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					        City of Salisbury



              The Consolidated Plan
                     CDBG PY 2004 - 2008
                                    (7/1/04 – 6/30/09)




                                          Prepared By:

The Department of Community Development                  Neighborhood Solutions, LLC
125 North Division Street                                P.O. Box 6502
Salisbury, Maryland 21801-4940                           Annapolis, Maryland 21401
                                      EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


A. Plan Development Process

The Consolidated Plan is a housing and community development plan which is required by the US
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for local governments to receive funding
from the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program and other HUD programs. The
City of S alisbury designated the Mayor’s Office as the lead agency to develop the City’s
Consolidated Plan for federal funds for CDBG P rogram Years (PY ) 2004 through 2008 (City FY
2005-2009). In order to fully implement its CDBG Program , the City will hire new staff w ith
appropriate education, skills, and experience. While the City will assume adm inistration of the
CDB G Program , it will award CDBG grant funds to other public agencies and non-profit
organizations to undertake any eligible activities.

Following the Citizen Participation Plan adopted by the City Council, the Mayor’s Office
encouraged service providers, citizens and other interested individuals to comment on the City’s
housing and community development needs. With the assistance of the consulting firm,
Neighborhood Solutions, LLC and the joint City/County Department of Planning, Zoning, and
Comm unity Development (PZCD), a survey, a focus group session, as well as individual meetings
were conduc ted to identify and prioritize housing and community developm ent needs in January
and February 2004. Also two public hearings were conducted in February and April 2004, followed
by a 30-day public comm ent period, to obtain citizen input on both the City’s Consolidated Plan for
CDBG PY 2004-2008 (City FY 2005-2009) and the Annual Action Plan for CDBG PY 2004 (City FY
2005).

Although the City is not a direct recipient of HUD’s Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG), Housing
Opportunities for People W ith AIDS (HOPW A), or HOME Partnership funds (HOME), the City, in its
Consolidated Plan, has discussed in detail the needs of the hom eless and the populations with
special needs (such as the elderly and those with HIV/AIDS). Consequently, if any of the local
prov iders of emergency shelter, trans itional housing, permanent supportive housing, or public
services for these clients were to apply for such federal funds, the City would be entirely supportive
of their efforts.


B. Salisbury Housing and Comm unity Development Needs

Homeless Needs

The homeless in W icomico County and Salisbury are assisted primarily by non-profit organizations
and local ministries. Current facilities include the Christian Shelter, an em ergency shelter; the Life
Crisis Center for victims of domestic violenc e; the Village of Hope (including Center 4 Clean Start),
a transitional shelter; Second W ind (a halfway house for addicts) and Hudson Health Services at
Deers Head Hos pital, a special needs facility for homeless individuals. During the winter, if
needed, Joseph House Crisis Center us es its Hospitality Room to shelter homeless individuals. If
FEMA declares a formal emergency, the Salvation Army will put cots in its center in Salisbury for
the homeless or those in temporary need of shelter. The Tri-County Alliance for the Homeless
provides permanent supportive housing and services to disabled homeless individuals and


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families. Finally, the Wicom ico County Social Services and Health Departments, Shore Up (the
local Comm unity Action Agency), and other non-profit organizations provide financial support and
services to homeless individuals and families and those at-risk of homeless.

As indicated in the City’s survey of needs and the Tri-County Alliance’s Point in Time survey of
homeless needs of February 24, 2004, the overwhelming need of the 240 homeless is additional
emergency shelter and permanent supportive housing. In addition, the homeless cited the need
for intensive case management, job training, substance abuse counseling, child care, and mental
health care as high priorities. To help resolve the needs of its homeless citizens and those at-risk
of becoming homeless, the City plans to participate fully as a mem ber of the Tri-County Alliance for
the Homeless. For example, the City will assist in updating and implementing the regional
Continuum of Care Plan. The City will do this through active participation in monthly meetings of
the Tri-County Alliance, through assistance in identifying buildings for use as shelter, and through
support of applications for federal ESG funds or other State and/or Federal funds to develop and/or
operate shelters, transitional housing, supportive housing, and services. The City also will provide
appropriate data for inclusion in the regional ServicePoint HMIS.

