterinary medicine. And
more than 100 students pursue post-baccalaureate certificates in public health core concepts
and specialized training. Reflecting the School’s growth as a global educational force, each
year some 10 to 20 percent of its total students are from other nations. Distance-learning and
executive degree programs, made possible through digital technologies, enable the School to
extend its instructional programs to working adult professionals, whose career, family
obligations and distance from campus preclude coursework in traditional settings.
The School expects demand for its educational programs to remain strong in the coming
decade. Interest in public health as a professional and scientific career continues to grow. New
public health challenges, new policy initiatives and emerging areas of research can be
expected to continue to spur interest in – and demand for – the latest public health knowledge.




University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Self-Study, February 2007
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                                                           Chapter 2: Instructional Programs

 2.1. Master of Public Health Degree
     2.1.a. Instructional Matrix

Table 14: Instructional Matrix (Template C)
                    Major/Program                                    Tracks/Specializations             Professional   Academic
 Master’s and Doctoral Degrees
    Biostatistics                                                                                      MPH             MS, PhD
    Clinical Research                                                                                                  MS
    Community Health Education                                                                         MPH
    Environmental Health                      General                                                  MPH             MS, PhD
                                              Environmental Chemistry                                                  MS, PhD
                                              Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology              MPH             MS, PhD
                                              Environmental Health Policy                              MPH             MS, PhD
                                              Environmental Infectious Disease                         MPH             MS, PhD
                                              Environmental Toxicology                                 MPH             MS, PhD
                                              Global Environmental Health                              MPH             MS
                                              Industrial Hygiene                                       MPH             MS, PhD
                                              Occupational Health Nursing                              MPH             MS, PhD
                                              Occupational Health Medicine                             MPH




 University of Minnesota School of Public Health
 Self-Study, February 2007                                                                                                  PAGE 57
                                                                                                                        Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 2: Instructional Programs                                                                                       Public Health for a Healthier World



                Major/Program                                        Tracks/Specializations                                  Professional     Academic
Master’s and Doctoral Degrees (continued)
   Epidemiology                                                                                                              MPH              MS, PhD
   Health Services Research, Policy &                                                                                                         PhD, MS
   Administration
   Healthcare Administration                                                                                                 MHA
   Maternal & Child Health *                                                                                                 MPH
                                             Maternal & Child Health Epidemiology                                            MPH
   Public Health Administration & Policy                                                                                     MPH
   Public Health Nutrition                                                                                                   MPH
                                             Epidemiology Emphasis                                                           MPH
   Public Health Practice                    Executive Program in Public Health Practice *                                   MPH

Post-Baccalaureate Certificates
   Public Health Practice                    Public Health Certificate in Core Concepts                                      Cert
                                             Public Health Certificate in Food Safety and Biosecurity                        Cert
                                             Public Health Certificate in Occupational Health & Safety                       Cert
                                             Public Health Certificate in Preparedness, Response & Recovery                  Cert
                                             Management Studies in Health Services Administration ISP-I (Certificate)        Cert
                                             Management Studies in Health Services Administration ISP-II (Certificate)       Cert
                                             Advanced Studies in Health Services Administration ISP-III (Certificate)        Cert




University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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Public Health for a Healthier World                                         Chapter 2: Instructional Programs


                 Major/Program                     Tracks/Specializations             Professional   Academic
 Dual Degrees
    Journalism, Community Health Education                                           MPH/MA
    Journalism, Environmental Health                                                 MPH/MA
    Journalism, Epidemiology                                                         MPH/MA
    Journalism, Maternal & Child Health                                              MPH/MA
    Journalism, Public Health Administration &                                       MPH/MA
    Policy
    Law, Community Health Education                                                  MPH/JD
    Law, Environmental Health                                                        MPH/JD          MS/JD,
                                                                                                     PhD/JD
    Law, Epidemiology                                                                MPH/JD
    Law, Health Services Research, Policy &                                                          MS/JD,
    Administration                                                                                   PhD/JD
    Law, Maternal & Child Health                                                     MPH/JD
    Law, Public Health Administration & Policy                                       MPH/JD
    Business Administration, Healthcare                                              MHA/MBA
    Administration
    Medicine, Epidemiology                                                           MD/MPH          MD/PhD
    Medicine, Health Services Research, Policy                                                       PhD/MD
    & Administration
    Medicine, Public Health Practice                                                 MD/MPH
    Nursing, Community Health Education                                              MPH/MS



 University of Minnesota School of Public Health
 Self-Study, February 2007                                                                               PAGE 59
                                                                                                  Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 2: Instructional Programs                                                                 Public Health for a Healthier World


                Major/Program                                            Tracks/Specializations        Professional     Academic
Dual Degrees (continued)
   Nursing, Environmental Health                                                                       MPH/MS
   Nursing, Epidemiology                                                                               MPH/MS
   Nursing, Maternal & Child Health                                                                    MPH/MS
   Nursing, Public Health Administration &                                                             MPH/MS
   Policy
   Public Policy, Health Services Research,                                                                             MS/MPP
   Policy & Administration
   Social Work, Community Health Education                                                             MPH/MSW
   Social Work, Maternal & Child Health                                                                MPH/MSW
   Veterinary Medicine, Public Health Practice*                                                        DVM/MPH

Non-degree Interdisciplinary Concentrations only available to students in MPH degree programs
                                                  Complementary & Alternative Medicine
                                                  Global Health
                                                  Public Health Policy

* Distance programs incorporating online and on campus intensive courses




University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Self-Study February 2007                                                                                                      PAGE 60
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     2.1.b. The School Bulletin
             The School Bulletin, which includes all degree offerings, is available at
             http://www.sph.umn.edu/img/assets/9141/SPH%20Catalog-1.pdf . A printed copy will also be
             available in the resource file.

     2.1.c. This criterion is met.

             Strengths
                The School offers an M.P.H. degree requiring demonstration of competency in
                each of the five core areas of knowledge basic to public health.

             Weaknesses: None

 2.2 Program Length
     2.2.a. Definition of a credit
            The School, following University policy, considers one semester credit to be 50
            minutes of classroom/contact time per week for 15 weeks.

     2.2.b. Minimum requirements for all professional degree programs
            Beginning with Fall Semester 2007, all professional degree programs will require
            a minimum of 42 semester credits.
             Prior to the 42-credit minimum, each of the degree programs has designated its
             own required number of credits based on curricular demands. The School
             generally has required courses in the following categories:
                Six core areas of public health: 14 – 19 credits (includes the five core areas of
                public health plus ethics, as required by the School)
                Required core classes in the major: varied
                Electives: 12 credits
             The table below (2.2.c.) shows the range of credits required by each program over
             the past three years.

     2.2.c. Number of M.P.H. degrees awarded with fewer than 42 semester credits
            In Fall 2007 the School will implement a new 42-credit minimum for all M.P.H.
            degrees. Prior to implementation of the new standards, there were four
            professional programs that granted degrees with fewer than 42 semester credits
            (see Table 15 below). Prior to 2007 accelerated programs were targeted to
            individuals with prior professional degrees or substantial public health experience
            relevant to the curriculum. With the new minimum requirement, students may
            complete an M.P.H. program requiring fewer than 42 credits only on an individual
            exceptional basis through petition. Such an exception requires faculty review and
            approval.




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          Table 15: MPH/MHA Degrees – Required Minimum Credits
                   Required Minimum Credits                  2004–2005       2005–2006      2006–2007

            Biostatistics                                              38              38             42

            Environmental Health Sciences Standard                     30              30             42

            Epidemiology Standard                                      45              45             48

            Epidemiology Accelerated                                31–32           31–32         34–35

            Community Health Education                                 48              48             48

            Maternal and Child Health Standard                         48              48             48

            Maternal and Child Health – Epi Emphasis                   47              47             48

            Maternal and Child Health Accelerated                   31–32           31–32         31–32

            Public Health Nutrition 13 months                       33–35           34–37         34–37

            Public Health Nutrition 16 months                       35–37           36–39         36–39

            Public Health Nutrition 24 months                       41–56           42–76         42–83

            Public Health Administration & Policy                      50              50             50
            Standard

            Public Health Administration & Policy                      36              36             42
            Accelerated

            Executive Program in Public Health Practice                35              35             42

            Veterinary Public Health                                   42              42             42

            Public Health Medicine                                     41              41             42

            Healthcare Administration MHA                              60              60             60




PAGE 62                                                   University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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     2.2.d. This criterion is met.

             Strengths
                As of Fall 2007, all of the School’s professional degree options will require a
                minimum of 42 semester credits.

             Weaknesses
              None.

 2.3 Public Health Core Knowledge
     2.3.a. How the School assures professional degree students have basic knowledge
             The School requires that M.P.H. students satisfy competency requirements in the
             five core areas of public health – administration, behavioral science, biostatistics,
             environmental health, epidemiology and an additional requirement in ethics.
             Students may satisfy the competency requirements in one of four ways:
             1. They must satisfactorily complete one of the following courses in each
                category with a grade B- or better.
                 Administration
                 PubH 6751 Principles of Management in Health Services
                           Organizations – 2 credits
                 PubH 6752 Public Health Management – 3 credits
                 Behavioral Science
                 PubH 6020 Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science – 3 credits
                 PubH 6050 Community Health Theory and Practice I
                           [CHE students only] – 3 credits
                 PubH 6914 Community Nutrition Intervention
                           [PubH Nutr students only] – 3 credits
                 Biostatistics
                 PubH 6414 Biostatistical Methods I – 3 credits
                 PubH 6415 Biostatistical Methods II – 3 credits
                 PubH 6450 Biostatistics I – 4 credits
                 PubH 6451 Biostatistics II – 4 credits
                 Environmental Health
                 PubH 6101 Environmental Health – 2 credits
                 PubH 6102 Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health – 2 credits




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               PubH 6103 Exposure to Environmental Hazards (EnHS students only) – 2
                         credits
               Epidemiology
               PubH 6320 Fundamentals of Epidemiology – 3 credits
               PubH 6341 Epidemiologic Methods I – 3 credits
               Ethics
               PubH 6741 Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy –
                         1 credit
               PubH 6742 Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy – 1 credit
          OR
          2. Students must pass an equivalency exam in the core area. Equivalency exams
             satisfy competency requirements for the following core courses:
               PubH 6751 Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations
               PubH 6020 Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science
               PubH 6414 Biostatistical Methods I
               PubH 6101 Environmental Health
               PubH 6320 Fundamentals of Epidemiology
               PubH 6741 Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy
          OR
          3. They must pass an advanced course in the core area, as approved by the
             respective Major Chair and the Educational Policy Committee, or as required
             by their area of specialization.
          OR
          4. They must complete a graduate-level course, with a grade of B or better, at an
             accredited university or college that meets the competencies defined by CEPH.
             Upon petition of the student, the School’s Educational Policy Committee will
             determine acceptance of a course for transfer.
          For the M.H.A. program, the following courses are required to fulfill the
          equivalent to the core public health requirements.
               Administration
               PubH 6542 Management of Healthcare Organizations – 3 credits
               PubH 6564 Managed Care – 2 credits
               PubH 6544 Principles of Problem Solving in Health Services
                         Organizations – 3 credits
               PubH 6543 Health Policy and Ethics – 2 credits




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                 PubH 6555 Health Economics – 2 credits or
                           PubH 6832 Health Economics – 3 credits
                 PubH 6535 Cost Accounting for Healthcare Services – 3 credits
                 PubH 6557 Health Finance I – 2 credits
                 PubH 6558 Health Finance II – 4 credits
                 PubH 6596 Legal Considerations in Health Services
                           Organizations – 3 credits
                 PubH 6563 Strategic Management in the Healthcare Industry – 2 credits
                 PubH 6562 Information Technology in Healthcare – 2 credits
                 Behavioral Science
                 PubH 6540 Organizational Behavior – 2 credits
                 PubH 6547 Healthcare Human Resources Management – 2 credits
                 PubH 6554 Marketing Health Services – 2 credits
                 Biostatistics
                 PubH 6541 Statistics for Health Management Decision Making – 3 credits
                 PubH 6561 Quantitative Methods Applied to Health Administration
                           Problems – 3 credits
                 PubH 6560 Operations Research and Quality in Health Care – 2 credits
                 Environmental Health
                 PubH 6556 Health and Health Systems – 2 credits
                 Epidemiology
                 PubH 6541 Statistics for Health Management Decision-Making – 3 credits
                 Ethics
                 PubH 6543 Health Policy and Ethics – 2 credits or
                                PubH 6835 Health Services Policy – 2 credits and
                                PubH 6741 Ethics in Public Health – 1 credit

     2.3.b This criterion is met.

             Strengths
                Curricula for the M.P.H. and M.H.A. degree programs require students to
                satisfy competency requirements in five core public health areas, including
                administration, behavioral science, biostatistics, environmental health,
                epidemiology and an additional requirement in ethics.

             Weaknesses: None



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2.4 Practical Skills
   2.4.a. Policies and procedures regarding practice experiences
          All M.P.H. and M.H.A. students are required to complete a formal, supervised
          fieldwork experience consisting of at least 90 hours.
          Fieldwork placements must be within the broad practice of public health and
          relevant to the major. All practice experiences require a contract that states
          objectives, activities, timeline and outcome. The contract is to be developed by the
          student, entered into with a community preceptor and approved by the faculty
          adviser. Preceptors, who are approved on the basis of their expertise in the relevant
          field of public health, contribute to the supervision and evaluation of students.
          Each major has established fieldwork criteria, including:
            Type of experience, site selection and preceptor;
            How students should initiate and arrange the fieldwork;
            Role of faculty supervisor;
            Method of evaluation; and
            Credit and course enrollment.
          Fieldwork requirements can take any form deemed appropriate to the major,
          including concentrated internships, master’s projects completed in a practice
          setting or significant field or community work done under the guidance of a
          community preceptor. For program-specific procedures and policies for the
          practice experience, please see Appendix 2.4.a.
          Structure and evaluation of the fieldwork are managed through registration in a
          course designed specifically for the practicum. A grade is assigned by the faculty
          adviser after taking into account the preceptor evaluation.
          A new Web-based tool implemented by the School is a valuable resource for
          initiating and managing fieldwork experience. From the initial stages of selecting
          potential sites, through the contracting process and final evaluation, this tool
          enables students, faculty, staff and practicum advisers to be well informed. For
          example, through the program, students are able to review comments from prior
          students about what to expect at specific fieldwork sites. To view this new Web-
          based tool, please visit http://www.ahc.umn.edu/sphfieldexp

   2.4.b. Agencies and preceptors used for practice experiences over last two years
          The School has over 205 field sites from which students have chosen a field
          experience. Field sites, such as the Minnesota Department of Health or other large
          employers, offer multiple opportunities. However, the total includes each
          employer only once. Students may also present other field experience options for
          consideration.
          The School’s 2002-2006 field placement sites are listed in Appendix 2.4.b.



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     2.4.c. Number of students waived of practice experience
             No students have been waived of practice experience in the past three years.

     2.4.d. Number of preventive medicine, occupational medicine, aerospace medicine,
            and public health and general preventive medicine residents completing the
            academic program

             Table 16: Residents Completing the Academic Program
                                                       2003–2004      2004–2005      2005–2006

                 Completed Academic Program                 3              2              3

                 Completed Coursework                       2              3              3

             “Completed Academic Program” refers to residents whose MPH degree has been granted.
             “Completed Coursework” refers to residents who have completed all the necessary courses, but
             have not completed their Plan B paper or passed their oral exam.
             Practicum rotations are arranged through Regions Hospital, 640 Jackson Street, St.
             Paul, Minnesota. The residency program involves several specialty clinics in the
             Twin Cities area to provide the residents with a range of clinical site experiences.

     2.4.e. This criterion is met.

             Strengths
                All M.P.H. and M.H.A. students are required to complete a formal, supervised
                practice experience in public health and with relevance to the major.
                A new Web-based tool is in place to facilitate management of fieldwork
                experiences.
                The School has relationships with more than 200 sites from which students may
                choose to conduct their field experience.

             Weaknesses: None

 2.5 Culminating Experience
     2.5.a. Identification of the culminating experience
             In addition to the field experience, each of the School’s professional majors has a
             culminating experience. In most cases, the culminating experience is a final
             written and oral presentation of a project appropriate to the field of specialization.
             Professional students must complete a master’s project and, through it,
             demonstrate familiarity with the tools of research or scholarship in the major, the
             capacity to work independently and the ability to present the results of the
             investigation effectively. The master’s project should involve approximately 120


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          hours (the equivalent of three full-time weeks) of work. Final oral presentations
          usually focus on how well students have integrated public health training and
          experience into their projects.
          Major faculty specify the nature and extent of the options available to satisfy the
          culminating experience requirement and determine whether the requirement is to
          be satisfied in conjunction with – or independent of – coursework in the major.
          Culminating projects require one of the following options for all students: data
          collection and analysis appropriate to a research paper, work with a community
          organization to plan and implement a needs assessment, intervention design for
          community implementation, or a systematic literature review of a public health
          issue.

          Table 17: Capstone (Master’s) Project Requirements by M.P.H. and M.H.A
          Major Programs (Students Choose Option):
                        Program               Degree          Capstone Outcome Indicators

             Biostatistics                     MPH     1. Research project
             Community Health Education        MPH     1. Needs assessment or program evaluation
                                                       2. Program development project
                                                       3. Research or data analysis project
             Environmental Health              MPH     1. Research project
                                                       2. Literature review
             Epidemiology                      MPH     1. Research project
                                                       2. Literature review
                                                       3. Grant proposal to the National Institutes of
                                                          Health (NIH)
             Healthcare Administration         MHA     1. Management project
                                                       2. Thesis option
                                                       3. New product development
             Maternal & Child Health           MPH     1. Research project
                                                       2. Literature review
                                                       3. Evaluation of an existing program
             Public Health Administration &    MPH     1. Research project
             Policy                                    2. Literature review
                                                       3. Applied field project based on projects
                                                          initiated during the course of field experience
             Public Health Nutrition           MPH     1. Research project
                                                       2. Literature review
                                                       3. Technical field project
             Public Health Practice            MPH     1. Research project
                                                       2. Literature review




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     2.5.b. This criterion is met.

             Strengths
                Each professional major requires a culminating experience, typically including
                a master’s project involving 120 hours of work in an area appropriate to the
                major with written and oral presentation.

             Weaknesses: None

 2.6 Required Competencies
     2.6.a. Identification of core public health competencies expected
            Please see Chapter 2.6.b.

     2.6.b. Matrix identifying the learning experiences by which the core public health
            competencies are met
             The School requires that all M.P.H. and M.H.A. students satisfy competency
             requirements in five core public health areas, including administration, behavioral
             science, biostatistics, environmental health, epidemiology and an additional
             requirement in ethics. Appendix 2.6.b. maps M.P.H. and M.H.A. core courses to
             ASPH Version 2.2 Core Competencies July 2006.
             Cross-cutting competencies identified in ASPH Version 2.2 July 2006 are under
             review by the Educational Policy Committee to map to current course and
             experiential opportunities in the School. Gaps will be identified and a plan
             developed to fill those gaps with public health and inter-professional educational
             (IPE) offerings. That IPE is the number one educational priority for the Academic
             Health Center (AHC) provides great opportunity to address the cross-cutting
             competencies as a system-wide effort. Current efforts in leadership and team-
             building coursework across the AHC as well as applied course offerings at the
             Public Health Institute (e.g. culturally responsive public health practice) provide a
             sound foundation for this effort.

     2.6.c. Competencies — and learning and evaluation opportunities — for each major
            program (professional and academic) identified in the Instructional Matrix.
             Please see Appendix 2.6.c., which identifies competencies and learning and
             evaluation opportunities for each major program (Biostatistics M.P.H./M.S./Ph.D.;
             Clinical Research M.S.; Community Health Education M.P.H.; Environmental
             Health M.P.H./M.S./Ph.D.; Epidemiology M.P.H./Ph.D.; Health Services
             Research, Policy & Administration M.S./Ph.D.; Healthcare Administration
             M.H.A.; Maternal & Child Health M.P.H.; Public Health Administration and
             Policy M.P.H.; Public Health Nutrition M.P.H.; Public Health Practice M.P.H. and
             certificates).




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   2.6.d. Description of the manner in which competencies are developed, used and
          made available to students.
          Each major identifies a set of competencies according to its specialty academic
          and professional degree. Consideration of profession-wide competencies is
          included with modifications made as the evidence base evolves. Please see
          Appendix 2.6.c. Students are informed of the competencies required and how they
          will be acquired and evaluated through an online curriculum website available for
          each major and updated annually.

   2.6.e. Manner in which School periodically assesses the changing needs of public
          health practice and uses this information to establish competencies for its
          educational programs
          The School uses multiple strategies to assess the evolving learning needs of public
          health professionals. These include:
            Needs assessments conducted in a variety of diverse settings:
            – A comprehensive needs assessment was completed by the School’s Centers
               for Public Health Education and Outreach (CPHEO) in 2003-2006 to identify
               gaps in the knowledge of public health practitioners in Minnesota, Wisconsin
               and North Dakota in core public health and emergency readiness
               competencies.
            – Ongoing inquiry into the practice and emerging training and education needs
               is conducted through conversations with members of the advisory boards to
               the School’s majors and centers and with attendees at major national and
               regional conferences at which the School exhibits. In a variation on this
               approach, in August 2006, the School invited over 3,000 alumni to the
               Minnesota State Fair for “Cowabunga! Visit Us at the Fair,” an event aimed
               at learning more about how the School can meet their educational and
               training needs.
            – An annual survey of public health professionals (half of whom are alumni)
               who serve as mentors to students as part of the School’s mentor program is
               conducted for feedback and program improvement.
            Review and revision of the School and its programs are ongoing through a
            variety of mechanisms that inform the establishment of competencies.
            Information is gathered through national competency sets and informed by
            expertise within the major area. See Appendix 2.6.c. for a complete list of
            competency statements by major program.
            Select employer and competency-based surveys of alumni also inform the
            revision of curricula based on the changing needs of public health practice:
            – Select programs within the School have conducted employer and
               competency based surveys of alumni. (Please see Chapter 2.7.f. for a
               description.)