Special Populations’ Needs

Special needs populations include physically and developmentally disabled pers ons, mentally ill
persons, persons w ith HIV/AIDS, persons w ith drug and alcohol addictions , and other persons with
disabilities. All these sub-populations s hare the common need of affordable housing w ith
appropriate supportive services. W hile Salisbury serves as a focal point for service providers, City
residents rely on the State and W icomico County as the primary service providers for persons with
special needs. The primary provider of supportive housing and services to this population is the
Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) through its Developmental
Disabilities Administration (DDA), Mental Hygiene Administration, Aids Administration, and Alcohol
and Drug Abuse Adm inistration. The W icomico County Health and Social Services Departm ents
also provide financial support and services to individuals and families with special needs.

The major provider of services to Salisbury’s elderly and frail elderly is MAC, the State’s regional
Area Agency on Aging. Their office is on Riverside Drive next to Pine Bluff Village, a senior
housing complex, in Salisbury. MAC works with numerous local organizations, including the
Alzheimer’s Association, Genesis Eldercare, Holly Community, Shore Up, United Way, Wicomico
County Health and Social Services Departments, local businesses, and others. According to the
2000 Census, an estimated 2088 households or 23 percent of all 9061 households are elderly (65
years and older) or have seniors living with them. The m ajority (1148 or almost 60 percent) of
Salisbury’s elderly live in their own hom es, 20 percent of whom have housing problem s. Similarly,
most of the estimated 2573 Salisbury individuals who are disabled live at hom e, as do the m ajority
of other special needs populations.

As indicated in a City survey of needs, the housing and service needs of the elderly rank above
those of other special populations. Accessible housing for the elderly and physically handicapped
is the highest ranking housing need. Similarly, the public service needs of the elderly rank highest,
follow ed by the service needs of the disabled and those with alcohol and drug addiction. To help
resolve these needs over the upcoming five years, the City plans to continue to provide
accessibility improvements to elderly homeowners as well as support applications for financial
assistance by service providers for rehabilitation and/or construction of one or two group homes or
facilities for three to 10 persons with special needs.

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Affordable Housing Needs

Overall, according to 2000 Census data, approximately 3,445, or 38 percent, of all 9,067
households in Salisbury experience some type of housing problem. Of these 9067 households,
roughly 5661, or 62 percent, are renters, while 3406, or 38 percent, are homeow ners. Of the 5661
total renters, 2774 or 49 percent have some type of housing problem. Conversely, of the 3406
homeow ners, only 681 or 20 percent have a housing problem. The most frequently experienced
housing problem is lack of affordability. It is commonly assumed that a maximum of 30 percent of
gross household income should be spent on housing costs, including utilities. Households
spending more than that amount are said to have a cost burden. Households spending 50 percent
or more of gross household income for housing costs are experiencing a severe cost burden. An
estim ated 3,460 Salisbury households are cost burdened and roughly 1550 households are
severely cost burdened.

W hile affordability is a concern of households across all income levels, those Salisbury households
with extremely low- and low-incomes have the greatest housing problems, 80 percent and 70
percent, respectively, of these households have housing problems. Also, large family households
(five or more mem bers), both renters and homeowners, have the most housing problems. Other
tenure types with significant housing problems include the elderly and “other” renters (roughly 50
percent each), followed by small family renters (43 percent) and “other” homeowners (30 percent).

Four neighborhoods (Camden, Newtown-North Division Street, Church Street-Doverdale, and
W estside) have been given priority by the City for housing assistance. All four have both higher
numbers of renters than homeowners, aged housing stock, and higher than average vacancy
rates. O ver 35 percent of renters in all the neighborhoods pay m ore than 30 percent of their
monthly income for rent; on the W estside over 50 perc ent pay m ore than 30 percent of their
income for rent. In addition, the Church Street–Doverdale and W estside neighborhoods suffer
from low median hom e values and relative overcrowding.

As reflected in the Plan and a City survey of housing needs, the households with extremely low-
and low-incomes hav e the highest priority housing needs. W hile such needs extend across both
renters and homeowners, the housing needs of the elderly and small families (renters and
homeow ners) rank the highest. Also ranking high are the housing needs of the physically disabled.
Accessibility or handicap improvements are ranked highly by all household types, regardless of
income. Other high ranking housing needs include down payment/ closing cost assistance and
credit counseling for homeowners and energy efficiency improvements and lead paint removal for
both renters and homeowners.

To help resolve these needs, the City’s goals are to continue to fund rehabilitation, including
accessibility improvements and lead paint abatement, of homes occupied by an estimated 40
extremely low-, low -, and m oderate-income hom eowners. Additionally, the City will seek to
encourage the development of at least one multi-family rental complex (e.g., 100 units) for
extremely low- and low-income tenants as well as the rehabilitation or construction of one or two
residential facilities (serving between three and 10 special needs persons) during the coming five
years. Salisbury also will continue to support housing counseling and down payment and closing
cost assistance for these populations, especially first-time homebuyers.


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Comm unity Development Needs

Even though the overall Salisbury economy is strong and diversified, the City has concentrated
recently on revitalizing its historic Downtown. During the mid-nineties over a dozen businesses
have left and relocated out of the Downtown. Vacancies have arisen in Salisbury’s Downtown and
the surrounding neighborhoods have experienced declining hom e values and increasing crime.
The City’s Dow ntow n and adjacent neighborhoods also suffer from num erous infrastructure
problems. Issues such as traffic congestion, poor signalization, restrictive access, inadequate river
crossings, and insufficient pedestrian crossings have helped to isolate the Downtown from the
neighborhoods, especially the Wes tside. Thus, a key to revitalization of the Downtown and the
surrounding neighborhoods is to link both through improved pedestrian access.

Central to the City’s revitalization effort is the establishment of more businesses in the Downtown
as well as the surrounding neighborhoods. Similarly, the goals of Urban Salisbury, the Greater
Salisbury Committee, and Salisbury-Wicomico Economic Development are to encourage business
growth and job creation in nursing and high tech industries. Along with the need to reduce crime,
improve streets, create jobs, and rehabilitate affordable housing, Salisbury’s residents also
indicated the need for youth and neighborhood centers, public restrooms in the Downtown to serve
the hom eless, and m ore open space to enhance neighborhood vitality.

To help resolve these needs over the upcoming five-year period, the City plans to concentrate
primarily on those comm unity development concerns rated high by its citizens. For instance, the
City Police Department will undertake and/or expand several crime initiatives directed especially at
the youth, including the Earn-A-Bike Program and the initiation of a new Police Athletic League.
The City also will continue to install bullet-resistant shields on its street lights in high crime
neighborhoods, like the Westside, as funding allows. As part of its effort to help create new jobs
and/or increase job training, Salisbury will continue to work with the private business sector and the
local schools to identify and encourage qualified individuals to participate in job training programs .
Salisbury also may use its financial resources to inv estigate the feasibility of im plem enting a sm all
business inc ubator and a Tax Increment Financing (T IF) district in the Dow ntown. Salisbury will
also help to improve the streets, sidewalks, and streetscapes in the priority neighborhoods and the
Downtown. Further, Salisbury will attempt to renovate and repair several neighborhood parks,
playgrounds, and com munity centers that serve low- and moderate-incom e persons, especially
youth.

Public Housing Residents’ Needs

The W icom ico County Housing A uthority owns and m anages 277 units of public housing. There
are 100 units of family housing at Booth Street just outside the City and 75 units of senior housing
at Riverside Apartments in Salisbury. There also are 90 scattered-site units in Salisbury, Fruitland,
and Hebron, of w hich 50 units are located within the City. Although the Housing Authority is
operated by the County, the m ajority of all tenants are from Salisbury.