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     2.6.f. This criterion is met.

             Strengths
                All M.P.H. and M.H.A. students are required to satisfy competency
                requirements in the five core areas of public health, plus ethics as a sixth core
                requirement.
                Major programs – both professional and academic – identify the competencies
                based on consideration of profession-wide competencies and the emerging
                evidence base.
                Review and revision of required competencies are ongoing. The School uses
                needs assessments, ongoing discussions with alumni, advisory board members
                and other practitioners and surveys of public health professionals to assess
                evolving public health competencies.

             Weaknesses
              A competency-based curricula requires constant alignment of course and
              experiential learning objectives with professional and academic competencies.
              This process is very time consuming and resource intensive.

             Recommendations
               Continue the competency mapping process, taking into consideration the ASPH
               competency project to best prepare the next generation of public health
               professional, academic and scientific leaders.

 2.7 Assessment Procedures
     2.7.a. Procedures used to monitor and evaluate student progress in the expected
            competencies
             Evaluating student progress toward learning objectives is conducted by faculty,
             project and fieldwork advisers, graduate faculties and course instructors.
             Evaluations occur at all stages of the student’s program – from matriculation
             through culminating experience – in both professional and academic degree
             programs. Please see Appendix 2.6.c. for methods of evaluation by major.




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   2.7.b. Outcome measures by which the school will evaluate student achievement

   Table 18: Outcome Measure to Evaluate Student Achievement in Each Program
                                                                                  *Year      **Year    ***Year
                                                                      Target      2003/4     2004/5    2005/6

          Objective 1.a.: Master’s student graduation rate             80%         57%        63%       56%
          (within 3 years) by program (excluding dual degrees)

   * Graduation year of students admitted in *2000/1, **2001/2, ***2002/3
   An 80%graduation rate target is recommended by CEPH for all schools of public health.
   The School did not reach the target for the past three years. Reasons for this in part reflect
   the University of Minnesota commitment to provide educational opportunities for working
   health professionals which often results in a longer time to graduation due to balance of
   work and school. Part-time students (9 credits) make up approximately 24% of the
   students in the School (Template B Criteria 1.6.e).

   2.7.c. Outcome measure related to job placement experience

   Table 19: Outcome Measure Related to Job Placement Experience
                                                                                   Year       Year      Year
                                                                      Target      2003/4     2004/5    2005/6

          Objective 1.b.: Job placement rates of graduates             80%       Data not     79%       85%
          within 12 months of graduation (self report on                         available   (57/72)   (61/72)
          graduate survey).




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      Public Health for a Healthier World                                                                                                                              Chapter 2: Instructional Programs


           2.7.d. Destination of graduates by specialty area for each of the last three years.
                       The table below shows the destination of graduates by specialty area.

Table 20: Destination of Graduates by Department or Specialty Area for Each of the Last 3 Years
Master’s and Doctoral Degrees (excludes certificate completers) (Template D)
                                Government *




                                                                                     Proprietary*




                                                                                                                                                 Employed *




                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Non-Health
                                                                                                          Education*
                                                             Nonprofit *




                                                                                                                                                                                                    University/
                                                                                                                                                                        Healthcare
                                                                                                                                Unknown*




                                                                                                                                                                                                    Research
                                                                                                                                                                                         Practice




                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Related
                                                                                                          Further




                                                                                                                                                                                         Private
                                                                                                                                                               Total
                                                                                                                                                 Not
      2004-2005             #                  %     #                     %     #                  %     #       %     #              %         #       %                #                 #           #            #

   Biostatistics                2              25%       2                 25%       3              38%                     1              13%                  8                                             2

   Environmental Health         6              55%       4                 36%       1              9%                                                         11                    2                        2
   Sciences
   Epidemiology and          18                38%   11                    23%       9              19%       9   19%                                1    2%   48                    6                       10
   Community Health
   Health Policy and            1              20%       1                 20%                                3   60%                                           5                    1
   Management
   Public Health                1              20%       2                 40%       1              20%                                              1   20%    5                    2                        2
   Practice
        Total Students —     28                36%   20                    26%   14                 18%   12      16%       1              1%        2    3%   77
            All Programs

Data Source: Graduate Survey List 8/06.
*The School does not collect all categories in an exclusive fashion. Alumni may indicate more than one category, such as “non-profit sector” and “health care.”
We are only able to provide overall percentages for the categories marked*.



       University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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Table 20: Destination of Graduates by Department or Specialty Area for Each of the Last 3 Years Master’s and Doctoral
Degrees (excludes certificate completers) (Template D) (continued)



                               Government *




                                                                                       Proprietary*




                                                                                                                                             Employed *




                                                                                                                                                                                                             Non-Health
                                                                                                            Education*
                                                            Nonprofit *




                                                                                                                                                                                               University/
                                                                                                                                                                   Healthcare
                                                                                                                                  Unknown*




                                                                                                                                                                                               Research
                                                                                                                                                                                    Practice




                                                                                                                                                                                                             Related
                                                                                                            Further




                                                                                                                                                                                    Private
                                                                                                                                                           Total
                                                                                                                                             Not
      2005-2006            #                  %     #                     %        #                  %     #       %         #          %   #       %               #                 #           #            #

   Biostatistics               0                        3                 43%          3              43%       0                                1   14%    7                   1                        2

   Environmental Health        6              30%       1                     5%       9              45%       3   15%                          1    5%   20                   2                        1
   Sciences
   Epidemiology and         19                36%   18                    34%      10                 19%       4        8%                      2    4%   53               13                          10
   Community Health
   Health Policy and           6              18%   18                    55%          4              12%       2        6%                      3    9%   33               19
   Management
   Public Health               2              33%       3                 50%          0                        1   17%                          0          6                   3
   Practice
        Total Students —    33                28%   43                    36%      26                 22%   10           8%                      7    6%   119
            All Programs


Data Source: Graduate Survey List 8/06.
*The School does not collect all categories in an exclusive fashion. Alumni may indicate more than one category, as “non-profit sector” and “health care.” We
are only able to provide overall percentages for the categories marked*. For 2005/06, “Unknowns” were not included as an un-replicated choice.




       University of Minnesota School of Public Health
       Self-Study, February 2007                                                                                                                                                                                     PAGE 74
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      Public Health for a Healthier World                                                                                                                                 Chapter 2: Instructional Programs

Table 20: Destination of Graduates by Department or Specialty Area for Each of the Last 3 Years Master’s and Doctoral
Degrees (excludes certificate completers) (Template D) (continued)



                               Government *




                                                                                    Proprietary*




                                                                                                                                                    Employed *




                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Non-Health
                                                                                                         Education*
                                                            Nonprofit *




                                                                                                                                                                                                       University/
                                                                                                                                                                           Healthcare
                                                                                                                                   Unknown*




                                                                                                                                                                                                       Research
                                                                                                                                                                                            Practice




                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Related
                                                                                                         Further




                                                                                                                                                                                            Private
                                                                                                                                                                  Total
                                                                                                                                                    Not
      2006-2007
   (as of Feb 2007)        #                  %     #                     %     #                  %     #       %         #              %         #       %                #                 #           #            #

   Biostatistics                                                                                                                                                   0

   Environmental Health                                 2                 67%                                                  1              33%                  3
   Sciences
   Epidemiology and            7              44%       4                 25%       2              13%       1        6%       1                        1    6%   16                    3                        6
   Community Health
   Health Policy and           3              43%       3                 43%                                                                           1   14%    7                    1                        2
   Management
   Public Health               4         100%                                                                                                                      4                                             2
   Practice
        Total Students —    14                47%       9                 30%       2              7%        1        3%       2              7%        2    7%   30
            All Programs


Data Source: Graduate Survey List 8/06.
*The School does not collect all categories in an exclusive fashion. Alumni may indicate more than one category, as “non-profit sector” and “health care.” We
are only able to provide overall percentages for the categories marked*. For 2005/06, “Unknowns” were not included as an un-replicated choice.




       University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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Chapter 2: Instructional Programs                 Public Health for a Healthier World




University of Minnesota School of Public Health
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             The table below summarizes destinations of master’s and doctoral degree
             graduates in 2004-2005 and 2005-2006. Year 2003/2004 data are unavailable in the
             required format due to a change in data systems for the graduate survey.

              Table 21: Master’s and Doctoral Degree Totals —
              Percentage All Programs: 2 years 2004/5 and 2005/6
                       Position Type             Count            Percent

                   Government*                            35              23%

                   Non-profit*                            36              24%

                   Health Care                            33

                   Private practice                        0

                   University/research                    26

                   Proprietary (for profit)*              20              13%

                   Further education*                     23              15%

                   Non-health related

                   Unknown*                                2                1%

                   Not employed (Seeking)*                35              23%

                   Total Respondents                     151              99%

              Data Source: Graduate Survey List 8/06; response rate 26%.
              *The School does not collect all categories in an exclusive fashion. Alumni may indicate more
              than one category, such as “furthering education and currently employed in government;” or
              “non-profit sector” and “health care.” We are only able to provide overall percentages for the
              categories marked*.

     2.7.e. Not applicable

    2.7. f. Data describing results from periodic assessments of alumni and employers of
            graduates’ ability to effectively perform the competencies in a practice setting
             The formation in 2006 of the Research and Education Advisors Partnership
             (REAP), which includes a number of employers from health systems, community
             and industry partners and government departments, provides a venue for assessing
             the ability of the School's graduates to perform public health competencies in a
             practice setting. Surveys of members of REAP – some of which are major
             employers of the School's graduates – are planned.




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          Various programs within the School canvas employers formally and informally to
          assess graduate readiness. As an example, several tracks within the Environmental
          Health Sciences have conducted extensive surveys of employers and alumni over
          the past 10 years. Alumni who graduated from 1992 - 2001 from the occupational
          health specialties were surveyed concerning specialty-specific core competencies
          and their responses have been used by each specialty to modify the respective
          curriculum. Examples of surveys include:
             “The Impact of Educational Research Centers on Occupational Health and
             Safety Alumni Competence,” designed to identify educational services relevant
             to alumni competence in the occupational health curricula within the
             Environmental Health Sciences major;
             “Crosscutting Competencies for Occupational Health and Safety Professionals,”
             designed to assess the fit between the competencies acquired during graduate
             training and subsequent professional practice of alumni after graduation; and
             “Employers’ Value of Competencies in Hiring Decisions Regarding Master
             Degree-Prepared Occupational Health Nurses.”

   2.7.g. This criterion is met.

          Strengths
             Evaluation of student mastery of learning objectives occurs at all stages
             throughout professional and academic degree programs. Evaluation is led by
             faculty, project and fieldwork advisers and course instructors. As competency
             can only be evaluated in action, the accomplishment of learning objectives in
             coursework is used as an indicator of mastery that can be demonstrated in
             fieldwork and culminating projects.
             Adult students who represent an increasing percentage of the student body and
             whose work schedules require part-time, flexible academic offerings are
             increasingly accommodated by the School as they seek to acquire or maintain
             key competencies. This is viewed as a strength of the School even though adult
             learner enrollment contributes to a less than 80 percent graduation rate within
             three years for some Major options.
             A new alumni network and board will enable alumni to provide feedback on
             graduates’ ability to perform effectively in a practice setting.

          Weaknesses
           Assessment of graduate competency in a practice setting is conducted
           informally and episodically.
           The School is below the 80 percent target graduation rate within 3 years of
           starting the Master’s program, in part due to large numbers of part-time and
           working professionals seeking degrees. Access by non-traditional students is
           viewed as a strength by the School even though it affects graduation rates as
           calculated by CEPH.



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             Recommendations
               Enhance follow-up strategies to increase response rate on graduation survey.
               Implement more formal, structured mechanisms to obtain feedback on graduate
               competency on a regular basis.
               Analyze graduation rate data by selected groups (e.g. dual degree, part-time) to
               better reflect School priorities and culture.

 2.8 Other Professional Degrees
     The School offers no other professional degrees.

 2.9 Academic Degrees
     2.9.a. All academic degree programs, by degree and area of specialization
             Please see Table 14: Instructional Matrix (Template C) in section 2.1.a.

     2.9.b. How the School assures that students in research curricula acquire a public
            health orientation
             In addition to competency statements for all majors, including academic and
             professional degrees in Appendix 2.6.c, the following sections describe
             specifically how each of the School’s Divisions assures a public health orientation
             for students in research curricula.
             Biostatistics
             M.S. students in Biostatistics are required to take one health science elective (at
             least 3 credits). The recommended courses are Epidemiologic Methods I (PubH
             6341, 3 credits) or Fundamentals of Epidemiology (PubH 6320, 3 credits).
             M.S. students gain an overview of public health in nearly all biostatistics methods
             courses, in which data analysis techniques are applied to real life public health
             research questions (as well as questions related to clinical research). In particular,
             the two required courses – clinical trials and survival data analysis – are unique to
             public health and medicine. These two courses are required of both M.S. and Ph.D.
             students in biostatistics.
             Environmental Health Sciences
             M.S. and Ph.D. students in Environmental Health Science are required to take one
             of two epidemiology courses: Fundamentals of Epidemiologic Methods I (PubH
             6341 – 3 credits) or Fundamentals of Epidemiology (PubH 6320, 3 credits).
             A broad foundation in public health is integrated throughout the required
             environmental health coursework. This includes public health case studies which
             are incorporated in exposures, health effects and policy course requirements.
             Epidemiology
             Master’s and doctoral students in Epidemiology are required to take (or to have
             through previous coursework) four methods courses (effective Fall 2006):


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          Epidemiologic Methods I, II, III and IV. Students must take at least one course that
          explores epidemiology in a specific content area (e.g., infectious diseases at a
          population level).
          Ph.D. students also receive a broad introduction to public health through the
          Seminar in Chronic Disease and Behavioral Epidemiology (PubH 8377; 1 credit).
          This seminar attracts guest speakers from every area of public health (advocacy,
          assessment and assurance). Doctoral students generally come from M.P.H.
          programs, where they have acquired solid grounding in public health.
          Health Policy and Management
          M.S. and Ph.D. students in this program are required to take Integration of Public
          Health Research Methods in Health Services Research (PubH 8836 -2 credits).
          This course integrates the methods of epidemiology and health services research.
          An overview of public health is obtained through a year-long sequence of
          biostatistics courses required for both M.S. and Ph.D. students. These courses
          apply biostatistical reason to a broad range of public health problems and
          approaches.
          In addition, M.S. students are required to take two relevant courses: The Health
          Care System and Public Health (PubH 6724, 3 credits) and Principles of Public
          Health Research (PubH 6806, 2 credits). Doctoral students who lack a foundation
          in the principles of public health research are directed to these courses by their
          advisers. M.S. students in the health outcomes research focus also take two courses
          in epidemiology.

   2.9.c. Identification of the culminating experience required for each degree
          program.
          For students in Ph.D. and M.S. degree programs, the School conforms with all
          Graduate School requirements for degree completion. The requirements
          summarized below are used in conjunction with the most current Graduate School
          Catalog and University Class Schedule to define what students must do to
          complete these degrees.
   Doctoral degree completion requirements
   Preliminary Written and Oral Examinations
        Preliminary Written Examination – All doctoral students are required to pass a
        written examination in the major field. This examination covers all work required and
        completed in the major field and may include any work fundamental to this field. The
        results of the examination are reported on the preliminary written examination report
        form, signed by the student’s adviser and the director of graduate studies in the major
        field.
        Preliminary Oral Examination – Doctoral students also take a preliminary oral
        examination after completing a substantial part of the coursework and passing the
        preliminary written examination, but before writing the dissertation.




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     Ph.D. Thesis
      The thesis must demonstrate the student’s originality and ability for independent
      investigation, and the results of the research must constitute a contribution to
      knowledge. The thesis must exhibit the student’s mastery of the literature of the subject
      and familiarity with the sources. The subject matter must be presented with a
      satisfactory degree of literary skill.
     Final Oral Examination
       All doctoral students are required to successfully defend their theses in a final oral
       examination and graduate within five calendar years after passing the preliminary oral
       examination. To be eligible for the final oral examination, a student must have:
       completed all work on the official doctoral degree program form; passed both the
       written and oral preliminary examinations; have an approved thesis proposal on file with
       the Graduate School; have maintained active status; and have satisfied the thesis credit
       requirement. In addition, the thesis must have been certified by the readers as ready for
       defense.
       Complete requirements for completing the doctoral degree may be reviewed at
       http://www.grad.umn.edu/current_students/degree_completion/doctoral/index.html.

     Master’s Degree Completion Requirements
      Master’s degrees may be completed in one of two ways: Plan A with thesis or Plan B
      with project(s).
     Plan A: Master’s Degree With Thesis
     Master’s Thesis
      Students must demonstrate familiarity with the tools of research or scholarship in their
      major field, the ability to work independently and the ability to present the results of
      their investigation effectively, by completing a master’s thesis.
       The thesis is read by the entire examining committee, which is appointed by the Dean of
       the Graduate School, on recommendation of the faculty in the major field at the time the
       student’s official degree program is approved. The examining committee consists of at
       least three members: two representatives from the major field and one from the minor or
       a related field. Committee members cannot represent more than one field
       simultaneously.
     Final Examinations
      Plan A master’s degree candidates must pass a final oral examination. A final written
      examination may also be required at the discretion of the graduate faculty in the major
      field. If both a written and an oral examination are specified, the written examination
      must precede the oral examination. The final examinations cover the major field and the
      minor or related fields and may include any work fundamental to these fields. The final
      oral for the master’s degree is conducted as a closed examination, attended by only the
      student and the examining committee.




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   Plan B: Master’s Degree Without Thesis
   Plan B Project(s)
     Students must demonstrate familiarity with the tools of research or scholarship in their
     major field, the ability to work independently and the ability to present the results of
     their investigation effectively, by completing at least one Plan B project.
     The Plan B project(s) should involve a combined total of approximately 120 hours (the
     equivalent of three full-time weeks) of work. The graduate faculty in each major field
     specifies both the nature and extent of the options available to satisfy this requirement,
     and whether the requirement is to be satisfied in conjunction with, or independent of, the
     courses in the student’s program.
   Final Examinations
    The Graduate School requires a final examination for Plan B candidates. At the
    discretion of the graduate faculty in the major field, it may be written, oral, or both. The
    final examinations cover the major field and the minor or related fields and may include
    any work fundamental to these fields. If a final oral examination is held, it is conducted
    as a closed examination, attended by only the student and the examining committee. All
    committee members must be present at the oral examination; the absence of any
    member results in an invalid examination.
     Complete requirements for completing the master’s degree may be reviewed at
     http://www.grad.umn.edu/current_students/degree_completion/masters/index.html

   2.9.d. This criterion is met.

           Strengths
              Students in all academic degree programs must demonstrate public health
              competencies identified for their majors.
              Each Division assures a public health orientation among students in research
              curricula by requiring completion of specified public health coursework.
              M.S. and Ph.D. students are required to meet Graduate School requirements for
              degree completion and culminating experience.

           Weaknesses: None

2.10 Doctoral Degrees
  2.10.a. Doctoral degree programs
           Please see Table 14: Instructional Matrix (Template C) in section 2.1.a. and the
           chart in 2.10.b.




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   2.10.b. Number of active students in each doctoral degree program

      Table 22: Number of Active Students in Each Doctoral Degree Program
                                      2002–       2003–        2004–       2005–       2006–
                                       2003        2004         2005        2006       2007*

       Biostatistics
          PhD applications                34          29           33          36          42
          PhD admissions                      9           4            5       11              9
          PhD new enrollment                  7           4            5           6           8
          PhD active students             15          14           16          16          15
          PhD graduates                       0           3            3           4           7

       Epidemiology
          PhD applications                34          38           27          36          48
          PhD admissions                  14              7            9       14          20
          PhD new enrollment              11              7            7       10          13
          PhD active students             36          37           41          40          44
          PhD graduates                       6           3            8           9           3

       Environmental Health Sciences
          PhD applications                22          19           22          14          22
          PhD admissions                  10          12           14              6       10
          PhD new enrollment                  8           9            5           4           6
          PhD active students             23          34           34          31          32
          PhD graduates                       2           3            7           3           1

       Health Services Research, Policy and Administration
          PhD applications                33          39           26          37          35
          PhD admissions                  15          14           14          17          13
          PhD new enrollment                  5           9            6           9           8
          PhD active students             45          49           51          53          52
          PhD graduates                       5           1            7           5           0

      * Through December 2007




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  2.10.c. This criterion is met.

          Strengths
             The School offers dynamic Ph.D. programs in biostatistics, environmental
             health, epidemiology and health services research, policy and administration.

          Weaknesses: None

2.11 Joint Degrees
  2.11.a. Joint degree programs and their requirements
          The School participates in several dual degree programs. The University makes a
          distinction between joint degrees, which involve a single admissions process and a
          single educational contract, and dual degrees, which necessitate admission to both
          participating schools and fulfillment of the requirements of both. Under the dual
          degree program, credit-hour savings are achieved through negotiating with both
          faculties to accept select courses and experiences in one degree as fulfillment of
          requirements for the other (i.e., double counting of credits). The School requires
          that its dual degree students satisfy the full set of requirements for a separate
          public health degree. Thus, time to graduation is generally longer than single
          degree options, yet shorter than would be expected if taken as separate degrees
          (e.g., D.V.M – 4 years/M.P. H. – 3 years; D.V.M./M.P.H. – 6 years).
          The table below shows all dual degree programs as of Fall 2006. The requirements
          for each are shown on curriculum sheets provided in Appendix 2.11.a.