The Authority, as indicated in the Agency’s Plan, wants to improve the quality of housing for all of
the residents by improving general managem ent, improving voucher management, increasing
customer service, and other activities. The Authority also wants to increase assisted housing
choices by conducting outreach efforts to potential landlords and to strengthen landlords with rental
units that meet HUD’s Housing Quality Standards. Another goal is to improve community quality of
life and economic vitality by implementing measures to improve the income m ix and de-

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concentrate poverty by bringing in higher income households. The Authority also is implementing
security improvements (e.g., m ore patrols) with the County Sheriff’s Department. Finally, to
promote self-sufficiency, W CHA is providing or assisting with the provision of supportive services
to improve the residents’ employability. In particular, the Authority is initiating a tenant orientation
program led by a new tenant services coordinator. The Authority, however, has not initiated any
resident initiatives directed toward participation in m anagement.

Despite these activities, the WCHA is currently in trouble with the federal government. W CHA,
once rated “superior” by HUD, is now considered “troubled” and this rating could be lowered to
“default.” As reported in the April 22, 2004 Salisbury Daily Times, the A uthority has two years to
implem ent HUD’s recommended changes or be taken over by the federal governm ent. Not only is
the Authority operating without a permanent executive director, but it is also plagued by improper
financial reporting practices. According to W CHA ’s Board Chairman, Chris Mills, the Board is
working hard to implem ent the reform s outlined in HUD’s Mem orandum of Agreement.

Unfortunately, W CHA’s Board is appointed by the W icomico County Council, Salisbury has no
control of WCHA’s operations. Regardless the City plans to monitor closely W CHA’s activities,
espec ially the allocation of 181 City Section 8 certificates and vouchers (previously transferred to
W CHA by the City) and the selection of an executive director. The Mayor intends to detail the
City’s concerns in a letter to the Authority in the coming months.

Lead-Based Paint Hazards

Lead is one of the most significant and widespread environmental hazards for children in Maryland.
Exposure to lead can cause long-term neurological damage that may be associated with learning
and behavioral problems and lowered intelligence. A major source of lead paint exposure for
children comes from dust from deteriorated lead paint or renovation of older housing units,
primarily those units built before 1950. According to the MD Department of the Environment
(MDE), almost 95 perc ent of such units contain lead paint, while 75 percent of those units built
between 1950 and 1978 probably contain lead paint. Using this approach, it is estimated that
approximately 5,995 of the 9769 housing units in the City may have a presence of lead-based
paint. O f these, an estim ated 4080 are rental units and 1920 are ow ner-occupied. Not only are
the City’s four Historic Districts located in the Downtown, Camden, Church Street-Doverdale and
New town neighborhoods , but also 90 percent of the housing in these communities was built before
1980. Similarly, 80 percent of the housing in the W estside neighborhood was built pre-1980.
Thus, lead paint abatement is a high priority in these four neighborhoods, especially for families
with very young children.

In spite of this large number of potentially contaminated housing units, there has been a steady
decline in childhood lead poisoning in W icom ico County and Salisbury over the past decade at all
levels of exposure. By 2002 only 74 children were determ ined to have high levels of lead in their
blood. Much of the decline in childhood lead poisoning is the result of public lead poisoning
prevention efforts. Such efforts include increased outreach and education, increased enforcement
of the State law, increased homeowner and landlord awareness of the hazards, improved
maintenance and abatem ent, and demolition of older structures.

In particular, the County Health Department, the joint City/County PZCD Department, and the
Salisbury Neighborhood Housing Service work continuously to reduce the threat of lead paint
contamination in the housing stock. The City will continue to follow these lead paint abatement

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procedures. In addition, the City plans to have its CDBG staff, the staff of SNHS, and the staff of
the joint City/County Department of PZCD distribute educational materials on the hazards of
lead-based paint.