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             Table 23: Dual Degree Programs
                                     Major Program                         Dual Degrees

                 Biostatistics                                           NA

                 Clinical Research                                       NA

                 Community Health Education                              MPH/MSW
                                                                         MPH/MS Nursing
                                                                         MPH/MA
                                                                         MPH/JD

                 Environmental Health                                    MPH/MS Nursing
                                                                         MS/JD; PhD/JD;
                                                                         MPH/JD
                                                                         MPH/MA

                 Epidemiology                                            MPH/MS Nursing
                                                                         PhD/MD
                                                                         MPH/JD
                                                                         MPH/MA
                                                                         MPH/MD

                 Healthcare Administration                               MHA/MBA

                 Health Services Research, Policy & Administration       PhD/MD
                                                                         MS/MPP
                                                                         MS/JD; PhD/JD

                 Maternal & Child Health                                 MPH/MSW
                                                                         MPH/MS Nursing
                                                                         MPH/JD
                                                                         MPH/MA

                 Public Health Administration                            MPH/MBA
                                                                         MPH/MS Nursing
                                                                         MPH/MA
                                                                         MPH/JD

                 Public Health Practice                                  MPH/MD
                                                                         MPH/DVM
                                                                         MPH/MA

                 Public Health Nutrition                                 MPH/MA




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  2.11.b. This criterion is met.

          Strengths
             Through a growing list of dual degree programs, the School is effectively
             integrating valuable public health principles and knowledge into the education
             and training of professionals across allied disciplines.
             The School requires dual degree students to satisfy the full set of requirements
             for a separate public health degree.

          Weaknesses
           Time to graduation is generally longer.

2.12 Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs
  2.12.a. Degree programs in a format other than regular, on-site course sessions
          The School’s distance and executive degree programs are listed in section 2.12.b.
          below. Also see Table 14: Instructional Matrix (Template C) in section 2.1.a.

  2.12.b. Description of the distance education or executive degree programs
          With changing demographics and increasing work demands on the population,
          distance-learning degree programs offered by the School provide an important
          option, especially to working adults who wish to obtain an advanced degree. In
          addition, the School serves the public health education needs of a wide geographic
          region including all of Minnesota and the surrounding states of North Dakota,
          South Dakota and Wisconsin that do not have schools of public health. Distance-
          learning enables the School to provide high-quality coursework to public health
          practitioners in remote areas, even to the corners of the globe where educational
          opportunities are, at best, limited.
          Model or methods: The School’s distance education programs are Internet-based
          in combination with summer intensive courses. Teaching methodologies are well
          grounded and course demands are equal to those of in-classroom courses.
          All of the School’s distance-based degree programs have a summer intensive
          component (through the Public Health Institute: http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu/institute) varying
          in credits required. The Institute offers an intensive on-campus experience that,
          over its five-year history, has matured to become a true forum for public health
          response to emerging public health issues. Sessions devoted to culturally
          responsive public health practice immersion and the latest research on avian
          influenza exemplify the Institute’s unique role as a forum for public health
          response.
          Administrative support for distance-learning degree programs is equal to that of
          other programs. Three staff (2.8 FTE) members serve as coordinators of the
          programs under the Public Health Practice major and a major coordinator has
          responsibilities for each of the M.C.H. and M.H.A. distance options. These staff


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             members participate in School governance and program oversight at a level equal
             to that of coordinators of the School’s other programs.
             Distance-learning programs are monitored for academic rigor using the same
             standards as the School’s other programs. In their earliest phase, the distance-
             learning programs were subjected to extensive monitoring and comparisons to
             ensure their equivalence with classroom-based programs. In addition, all new
             programs must go to the University Regents for approval, and those programs with
             more than 50 percent online coursework must go to the Higher Education Council
             for review prior to start.
             For both distance and on-campus formats:
                 Courses and faculty are evaluated under the same guidelines;
                 Students complete evaluations of programs and individual courses;
                 Faculty are reviewed annually;
                 Students are evaluated using the same measures;
                 Programs are evaluated using the same criteria.

 Programs at the School coded as distance programs include:
       The Executive Program in Public Health Practice (EPHP) is a flexible curriculum
       that students may tailor to their careers and practice. The program is aimed at
       professionals with significant work experience in health or human services, and who
       also hold an advanced degree, such as an M.S., M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., Pharm.D. or
       Ph.D. Courses are available on campus or through a combination of courses online and
       by attending class at an annual Public Health Institute.
       (http://www.sph.umn.edu/education/exec/home.html)

       The Veterinary Public Health (VPH) program allows students to combine their
       veterinary studies with a public health degree, giving them the credentials to address key
       issues related to food safety, emerging infectious diseases and public health. Courses are
       available on campus or through a combination of courses online and by attending class
       at an annual Public Health Institute.
       (http://www.sph.umn.edu/education/vph/home.html)

       The M.H.A-Rochester Part-Time Option for Working Professionals is a distance
       extension of the existing part-time M.H.A. Program, developed in 1999 for Twin Cities-
       area health professionals. The M.H.A.-Rochester option was approved by the Board of
       Regents in July 2006, with development funded by the state’s Rochester Higher
       Education Development Committee, to serve health professionals working in
       southeastern Minnesota, including the large number of Mayo Clinic professionals. The
       M.H.A.-Rochester program combines face-to-face classes taught by School faculty who
       travel to Rochester (approximately 45 percent of the curriculum) with online and Public
       Health Institute courses (http://www.hsr.umn.edu/mha/mha_programs.htm).
       The online M.P.H. degree in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) provides an
       opportunity for mid-career professionals with advanced degrees who have five or more
       years of MCH work experience or individuals without an advanced degree who have


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     eight to 10 years of work experience in MCH to earn an M.P.H. through a combination
     of online courses and class attendance at an annual Public Health Institute. The program
     is designed especially for working professionals whose goal is to advance to leadership
     roles within MCH or related fields. The program focuses on the principles that drive the
     field related to social justice and concern for vulnerable populations. Graduates develop
     expertise in the development of evidence-based advocacy, rigorous public health
     assessment, accessible and appropriate health education and effective and innovative
     programs that promote health and well-being. Please see
     http://www.sph.umn.edu/education/mch/curriculum/online.html
     for more information.

  2.12.c. This criterion is met.

           Strengths
              The School has established high-quality distance education programs to meet
              the needs of students in remote areas and/or who wish to pursue a degree
              program or coursework while continuing to work.
              Distance learning programs must be approved by the University Regents. Those
              that require more than 50 percent online coursework must go to the Higher
              Education Council prior to start.
              Distance and on-campus formats are evaluated using equivalent measures.

           Weaknesses: None




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                            CHAPTER THREE




Creation, Application and
Advancement of Knowledge
Chapter 3: Creation, Application and                              Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Advancement of Knowledge                                          Public Health for a Healthier World



3.0 Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge
   3.1 Research
   3.2 Service
   3.3 Workforce Development

Introduction
The School is a recognized leader in public health research. It ranks second out of seven
public research university schools of public health in total grants and contracts, NIH and other
federal funding and in the generation of indirect cost recovery funds. It has accomplished this
with a faculty smaller than all but one of its six closest competitive institutions. The School’s
faculty-per-capita grant and contract funding is the highest among all public research
university schools and has been so for about a decade. In 2005-2006, faculty averaged more
than $500,000 each in grants and contract funding, contributing to a School total of $66
million in external sponsored project funding.
The impact of the School’s research is manifest in its education, service and outreach
activities. The faculty publishes regularly in the peer-reviewed scientific literature in highly
rated journals and their work is cited often in the scientific literature. In addition, many
faculty participate on editorial review boards and study committees.
In addition to service to the profession, the School acts to benefit the practice community –
and populations facing public health challenges. The establishment of a number of Centers
within the School has provided pathways to community partnership and service. Among
these, the Centers for Public Health Education and Outreach, the Center for Infectious Disease
Research and Policy and the Minnesota Obesity Prevention Research Center particularly stand
out. Through these and other outreach efforts, the School educates the public and
policymakers, provides an open forum for the exchange of ideas with the community and
health professions and builds the capacity of the public health workforce through continuing
education, training and preparedness. In 2005-2006, the School served more than 30,000
professionals through seminars, short-courses and on-line learning aimed at enhancing their
understanding of public health principles and approaches. In these activities, the School leads
in partnership with the Minnesota Department of Health, local and federal health agencies and
non-government organizations.




University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Self-Study, February 2007
Transforming Discovery to Impact:                      Chapter 3: Creation, Application and
Public Health for a Healthier World                          Advancement of Knowledge

3.1 Research
    3.1.a Research Overview
            The University of Minnesota School of Public Health ranks as a premier public
            health research institution in the United States based on a number of key criteria:
               Research grants and contracts received. Among schools of public health across
               the country and among the schools that make up the University of Minnesota,
               the School is a leader in research grants and contracts received. Over the past
               three years, the School has held an esteemed position among an elite group of
               four schools of public health garnering more than $40 million in National
               Institutes of Health (NIH) funding annually. Across 21 schools within the
               University of Minnesota – one of the nation’s top seven public research
               universities – the School ranks third in total sponsored funding. On this basis,
               the School ranked as the most productive grant-receiving unit within the
               University.
               The breadth of research conducted. Faculty, staff and students are engaged in
               research that complements the School’s educational programs and advances the
               knowledge and expertise needed to address pressing public health needs.
               Faculty research interests are diverse and far-ranging, spanning topics from the
               basic molecular mechanisms of disease to the effectiveness of health care
               delivery systems and the impact of policy on public health. The School has
               earned distinction for research in many areas, including: adolescent health
               behavior; nutritional epidemiology and obesity prevention; health services
               research; chronic and infectious disease epidemiology, including the genetics of
               cardiovascular diseases; health disparities among minority and ethnic
               populations; smoking and alcohol prevention and cessation; the structure and
               financing of health care systems; the conduct and analysis of clinical trials;
               treatment of HIV/AIDS; occupational health and safety; women’s health policy,
               risk assessment and biomarkers; and the use of health databases for research
               and public health planning.
               The breadth of the School’s research is further extended through a vigorous
               commitment to interdisciplinary collaboration. The School has embraced
               University-wide strategic planning initiatives, which call for, among other
               things, an overall emphasis on collaboration. It participates extensively in
               collaborative efforts within the School itself, within the University’s Academic
               Health Center (AHC) and across the University, from the School of
               Architecture to the College of Veterinary Medicine.
               Among the School’s most visible collaborative efforts is active participation in
               more than half of 15 interdisciplinary centers housed in the AHC. This includes
               work with the Obesity Prevention Center, which is a partner in the National
               Cancer Institute’s $54 million initiative to understand the relationship between
               obesity and cancer, and with the Center for Infectious Disease Research and
               Policy, which connects scientific research to real-world action through


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            communications and public policy recommendations around such issues as
            pandemic influenza and bioterrorism.
            The School itself is host to 21 interdisciplinary centers recognized nationally
            and internationally for their high-caliber research, outreach and training. These
            centers facilitate a high degree of creativity as well as collaboration among
            faculty and students within the School and beyond. For a complete listing of the
            centers hosted by the School, please visit http://www.sph.umn.edu/about/centers/home.html
            A high-caliber research faculty. Many members of the faculty are leaders in
            their disciplines, recognized for the quality of their research, their publication in
            peer-reviewed journals, the number of citations referencing their research and
            requests for podium and panel presentations. School faculty are recognized by
            colleagues as productive researchers with a high success rate in receiving extra-
            mural support. They are often sought by other units as collaborative partners
            based on their quantitative expertise and range of interests. Appendix 3.2.b lists
            faculty involvement on editorial boards, in study sections and in other activities
            that support public health as a discipline and as a practice and documents the
            caliber of the School’s faculty.
          Certainly, the School’s stature in public health research can also be attributed to its
          institutional home. As noted earlier, the University has consistently ranked as one
          of the top seven public research universities in the nation. While impressive, the
          University has set a more ambitious goal: to become one of the nation’s top three
          public research universities.
          In addition, the University is one of only a handful of campuses in the nation with
          the full complement of the six health science disciplines: public health, medicine,
          nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine and pharmacy. Ready access to the depth
          and breadth of health sciences scholarship available on the campus creates rich
          opportunities for the multi-disciplinary collaboration that complex public health
          issues require. Opportunities to collaborate with other campus schools are
          encouraged through concerted University efforts. Among them are:
            Interdisciplinary initiatives sponsored by the Office of the President;
            The University’s Research Infrastructure Task Force, which has included cancer
            and infectious disease research – both strong areas of expertise for the School –
            among the President’s five proposed priority areas of emphasis; and
            The Task Force on Collaborative Research, which has identified
            recommendations for greater collaboration across University schools and
            departments. These recommendations would allow the School to build upon its
            strong tradition of collaboration in research.
          Financial support is also made available to encourage a multi-disciplinary
          approach to research. The University – and the Academic Health Center – offer
          one- or two-year seed grants to foster collaboration. Ultimately, it is intended that
          such collaboration may lead to the development of new academic and research
          centers of excellence that draw upon the faculty’s diverse skills and experience.




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            Research Policies and Procedures
            All faculty members are required to participate directly in research/scholarly
            activities that relate to the generation or interpretation of knowledge that will
            enhance the well being of the public. The School’s Academic Appointment,
            Promotion and Tenure document (http://www.sph.umn.edu/about/policies/apt/home.html)
            describes the expectations for research/scholarly activity at various faculty ranks.
            The University – and the School – are committed to research of the highest
            integrity, conducted according to the highest ethical standards. The philosophy
            underlying the University’s system is expressed in the words of President
            Bruininks:
            “The mission of the University of Minnesota is deeply connected to the conduct of
            research. It is of critical importance to the reputation and future of this institution
            that we remain committed to the highest standards of research integrity in all work
            conducted in our institution.”
            The University has developed and maintains a sophisticated grants and project
            management oversight system that applies to all of its units, including the School.
            The system clearly identifies the roles and responsibilities of various members of
            the University for elements of the grants application and management process and
            protection of human subjects. It establishes lines of authority within the University
            related to all transactions on sponsored projects. A fundamental aspect of the
            University’s oversight approach is the decentralization of many responsibilities to
            the principal investigator level, with oversight and monitoring provided by
            department heads and deans.
            University Infrastructure for Oversight. The Office of the Vice President for
            Research (OVPR), the umbrella office responsible of overseeing research at the
            University’s five campuses, is home to seven administrative programs or units that
            focus on various aspects of the research process. (Please visit
            http://www.research.umn.edu/about.html to learn more about OVPR.) Reporting to the
            OVPR are two organizations charged with research management and oversight:
               The Sponsored Projects Administration (SPA) has the authority to deal directly
               with both federal and non-federal funding agencies relating to any aspect of
               externally funded activity at the University. The SPA signs all applications for
               funding and also accepts all awards on behalf of the University. It also houses
               the Electronic Grants Management System (EGMS), a centralized grant
               preparation and tracking system. (Use of the EGMS has helped School faculty
               prepare for transition to the new federally required electronic grants
               management system set to be implemented in early 2007);
               The Office of Oversight, Analysis and Reporting monitors and analyzes grant
               transactional activity to identify unusual activities and report problems to deans
               and department heads in order to implement resolutions. A fuller description of
               grants management at the University may be obtained at: http://www.oar.umn.edu/
            In addition, other University-level offices and programs take an active role in
            ensuring the conduct of quality research.


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             The Council of Research Associate Deans (CRAD), made up of Associate
             Deans for Research for all units in the University. CRAD reviews and provides
             guidance on research-related policies and initiatives and serves as a forum for
             the University’s research colleges to exchange information. The School’s
             Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research will chair the
             Council in 2006-2007.
             Fostering Integrity in Research, Scholarship and Teaching (FIRST), which
             provides a comprehensive curriculum to help faculty meet the challenge of
             responsible conduct of research and scholarship.
             Regulatory Affairs, which facilitates ethical and responsible research through
             education, monitoring and resources.
             Research Subjects’ Protection Programs, which reviews and monitors use of
             human and animal subjects in research, ensuring oversight of risk, consent and
             justified use issues. This office is also known as the Institutional Review Board
             (IRB). All grants and contracts that include research with human subjects must
             be reviewed and approved by this office.
             Technology Commercialization and Business Development, which seeks
             proprietary protection for University technology and negotiates its transfer to
             the private sector through licensing or by participating in starting new
             companies.
          University Policies. A number of University policies, set by the Board of Regents,
          the University Senate and other administrative bodies, govern research conducted
          across the University and at the School. Relevant policies are listed at
          http://www.research.umn.edu/regulations/policies/.

          School Oversight and Policies. The School ensures that all faculty, staff and
          students undergo the rigorous training offered at the University level related to the
          proper conduct of research. This includes training in the Responsible Conduct of
          Research (RCR) as well as in research policy, procedures and human subject
          protection offered by the University’s FIRST program (http://www.research.umn.edu/first/).
          In addition, the School ensures that all faculty, staff and students meet the strict
          training requirements of federal funding agencies with respect to the safe,
          responsible and ethical conduct of research. Principal investigators also are
          required to receive special training related to research management and oversight.
          To further safeguard the integrity of research, all grant proposals that involve a
          School faculty member must be reviewed and approved prior to their submission
          at each of three levels: the Division Head, the School’s Senior Associate Dean for
          Academic Affairs and Research and SPA, the University-wide office authorized to
          submit all research proposals and receive awards from external sources on behalf
          of the Board of Regents.
          Within the School, faculty members, Division Heads and the Senior Associate
          Dean for Academic Affairs and Research are responsible for:
             The School’s compliance with all federal rules and regulations;
             Accurately calculating facilities and administrative cost recovery; and


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               Ensuring that any cost-sharing or special resource needs conform to School
               policies.
            When a grant or contract is awarded, the principal investigator is responsible for
            carrying out the work as proposed, monitoring the progress of the research,
            submitting interim and final reports as required and completing the work within
            budget. Annual faculty evaluations by Division Heads include a review of
            responsible grants management and satisfactory conduct of research.
            For faculty who need to spend time at other institutions to further their research or
            scholarly activity, the School participates in the University program for sabbatical
            leaves consisting of 50 percent salary support for two semesters and 100 percent
            salary support for one semester. Faculty may apply for a sabbatical every six years
            and for semester leave every four years. Leave is awarded by the University on a
            competitive basis.

            Research Practices
            The School’s research practices embrace the key characteristics of practice-based
            research (ASPH Special Publication/January-February 2006). These practices aim
            to focus rigorous scientific research on real-world problems and the development
            of practical applications and interventions linked to the core principles and
            essential services of public health. Also central to the School’s practice-based
            research principles is a commitment to partnership – with practitioners, members
            of communities and their leaders, policymakers and other academic researchers
            across disciplines and geographies. The School views rigorous scholarship as
            essential to the development of successful public health interventions – and
            effective partnerships as vital to the successful application of effective
            interventions.
            The School has been and continues to be involved in significant practice-based
            research. For example, in 2002, the School began a community-based,
            participatory research project aimed at addressing health disparities in
            communities in the Twin Cities. With funding from an Allina Foundation grant
            entitled “Building Community-University Partnerships to Address Health
            Disparities in Minnesota,” School researchers partnered with the Minnesota
            Department of Health and leaders from organizations representing an array of
            communities, including Latino, African, African American, Asian American and
            American Indian to create and develop the Participatory Research Partnership
            (PRP). Two consecutive subcontracts were awarded to community-based
            organizations (the Urban Coalition and the Powderhorn/Phillips Cultural Wellness
            Center) to facilitate PRP activities. The PRP has successfully competed for grants
            from:
               The Minnesota Department of Health Division of Health Services to explore
               barriers to care among Minnesota Care program enrollees (end date 12/04);
               Medica Foundation to disseminate the results of the DHS study to grassroots
               community members (end date 2/07); and




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            A small grant from the University’s Office of Public Engagement to work with
            community members to create a course on Cultural Research (end date 9/06).
          Members of the PRP have published, presented and taught together. Although
          support from the Allina grant ended in February 2005, the PRP continues to meet
          monthly to pursue collaborations in health disparities.

   3.1.b. Community-based research activities
          The School’s deep commitment to practice-based research has inspired significant
          growth in its community-based research activities – and the development of an
          impressive body of knowledge that addresses a broad range of practical public
          health issues. Appendix 3.1.c. Template E lists all current research activities and
          indicates those that are community based. The following section provides an
          overview of several key areas of community-based inquiry led by School faculty:
          Eliminating health disparities in Minnesota and beyond
          Minnesota has long been rated one of the nation’s healthiest states. But many
          communities in the state experience much worse health than Minnesotans in
          general. In fact, some of these health disparities rank among the worst in the
          nation. School researchers have partnered with community leaders and citizens in
          the Latino, African-American, Somali, Hmong and American Indian communities
          to learn more about the factors behind these disparities – and interventions that
          may successfully address them. Among the many community-based research
          efforts conducted by the School to help close the health disparity gap are the
          following:
            Barriers to preventive care. School researchers teamed with leaders of the
            Latino, Somali, Hmong and Native American communities to conduct surveys
            and focus groups in order to identify barriers to preventive care faced by
            members of their communities. Together, the collaborators created a list of
            barriers – and developed recommendations for overcoming them in order to
            increase the use of preventive care services, considered an important factor in
            reducing health disparities.
            Native American teen pregnancy. To identify the factors behind the high
            pregnancy rates of Native American teen girls, School researchers worked with
            the Native American community to design, implement and analyze the Native
            Teen Voice Study. The study aimed to learn more about the attitudes of
            adolescent Native Americans on pregnancy prevention and birth control. Data
            revealed that Native American youth trust their elders, parents, schools and
            Indian youth service agencies to provide accurate information on
            contraceptives, pregnancy prevention and education relating to sexual
            behavior – and that they are eager to talk with parents and elders about these
            topics.
            Health insurance disparities. For nearly a decade, School researchers have
            teamed with the State Health Access Data Assistance Center to examine racial
            and ethnic health care coverage and access to care. Among their findings:
            Immigrants covered by state health insurance programs reported the highest


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               barriers to care. Among the barriers were difficulty in getting translators,
               mistrust of health care providers and discrimination from providers based on
               income, type of insurance, race and ethnicity. In a separate project that studied
               health care access among Latino communities in the rural Midwest, School
               researchers found significant barriers (no insurance, limited income and
               language) despite free or low-cost care provided through community clinics and
               connections to the health care system through schools, government agencies
               and religious organizations.
            Preventing childhood obesity
            A second major focus of community-based research has taken aim at
            understanding more about preventing childhood obesity. Among the projects are:
               Seeking to prevent childhood obesity and diabetes among American Indian
               children. With diabetes occurring at epidemic proportions within the American
               Indian population, School faculty teamed with colleagues at the Pine Ridge
               Indian Reservation in South Dakota on a childhood obesity prevention project,
               called Bright Start. The partnership, endorsed by the Pine Ridge Tribal Council
               and funded by the National Institutes of Health, aims to promote physical
               activity and healthy eating at home and school.
               Interventions to help young girls avoid obesity. After a six-year School study
               that engaged local high school physical education teachers and students in
               developing interventions to help young girls prevent obesity, several Twin
               Cities high schools made the study’s centerpiece a permanent part of the
               curriculum. “New Moves” is a girls-only physical education class designed to
               help girls increase physical activity, improve eating habits and bolster self
               image. During the study, girls were asked what they would include in such a
               program. They listed “fun,” “interactive activities,” a “supportive environment”
               and “sessions for talking and listening.” “New Moves” incorporates the girls’
               wishes, offering four days per week of physical activity and one day focused on
               nutrition, body image and self-esteem.
               Effort to increase consumption of low-fat foods among high school students. A
               School researcher conducted a study in partnership with 20 Twin Cities high
               schools aimed at encouraging schools to offer more low-fat food options in
               their cafeterias.
               Programs for 7th and 8th grade girls to become more physically active.
               Currently, a School researcher is working with 36 schools and communities to
               create opportunities for increased exercise.
            Global public health
            School researchers ascribe to the philosophy that public health challenges must be
            met by both developed and developing countries – and that they share the
            responsibility of finding solutions to these challenges. For that reason, a significant
            number of faculty research projects engage faculty and practitioners from host
            communities in research aimed at meeting public health needs of developing
            nations. The projects below are representative:


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                 Reduce tobacco and alcohol use in India: The director of the School’s widely
                 recognized community-and school-based intervention programs to combat
                 youth tobacco and alcohol use has taken her tested theories to India, where wide
                 availability of these products and relentless marketing have made their use an
                 emerging public health crisis.
                 HIV screening and treatment protocols in South Africa: A faculty member is
                 working with investigators in Pretoria, at the National Institutes of Health and
                 the U.S. Department of Defense to organize a statistical and data management
                 center to coordinate large HIV treatment trials in South Africa.
                 Tobacco cessation: A School faculty member is the principal investigator on a
                 project to promote tobacco cessation in India and Indonesia, both hard hit by the
                 damaging health effects of tobacco use.
                 Air pollution and health implications in the Philippines: A faculty researcher is
                 investigating the health impact on public utility drivers of exposures to vehicle-
                 related air pollution.
                 Indoor air pollution and its health and economic consequences in India: School
                 researchers are assessing the health and economic impact of exposure to indoor
                 air pollution from burning fuels, such as wood or kerosene, in poorly ventilated
                 homes.
                 Gastric bypass surgery: A School faculty member is participating in the design
                 and planning of a clinical trial in India of gastric bypass surgery to reduce
                 cardiovascular risks of obese people who have Type 2 diabetes.

   3.1.c. Current research activity of all primary and secondary faculty
              Please see Appendix 3.1.c. Template E: Research Activity of Primary and
              Secondary Faculty for Each of the Last 3 Years.

   3.1.d. Measures by which the School may evaluate the success of its research
          activities.

   Table 24: Outcome Measure by which the School May Evaluate Success of
   Research Activities
                                                                                Year       Year       Year
                                                                   Target      2003/4     2004/5     2005/6

          Objective 5.a.: Amount of sponsored grant dollars per    400,000     759,567    679,913    589,322
          full-time faculty member.

              Faculty have consistently exceeded target based on national norms. However
              national trends suggest outcomes may be challenged thus target has not been
              adjusted.




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    3.1.e. Student involvement in research
            Students are involved in many aspects of faculty research and benefit directly from
            the opportunities to work with faculty, many of whom are renowned nationally and
            internationally in their respective fields. Often student research builds on the
            research efforts of faculty advisers, especially in the academic programs.
            Rapidly rising costs (fringe rates and health care costs, in particular) are resulting
            in fewer available graduate assistantships (154 available in 2005-2006), a trend
            that is driving the School to seek alternative forms of student support through
            scholarships, paid internships and practice arrangements that support research
            activities. One example of alternative support is the School’s ability to place more
            than 50 students in research positions with the Minnesota Department of Health
            each year in such activities as “Team Diarrhea,” an infectious disease surveillance
            initiative. Faculty advisers also actively support student research endeavors with
            practical advice and training, with the challenge of intellectual rigor and through
            reinforcement of principles of ethical research.
            All master’s-level students are required to complete a project or formal thesis, and
            doctoral candidates are required to present and defend a formal dissertation. The
            nature of student research projects is determined by Major faculty.
            In addition to research conducted as part of their degree requirements, students
            have additional opportunities as paid or unpaid research assistants to be involved
            in faculty research projects. These opportunities provide important experience in
            data collection and analysis as well as learning that comes with close interaction
            with faculty and research staff.
            Several funding sources are also available to support student research at the
            School, including the:
               Fogarty International Center research grants for international scientists;
               National Research Service Awards that provide financial support for student
               research and specifically train students as future researchers;
               CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) Dissertation Awards in
               Health Care Policy and Finance; and
               Traineeships, Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships.

   3.1. f. This criterion is met.

            Strengths
               All tenured and tenure-track faculty are involved in research.
               Faculty members are highly productive competitors for research funding. The
               average amount of sponsored grant dollars per full-time faculty is $589,322
               (2005-2006), one of the highest amounts among public university schools of
               public health in the nation.
               Faculty members conduct important research that translates discovery to impact
               across a broad range of public health issues of growing importance.


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              Faculty members are building a significant body of knowledge based on
              community-based, participatory protocols. In addition, the faculty is involved in
              research collaborations within the School and across the University, state,
              nation and world.
              Faculty research is respected and frequently cited in peer-reviewed journals and
              other public health contexts.
              Faculty are involved in a growing number of international research efforts.
              Students are involved in faculty research as part of faculty grants and research
              assistantships and master’s projects.

          Weaknesses
           More students could benefit from increased research assistantships.

          Recommendations
            Continue to seek new sources of support for student research assistantships.

3.2 Service
   3.2.a. The School’s service activities, including policies, procedures and practices
          that support service.
          The School has a tradition and a strong commitment to service both as a
          contributor to the advancement of the public health profession and to the health
          and well being of populations locally, nationally and internationally.
          Engagement – a term encompassing service – is a key goal, both of the School and
          the entire University. As such, it is inextricably intertwined with research and
          education in achieving the School’s overarching mission to make a positive impact
          on the public’s health. In the School’s conceptualization of its role, research,
          education and service are not separable; they are in fact three essential facets of the
          same jewel. To attempt to “silo” them is to ignore the fact that, when aligned,
          education, research and service strengthen each other – and produce results that are
          equal to more than the sum of the parts. To have maximum impact on the complex
          public health issues faced by the practice community today, it is the School’s view
          that all facets of its enterprise need to be aligned and integrated.
          As the School’s research, education and service efforts grow in sophistication, it
          becomes increasingly difficult to discuss each alone. Into which of the three
          categories, for example, do the outcomes of community-based, participatory
          research belong? Is it research, or is it service – or both? Into what silo might the
          offerings of the School’s Centers for Public Health Education and Outreach be
          categorized – service or education or both? When research into obesity prevention
          leads to the development of a diet and exercise regimen for young girls, as well as
          classes to educate them on preparing healthy foods, should the project be
          considered research, education or service? Certainly, all three of the School’s core
          functions would be part and parcel of this work. Indeed, it is increasingly rare that
          the School engages in one core activity that does not inform the others.


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            Central to the School’s commitment to making an impact is the concept of
            dynamic, two-way interaction with communities of public health practitioners,
            policymakers, organizations and populations. David N. Cox
            (http://amps-tools.mit.edu/tomprofblog/archives/2006/05/726_the_scholar.html#more) refers to service
            that connects “with people and places outside of the university in the activities of
            scholarship” as the “scholarship of engagement.” During his tenure as Executive
            Vice President and Provost, Bob Bruininks, the current University President,
            described civic and public engagement as an institutional commitment to public
            purposes and responsibilities intended to strengthen a democratic way of life in the
            rapidly changing Information Age of the 21st century.
            (http://www1.umn.edu/civic/about/index.html) Boyer (1990, Scholarship Reconsidered:
            Priorities of the Professoriate. Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the
            Advancement of Teaching) has described faculty as taking on the “responsibilities
            of the scholarship of engagement, as they connect knowledge creation with the
            translation and impact of what they do with the world beyond the campus.”
            In recent years, the School has expanded its reach into the practice communities
            through a wide web of affiliations developed by the faculty and students, as well as
            through innovative new programs and partnerships. The launch of the Centers for
            Public Health Education and Outreach (CPHEO), discussed in greater detail in
            Chapter 3.3, initiated a new level of service and outreach to the public health
            community. Through CPHEO, the School makes lifelong learning opportunities
            available – and easily accessible – to people in public health or related careers
            locally, nationally and around the globe. In 2005-2006, CPHEO has served more
            than 30,000 participants with high-quality training in subjects relevant to current
            and emerging public health concerns.
            The School’s service achievements are the result of many factors, but chief among
            them are the partnerships it has established with practicing public health
            professionals. Among the partners are neighborhood-based organizations,
            departments of health, the Education and Research Centers for Occupational
            Health and Safety, the National Network of Centers for Public Health
            Preparedness, the National Network of Public Health Training Centers, nonprofit
            agencies, business and industry and universities, colleges and schools integrating
            population science into health and human service education.
            These partnering organizations – many of which are on the front line of public
            health practice – have played a vital role in the direction of the School’s outreach.
            Detailed in Chapter 3.3, the growing list of continuing education programs made
            available as a service of the School are:
               The Public Health Institute (PHI) – a three-week educational event for people
               working in the field who are looking to enhance their public health knowledge
               in highly relevant and emerging public health issues. Through Summer 2006,
               PHI had served some 1,100 students since it began in 2002.
               The Public Health Practice major, geared also for working professionals, which
               leads to a master’s in public health through the Executive Program in Public
               Health Practice, or one of several dual degrees (M.D./M.P.H.; DVM/M.P.H).



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             Certificate programs for practicing public health workers who want to acquire
             knowledge (and credentials) in core public health concepts or in specialty areas,
             but who don’t immediately seek an M.P.H. degree.
             Quarterly roundtable discussions on current public health topics that engage
             professionals from academia, practice and policy-making.
             Free community education programs offered through local neighborhood
             groups
           To serve the needs of the public health community and adult learners, the School
           has invested extensively in making its training services broadly accessible via
           online and distance-learning modalities. Recognition for its innovative technology-
           enhanced course design and delivery has spread far. As an example, today, 12
           schools of veterinary medicine across the country partner with the School in
           offering the dual D.V.M./M.P.H. degree.
           In addition to extending education and training services to the field, the School,
           through CPHEO, provides a “portal” through which the community may easily
           interact with faculty. As CPHEO becomes recognized as a point of entry to the
           School, community and professional groups find access to the School’s resources
           increasingly at hand.
           Centers of excellence hosted by the School. Also integral to the service
           infrastructure of the School are many of the centers to which it plays host. Through
           them, the School interacts with practicing public health professionals and
           communities to address and inform specific needs. Each of the centers is
           strengthened by input from a community advisory board made up of public health
           leaders from nonprofit community and government agencies. They include:
             Center for Environment and Health Policy (CEHP): Focuses on improving
             the assessment, management and communication of environmental health risks
             and fostering better environmental policy decisions.
             Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP): Strives to
             reduce illness and death from infectious diseases by conducting original,
             interdisciplinary research and by facilitating public policy refinement and the
             adoption of science-based best practices among professionals and the public.
             Center for Youth Health Promotion (CYHP): Disseminates to schools and
             communities innovative youth health promotion programs and materials created
             in the Division of Epidemiology.
             Center to Study Human-Animal Relationships and Environments
             (CENSHARE): Creates opportunities to acquire, disseminate and apply
             knowledge about the relationship between animals, humans and their shared
             environment to improve the quality of life for all.
             Health Services Research Survey Center: Supports School research and
             partners with public health organizations in designing, conducting, and
             analyzing mail, telephone and in-person surveys.




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               Minnesota Technical Assistance Program (MnTAP): Helps Minnesota
               businesses implement solutions that maximize resource efficiency, prevent
               pollution, and reduce costs to improve public health and the environment.
               Nutrition Coordinating Center (NCC): Develops, provides, and supports
               state-of-the-art methods and databases for researchers collecting and analyzing
               dietary data.
               Regional Injury Prevention Research Center (RIPRC): Provides a
               multidisciplinary program for the prevention and control of injuries, including
               catastrophic and long-term disabling injuries, with attention to the rural
               environment.
               State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC): Helps states
               monitor rates of health insurance coverage, understand factors associated with
               uninsurance and evaluate state policy initiatives.
            Adjunct faculty. The School’s 175 adjunct faculty members also play an important
            role in the School’s engagement with communities. Often, adjunct faculty are
            practicing public health professionals who facilitate campus-community
            communications, collaboration and service. To recognize the contributions of its
            adjunct faculty, the School honors them each year at its Community Partners
            Event.
            Other. The establishment of the Research and Education Advisors Partnership
            (REAP) brings together a high-level group of community health partners to help
            set direction for School-wide growth in education, research and service. While the
            focus of REAP is on partnerships, strategies and information-sharing for public
            health science and learning, seminars held annually and chaired by the Dean
            provide opportunities to explore service partnerships as well.
            Fostering engagement through policy. Service is expected of all faculty members
            and is taken into account in faculty promotion, tenure and salary decisions. Service
            requirements are addressed in the School’s Academic Appointment, Promotion
            and Tenure policy. To support them in meeting their service expectations,
            members of the faculty are awarded one day each per seven-day-week for
            consulting.
            In June 2006, the University’s Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and
            Provost directed all schools within the University to review and revise the general
            criteria for conferral of tenure. Among the required elements of review is to ensure
            that the tenure code statements “reflect a coherent strategy for achieving
            excellence in research, teaching and public engagement.” The School is
            participating in this process.
            Service through community-based, participatory research. The School’s growing
            emphasis on community-based participatory research is also encouraging
            increased outreach and service. Community-based research directly involves
            interaction with members of the populations affected by the issue under study –
            and often results in such services as needs assessments, development of programs
            and training. (Please refer to Chapter 3.1.b and 3.1.c for more on the School’s
            community-based research projects.)


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           Service through formal agreements. The School serves the public health
           community through formal contracts or agreements with external agencies for
           technical assistance, consulting and other services.

   3.2.b. A list of the School’s current service activities over last three years
           Service provided by the School encompasses a broad range of activities across
           many areas of public health concern and affecting diverse populations. Appendix
           3.2.b. lists faculty service activities over the last three years. The examples below
           illustrate the types and reach of service provided by the School.
           Public Health Awareness
             Public health awareness at the Minnesota State Fair: Each year, the School
             sponsors a booth at the Minnesota State Fair, a stage from which to convey
             public health messages to a wide audience.
             Nutrition guidelines for the workplace: Recognizing that obesity is a growing
             epidemic and that it contributes to health-related costs incurred by employers,
             University faculty developed guidelines for healthy eating at work, including
             suggestions for healthy alternatives for meetings and conferences.
             Combating teen obesity: To bring her research into adolescent eating behaviors
             to the public in a way that is useful, a School faculty member published a book
             for parents of teens. Entitled “I’m Like SO Fat!” Helping Your Teen Make
             Healthy Choices about Eating and Exercise in a Weight-Obsessed World, the
             book recommends reinforcing positive messages at home while looking for
             ways to counteract negative influences from society.
             Advice for young vegans: School professors teamed with an alumna to author
             The Vegetarian Manifesto, a guide for teens and young adults who are – or are
             thinking of becoming – vegetarians.
             A podcast channel for delivering public health information: Making use of the
             latest technologies to deliver training and information, the School has extended
             its delivery of public health information via a podcast channel. Anyone with an
             iPod or MP3 player and access to the Internet can download the files.
             Help for families navigating long-term care: A member of the School faculty
             and one of the country’s top researchers on aging, published It Shouldn’t Be
             This Way: The Failure of Long-Term Care (Vanderbilt University Press), a
             book designed to help families navigate the confusing world of hospitals,
             clinics and long-term care. He also founded PPECC (Professionals with
             Personal Experience in Chronic Care), a national organization through which
             members share experiences with the system in order to raise public awareness
             of changes needed.
             Translating scientific information into real-world action: A School faculty
             member who directs the University’s Center for Infectious Disease Research
             and Policy (CIDRAP) has conducted hundreds of media interviews to raise
             awareness of the need to prepare for pandemic influenza. In addition, CIDRAP



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               maintains a Web site for public health professionals and the public that provides
               the latest information on bioterrorism, food safety and infectious diseases.
            Community/Regional Service through outreach, technical assistance and
            transfer of research findings to community impact
               Healthier bus drivers: When officials at Twin Cities Metro Transit recognized
               that 89 percent of its bus drivers were overweight, they turned to the School for
               help in making drivers healthier.
               Helping American Indian youth stop smoking: Working with American Indian
               communities in Minnesota to create an anti-smoking intervention strategy
               specific to the Twin Cities Indian youth population, a School faculty member
               used a community-based participatory research model to learn more about the
               problem. The research – by and for the Indian people – used standard data
               collection methods and traditional activities such as storytelling, feasts and
               talking circles to make the findings accurate and useful to the community.
               Childhood obesity prevention: As part of a five-year obesity prevention study
               on the Pine Ridge and Rosebud reservations in South Dakota, a School
               researcher is working with local schools to develop school- and family-based
               interventions aimed at increasing physical activity and healthy eating among
               kindergarten and first-grade children.
               Helping people choose the right nursing home care: When the Minnesota
               Departments of Health and Human Services set out to create an online Nursing
               Home Report Card to help people choose the right care based on their needs,
               they turned to a School faculty member recognized for his expertise in long-
               term care to help design the report card.
               The link between environmental toxins and health: An environmental health
               sciences faculty member made some 20 presentations to communities across
               state to raise awareness of the presence of environmental toxins in
               neighborhoods and how they can affect health. Specifically, his presentations
               have raised awareness of the possible link between exposure to synthetic
               estrogen from plastic and diabetes. (Animals born with this exposure have been
               found to produce excess insulin, suggesting that they are pre-set at birth for
               diabetes.) One result of his pioneering service has been a change in the way a
               major supermarket chain wraps food – in paper rather than plastic.
               Expired drug take-back: A faculty member has worked with the environmental
               sub-group of the Minnesota Medical Association to make a plea to the
               American Medical Association to urge the pharmaceutical industry to take
               “expired” drugs back and thus prevent their entry into the water supply.
               A plan for controlling cancer: School faculty contributed to the development of
               Cancer Plan Minnesota 2005-2015, the state’s first comprehensive cancer
               control plan created to reduce the cancer burden among all Minnesotans. This
               framework for action establishes measurable objectives and will help guide the
               Minnesota Cancer Alliance in its fight against cancer.



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             Preventing onset of alcohol use: The School’s Center for Youth Health
             Promotion found significant reductions in alcohol use among boys after
             implementing Project Northland Chicago. The program created school,
             community, peer and parent awareness to help prevent the onset of alcohol use
             among urban sixth to eighth graders. A Web site (http://www.epi.umn.edu/alcohol)
             includes intervention and evaluation instruments as well as fact sheets used by
             community and the media.
             Strong bones for young girls: Faculty researchers collaborated with local Twin
             Cities Girl Scout troops on a program called Cal-Girls to help fifth and sixth
             grade girls increase their calcium intake and bone-building physical activity.
           National/International
             Increased accuracy in estimating nation’s uninsured. Collaborating with the
             U.S. Census Bureau, the School’s State Health Access Data Assistance Center
             (SHADAC) determined the accuracy of Current Population Survey (CPS) data
             on health insurance coverage. Based on SHADAC’s findings, the Census
             Bureau revised its method of calculating estimates, increasing its standard
             errors by 55 percent. CPS estimates are used in federal formulas that distribute
             billions of dollars each year to public programs – thus the need for accurate
             data.
             Technical assistance on Medicare pricing. School faculty have long provided
             technical assistance on Medicare reform. Working with the Centers for
             Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2002-2003, they provided findings
             estimating the price sensitivity of Medicare beneficiaries to changes in the cost
             of out-of-pocket premiums.
             Tobacco control in India and Indonesia. Working with health professionals in
             India and Indonesia, a School faculty member is lending technical assistance to
             the establishment of a foundation for tobacco research at universities in India
             and Indonesia, where deaths due to tobacco use are expected to rise to 4.2
             million annually over the next two decades. The faculty member also serves as
             President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco and as chair of
             the SRNT Global Network Committee.
           Professional Service, including leadership of and participation in, professional
           organizations:
             IOM report on childhood obesity prevention. A School professor, who is a
             leader in childhood obesity prevention research, served as a member of the
             Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention and helped
             draft its landmark report on childhood obesity, released in 2004.
             New peer-reviewed journal. A School faculty member launched a new peer-
             reviewed, professional journal and served as its first editor-in-chief. The
             International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity is the
             official journal of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical
             Activity.



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                Organizational leadership. Faculty have participated in the leadership of over
                50 organizations in the past three years (see Appendix 3.2.b for details).
                Editorial review. Ninety-two percent of the faculty participate in editorial
                review (see Appendix 3.2.b for details).

    3.2.c. Identification of the measures by which the school may evaluate the success of
           its service program, along with data regarding the school’s performance
           against those measures for each of the last three years.