Fair Housing

One of the greatest barriers to affordable housing for m any Maryland fam ilies is the lack of fair
housing choice. HUD broadly defines fair housing choice as "the ability of persons with similar
incomes to have the same housing choices regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, national
origin, familial status, or disability." All state and local governments, particularly those that receive
federal funds from HUD, are required to promote fair housing choice and to affirm atively further fair
housing.

Des pite the pros pective existence of barriers to housing choice in Salisbury, the City promotes fair
housing choice and affirmatively furthers fair housing for all residents. Upon completion and
approval of its Consolidated Plan and Annual Action Plan for federal CDBG funds, the City intends
to undertake an Analysis of Impediments (AI) to Fair Housing as required by HUD. The City plans
to com plete this AI during the s ummer and/or early fall of 2004. This analysis will not only identify
any impediments, but also will detail appropriate actions to remove any identified impediments.


C. Salisbury Strategic Plan, CDBG PY 2004 - 2008

Salisbury’s Strategic Plan details the City’s investment priorities for its CDBG funds for the
Consolidated Plan period of CDBG PY 2004 - 2008. The following three national goals will guide
the use of CDBG resources for this Strategic Plan:
•      Provide decent housing;
•      Provide a suitable living environment; and
•      Expand economic opportunities.

The City plans to provide comprehensive, multi-year financial assistance, especially housing
rehabilitation and homeownership development Citywide. However, businesses in the Downtown
and residents of the Camden, Newtown-North Division Street, Church Street-Doverdale, and
W estside neighborhoods w ill be given priority for housing and comm unity developm ent ass istance.
Help for the homeless and special needs populations, especially the elderly, will be directed to
agencies located throughout the City. Similarly, efforts will be made to increase housing choice
and opportunity outside areas of minority and low-income conc entration.

Given its limited resources, Salisbury will use innovative approaches and cooperative partnerships
with other public agenc ies and private organizations to meet its affordable housing and com munity
development goals and objectives. In general, the City plans to use its CDBG funds as financial
incentives to accom plish its goals and objectives. In order of overall priority, the City will
concentrate first on resolving its affordable housing needs, second its comm unity development
needs, and third its needs for both the hom eless and populations with special needs. Specifically,
the City of Salisbury will pursue the follow ing strategies and objectives to resolve its affordable
housing and community development needs for its extremely low-, low- and moderate-income
citizens.

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Homeless Strategy

Strategy:      Help Hom eless Persons and Persons At-Risk of Becom ing Hom eless Obtain
               Affordable Housing

Objectives:
   1. Provide support to organizations to help increase emergency shelter and transitional
       housing space for the homeless.
   2. Support the operations of homeless shelters and transitional housing providers.
   3. Support intensive case management, housing counseling and job training for
       homeless individuals and families.
   4. Support the development of permanent supportive housing for the homeless and disabled
       by non-profit organizations and governmental agencies.
   5. Support and encourage the various hom eless organizations to m ore fully coordinate their
       efforts and develop appropriate data.

Strategy for Special Populations

Strategy:      Assist in the Provision of Housing Options for Persons with Special Needs

Objectives:
   1. Finance accessibility alterations for existing owner-occupied units.
   2. Support the rehabilitation and/or development of facilities for persons with special needs.

Affordable Housing Strategy

Strategy:      Promote Increas ed Hom eow ners hip O pportunities and Preservation of Affordable
               Housing
Objectives:
   1. Provide assistance to extremely low-, low- and moderate-income hom eowners for housing
       rehabilitation.
   2. Preserve and expand the supply of affordable housing through acquisition with
       rehabilitation, demolition and/or new construction.
   3. Support housing counseling, down payment and closing cost assistance for first-time low-
       and moderate-income homebuyers.
   4. Support the expansion of affordable housing opportunities for first-time homebuyers.
   5. Support the development of affordable housing opportunities for extremely low- and low-
       income renters.

Comm unity Development Strategy

Strategy: Improve the Safety and Livability of Neighborhoods

Objectives:
   1. Support infrastructure improvem ents that improve safety, acc essibility and connectivity.
   2. Support improvement or construction of comm unity facilities Citywide.
   3. Improve security and public safety Citywide, especially in the priority neighborhoods.
   4. Improve public safety through increased support of productive youth activities.