    Table 25: Outcome Measures of Service Program Success
                                                                              Year     Year     Year
                                                                   Target    2003/4   2004/5   2005/6

        Objective 8.a.: Number of faculty involved in editorial     75%                          92%
        review                                                                                 (96/104)

        Objective 8.c.: Percent of faculty involved in other        75%                          74%
        (non-editorial review) service activities                                              (77/104)


    3.2.d. A description of student involvement in service
            The Center for Health Interprofessional Programs (CHIP) is a center for initiatives
            created by students, for students in the Academic Health Center. CHIP brings
            students together in social, learning, service and leadership development
            opportunities. Each year, CHIP sponsors a variety of service activities, from one-
            shot events to longer service-learning projects, such as performing blood pressure
            checks at the Minnesota State Fair, participating in panels aimed at high school
            students interested in the health sciences, and forming teams to walk in the annual
            University of Minnesota Relay for Life fundraiser.
            Through their affiliation with the School, students become part of the culture of
            service. Service learning is an expectation for students in the public health practice
            major. Sites have been identified with community sponsors to assist students in
            developing opportunities. Above and beyond the service learning project that is
            expected of students in the Public Health Practice major, students throughout the
            School are engaged in service through other mechanisms, many of them inspired
            by faculty, others undertaken of their own initiative.

    3.2.e. This criterion is met.

            Strengths
               Service, a key element in achieving public health impact, is viewed by the
               School as inextricable from research and education in the pursuit of its mission.
               School faculty are involved in service to the profession, the practice community
               and to communities locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.



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             The School has established a sound infrastructure for service and engagement
             with community through its interdisciplinary centers and its Centers for Public
             Health Education and Outreach, which is a School-wide link to the community.
             The School encourages student service through a student-led program that
             sponsors service activities. Students also become part of the School’s culture of
             service through association with the faculty and through service learning, which
             is expected of all public health practice major students.

           Weaknesses
            The School currently has no easy-to-use data collection system by which to
            track faculty or student service.

           Recommendations
             Develop a service reporting system that faculty find easy to access and use.

3.3. Workforce Development
   3.3.a. The School’s continuing education program, including policies, needs
          assessment, procedures, practices and evaluation that support continuing
          education and workforce development strategies
           The Centers for Public Education and Outreach (CPHEO) (http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu) is
           the School’s central platform for professional outreach and continuing education
           for the public health workforce. Established as a unit of the Office of the Dean in
           2000 to coordinate the School’s outreach efforts, CPHEO today leads the Upper
           Midwest in providing high-quality educational experiences in the principles and
           practice of public health. Its lifelong-learning focus serves the needs of a growing
           number of students.




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            Table 26: Growth in Continuing Education Courses and Registrations
            Online and On Campus 2000–2006
                  Academic             Number                Number
                    Year              of Courses         of Registrations

                   2000-2001                       86                  1,483

                   2001-2002                       90                  1,644

                   2002-2003                       79                  1,501

                   2003-2004                       130                 7,174

                   2004-2005                       179                16,184

                   *2005-2006                      263                36,661

            * In 2005 the CPHEO developed a Digital Learning Group (DLG) to
              increase Internet, Webcast and podcast delivery, allowing for an
              expanded reach and broader audience for workforce development.
              This also allowed CPHEO to better track registrations/trainees in
              technology-enhanced training activities.
            Growth in the number of students served through CPHEO programs is the result of
            course offerings that meet the content and lifestyle needs of a wide range of
            audiences (Please see Appendix 3.3.c).
            The School ensures that the content provided through its continuing education
            offerings is:
               Timely and relevant through ongoing partnerships with the practicing public
               health community and through the public health workforce learning needs
               assessments it conducts;
               Of high quality and well grounded in the latest public health discoveries
               through full integration with the School’s faculty and academic programs.
            Growth in the number of continuing education students is also a product of the
            School’s sensitivity and response to the special needs of its audiences – most of
            whom are working adults engaged full-time as public health and health and safety
            professionals, employees of local and state public health agencies, community
            organizations, business and industry, members of rural and tribal communities and
            degree-seeking students. Through innovative use of Web technologies and creative
            program formatting, the School meets the needs of these adult and distance
            learners whose life and work situations may preclude regular campus-based,
            classroom attendance. Continuing education courses thus are provided via several
            modalities:
               Web-based – including Webcast (live and archived), podcast and CDs



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             Traditional onsite classes
             Interactive television
             Summer intensive (brief, intense learning experiences)
           In addition to serving as the central coordinator and manager of the School’s
           outreach and workforce development activities, CPHEO:
             Assesses professional and public learning needs – and works with School
             faculty and public health professionals to develop strategies to meet them (see
             “Needs Assessment” below) or visit
             http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu/cpheo/resources/Needs_Assessments.html
             Develops professional learning activities
             (http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu/cpheo/courses/home.html) using its expertise in instructional
             design, Web development, application of technology-enhanced learning
             methods and meeting and conference planning. Growing demand for
             technology-enhanced learning opportunities is reflected in the 3,209 online
             course registrations – accounting for 7,716 academic credits – from 2002-2006
             supported through CPHEO. To meet the demand, the School in 2005
             established a Digital Learning Group, a dedicated School-wide mechanism
             administered by CPHEO through which excellence in digital learning is
             effectively and efficiently achieved;
             Builds and nurtures partnerships with public health agencies, educators and
             organizations in order to respond rapidly to the education and training needs
             required to address emerging public health issues.
           As a bridge connecting the academic and public health communities, CPHEO
           provides a welcoming pathway through which public health practice professionals
           may gain access to the faculty, expertise and resources of the School in their quest
           for solutions to public health problems. Through partnerships with regional health
           departments and universities, the School is today the chief platform connecting
           public health education, research and practice in Minnesota, Wisconsin and North
           Dakota.
           Collaboration with these and other partners has resulted in significant support for
           public health workforce continuing education and high-quality, innovative efforts
           to meet the public health training needs in the state and region. Major funding
           awarded through the efforts of these partnerships and used to support workforce
           training programs is now administered through several centers housed within
           CPHEO. These include:
           The Public Health Training Center (Midwest Center for Life-Long-Learning in
           Public Health (MCLPH)) (http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu/cpheo/mclph/home.html)
           The School administers a Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)-
           funded Public Health Training Center, a collaboration in public health workforce
           development and lifelong learning involving the School and the state departments
           of public health in Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota. Initially funded in
           2001, the Center seeks to foster an ethic of continuous learning among public
           health professionals and strengthen the technical, scientific, managerial and


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            leadership competence of the current and future public health workforce in the
            Midwest. The Center has five major goals:
               Ensure regional access to public health training and education;
               Eliminate cultural disparities in access to public health training and support the
               goals, outcomes and indicators of the Bureau of Health Professions (BHPr)
               Comprehensive Performance Management System that seeks to improve the
               distribution, diversity and quality of the public health workforce;
               Develop access mechanisms that fit public health professionals’ lives, learning
               and work;
               Increase capacity of public health practitioners in core public health
               competencies; and
               Increase the supply of public health practitioners trained in public health.
            To achieve its goals, the MCLPH has embraced distance-learning technologies and
            taken courses off campus to meet the needs of public health personnel in medically
            under-served and geographically remote areas. Between 2001 and 2006, MCLPH,
            in collaboration with faculty and community experts, developed a comprehensive
            set of trainings in core public health concepts. Funding for the MCLPH was
            renewed in 2006 to continue to meet the educational needs of more than 100
            existing partners.
            University of Minnesota Center for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP)
            (http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu/cpheo/umncphp/home.html)

            Under a cooperative agreement with the Association of Schools of Public Health
            and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the School became an
            Academic Center for Public Health Preparedness in early 2002 and was renewed
            in 2004 as a Center for Public Health Preparedness through CDC. Through the
            UMNCPHP, the School actively collaborates with the greater public health
            community to improve the capacity of front-line public health workers to respond
            to current, new and emerging public health threats. The Center works to:
               “Determine the knowledge base related to biosafety, infectious diseases and
               infectious control in the non-public health prepared workforce within the
               state/region;
               Provide continuing education to those working in the front lines of industry,
               health care and the public and/or private sector who have little formal
               preparation in public health frameworks for problem analysis;
               Collaborate with the Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin Departments of
               Health to improve responsiveness to potential health alerts;
               Provide continuing education for those in public health leadership positions to
               assist in the development of strong surveillance and response systems;
               Expand the availability of continuing education in the basic, cross-cutting and
               technical competencies by developing distance-education opportunities;
               Evaluate the effectiveness of training methods and the impact of training on the
               ability to respond to urgent public health problems; and


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              Strengthen the interaction between – and knowledge base of – practitioners and
              academics by sponsoring collaborative workforce-generated research projects.”
           The addition of the Center has enabled the School to ensure that front-line public
           health workers have access to training in the skills and competencies required to
           effectively respond to current and emerging public health threats, such as
           bioterrorism and pandemic flu.
           Occupational Health, Safety and Hazardous Substance Training
           The School serves as the administrative home of continuing education programs
           led by the Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety (MCOHS)
           (http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu/cpheo/mcohs/home.html), a top-ranked National Institute for
           Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Education and Research Center. The
           MCOHS has provided academic programs at the master’s and doctoral levels
           through the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, along with continuing
           education and outreach since 1978. CPHEO administers a National Institute of
           Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
           (http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu/cpheo/mcohs/courses/coursewelcome.html) collaborating center for
           hazardous materials training. It has also served as a designated Occupational
           Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) training center and an Environmental
           Protection Agency (EPA) Lead Training Center.
           Other Workforce Training Initiatives
           The School has expanded its capacity to meet the needs of the current and future
           public health workforce through other initiatives, resulting in additional program
           support. Examples include:
              The Emergency Preparedness Assessment Project (2002-2006) to support state-
              wide assessment of public health training needs for the Minnesota Department
              of Health (2002-2003), the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family
              Services (2004) and the North Dakota Department of Health (2006).
              National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO)
              Advanced Practice Center Support Proposal (2004-2005), in collaboration with
              Hennepin County, City of Minneapolis and Ramsey County Public Health
              Departments, to create an online curriculum defining the role of the
              environmental health specialist in emergency response.
              Minnesota Emergency Readiness Education and Training (MERET) (2005-
              2008) (http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu/cpheo/meret/home.html) grant from HRSA, in
              collaboration with the University’s School of Nursing, to provide continuing
              education programs for the health care workforce on public health emergency
              or bioterrorism events.
              The CDC-funded Genomics Project (2006-2008), in collaboration with the
              Minnesota Department of Health and the School’s Division of Environmental
              Health Sciences, to create education and training programs in genomics for
              public health professionals.
              Multiple contracts for continuing education course development and delivery to
              support activities such as: OSHA training in Shanghai, China; Building Healthy


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               Communities for Children; National Maternal Nutrition Intensive Course; Fetal
               Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Symposium; Summer Institute on Adolescent
               Health; Obesity Prevention Center Symposium; Focus Group Interview Skill
               Development; Public Engagement Symposium; and the Ancel Keys
               Symposium.
            These initiatives have resulted in over 600 course offerings, more than 30,000
            participants and more than $13 million generated in grants, contracts, course fees
            and tuition between 2000 and 2006.
            Other Continuing Education Programs Provided by the School
            In addition to the continuing education efforts managed by CPHEO, the School
            provides training through several of its centers and programs, including:
            The Center on Aging (http://www.hsr.umn.edu/coa/), which sponsors:
               An annual Summer Institute on Aging, held in June in cooperation with
               Minnesota Area Geriatric Education Centers, Blue Cross Blue Shield of
               Minnesota, Evercare and Ovations (a UnitedHealth Group Company), UCare
               Minnesota, University of Minnesota Family Medicine and Community Health
               and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Attendance is
               approximately 200.
               Four quarterly Geriatric Conferences, held at partner sites, including Regions
               Hospital, the VA Hospital, Hennepin County Medical Center and the School.
               Approximately 30-40 community practitioners attend.
            The Center for Leadership Education in Maternal and Child Health
            (http://www.epi.umn.edu/mch/), which, in addition to co-sponsoring activities through
            CPHEO, holds professional development events, such as the Annual Women’s
            Health Research Conference and the Healthy Generations Videoconference. It also
            publishes “Healthy Generations,” a quarterly newsletter that reports recent
            research in the field.
            The Leadership, Education and Training (LET) Program in Maternal and Child
            Nutrition (http://www.epi.umn.edu/let/) sponsors several local and state continuing
            education seminars each year, as well as at least one regional and national
            continuing education conference for health care professionals with a maternal and
            child nutrition interest, including registered dietitians and nutritionists. More than
            26,250 participants have been served in 102 continuing education courses and
            more than 14 technical assistance activities have been conducted over the past
            three years.
            The Healthcare Management Alumni Association
            (http://www.hsr.umn.edu/mha/alumni/index.htm), which also is connected with the School and
            sponsors professional education activities, holds an Alumni Institute each
            September, targeting the M.H.A. program’s 200 alumni across the country. In
            addition, the Association’s Leadership Analogies is a well attended activity
            sponsored as part of the Health Sector Leader Challenges Series. In 2005, it
            included: Leadership in High Risk Aviation; Leadership with Strong Personalities;
            and Leadership in Global Health: Prognoses and Performance.


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           The University’s Center for Aging Services Management (formerly the Center for
           Long-Term Care Administration) (http://www.hpm.umn.edu/mha/ltcal/index.htm) offers a
           non-traditional program for people seeking licensing as a nursing home
           administrator or a career as a long-term care manager. Founded in 1968, the Center
           is among the premier training programs for managers of long-term care facilities in
           the Upper Midwest. Most students are working adults from a variety of
           backgrounds, such as management, nursing, therapeutic activities, social work and
           other disciplines. Full-time students interested in licensure also enroll in the pre-
           licensure program. In coming years, the Center will broaden its curriculum to offer
           advanced training to managers across the long-term care continuum to encompass
           community-based services, senior housing, assisted-living facilities and nursing
           facilities.
           Across the School, multiple seminars on timely topics and research are offered
           throughout the year, engaging faculty, staff, students and community partners in
           the exchange of best practices.
           Needs Assessments
           CPHEO conducts ongoing assessments of the continuing education and training
           needs of the public health workforce. Examples of recent needs assessments
           (http://cpheo.sph.umn.edu/cpheo/resources/Needs_Assessments.html) are included below.

           Through the Center for Public Health Preparedness:
             The Emergency Preparedness Assessment Project (2002-2006) identified public
             health training needs for the Minnesota Department of Health (2002-2003), the
             Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services (2004) and the North
             Dakota Department of Health (2006). To develop an effective assessment tool,
             focus groups and a literature search to identify key skills and knowledge
             elements needed for bioterrorism/emergency preparedness were conducted.
             Once developed, the assessment tools consisted of online and paper surveys
             completed by over 5,000 public health workers across the three states. As
             follow-up, an annual meeting gathers bioterrorism grant administrators to
             identify unmet training needs.
             In 2003-2004, the online needs assessment was conducted under collaboration
             with the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH). Responses from 2,791
             respondents were processed and presented to MDH. This was followed by 10
             informational sessions conducted with clusters of local agencies to help with
             data interpretation and priority-setting for local preparedness training initiatives.
             A competency mapping process guide and competency map based on survey
             indicators were then created to facilitate identification of bioterrorism and
             emergency response competencies embedded in training.
             In 2005-2006, the Center implemented the online needs assessment on behalf of
             the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services. Responses from
             2,382 respondents were processed and presented.
             Also, the Center worked with the Hennepin County Human Services and Public
             Health Department on the Project Public Health Ready needs assessment. A


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               survey of 347 employees yielded 274 completed and returned assessments for a
               response rate of about 80 percent.
            Through the Midwest Center for Life-Long-Learning in Public Health:
               In 2002-2003, a tool to assess core competency achievement for those working
               in public health agencies was developed, reviewed by state partners and
               prepared for online delivery.
               CPHEO worked with the Midwest Center for Life-Long-Learning in Public
               Health partners to inventory available training resources in order to identify
               gaps.
            Ongoing needs assessments are conducted through:
               Focus groups and feedback at the conclusion of the Public Health Institute,
               online and other courses;
               Interaction and inquiry during conferences to identify training needs of
               attendees;
               Conversations at the state level about needs for new courses; and
               Ongoing informal survey of grant partners and staff to learn about emerging
               needs.

    3.3.b. Description of certificate programs or other non-degree offerings, including
           enrollment data for each of the last three years.
            Certificate Programs (See Chapter 2.6.c for competency-based curriculum)
            With the introduction of a new academic major in Public Health Practice (PHP) in
            2001, the School took an important step in meeting the need for lifelong learning
            for working health and human service professionals who wish to enhance their
            knowledge and skills in population science. The PHP major was designed to
            provide physicians, medical students, nurses, veterinarians, healthcare and human
            services professionals, as well as public health workers without formal public
            health training, a comprehensive overview of public health knowledge and the
            skills needed to understand, assess and manage population health in a variety of
            settings – from public health to healthcare and human service. Structured to offer
            the flexibility working professionals require, the PHP major assumes most of its
            students will have little time for on-campus attendance. It thus makes available a
            broad array of technology-enhanced and distributed-learning opportunities.
            The School offers seven University of Minnesota Regents’ Certificates through the
            PHP program for working health and human services professionals who have little
            or no formal public health education and who wish to develop skills and
            knowledge in a specific area of public health or healthcare administration. All
            course credits are approved as graduate university course credits and are eligible
            for transfer to applicable programs, subject to program approval. Certificate
            courses are available through distance-learning or summer-intensive programs.




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           The Public Health Certificate programs build on close ties between the School and
           the practicing community to address the need for more flexible training and to
           meet the demand to safeguard the health of our communities. The Certificate
           Programs provide a public health credential that can be obtained in a shorter time
           and via a more flexible method than a Master of Public Health degree.
           The School’s Certificate Programs managed under the PHP major include:
           http://www.sph.umn.edu/education/certificates/home.html

              The Public Health Certificate in Core Concepts is a 15 semester-credit program
              focusing on public health knowledge, skills and attitudes to understand, assess,
              and manage population health in public health, health care and human resources
              settings. It provides foundational skills in epidemiology, biostatistics, social and
              behavioral sciences, ethics, management and environmental and occupational
              health.
              The Public Health Certificate in Food Safety and Biosecurity is a 14 semester-
              credit program for working health and human service professionals with
              completed baccalaureate or advanced degrees who wish to develop a credential
              in the area of food safety and biosecurity, and who do not currently seek full
              M.P.H. training.
               The Public Health Certificate in Preparedness, Response and Recovery is, at
              minimum, a 12 semester-credit program for working health and human service
              professionals with completed baccalaureate or advanced degrees that focuses on
              public health knowledge, skills and attitudes to protect the health of the
              community in times of bio-terrorist incidents, infectious disease outbreaks and
              emergent public health threats.
              Public Health Certificate in Occupational Safety and Health is a 13-to-17
              semester-credit program for working health and human service professionals
              with completed baccalaureate or advanced degrees aimed at developing a
              credential in occupational health and safety to protect the health and well-being
              of workers.
              Certificate of Management Studies in Health Services Administration (ISP I and
              II); Certificate of Advanced Management Studies in Health Services
              Administration (ISP III) (http://www.sph.umn.edu/education/certificates/isp.html). ISP is
              designed specifically for executives in healthcare to develop knowledge to meet
              changing market demand, respond to better informed consumers, integrate new
              ideas of wellness and embrace alternative strategies for care and the means for
              providing them. Eligibility is based on the executive’s job responsibility and
              authority to implement the units of study, not on prior formal education.
              Students select a sequence of study from three tracks: Hospital Administration;
              Ambulatory Care; and Patient Care Administration. They complete three year-
              long courses, each beginning with an on-campus session during the summer.
              The remainder of the learning is conducted through monthly applications of
              units of study, preceptor/student groups and regional seminars. Upon successful
              completion of the three year-long ISP courses, students have the option, after
              separate admission, of applying ISP credits to an M.P.H. degree, through the


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               Executive Program in Public Health Practice, or to an M.H.A. degree. Some
               additional coursework for the degree is required.

       Table 27: Enrollment Data for Certificate Programs
                                              2001-         2002-   2003-   2004-    2005-
                                Target        2002          2003    2004    2005     2006

             Food Safety &      Applied          *            1       4       1        2
              Biosecurity       Admitted         *            1       4       1        2
                                Enrolled         *            0       3       1        2
            Preparedness,       Applied          *           12       7       4        5
             Response &         Admitted         *           12       7       4        5
              Recovery
                                Enrolled         *           12       7       4        4
             Occupational       Applied          *            2       1       1        0
            Safety & Health     Admitted         *            2       1       1        0
                                Enrolled         *            2       1       0        0
            Core Concepts       Applied         6            43      48       49      68
                                Admitted        6            42      41       44      62
                                Enrolled        5            39      37       37      61
                 ISP I          Applied         ^             ^       ^       26      40
                                Admitted        ^             ^       ^       26      40
                                Enrolled        ^             ^       ^       22      31
                 ISP II         Applied         ^             ^       ^       23      12
                                Admitted        ^             ^       ^       23      12
                                Enrolled        ^             ^       ^       23      12
                ISP III         Applied         ^             ^       ^       21      19
                                Admitted        ^             ^       ^       21      19
                                Enrolled        ^             ^       ^       21      19

       * Program did not admit students until Summer 2003
       ^ Program was not part of the SPH
            Public Health Institute
            The Public Health Institute is an intensive learning experience offering as many as
            47 courses around a thematic emphasis over a three-week period in early summer.
            Designed to meet the needs of busy professionals, Public Health Institute courses
            are modular, so that students can take as few as 1.5 days or as many as three weeks
            of study. Through the Institute, students may earn continuing education credit or
            up to 6.5 graduate credits over the three-week session.