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Strategy:     Provide Services and Financial Incentives to Assist with Em ploym ent,
              Empowerment and Self Sufficiency

Objectives:
   5. Continue to promote technical job training for all low- and moderate-income citizens.

   6. Provide financial incentives and technical assistance to encourage mixed-use development
      (comm ercial and residential) in the Downtown.
   7. Investigate and implement, if feasible, new public financing tools.




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                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                                 Pages
Executive Summary                                                                  i

I. Citizen Participation Process                                                    1
   •    Lead Agency                                                                 1
   •    Citizen Participation                                                       1
   •    Com m unity Consultation                                             1
   •    Consultation with U nits of Local Governm ent and the State          3
   •    Sum m ary of Public Com m ents and Responses                                3

II. Com munity P rofile                                                             5
   •     City and the Region                                                        5
   •     City Governm ent

III. Housing and Comm unity Development Needs                                       6
   •    Hom eless Needs                                                      6
   •    Housing and Service Needs of Special Populations                          12
   •    Affordable Housing Needs                                                  15
   •    Needs o f Pu blic Housing Re sidents                                      23
   •    Lead-Based Paint Hazards                                                  26
   •    Barriers to Affordable Housing                                            27
   •    Fair Housing                                                              28
   •    Com m unity Developm ent Needs                                            29

IV. Strategic Plan                                                                 38
   •    Overview                                                            38
   •    Hom eless Strategy                                                        38
   •    Strategy for Populations with Special Needs                               40
   •    Affordable Housing Strategy                                               41
   •    Com m unity Developm ent Strategy                                         43
   •    Oth er Re quirem ents                                                     46
                   Public Housing Strategy                                        46
                   Lead-Based Paint Hazards                                       47

                  Barriers to Affordable Housing                                  47
                  Anti-Poverty Strategy                                           48
                  Institutional Structure and Public/Private Coordination         48
                  Monitoring                                                      49

Table   1A: Priority Needs of Homeless and Special Needs Populations             11
Table   1B: Priority Needs of Special Populations                                  15
Table   2A: Priority Housing Needs by Family Status and Income                     23
Table   4: Priority Public Housing Needs                                           25
Table   2B: Priority Community Development Needs                                   36

Map 1: Salisbury on Maryland’s Lower Eastern Shore
Map 2: Salisbury’s Census Tracts/Priority Neighborhoods

Appendix A: Salisbury Citizen Participation Plan
Appendix B: Salisbury Housing and Com m unity Developm ent Needs
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Appendix C: Salisbury Residential Anti-Displacement and Relocation Assistance Plan
Appendix D: Salisbury Glossary
Appendix E: Salisbury Certifications
Appendix F: Citizen Letters and City’s Responses
                           I. CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PROCESS


The City of Salisbury has prepared this Consolidated Plan to guide its use of affordable housing
and community development resources. The Consolidated Plan addresses three basic goals:
(1) the provision of decent housing, (2) the creation of a suitable living environment, and (3) the
expansion of economic opportunities, primarily to benefit low and m oderate income persons.
The Consolidated Plan also serves as an application for federal Comm unity Development Block
Grant (CDBG) Program funds. The City of Salisbury is not eligible as a grantee for any other
formula entitlement programs administered by HUD.

The Strategic Plan portion of Salisbury’s Consolidated Plan covers a five (5) year period from
July 1, 2004 - June 30, 2009 (or CDBG Program Years (PY) 2004-2008). The Annual Action
Plan covers the upcoming one-year program period beginning July 1, 2004 and ending June 30,
2005 (CDBG PY 2004).