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           Working with community and University partners, CPHEO has organized Public
           Health Institutes on some of the practice community’s most pressing issues,
           including:
             Culturally Responsive Public Health Practice
             Food Safety and Biosecurity
             Infectious Disease Epidemiology
             Occupational Health and Safety
             Public Health Preparedness, Response and Recovery
             Maternal Child Health
             Environmental Health
             Applied Biostatistics
             Evaluation Methods
             Public Health Leadership
           Building on the success of the summer Public Health Institute, the first Winter
           Institute was held in collaboration with the University of Florida-Gainesville in
           January 2006 to extend partnership and build additional emerging programs in/
           public health.
           Participation in the Public Health Institute for both continuing education and
           academic credit has exceeded expectations. The following table shows the growth
           in courses, registrations and credits since 2002:

           Table 28: Growth in Public Health Institute Courses, Registrations and
           Credits
                 Year          Courses        Registrations         Credits

                  2002                    7                39               105.5

                  2003                   17               146                 490

                  2004                   27               284                 679

                  2005                   39               386                 878

                  2006                   47               251                 792




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Public Health for a Healthier World                                  Advancement of Knowledge

            Public Health Roundtable
            The Public Health Roundtable, planned by a committee of faculty and public
            health professionals, is a half-day forum, held three to four times a year, that
            brings together participants from research, practice and public policy for in-depth
            exploration of a public health issue. The goal is to inform public discourse on key
            issues. Topics have included:
                2001-2002: Youth Health
                2002-2003: Aging and Its Public Health Consequences
                2003-2004: Global Public Health Issues – Minnesota Perspectives
                2004-2005: Foods and Health
                2005-2006: Public Health Responses to Diverse Community Needs
                2006-2007: Public Health and Human Rights Around the Globe

    3.3.c. A list of the continuing education programs offered, number of students
           served, indicating those offered in a distance-learning format over last three
           years.
            Please see Appendix 3.3.c.

    Table 29: Outcome Measures Related to Continuing Education Programs and
    Workforce Development
                                                                             Year     Year     Year
                                                                 Target     2003/4   2004/5   2005/6

        Objective 2.c.: Number of continuing professional        150-250     128      181      263
        education courses (online and onsite) across a broad     variance
        spectrum of public health                               threshold

        Objective 1.c.: Number of trainees participating in       15,000-   7,174    16,184   36,661
        continuing professional education                         25,000
                                                                 variance
                                                                threshold


    3.3.d. Educational institutions or public health practice organizations collaborating
           to offer continuing education
            Collaboration with academic and practice partners includes co-sponsorship of
            trainings, faculty exchange and speaker participation. Among the most noteworthy
            collaborations are:
            Continuing education collaborations with other Universities and campuses
                University of North Dakota Medical School
                University of Florida-Gainesville
                University of Southern Florida


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             University of Georgia (College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM))
             Michigan State University (CVM)
             Kansas State University (CVM)
             Purdue University (CVM)
             University of Illinois (CVM)
             Iowa State University (CVM)
             Cornell University (CVM)
             Colorado State University (CVM)
             Virginia/Maryland (CVM)
             University of Pennsylvania (CVM)
             University of Wisconsin
             University of California – Los Angeles
             University of California – Davis (CVM)
             University of Minnesota (CVM)
             University of New Mexico School of Medicine and Regional Cancer Center
             St John’s Medical College, Bangalore, India
             ISP Asia Inc., Hong Kong
             University of Minnesota School of Nursing
             Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Minnesota
             College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of
             Minnesota
             School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Minnesota
             Medical School, University of Minnesota
             Mayo Medical School
           Continuing education collaborations with public health practice organizations and
           industry partners. Examples include:
             Minnesota Department of Health
             North Dakota Department of Health
             Wisconsin Department of Health
             Hennepin County Department of Health
             Ramsey County Department of Health
             Be Active Minnesota
             Powderhorn/Phillips Cultural Wellness Center
             Minnesota Department of Agriculture
             Lake Area Human Services
             Minnesota Partnership for Action Against Tobacco
             Northrup Grumman Corporation


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               Ecolab
               Many professional associations in Minnesota

    3.3.e. This criterion is met.

            Strengths
               The School is a leader in workforce development programs. It offers extensive
               lifelong learning opportunities, delivered in formats and via modalities designed
               to accommodate the special requirements of working professionals.
               The School has assembled the resources and capabilities to lead in the
               development and management of online and technology-based coursework.
               Through digital technologies, the School extends its lifelong learning programs
               across the Upper Midwest region, the nation and the world.
               The School develops its workforce development programs based on formal
               needs assessments, feedback from focus groups and students, discussions with
               partners and informal surveys of partners.
               Coursework, summer-intensives and other professional education programs are
               timely; they meet the need for knowledge and strategies to address current and
               emerging public health issues.
               The School offers seven post baccalaureate Certificate programs, all approved
               by the University Regents, designed to meet the needs for flexible educational
               opportunities in areas of importance to public health, and held to the same
               standards and quality controls as all School course and program offerings.
               The School works with a growing cadre of collaborators to develop relevant and
               effective continuing education programs.

            Weaknesses: None




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PAGE 120                               University of Minnesota School of Public Health
                              CHAPTER FOUR




Faculty, Staff and Students
                                                                Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students                          Public Health for a Healthier World



4.0 Faculty, Staff and Students
   4.1   Faculty Qualifications
   4.2   Faculty Policies and Procedures
   4.3   Faculty and Staff Diversity
   4.4   Student Recruitment and Admissions
   4.5   Student Diversity
   4.6   Advising and Career Counseling

Introduction
The faculty and staff, vital to the School’s education, research and engagement activities, are
highly regarded for the quality and impact of their work. In September 2006, the number of
faculty stood at 117, up from 95 in September 2004. Increasingly, through the expanded use
of contract and adjunct faculty who are or have been involved in professional practice,
practical, real-world perspectives are integrated into the School’s teaching of principles and
theory as well as into its research efforts. The School recognizes that its future excellence
depends on the continued growth of its faculty – and it is actively adding faculty in priority
areas.
University-, School- and division-level programs, policies and practices help assure the hiring
and retention of high-caliber faculty and staff – as well as their continued professional
development. Future excellence across all School endeavors will depend, in part, on increased
diversity. While women now make up about 45 percent of the faculty, ethnic and minority
representation continues to challenge the School. The School has committed to a goal set by
the University Board of Regents to increase the presence and participation of racial/ethnic
minorities and women where they are under-represented.
Student demand for public health education has increased across the nation and at the School.
Since 1999, the School’s total enrollment has increased from 346 to more than 1000 students
in 2006-2007. Increased enrollment has been driven by several programs, specifically
Environmental Health Sciences (M.P.H., M.S., Ph.D.), Health Services Research, Policy and
Administration (M.S., Ph.D.), Public Health Administration and Policy (M.P.H.),
Epidemiology (M.P.H.) and Biostatistics (M.S., Ph.D.). The M.P.H. areas of study and post-
baccalaureate certificates in the Public Health Practice major (the fastest growing major in the
School) also have contributed to enrollment growth. In 2006 (Spring, Summer, Fall 2006),
162 certificate students were actively enrolled.
To ensure a high-caliber student body, the School adheres to established admissions policies
and procedures. Special efforts to attract a more diverse student body have paid off. Since
2002, when the School enrolled 56 students of color from the U.S., the number has nearly
tripled to 147 (2005-2006). As a result, domestic students of color increased from 11 percent
of the student body in 2002 to 15 percent in 2005-2006.




University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Self-Study, February 2007
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                     Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students

4.1 Faculty Qualifications
    4.1.a. Primary faculty who support degree programs
            Please see Appendix 4.1.a Template F: Faculty Who Support Degree Programs.

    4.1.b. Other faculty who support teaching programs
            Please see Appendix 4.1.b Template G.

    4.1.c. How the faculty integrates perspectives from the field of practice
            The School and its faculty integrate perspectives from the field of public health
            practice in numerous ways. In fact, increased partnership and collaboration
            between the faculty and the practice community could be considered among the
            School’s key achievements and enhancements in recent years. The following table
            lists ways the faculty integrates practice community perspectives into the fabric of
            teaching, research and service:

           Table 30: How Faculty Integrate Perspectives from the Field of Practice
                Perspectives from
                public health practice
                community are
                integrated through:                                  Description

            School faculty, participating through various tracks:

                Tenured and tenure-track   The personal experiences of faculty in community public health
                faculty                    practice situations infuse instruction and research with field
                                           perspectives.

                Contract faculty           In 2003, the School implemented a contract faculty position as
                                           one strategy for further integrating perspectives of the public
                                           health community in its teaching, research and service. Contract
                                           faculty serve under annual or multi-year contracts. They are
                                           eligible for promotion, but are not eligible for tenure. Under the
                                           terms of their contracts, these faculty members may focus on a
                                           single area of interest, such as teaching or research. Contract
                                           faculty may share their time between the School and another
                                           organization engaged in public health, such as the Minnesota
                                           Department of Health, and receive compensation proportionally.
                                           These faculty bring immediate, first-hand perspectives from the
                                           practice community.

                Adjunct faculty            Adjunct faculty members include public health professionals from
                                           the community who are employed by the School to teach or
                                           lecture – and to bring perspectives from the “real-world” to
                                           School instruction.




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             Perspectives from
             public health practice
             community are
             integrated through:                                       Description

             Guest speakers, lecturers      Practicing public health practitioners frequently are invited into
             and panelists                  classrooms as guest speakers, lecturers and/or panelists to share
                                            perspectives with students.

             Joint appointments             Joint faculty appointments across the University of Minnesota
                                            and other universities provide yet another avenue for richer, more
                                            diverse perspectives.

           Programs that connect faculty and students with the practice community

             Public Health Practice Major   The Public Health Practice Major offers academic programs at the
                                            master's level geared especially for practicing public health
                                            professionals and others in the health care disciplines. As such, it
                                            serves as a conduit for bringing students – and perspectives –
                                            from the practice community to the School.

             Public Health Institute        Through the School’s Public Health Institute, a three-week on-
                                            campus opportunity for study with academic credit or continuing
                                            professional education, the faculty interacts closely with
                                            practicing professionals who attend, gaining insight into the
                                            issues and perspectives of importance to the field. In addition,
                                            faculty participation in the Public Health Institute provides an
                                            opportunity to “co-lead” courses with professionals from
                                            departments of health, private industry, health care organizations
                                            and other universities locally and globally – and thus gain
                                            exposure to external perspectives.

             Community Partners and         The School actively partners with individuals, organizations and
             Annual Community               agencies from the community to enrich the student educational
             Partners Event                 experience. In addition to serving as adjunct faculty members,
                                            individuals from the community may, for example, serve as
                                            mentors, guest lecturers or preceptors. Community organizations
                                            and agencies may sponsor student events, such as the National
                                            Public Health Week Film Festival, the mentoring program or
                                            Welcome Week orientation. The School celebrates these
                                            partnerships at its Annual Community Partner Event. Individuals
                                            who have contributed to an outstanding experience for students
                                            in education, training, research or guidance are presented a Star
                                            award. Similar awards are made to one agency, one organization
                                            and one individual to recognize their significant contributions to
                                            the student experience. In addition, adjunct faculty are honored at
                                            the event for the perspectives they bring to students.




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Transforming Discovery to Impact:
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                Perspectives from
                public health practice
                community are
                integrated through:                                  Description

                Mentoring                  The School features one of the largest active mentoring programs
                                           among schools of public health in the country. Some 150 public
                                           health professionals, representing a broad range of disciplines,
                                           from throughout the state were paired with students in 2005-2006.
                                           The program’s emphasis is on matching mentors with first-year
                                           students. Its goal is to provide a link between the strong focus on
                                           theory that first-year students receive in the classroom and the
                                           application of those theories in the field. Mentors are encouraged
                                           to meet with mentees once a month for one or more hours. In
                                           addition, mentors and students interact at more formal School-
                                           sponsored events.

            Research

                Community-based            Through community-based participatory research, the faculty
                participatory research     forms partnerships with community and local public health
                                           organizations to assess needs, develop and implement
                                           appropriate interventions and evaluate success. Through the
                                           research process, community perspectives become integrated
                                           into the School.

            Advisory board input on curricula

                External advisory boards   Advisory boards made up of practicing public health
                                           professionals from a range of disciplines provide perspectives
                                           that shape curricula and other aspects of School majors and
                                           Centers.

            Student engagement in community

                Student field work         Students gain real-world perspectives on the practice of public
                                           health through applied research and service projects. They, in
                                           turn, bring their experiences back to the faculty and other
                                           students. All professional degree students are required to do a
                                           field practicum.




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   4.1.d. Outcome measures judging qualifications of the faculty complement and
          three-year performance against these measures.

   Table 31: Outcome Measures by which to Judge Qualifications of Faculty
   Complement
                                                                               Year     Year       Year
                                                                Target        2003/4   2004/5     2005/6

       Objective 3.a.: Percentage of eligible faculty who         80%                              86%
       receive promotion from assistant to full professor
       within 11 years

       Objective 8.b.: Recognition of community partners      At least 50%                          61%
       through adjunct appointments within the University       of adjunct                        (67/107)
       and within external communities                         faculty will
                                                                 be from
                                                                 external
                                                              communities


4.1.e.This criterion is met.
           Strengths
              School faculty is highly regarded nationally and internationally for the quality
              and impact of their research, teaching and service.
              The addition of the new contract faculty category – non-tenure-track faculty
              who focus on teaching or research under a contract with the School – has
              strengthened the faculty complement and introduced perspectives from the field
              of practice.
              In addition, the School integrates perspectives from the community through
              adjunct faculty, guest lecturers, advisory boards, mentors, continuing
              professional education programs, community-based research, student field work
              and other activities.
              With new public health imperatives demanding increased attention, the School
              in 2004-2005 established a plan to increase its faculty of 95 to a projected 130
              over the next five years in order to strengthen traditional areas and build new
              ones. The plan to increase faculty headcount is on track.
           Weaknesses
            More faculty members are needed to serve the School’s growing student body,
            strengthen expertise in current disciplines and develop new areas of knowledge
            to address current and emerging public health issues.
           Recommendation
             Continue to add faculty in priority areas.


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Transforming Discovery to Impact:
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4.2 Faculty Policies and Procedures
    4.2.a. Documentation of faculty rules and regulations
            Clearly articulated rules and regulations for the faculty are provided by the
            University, the School and its Divisions:
            University
            Upon initial hire, faculty members attend a three-day orientation during which the
            University describes, illustrates and reinforces policies, rules and regulations
            governing education, research and service. University policies regarding tenure are
            also reviewed at the time of hire, with annual updates provided through the
            Academic Health Center. In addition, the University maintains a comprehensive
            on-line policy library through which faculty may obtain access to all policies, rules
            and regulations at any time.
            School and Division
            Beginning in 2004 and continuing since then, the Dean and three Associate Deans
            have met individually with each new faculty member to orient him or her to
            School policies. Among the policies reviewed are:
               Academic Freedom and Responsibility
               Academic Misconduct
               Outside Consulting, Service Activities and Other Work
               Professional Development Leaves
               Staff Appearances Before the Legislature
               Tenure Regulations
               Community Partnerships and Service Opportunities
            Like the University, the School also makes faculty policies accessible via its Web
            site at http://www.sph.umn.edu/faculty/resources/home.html
            New and revised policies are announced through the School’s monthly newsletter,
            SPH News, which is delivered to all faculty, and through updates to the faculty
            resource Web site, referenced above. These policies are also communicated and
            discussed at Division meetings.
            Each year, all School faculty are asked to review the School’s Academic
            Appointment, Promotion and Tenure Policy and the University’s Tenure Policy.
            Revisions to these policies are made by faculty vote.

    4.2.b. Provisions for faculty development
            The ongoing professional development of faculty – the School’s primary asset – is
            critical to the achievement of School goals. The 21st Century has introduced new
            opportunities and complexities throughout academia – and particularly, it seems,
            across the public health disciplines.




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           A rich complement of professional development opportunities is available to
           School faculty, including:
           Opportunities through the School Faculty Development Plan
           The School’s Faculty Development Plan provides information and resources that
           faculty may use for professional growth over the course of their careers. These
           resources are designed to assist faculty in seeking greater professional
           accomplishment and advancement to higher levels within the academy. All faculty
           members – tenured, tenure track, contract and adjunct – are eligible to take
           advantage of development opportunities outlined in the plan:
              Instructors and Lecturers: Focusing on Knowledge Development
              Assistant Professors: Realizing the Scholarly Potential
              Associate Professors: Gaining Mastery Throughout the Academy
              Professors: Creating a Legacy
              Professors Emeriti Corps: Sharing through Growth and Wisdom
           The School’s Faculty Development Plan is available online at
           http://www.sph.umn.edu/img/assets/9103/FacDevPlan082106.pdf

           University-sponsored faculty development opportunities
           The University offers a wide range of informative workshops and seminars for
           new and more senior faculty. Among the University-sponsored development
           opportunities are the Bush Faculty Development Program and the University
           Center for Teaching and Learning Services.
              The Bush Faculty Development Program offers opportunities for tenure-track
              and experienced faculty members to gain a higher level of teaching expertise
              and a greater appreciation of the connections between excellence and diversity
              in teaching. A 10-week "advanced seminar" is offered each spring for program
              graduates.
              The Center for Teaching and Learning Services offers activities in teaching
              improvement for all faculty, instructional staff, teaching assistants and
              undergraduate tutors. These activities include courses and workshops,
              orientation for new faculty, one-to-one consultation and classroom feedback, as
              well as special preparation for international instructors and teaching assistants.
              The Center’s Preparing Future Faculty program assists graduate and
              postdoctoral participants in the development of teaching skills and exploration
              of the faculty role. Topics such as teaching skills, grants management, human
              subjects concerns, ethics, time management and administrative skills are
              addressed.
              The University also provides training and development for leaders.
              (http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/leadership/) A number of University-sponsored development
              opportunities provide orientation and best practices for new chairs, department
              heads and directors.




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Transforming Discovery to Impact:
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            Sabbatical and leave opportunities
            The opportunity for sabbatical and leave supports professional development and
            rejuvenation. University policy grants tenured, tenure-track and multi-year
            contract faculty the opportunity to apply for single-semester leave at full pay or for
            a year-long sabbatical at half pay. Supplemental funding for sabbaticals is
            available from the University on a competitive basis.
            Support for attendance at professional and scientific meetings
            Generally, primary faculty members are encouraged – and provided the support
            necessary – to attend professional and scientific meetings at least once each year.
            Most faculty are supported through sponsored research and are thus funded for
            travel to present scientific papers and participate in professional conferences on a
            more frequent basis.
            In addition to the enrichment gained by attending scientific and professional
            meetings, all faculty are urged to attend special lecture events sponsored by the
            School. These events attract renowned national and international leaders in public
            health – and provide faculty with insights and perspectives that can influence and
            advance their work. Among the regular lecture events sponsored by the School are
            the:
               Carl J. Martinson Lecture on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention;
               Gaylord Anderson Lecture, named for the School’s founding Dean;
               The Richard G. Bond Lecture series, presented each year since 1987 in memory
               of Richard G. Bond, director of the Division of Environmental Health from
               1962 to 1973 and member of the School faculty from 1949 until 1979;
               The International Ancel Keys Symposium on Nutrition and Health, named in
               memory of the former professor at the University known for his studies of the
               influence of diet on health.
            Formal and informal mentoring
            The School’s Divisions have instituted formal and informal mentoring for all new
            faculty members to assist their smooth assimilation. Frequently, senior faculty
            members or Division Heads take responsibility for advising new faculty and
            helping develop their teaching and research programs.
            Start-up funds for new faculty; support for new directions for experienced
            faculty
            Funding support is available to faculty to begin new careers and new directions:
               The School and Divisions may provide start-up funds to new faculty to help pay
               partial salary support and defray expenses for research assistants, opening a lab,
               computers and other equipment, travel to other universities to begin
               partnerships and professional development opportunities.
               The School and the Academic Health Center (AHC) support junior faculty or
               new directions for established faculty through seed grants. On average, the
               School supports faculty with three grants worth $25,000 each per year. The


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             AHC funds approximately 15 projects annually at $25,000 each. The School
             must compete with others from across the AHC for these grants.
             Regents’ Scholarships, provided by the University to all School faculty and
             staff, underwrite the cost of any additional course or degree that may be
             pursued.
             Provost pool money for “preventive” retention, which seeks to reward highly
             productive faculty and may be used for development, can be requested by the
             School to retain prestigious, nationally competitive faculty.

   4.2.c. Formal procedures for evaluating faculty competence and performance
           Faculty competence and performance are essential to the School’s ability to carry
           out its mission. To ensure quality performance, the School has established
           processes for regular faculty evaluations, including:
             The annual performance review; and
             Promotion and tenure reviews
           Annual performance reviews
           Tenured and tenure-track faculty
           Division Heads conduct annual performance evaluations with all tenured and
           tenure-track faculty as the basis for merit salary increases. Student evaluations also
           are important in determining merit increases. In addition to reviewing past
           performance, Division Heads and faculty members use the review to establish
           goals for the coming year. Salary increase recommendations are forwarded to the
           Dean for review and approval.
           Under University policy, criteria for annual performance evaluations, which
           encompass teaching, research and service, must be developed by the Division
           Heads in consultation with faculty members. Therefore, each division has
           established faculty performance evaluation criteria. Specific information is
           requested regarding teaching of academic courses, advising of students,
           grantsmanship, publications, local, national/international service (both professional
           and administrative), and a summary of activities and accomplishments, current and
           proposed. Documentation is assembled by each faculty member prior to a personal
           discussion with the respective division head.
           Contract faculty
           Division Heads also conduct performance evaluations annually with all contract
           faculty to determine merit salary increases. While tenure-track and tenured faculty
           are reviewed on accomplishments spanning the School’s core activities of
           research, education and service, contract faculty are measured against specific
           expectations spelled out in their contracts – and they are assessed only in the
           specific area of focus (teaching or research) for which they were hired.




PAGE 128                                            University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
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            Community and adjunct faculty
            The performance of adjunct faculty, who are appointed for a one-year term, is
            evaluated more informally. At the time of engagement, adjunct faculty members
            and Division Heads agree on specific expectations and assignments. After each
            term, an adjunct faculty member’s continuation is determined by on-going need
            for his or her expertise and feedback from students and faculty colleagues.
            Promotion and Tenure Reviews
            Before they receive tenure, primary faculty members are reviewed annually under
            terms of the School’s Academic Appointment, Promotion and Tenure (APT)
            policy. (Even though they are not eligible for tenure, contract faculty are also
            evaluated for promotion as qualified.) Recommendations for promotion from
            assistant professor to associate professor and from associate professor to professor
            are made by the APT Committee to the Dean, who forwards the documentation for
            consideration by the Academic Health Center and the University.
            The University’s post-tenure review process, which governs that of the School,
            builds upon annual reviews to sustain and enhance faculty performance in
            teaching, research and service. It is also intended to assist faculty members who
            may have difficulty achieving established expectations.
            Once faculty members are tenured, their performance is evaluated every five years
            by the APT Committee. In addition, a Division Head may, at the time of a faculty
            member’s annual review, ask him or her to submit documentation to the APT
            Committee for screening for “substantial substandard performance.” The
            documentation of faculty members who fail the APT Committee review is passed
            to the Dean, who may then decide to pursue the special review process described
            in the University’s Rules and Procedures for Annual and Special Post-Tenure
            Review.

    4.2.d. Student course evaluation and evaluation of teaching effectiveness
            The content and quality of courses and teaching effectiveness are of central
            importance to the School’s education objectives. In fact, teaching receives strong
            emphasis in the faculty promotion and tenure process: “The candidate [for
            promotion] should be clearly recognized for his/her impact and effectiveness as a
            teacher and adviser.”
            Student evaluations, conducted at the conclusion of every course, provide valuable
            feedback on courses and teaching effectiveness – and are taken seriously by the
            School and faculty. Safeguards are in place to protect student anonymity and
            prevent faculty from altering evaluation results.
            Currently, courses are evaluated using Form D, the Student Evaluation of
            Teaching, a standard form supplied by the University’s Measurement Services
            Office. An online version of the form is also available for evaluating distance
            education and/or scheduled courses. Use of the online form is expected to increase.




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           Course evaluation proceeds as follows:
             The School’s Student Services Center provides the primary course instructor
             with the University’s Form D and a comment sheet developed by the School,
             which asks specific questions related to teaching methods, instructor and/or TA
             availability, course subject matter, reading material and text, performance
             requirements (attendance, papers, discussion, tests, presentations), grading
             methods and guest instructors.
             Instructions are provided to instructors and students to ensure that the
             evaluation process is followed and forms are completed correctly. Students
             concerned that they may be linked to their comments may ask a major
             coordinator to forward their comments confidentially, bring a typed sheet of
             comments to the Student Services Center or complete the comment sheet in the
             Student Services Center where a typewriter is available.
             On the last day of class, the instructor leaves the room and the class elects a
             representative to collect and return completed evaluations to the Student
             Services Center. To ensure the integrity of the process, evaluation forms are
             held in the Student Services Center until official grades have been submitted.
             Then, the Form Ds are sent for electronic tabulation to the Office of
             Measurement Services, which, in turn, forwards the official results to the
             Student Services Center and the course instructor(s). For online evaluations, the
             process follows the same steps after official grades are submitted.
           Copies of the School’s core course evaluations are retained by the Student
           Services Center and are reviewed by the Educational Policy Committee. The
           comment sheets go to the course instructor(s).

   4.2.e. Community service activities in the promotion and tenure process
           The Promotion and Tenure process requires demonstrated achievement in
           teaching, research and professional service. The process requires faculty members
           to provide cumulative documentation of service activities, such as roles in
           professional organizations, service in governmental organizations, professional
           community service, presentations to community groups and participation on
           University and School committees.
           Service aimed at improving public health is particularly valued as a component of
           activities for promotion and tenure. For example, in the case of promotion to full
           professor, service is not only an important supplementary component, but a
           candidate should also have contributed significantly to major policy formation and
           had a demonstrated impact in his/her field within the framework of professionally-
           related community activities. The candidate should also have contributed to Major,
           Division, School and University functions as service to the academy, as well as to
           professional organizations and to local, state, national or international
           communities.




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    4.2.f. This criterion is met.
            Strengths
               The University, School and its Divisions communicate and make easily
               accessible the many policies and procedures related to faculty and their
               activities.
               Ongoing professional development is supported by the School and the
               University, and development opportunities are communicated and made
               accessible to faculty.
               Rigorous evaluation of faculty competence and performance occurs annually
               for contract, adjunct and tenure-track faculty. Tenured faculty are evaluated
               every five years.
               Student evaluations of courses and teaching effectiveness are taken seriously by
               the School and faculty and used to review and revise program offerings.
               Achievement in professional service is an important consideration in decisions
               regarding promotion and/or tenure.
            Weaknesses
             The School currently has no easy-to-use data collection system by which to
             track faculty or student service.
             Requirements for faculty service to the community (engagement) are not fully
             enumerated in performance and promotion and tenure expectations and are
             currently under review University-wide.
            Recommendations
              Develop a service reporting system that faculty find easy to access and use.
              Enumerate community service as a valued performance criteria and a value that
              defines the culture of an engaged School. The School is currently an active
              participant in the University-wide review of tenure code for such enumeration.




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4.3 Faculty and Staff Diversity
    4.3.a. Summary demographic data – faculty (Data Source: Human Resource
           Tracking September 2006)

Table 32: Summary Demographic Data – Current Core and Other Faculty
(Template H)
                                       Core Faculty         Other Faculty                Total            STATE
                                       #          %          #           %          #            %        MN %
 Male                                      65      56%         126       64%         192         60%
 African-American                          1          2%          -           -          1       1%
 Caucasian                                 56      86%           93      74%         150         78%
 Hispanic/Latino                            -          -          -           -           -           -
 Asian/Pacific Islander                    8       12%           5       4%             11       6%
 Native American/Alaska Native              -          -          -           -           -           -
 Unknown/Other                              -          -         28      22%            28       15%
 International                              -          -                      -           -           -
 Female                                    51      44%           74      36%         125         40%
 African-American                          1          2%          -                      1       1%
 Caucasian                                 47      92%           57      77%         104         83%
 Hispanic/Latino                           1          2%                      -          1       1%
 Asian/Pacific Islander                    2          4%         5       7%              7       5%
 Native American/Alaska Native              -          -         1       1%              1       1%
 Unknown/Other                              -          -         11      15%            11       9%
 International                              -          -          -                       -           -
ALL Male/Female
 African-American                          2          2%          -           -          2           1%      3.5
 Caucasian                               103       89%         150       75%            254      80%        89.4
 Hispanic/Latino                           1          1%          -           -          1           1%      2.9
 Asian/Pacific Islander                    10         8%         10          5%         18           5%      2.9
 Native American/Alaska Native              -          -         1           1%          1           1%      1.1
 Unknown/Other                              -          -         39      20%            39       12% multi 1.7
 International                              -          -          -           -           -           -      5.3
                                         116                   200                      317

* State 2000 Census http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/27000.html



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    4.3.b. Summary demographic data – staff

            Table 33: Summary Demographic Data – Full-Time Staff (Template I)
                                                      Full-Time Staff       %

              Male                                                  83      24.2%

                African-American                                        4       4.8%
                Caucasian                                           70      84.3%
                Hispanic/Latino                                         1       1.2%
                Asian/Pacific Islander                                  6       7.2%
                Native American/Alaska Native                           -       0.0%
                Unknown/Other                                           2       2.4%
                International                                           -       0.0%

              Female                                               260      75.8%
                African-American                                        4       1.5%
                Caucasian                                          220      84.6%
                Hispanic/Latino                                         4       1.5%
                Asian/Pacific Islander                              16          6.2%
                Native American/Alaska Native                           3       1.2%
                Unknown/Other                                       13          5.0%
                International                                           -       0.0%
                                                343

              ALL Male/Female                                      343

                African-American                                        8       2.3%
                Caucasian                                          290      84.5%
                Hispanic/Latino                                         5       1.5%
                Asian/Pacific Islander                              22          6.4%
                Native American/Alaska Native                           3       0.9%
                Unknown/Other                                       15          4.4%
                International                                           -       0.0%
                                                                   343




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   4.3.c. Policies and procedures regarding the School’s commitment to providing
          equitable opportunities without regard to age, gender, race, disability, sexual
          orientation, religion or national origin.
           The School views diversity of its faculty, staff and students as essential to
           achieving excellence and impact. In research, education and service, perspectives
           from diverse backgrounds and experiences are critical if the School is to have a
           noteworthy impact on the public health of diverse populations.
           The School adheres to all faculty recruiting and hiring policies and procedures
           defined by the University and the Board of Regents. The University’s Office of
           Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action maintains on its Web site a large
           number of policy documents regarding diversity, equal employment opportunity,
           affirmative action, and the prohibiting of discrimination due to age, disability and
           gender. University policies, guidelines and processes provide hiring authorities
           with as much flexibility as possible in recruiting and hiring faculty and
           professional and administrative staff. In addition, they provide information in
           support of sound equal opportunity and affirmative action practice compliance and
           effective human resource management and practice. (To visit the Office of Equal
           Opportunity Web site, please go to http://www.eoaffact.umn.edu/).
           The School has committed to the goal set by the University Board of Regents to:
           Increase the presence and participation of racial/ethnic minorities and women
           where they are under-represented; and the creation of an inclusive and supportive
           environment for men and women students, faculty, and staff from varying racial,
           religious and ethnic backgrounds, of varying sexual orientations and people with
           disabilities.
           The Office of the Dean has directed that “it is the responsibility of the School and
           each search committee under the leadership of its chair(s) to assure that this goal is
           met.” The Dean’s directive also requires search committees to initiate some or all
           of the following actions as appropriate in each national search:
           “Searchers will aggressively seek qualified candidates from under-represented
           populations through a variety of networks and personal contacts. These may
           include:
                  Publication of position notices on World Wide Web sites and in
                  publications likely to be viewed by candidates from under-represented
                  populations;
                  Use of networks provided by professional societies and associations of
                  scholars and others from under-represented populations;
                  Use of personal networks of search committee members and School faculty
                  and staff to assure the widest dissemination of position notices.
           “Search committee composition should reflect diverse constituents.
                  Where appropriate, committees should consider keeping candidate pools
                  open until qualified candidates from under-represented groups are found
                  and contacted.”


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            In an effort to increase diversity and create an environment that supports it, the
            Academic Health Center (AHC), the administrative home of the School, conducted
            a baseline assessment (condensed version of the Multicultural Awareness Project
            for Institutional Transformation or MAP IT) in 2005 to gauge diversity in AHC
            schools and provide a guide for their transformation to a more diverse, inclusive
            environment. The assessment found a commitment to diversity and inclusion by all
            AHC schools and varying levels of progress. Findings also showed:
                     That while most of the schools have explicit diversity statements, most
                     currently do not communicate diversity/inclusion through their mission
                     statements;
                     The existence of a supportive learning environment that successfully pairs
                     students with mentors and role models and offers experiential opportunities
                     to gain insight into cultural differences;
                     That resources to support diversity are generally limited and vary across
                     schools;
                     That cultural competencies and perspectives are highlighted most
                     frequently in coursework and in experiential assignments; and
                     That faculty take an individual approach in teaching and supporting
                     culturally related topics, since there is no formal faculty development
                     program with this focus.

    4.3.d. Description of recruitment and retention efforts to attract and retain a
           diverse faculty and staff, along with information about how these efforts are
           evaluated and refined over time.
            In addition to the activities referenced above, the School employs a range of
            strategies to attract and retain a more diverse workforce, including documenting
            and reviewing the hiring efforts of each search committee as required for the
            completion of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission reports. Among the
            strategies are advertising, networking, support (financial and other), developing
            candidates from within and nurturing the progress of future faculty members:
            Advertising
            Regular advertisements in journals, newsletters and periodicals, Web sites and list-
            serves relevant to minority populations and that reach a wide audience of health
            professionals.
            Networking
            Faculty are encouraged to establish on-going dialogues and possible faculty
            exchanges with historically black colleges and to seek other opportunities at
            conferences, professional meetings, through research and service on editorial
            boards or study committees, etc., to build relationships with minority faculty.




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           Faculty Bridge Funding Program
           In 1989, the University established a special bridge fund to support academic
           departments that have identified, through a national search process or through a
           target-of-opportunity procedure, full-time faculty of color in tenured or tenure-
           track appointments to fill a specific academic niche, but that do not immediately
           have adequate funding available to extend an offer of employment. The fund may
           also be used to support non-regular faculty or professional/academic staff on
           continuous appointments. The Interim Dean (now Dean) disseminated information
           on the fund to all faculty during the 2004 – 2005 academic year and awarded the
           fund to a minority post-doctoral associate in 2006.
           Facilitating Spousal Hires
           To lower one of the barriers to recruiting candidates, the School often makes
           special arrangements, as provided by University policy, to facilitate spousal hires.
           Development from Within
                 President’s Post-doctoral Fellowship for Academic Diversity.
                  – Seeking to attract fellows for post-doctoral study who will then stay to
                    become faculty members, the University offers post-doctoral
                    fellowships for academic diversity. Available to candidates from under-
                    represented populations, the University provides 75 percent funding for
                    two years; 25 percent comes from the academic unit.
           Recruitment – and Nurturing – of Minority Students
           The School looks to develop its own minority faculty by recruiting more minority
           students (Chapter 4.5), and encouraging their progression to doctoral programs.
           Competition from private industry and other universities for these excellent
           graduates makes retaining them a challenge.
           To reach potential students (and future faculty), the School participates in the
           McNair Scholars’ Kids Into Health Careers and the Life Sciences Summer
           Undergraduate programs that provide minority undergraduates opportunities to
           work with faculty on projects over the summer. Several students have worked with
           School faculty. Through their experiences, participants are encouraged to pursue
           careers in the health sciences.
           The School’s participation in the Life Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research
           Programs (LSSURP) and graduate programs fair is another avenue through which
           it seeks to recruit students of color. In 2006, 40 to 50 undergraduate students –
           about half of whom were minorities – attended from colleges across the U.S. The
           event is designed to promote interaction between the LSSURP students and
           representatives of the graduate programs in the Life Sciences.
           In addition, in order to introduce students early in their undergraduate careers to
           public health, the Director of the Office of Multicultural Services has taught a
           Student Excellence and Multiculturalism course for first-year students of color
           interested in the health professions.



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    4.3.e. Description of efforts, other than recruitment and retention of core faculty,
           through which the school seeks to establish and maintain an environment that
           supports diversity.
             The School and University at large are strongly committed to the vital goal of
             providing equitable opportunities without regard to age, gender, race, ability,
             religion or national origin and to a culture that promotes collaboration. The
             University has created a system-wide academic task force on diversity
             (http://www1.umn.edu/systemwide/strategic_positioning/tf_sys_acad_diversity.html) and an academic
             task force on faculty culture (http://www1.umn.edu/systemwide/strategic_positioning/tf_acad_fac_
             culture.html).The diversity task force has reaffirmed and deepened the “University’s
             commitment and capacity…to become a national leader in articulating, respecting,
             embracing and supporting diversity among faculty, staff, and students.” The
             faculty culture task force has yielded one of the most dynamic reports at the
             University resulting in the review of all tenure codes with an emphasis on
             rewarding interprofessional collaborations and a culture of engagement. The
             School is actively participating in implementing these recommendations. In
             addition, the School has engaged community and University experts to encourage
             open dialogue about issues of culture and diversity within the School. Examples
             include: “A Framework for Understanding Poverty,” presented by Jodi Pfarr of
             aha! Process Inc., for the past three years to a diverse audience of over 80 students,
             faculty, staff and community partners; and in August 2006, a presentation,
             “Diversity: A Gentle Approach to the Tough Stuff,” by Kirby Edmonds, T.F.
             Associates of New York.

    4.3.f. Identification of outcome measures by which the School may evaluate its
           success in achieving a diverse faculty and staff, along with data regarding the
           performance of the school against those measures for each of the last three
           years.

    Table 34: Outcome Measure by Which to Judge Success in Achieving Diverse
    Faculty and Staff
                                                                               **Year     **Year       Year
                                                                    *Target    2003/4     2004/5      2005/6

        Objective 3.b.: Proportion of racially and ethnically                                         9%/44%
        diverse and female/male faculty***

        Objective 4.b.: Proportion of racially and ethnically                                        11%/76%
        diverse and female/male staff.

    * No quantitative targets are established. General goal is to continue to increase diversity of faculty and
       staff.
    ** Data systems changed. Future percentages will be measurable.
    *** Faculty include tenured, tenure track and contract.




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   4.3.g. This criterion is met.
           Strengths
              Gender diversity has greatly improved, with women now making up 44 percent
              of the faculty.
              The School is committed to recruiting and retaining a faculty that reflects the
              demographic and ethnic profile of the region.
              The Dean has directed all search committees to aggressively seek qualified
              candidates from under-represented populations.
              The School adheres to all University and Board of Regents recruiting, hiring
              and affirmative action policies and procedures.
              The School employs a range of strategies to recruit and retain a diverse faculty
              and staff including faculty development programs and a faculty-led working
              group on health disparities.
           Weaknesses
            The racial and ethnic diversity of the faculty (9 percent) does not fully reflect
            that of the population of the region (11 percent).
           Recommendations
             Increase efforts to recruit and retain a more racially and ethnically diverse
             faculty.
             Continue to strengthen relationships and ties with historically black colleges
             and minority faculty at other institutions.

4.4 Student Recruitment and Admissions
   4.4.a. Recruitment policies and procedures
          Preparing the next generation of students is a primary goal of the School. The
          School, therefore, seeks an intellectually vibrant, yet racially, ethnically and
          geographically diverse student body. Diversity contributes to an enriched learning
          environment. Plus, students from many and varied backgrounds will contribute to
          a public health workforce better equipped to provide public health leadership
          among diverse populations.
           In seeking a diverse student body, the School considers factors such as cultural and
           ethnic origins, social and educational background, geography, life experience,
           community leadership experience and interests in public health fields. In admitting
           candidates, the School emphasizes experience in public health and the health
           sciences.
           The task of recruitment is a shared responsibility, involving faculty,
           administrators, students, major coordinators and alumni. An Office of Recruitment
           Services, established in 2000, coordinates recruitment efforts and can be credited,
           in part, for the School’s doubling in the number of students. It has also contributed



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            significantly to the School’s increased efforts to attract students from under-
            represented populations.
            The School undertakes numerous activities to attract high-caliber, diverse students:
            Assessment. The School participates in market research to gain insight into factors
            that shape student decisions to pursue master’s degrees. This information is helpful
            both for planning recruitment strategies and for developing programming that
            meets student needs for flexibility. For example, in 2004, it collaborated on
            “Pathways to Public Health Focus Group Assessment Research,” an effort to
            gather market information relevant to increasing the number and diversity of
            Minnesotans who pursue graduate education in public health. The focus groups
            suggested that before enrolling in a master’s program, participants focused on two
            key questions: (1) “Should I pursue higher education?” and (2) “Which path will
            allow me to do ‘meaningful work’ (i.e., help others, social justice), help me
            accomplish my goals, give me the flexibility I need in school and career and allow
            me to make a living?”
            Online applications. The School is an early and enthusiastic adopter of the
            Schools of Public Health Application Service (SOPHAS), the online centralized
            application service for schools of public health. This exciting capability serves the
            needs of students – providing time-savings through the ability to submit an
            application completed once to many schools – and the School, which benefits from
            the broad marketing and outreach capability inherent in Web-based technology.
            Informational events. The School holds numerous events throughout the year to
            introduce its programs, faculty and staff to prospective students. These events –
            free and open to the public – include many 1.5-hour information sessions and
            several half-day School Preview Days, through which prospective students can
            interact with faculty, staff and students. In addition, the School’s degree programs
            also hold open houses and information events.
            Advertising. The School regularly advertises in journals, newsletters, periodicals
            and via Web sites and list-serves that reach a wide audience of health
            professionals, particularly in minority populations.
            Networking. The School actively encourages personal contact, networking and
            enthusiastic recruiting of applicants by faculty members and staff at local and
            national events and key undergraduate programs.
            Other. In addition, the School uses a number of other recruitment strategies,
            including:
               Distribution of the School catalog, view book, information sheets and related
               information (most recent versions available in the Resource File)
               Distribution of major and Division brochures
               Posting of a toll-free telephone number
               Attendance at recruiting fairs (see list of Recruiting Events, below)
               Updates to the School Web site
               A listing in Peterson’s Guide



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             Enrollment or link on other Web sites, including GradSchools.com

   4.4.b. Statement of recruitment policies and procedures
           Application review process
           The Student Services Center coordinates the application process and forwards
           completed applications for review to the School’s Admissions Committees. (Each
           M.P.H. Major and Graduate Program has an Admissions Committee composed of
           at least three faculty, at least two of whom hold primary appointments in the
           School or on the Graduate Faculty.) The Admissions Committees evaluate each
           completed application and forward their recommendations to the Major Chair and
           Dean for review and admission signatures.
           Procedures for application review
           Admissions Committees consider the candidate’s complete file including:
                Evidence of interest and intent (usually appearing as a CV/resume and
                personal essay regarding public health interests and personal directions);
                Evidence of past academic performance achieved at a properly accredited
                institution of higher education in the form of an official transcript of a
                baccalaureate degree or of a post-baccalaureate graduate or professional
                degree. (No applicant is permitted to matriculate who has not completed a
                baccalaureate degree from a properly accredited university or college);
                Evidence of academic potential usually in the form of standardized test
                scores taken within five years previous to the application that are acceptable
                to the major for graduate and professional study. Generally test scores
                considered acceptable include those from the GRE, GMAT or MAT
                examination, although some majors may permit Medical or Law School
                scores or academic performance in the Public Health Certificate in Core
                Concepts (within past three years) as sufficient evidence. Majors may also
                choose to accept an earned doctorate (e.g., M.D., J.D., Ph.D.) or other
                advanced degree (e.g., M.S.N.) as sufficient evidence of academic potential.
                Applicants who have earned a Public Health Certificate in Core Concepts
                (which includes all six core course requirements, which are the same as the
                M.P.H. core) are waived from the GRE requirement for admission to the
                Environmental Health Sciences M.P.H. or Public Health Administration and
                Policy M.P.H. major programs if they meet the following criteria:
                    1. All core courses were completed on a letter grade (A-F) basis
                    2. The overall GPA for all core courses was 3.25 or greater; and
                    3. No grade for a core course was less than a B-.
                Evidence of external evaluation of the candidate in the form of three letters
                of recommendation, each accompanied by an evaluation form. At least one
                of these must comment on the applicant's potential as a graduate student and
                public health professional.