A. The Lead Agency

As required by the Consolidated Plan regulations, the City will create a new departm ent within
City government and designate it as the lead agency to develop the Consolidated Plan and
administer the CDBG Program. W orking w ith assistance from the joint City of Salisbury/
W icomico County Department of Planning, Zoning and Comm unity Development and
Neighborhood Solutions, LLC (a consulting firm), the staff of the Mayor’s Office has completed
all the requirements of the Consolidated Plan development process.

B. Citizen Participation

The City of Salisbury follows an adopted Citizen Participation Plan (see Appendix A). The
primary goals of the plan are to: provide for and encourage citizens to participate in the
development of the Consolidated Plan, particularly low and moderate-income residents; give
citizens timely and reasonable access to meetings and information; provide citizens information
on the amount of CDBG funds, type of activities, and anticipated benefits to be achieved; offer
technical assistance to groups seeking CDBG funding; and hold public hearings to obtain
citizens’ comments on proposed CDBG Program actions and activities.

The City conducts at least two public hearings annually to identify and prioritize housing and
comm unity development needs, to review the status of activities undertaken during the program
year, to invite comments on the proposed Consolidated and Action Plans, and to provide the
public access to staff persons most knowledgeable about the CDBG program. Both the
Consolidated Plan and the Annual Action Plan are subject to a public hearing and a separate
thirty (30) day public com ment period.

C. Comm unity Consultation

The citizen participation process was an essential component in the development of the
Salisbury Consolidated Plan. The process was designed to solicit maximum participation from
neighborhood advocates, public agencies, non-profit organizations, local ministry, and the
public to ensure that those most affected by the City's comm unity planning and development
programs would be involved in the planning process.

Salisbury solicited comments and had discussions with many public and private organizations
during the planning process. The City distributed a needs survey to a sample of 158 citizens


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(60 responded) in January 2004 and conducted a focus group meeting on January 24, 2004 at
which 11 citizens attended. The survey and meeting covered a wide range of housing and
community development needs, including rental and owner-occupied housing, homelessness,
economic development, public services and facilities, infrastructure, and housing for persons
with special needs. The focus group discussions also identified and prioritized housing and
comm unity development needs not cited in the survey. Along with data from the 2000 Census
and from local organizations, the needs identified and prioritized by the survey respondents and
focus group attendees form the foundation of the strategies and objectives of the Consolidated
Plan (see Appendix B).

Among others, 60 citizens from the following organizations responded to the survey, identified
and prioritized housing and community development needs for the Consolidated Plan, and
commented on projects to help resolve them:
   • Greater Salisbury Comm ittee
   • Christian Shelter
   • Village of Hope
   • Joseph House Crisis Center
   • MAC, Inc. (Area Agency on Aging)
   • Destiny Rest Home
   • Sarah, Margaret & Mollie’s Place
   • Atria Assisted Living
   • W ayside Apartm ents
   • Pem berton Manor Apartments
   • W itness International
   • Holly Center
   • Dove Pointe
   • Urban Salisbury
   • Eastgate Village Apartments
   • Pine Bluff Village
   • Second Chance Home
   • Go-Getters
   • Shore Up
   • Salvation Army
   • Lakeview Center
   • Riverside Homes
   • Life Crisis Center
   • Deaf Independent Living Association
   • Hudson Health Services
   • Maryland Capital Enterprises
   • Salisbury-W icomico Econom ic Development
   • Salisbury Chamber of Commerce
   • Salisbury Neighborhood Housing Services
   • Salisbury Urban Ministries
   • Shore T rans it
   • W icom ico County Council
   • W icomico County Health Department
   • W icom ico County Housing Authority
   • W icomico County Department of Corrections
   • W icomico Department of Social Services
   • W icomico Community Housing Resources Board (CHRB)

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   •   Maryland Legal Aid Bureau
   •   Citizen members (45) from the Mayor’s Neighborhood Roundtable
   •   Mem bers (48) from the Salisbury m inistry

Additionally, the staff of the Mayor’s Office and joint City/County Department of Planning,
Zoning and Com munity Development (PZCD) held a public hearing to obtain citizens’ comm ents
on the identified and prioritized needs on February 4, 2004. The staff of the Mayor’s Office and
joint City/County Department of PZCD also conducted a second public hearing on the
completed draft of the Consolidated Plan and Annual Action Plan on April 27, 2004. Again the
purpose of the public hearing was to obtain citizens’ comments on prioritized housing and
com munity development needs for the upcom ing five fiscal years and the initial projects
proposed to help resolve them in the first year. A 30-day public comm ent period followed the
second public hearing.