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                  Evidence of fluency in English is required of international students whose
                  primary language is not English. The operational standard for admission to
                  the School is a TOEFL score of 90 on the Internet-based (iBT) test, 600 on
                  the paper test or 250 on the computer-based TOEFL. International applicants
                  are exempt from this requirement if they have completed 16 semester credits
                  (or 24 quarter credits) within the past 24 months at a recognized U.S.
                  institution of higher learning. Other students whose primary language is not
                  English may submit a TOEFL score or other evidence of written and oral
                  fluency.
                  Other evidence is welcome, including information about the applicant’s
                  professional and life experience, potential contribution to diversity and
                  compatibility with faculty expertise and program directions.
                  To guide applicants, the School program catalog and Web site provide
                  expectations and points of reference in these areas of admissions review.
            Admissions decisions
            Admissions Committees may render one of three decisions in reviewing an
            application:
               Admit the applicant. The decision to admit an M.P.H. applicant is confirmed by
               the Major Chair or Director of Graduate Studies and the Dean (acting through
               the Associate Deans for Academic Affairs or Student Affairs). A letter of
               admission is issued by the Dean.
               Do not admit the applicant. The Major Chair informs applicants who are not
               accepted of the reasons in writing. Unsuccessful applicants are invited to
               address deficiencies and to reapply in a succeeding cycle if they so desire.
               Conditional admission. Under rare circumstances, an M.P.H. Admissions
               Committee may recommend in writing to the Associate Dean for Academic
               Affairs that an applicant be granted conditional admission. This designation
               may be requested in those rare cases in which an applicant has demonstrated
               strong potential for public health practice or public health leadership skills.
               With the Dean’s approval, conditional admission will require the student in the
               first semester to complete a minimum of nine credits in program core courses
               (of which one course must be a designated biostatistics or epidemiology core
               course) with no less than a B- in each course and an overall GPA of 3.0.
               Successful completion will result in full admission. Unsuccessful completion
               will result in withdrawal of the conditional status and non-continuation in the
               program. Conditional students must register and receive letter grades
               (incompletes are unacceptable). All conditional students are assigned a faculty
               adviser by the Major Chair with special consideration for academic need. The
               conditional designation is also available to M.S. and Ph.D. Admissions
               Committees but is regulated separately and according to the customs of the
               Graduate School.




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   4.4.c. Examples of recruitment materials
           The School offers comprehensive recruitment materials, each of which is designed
           to address specific audiences. Examples of these publications include:
             Introduction to the Profession
             School Overview
             Ph.D. brochure
             Office of Multicultural Services
           In addition, the School’s three recruitment Web sites serve specific purposes:
             School home page: www.SPH.umn.edu. Entry point to the School geared for
             everyone
             Web site for prospective students: www.sph.umn.edu/students/applicants/home.html.
             Geared to those seriously considering applying
             Web site for Recruitment Services: http://www.sph.umn.edu/pro/recruitment.html.
             Introduction to the Recruitment Services staff and services offered.




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    4.4.d. Number of applicants, acceptances and enrollment by program area

     Table 35: Program Applicants, Acceptances & Enrollment (Template J)
     (Data Source: PeopleSoft; Spring, Summer and Fall of the calendar year)

                                                               2006        2005        2004

        Biostatistics                             Applied         126          128        107
                                                  Admitted            64          48          46
                                                  Enrolled            38          30          26

        Clinical Research                         Applied             25          25          18
                                                  Admitted            20          24          13
                                                  Enrolled            19          23          13

        Community Health Education                Applied         109             65          71
                                                  Admitted            80          54          46
                                                  Enrolled            37          26          27

        Environmental Health                      Applied             91          90          81
                                                  Admitted            67          68          67
                                                  Enrolled            36          42          39

        Epidemiology                              Applied         212          178        153
                                                  Admitted        135          115        101
                                                  Enrolled            60          55          55

        Health Services Research and Policy       Applied             62          64          50
                                                  Admitted            28          36          27
                                                  Enrolled            18          20          15

        Health Care Administration                Applied         120             85      NA
                                                  Admitted            71          38      NA
                                                  Enrolled            52          27      NA

        Maternal and Child Health                 Applied             56          57          29
                                                  Admitted            43          41          24
                                                  Enrolled            20          19          11

        Public Health Administration and Policy   Applied             96          75          68
                                                  Admitted            68          59          57
                                                  Enrolled            33          33          28




Self-Study, February 2007                                                               PAGE 143
                                                                             Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students                                       Public Health for a Healthier World



    Table 35: Program Applicants, Acceptances & Enrollment (Template J)
    (Data Source: PeopleSoft; Spring, Summer and Fall of the calendar year) (continued)

                                                                        2006              2005         2004
       Public Health Nutrition                        Applied                  38                38           30
                                                      Admitted                 27                27           24
                                                      Enrolled                 13                17           13

       Public Health Practice (M.P.H. only)           Applied                 109                90           51
                                                      Admitted                 86                81           46
                                                      Enrolled                 63                63           32

       Public Health Practice Certificate             Applied                 146                70           70
                                                      Admitted                128                56           55
                                                      Enrolled                118                46           44


    4.4e. Number of students enrolled in each specialty area
            Please see Appendix 4.4.e Template K.

    4.4.f. Identification of outcome measures for evaluating success in enrolling a
           qualified student body

   Table 36: Outcome Measures by Which to Evaluate Success in Enrolling
   Qualified Student Body
                                                                                Year         Year        Year
                                                                  Target       2003/4       2004/5      2005/6

       Objective 1.d.: Number of applicants                      1200-1800          729          768     962
                                                                  variance
                                                                 threshold

       Objective 2.b.: Ratio of degree-seeking students (head     10 to 1        6.7:1       7.9:1       8.2:1
       count admissions) to faculty (head count).

            The School seeks to increase the number of applicants and ratio of students to
            faculty. An increase in resources, new hire of Director of Student Recruitment,
            Melvin Monette, and strategic planning are expected to yield targets.




PAGE 144                                                    University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                  Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students

    4.4.g. This criterion is met.
            Strengths
               The School has established rigorous policies and procedures for recruitment and
               admissions.
               The School sets high standards for admissions to assure a high-caliber student
               body and a high-caliber future public health workforce.
               The School has adopted the Schools of Public Health Application Service
               (SOPHAS), an online centralized application service to improve student access
               to application. In addition, it provides comprehensive recruitment materials that
               address specific student audiences.
               The School has attracted a growing body of qualified candidates. The student
               body has more than doubled in the last five years.
            Weaknesses: None

4.5 Student Diversity
    4.5.a. Policies, procedures and plans to achieve a diverse student population
            The School is committed to achieving a diverse student body that reflects the
            composition of the population and communities to be served. It is also committed
            to preparing students to work in a multicultural society. To carry out its
            commitments, the School strives to create an environment that welcomes and
            encourages all students to participate in the life of the School and in activities that
            foster academic achievement.
            Underscoring its commitment to these ideals, the School established the Office of
            Multicultural Services in August 2002 to provide leadership in this important area.
            Consequently, the School has recorded substantial improvement in student body
            diversity. Since 2002 when the School enrolled 56 students of color from the U.S.,
            the number of students of color had nearly tripled to 147 by the 2005-2006
            academic year. As a percentage of the student body, domestic students of color
            increased from 11 percent in 2002 to 15 percent in 2005-2006. Moreover, the
            School sponsors many activities to create a culture of diversity once the students
            arrive on campus and during their academic career. For example, during
            Orientation Week an outside expert provides a seminar offered to all students, staff
            and faculty on diversity. In addition, ongoing activities on diversity and minority
            affairs are offered throughout the academic year at the School and University.
            To increase student body diversity, the School has undertaken a range of
            recruitment activities that include:
               Joining recruitment efforts of the Graduate School, which has extensive
               outreach and participation in events with targeted under-represented populations
               (e.g., National Name Exchange Program, FAMU Feeder Program, McNair
               Scholars list, etc.)



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                                                                 Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students                           Public Health for a Healthier World

             Attending targeted recruiting events, such as the Annual Biomedical Research
             Conference for Minority Students and the Society for the Advancement of
             Chicanos and Native Americans in Science.
             Participating in Project 1000 (a national effort to recruit, admit and graduate
             under-represented graduate students. Participating institutions agree to waive
             application fees for those applying through this project.)
             Providing application fee waivers for students with verified financial need.
             Maintaining close relationships with the University’s central Office for
             Multicultural and Academic Affairs, the Multicultural Center for Academic
             Excellence, the Graduate School Diversity Office and the Martin Luther King,
             Jr. Center. These offices primarily provide support to under-represented
             students.
           In addition, the School seeks to build relationships with talented students of color
           who are on campus for various summer programs. At the 2006 Life Sciences
           Summer Undergraduate Research Programs (LSSURP) and graduate programs
           fair, for example, the School interacted with the 40 to 50 undergraduate attendees
           (half of whom were minority students) from colleges across the country.

   4.5.b. Recruitment efforts to attract a diverse student body; how these efforts are
          evaluated and refined over time.
           In 2004, the School centralized recruitment efforts with the establishment of the
           Office of Recruitment Services. However, recruitment continues to be a shared
           responsibility throughout the School, involving faculty, administrators, students,
           staff and alumni, and is coordinated by the Student Services Center.
           The Office of Recruitment Services is dedicated to recruiting intellectually vibrant
           candidates who are racially, ethnically and geographically diverse, by working
           with student affairs, academic programs, the advancement staff and alumni.
           Recruitment strategies employed by the Office of Recruitment Services include:
             Distributing the School catalog and related information
             Distributing printed and electronic versions of School marketing materials to
             prospective students
             Hosting regular on-campus Information and Preview Days for prospective
             students
             Posting a toll-free telephone number
             Increasing the use of technologies (Web site, e-mail, e-newsletter, etc.) to reach
             prospects
             Developing a specific Recruitment Services Web page
             Attending recruiting fairs (see list of Recruiting Events, below)
             Assessing impact of recruitment activities through a data management/inquiry
             tracking system




PAGE 146                                            University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World               Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students

               Developing a communications cycle for inquiries and establishing five points of
               contact for each inquiry
               Mailing information and sending e-mail messages to universities with
               undergraduate public health majors
               Mailing information to specific programs around the country that could be
               feeders to the School
               Advertising in select publications
               Providing travel assistance to top prospects
               Making presentations in undergraduate courses
               Holding receptions for admitted students
               Holding special event for students admitted to the Ph.D. programs
            Recruiting Events
            The following recruiting events took place from Fall 2004 - Spring 2006:
            Conferences
               American Public Health Association annual conference
               Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS)
               Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science
               (SACNAS)
               CDC Conference on Increasing American Indians, Native Alaskans and Native
               Hawaiians in Public Health Careers
               Minnesota Department of Health Diabetes Program annual conference
               Minority Health Professions Foundation Annual Symposium on Career
               Opportunities in Biomedical Sciences
               Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO)/Association of
               Public Health Laboratories (APHL) combined conference
               U.S. Public Health Service Professionals Conference
               American Indian Higher Education Consortium
            Graduate and Professional School Fairs
               University of Minnesota, Morris
               University of Minnesota, Duluth
               University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
               Atlanta University Center (Spelman, Morehouse, Clark Atlanta)
               Morehouse Public Health Awareness annual conference
               Iowa State University
               University of Wisconsin, Madison
               University of Wisconsin, La Crosse
               Wartburg College


Self-Study, February 2007                                                              PAGE 147
                                                                Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students                          Public Health for a Healthier World

             Luther College
             University of California, Berkeley
             Winona State University/St. Mary’s University Fair
             Tri-College University (Concordia College-Moorhead, North Dakota State and
             Minnesota State University, Moorhead)
             Ivy Native Council College Fair
             Chicago area fair
             Jackson State University
             Spelman College Health Careers Program Recruitment Fair
           On-Campus Events
             Living and Learning Community Health Sciences House presentation
             Promoting Healthy Children Conference
             Food Fight: Dialogue on Food Industry Litigation (roundtable)
             College of Biological Sciences resource fair
             Health Career Center Fair
             Lunch for Life Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research Program
           Community and Special Events
             Networking event for students of color with Minnesota Department of Health
             Office of Workforce Diversity.
             Community reception for prospective students
             Presentation for Northwestern University Latino Student Affairs program
           Recruitment Evaluation
           The School has been part of the inaugural launch of the ASPH Centralized
           Application System (CAS). Once it is fully optimized, CAS promises the
           functionality needed to further enhance the School’s ability to track effectiveness
           of recruitment activities.




PAGE 148                                           University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                  Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students

    4.5.c. Demographic characteristics of the student body
 Table 37: Template L: Demographic Characteristics of Student Body
                                                   2006                   2005                   2004
      Race/Ethnicity                       U        M     F       U        M     F       U        M     F

  African-American              Applied        0     24   38          0     29   38          1     14    45
                                Admitted       0     18   20          0     10   18          0      9    30
                                Enrolled       0     14   13          0      5   12          0      7    17

  Caucasian                     Applied        2    201   463         2    141   382         1     91   300
                                Admitted       1    163   366         1     90   325         1     70   241
                                Enrolled       0    115   232         1     65   206         1     46   154

  Hispanic/Latino               Applied        0     10   12          1      5   10          0      3        6
                                Admitted       0      8   10          0      3       6       0      3        3
                                Enrolled       0      4       6       0      3       5       0      3        2

  Asian/Pacific Islander        Applied        2     21   65          0     20   45          0     21    32
                                Admitted       1     10   48          0     11   28          0     18    23
                                Enrolled       1      6   24          0      5   18          0      6    15

  Native Alaskan/Alaskan        Applied        0      1       9       1      2   11          0      0        2
  Native                        Admitted       0      1       7       1      2       9       0      0        2
                                Enrolled       0      0       6       1      1       6       0      0        1

  Unknown                       Applied        1     21   19          1     12   16          0     15    10
                                Admitted       1      8   15          1      7   14          0      8        7
                                Enrolled       0      6       9       0      5       9       0      2        4

  Multi-racial                  Applied        0      5   20          0      6   14          0      1        5
                                Admitted       0      1   14          0      6   12          0      1        5
                                Enrolled       0      1       6       0      4       6       0      1        1

  International                 Applied        1    125   150         1     94   134         3     73   105
                                Admitted       1     60   72          0     39   64          1     31    53
                                Enrolled       0     29   35          0     16   33          1     15    27

                      Total     Applied        6    408   776         6    309   650         5    218   505
                                Admitted       4    261   552         3    168   476         2    140   364
                                Enrolled       1    175   331         2    104   295         2     80   221

Source: SPH Student Information Database




Self-Study, February 2007                                                                         PAGE 149
                                                                        Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students                                  Public Health for a Healthier World


  4.5. d. Measures to evaluate success in achieving a demographically diverse student
          body

   Table 38: Outcome Measure by Which to Evaluate Success in Achieving a
   Demographically Diverse Student Body
                                                                Year           Year           Year
                                                    Target     2003/4         2004/5         2005/6

       Objective 1.e.: Percent of students from              18%/9%/74%    20%/10%/73%     12%/15%/72%
       diverse communities (international; racial
       and ethnic; and female/male) served by
       the School


   4.5.e. This criterion is met.
           Strengths
              Determined to achieve a diverse student population, the School established the
              Office of Multicultural Services in August 2002. That Office, working with the
              Office of Recruitment Services, implemented an aggressive program of targeted
              recruitment efforts to increase student diversity.
              The School has recorded substantial improvement in student body diversity
              since 2002 with an increase from 56 to 147 domestic students of color in 2005-
              2006. As a result, domestic students of color have grown from 11 to 15 percent
              of the student body.
              The School is building relationships and awareness among undergraduate
              students of color who may have an interest in a professional career in public
              health.
              The School’s ability to track the effectiveness of its recruitment-related
              activities will be enhanced once the ASPH Centralized Application System
              (CAS) is fully optimized.
              The success of the Office of Multicultural Services has led to the director being
              recruited to a new position in multicultural services at the University level. A
              replacement is being sought for the School.
           Weaknesses:
            This is an ongoing priority that needs continuous emphasis and improvement.
           Recommendation:
             Although progress has been made in recruiting and retaining students of color
             from the local area, we have identified additional goals to help address local
             needs. This includes: a) developing a stronger connection with alumni and other
             public health professionals to help in recruiting students of color; b) providing
             more proactive financial assistance to prospective students of color; c)


PAGE 150                                                 University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students

               establishing an ongoing community advisory committee for the Office of
               Multicultural Services; d) exploring additional ways to assist prospective
               students of color in preparing for the academic challenges of admission to the
               School; and e) expanding the number of off-campus recruitment initiatives.

4.6 Advising and Career Counseling
    4.6.a. The School’s advising and career counseling services
            Academic advising
            The School begins the advising process each year with a new student orientation,
            lunch and resource fair. Following this event, students meet with their respective
            majors for further orientation. A week-long series of fun and informative events
            follows. These events aim to introduce students to the public health field and the
            School, faculty and other students.
            The School’s academic advising program is designed to provide each student the
            support and services needed to successfully meet academic requirements. These
            include:
               A faculty academic adviser who is assigned upon the student’s decision to
               enroll
               A research adviser and/or master’s project committee
               One or more student services personnel in each major
               Student Services Center personnel
               Campus resources such as University Counseling Services, relevant targeted
               resources, such as the University Alumni Association mentor program, the
               international program and academic resource centers.
            The School holds faculty accountable for their responsibilities as advisers. The
            School receives feedback on the quality of faculty advising via the annual student
            survey and the recent-graduate survey. Poor advising performance is addressed in
            annual faculty performance reviews. Implementation of ‘quality circles’ 2007 led
            by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs in all divisions are addressing student
            suggestions including improving academic and career advising.
            Career counseling
            Primary responsibility for career counseling rests with the School’s Career
            Resource Center. The Career Resource Center helps current students and alumni
            enhance their career management skills, maximize employment opportunities and
            develop and maintain professional contacts.
            This is accomplished through services and programs that include:
               Career Services Web Site. The career services Web site includes a calendar of
               career-related events; a job posting system available to employers, students and
               alumni; tip sheets related to job search issues; links to relevant Web sites;



Self-Study, February 2007                                                              PAGE 151
                                                                  Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students                            Public Health for a Healthier World

             information about placement of previous graduates; profiles of student field
             experiences; and information for employers, mentors and alumni.
             One-on-One Career Counseling. The Center’s career counselor is available for
             résumé critique, mock interviews and general job-search coaching. She meets or
             has e-mail contact primarily with current students. As time allows, she also will
             meet with alumni and/or prospective students.
             Resource Room. Open from 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday to
             accommodate student schedules, the Resource Room provides prospective
             students, current students and graduates access to computers, job posting
             binders, job search reference books, CDs and DVDs and other materials.
             Professional Networking Directory. Available both in a binder and online, the
             Professional Networking Directory offers contact information for alumni
             employed around the world. It is a helpful resource for current students, alumni,
             and, on a limited basis, prospective students as they network for employment
             opportunities.
             E-mail Announcements. The Career Center sends one or more messages each
             week to all students, providing information about job search workshops,
             employer campus visits, job openings, scholarship or fellowship opportunities,
             internship postings, etc.
             Special Programs. The Career Center sponsors campus visits by employers,
             alumni panels and job fairs and sponsors job search workshops, practice
             interviews and mentor networking events.

   4.6.b. Procedures by which students may communicate their concerns to officials
           The University defines student grievance policies and procedures and provides
           resources related to assisting their resolution. University policies and procedures
           are in force in the School, and the School does not replicate University resources.
           It does provide information regarding student grievances in its student handbook
           and, on a case-by-case basis, individual faculty, Student Services staff and/or the
           Dean’s Office work with students to address concerns or direct them to University
           resources.
           Students are informed of the University’s grievance policies, procedures and
           resources through its Web site. Other resources available to students include:
             The Student Conflict Resolution Center (http://www1.umn.edu/sos/contactus.htm)
             The Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action.
             (http://www.eoaffact.umn.edu/)

           For more detail on student grievance procedures, please see Chapter 1.4.e. As
           noted there, aggregate data on the complaints of the School’s students are not
           available.




PAGE 152                                             University of Minnesota School of Public Health
Transforming Discovery to Impact:
Public Health for a Healthier World                Chapter 4: Faculty, Staff and Students

    4.6.c. Student satisfaction with advising and career counseling services
            Student satisfaction with advising and career counseling is measured through an
            annual, year-end survey. Twenty-five percent of School students responded to the
            2005-2006 survey. Among those who responded, nearly three-fourths (73 percent)
            were “somewhat” or “very satisfied” with academic advising.
            Thirty-nine percent of respondents reported using career services. Of those who
            ranked career services, 70 percent rated them highly (4 or 5 on a 5-point scale) and
            22 percent chose the middle score.

    4.6.d. This criterion is met.
            Strengths
               The School offers students a comprehensive academic advising program
               designed to provide the support they need to meet academic requirements.
               The School maintains a Career Resource Center offering tools and personal
               support to help students and alumni manage their careers, identify employment
               opportunities and develop and maintain professional contacts.
               Faculty are held accountable in annual performance reviews for their
               responsibilities as advisers.
               Students and recent graduates are surveyed annually to gauge their satisfaction
               with the School’s advising and counseling support.
            Weaknesses
             The response rate to student satisfaction surveys is low.
            Recommendations
              Other methods to measure effectiveness of advising and counseling services
              should be implemented.




Self-Study, February 2007                                                              PAGE 153

				
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