D. Consultation with Units of Local Governm ent and the State

During the winter and early spring of 2004 the City of Salisbury consulted with the State of
Maryland and W icomico County in developing the City’s Consolidated Plan. A copy of the draft
Consolidated Plan was provided to the staffs of the joint City/County Planning, Zoning and
Com munity Development (PZCD), the Maryland Department of Housing and Com munity
Development (DHCD), and the T ri-County Alliance for the Hom eless for review and com ment.
The City also consulted with staff of the Wicomico County Health and Social Services
Departments, and Wicomico County Housing Authority; the City Police, Public W orks, and
Building, Housing and Zoning Departments; the local Salvation Army, Salisbury Neighborhood
Housing Services, Urban Salisbury, Greater Salisbury Committee, Salisbury-Wicomico
Econom ic Dev elopm ent, Village of Hope/Joseph House, Shore Up, Christian Shelter, S alisbury
Urban Ministries, and the regional Area Agency on the A ging (MAC, Inc.).

E. Summary of Public Comments and Responses

Public Hearing #1

A public notice advertising the first public hearing on Salisbury’s Consolidated Plan for CDBG
PY 2004-2008 was published in the Salisbury Daily Times on January 22, 2004 and February 1,
2004. The first required public hearing was held on February 4, 2004 in the City Council
Cham bers.

Eighteen citizens attended the hearing and six chose to comm ent. Representatives from four
non-profit organizations (Christian Shelter, Maryland Capital Enterprises, Habitat on the Lower
Shore, and Urban Salisbury) and one college instructor (Sojourner-Douglas College) made
presentations on their organizations’ missions and activities and concurred with the need for
assistance for the homeless, finance for small and minority businesses, affordable housing,
improved streets and sidewalks, and job training. Only the question by a neighborhood
advocate (Had the administrative structure of the CDBG Program been determined?) required a
response (No s tructure, as of that date, had been decided.).

Public Hearing # 2

A public notice advertising the second public hearing on Salisbury’s draft Consolidated Plan for
CDBG PY 2004-2008 and Annual Action Plan for CDBG PY 2004 w as published in the
Salisbury Daily Times on April 11, 2004 and April 25, 2004. The second required public hearing
was held on April 27, 2004 in the City Council Chambers. Public comm ents on the two Plans


                                                                                                   10
were received v erbally at the Public Hearing and in writing through May 28, 2004.

An estimated 20 citizens attended the second public hearing on April 27, 2004, which was
televised to the public. After Mayor Tilghman sum marized the CDBG public participation
process and outlined the City’s housing and comm unity development needs, she discussed the
City’s five–year Strategic Plan (presented in the Consolidated Plan) and the projects (presented
in the Action Plan) identified to help resolve the needs in the first year. She then opened the
hearing to comm ents from the attendees, nine of whom spoke. Of the nine speakers, three
(from the Tri-County Alliance for the Homeless, Salisbury University/School of Social Work, and
Salisbury Urban Ministries) spoke to the homeless problem and cited the need for the City’s
help with the matching funds required for federal financial assistance to expand the number of
emergency beds. They also cited the critical need to have a plan for housing the homeless
during the winter, and the need for restrooms in the Downtown area. A representative from the
non-profit Corporation for Healthy Homes and Econom ic Development stressed the need for
more affordable housing units for low-incom e fam ilies, and offered to as sist with developm ent.
A com munity advocate w arned against predatory lenders. Another com munity advocate
praised the City for its decision to attem pt to reduce crim e, and reminded the Mayor of the help
that had been received in this endeavor through the Weed and Seed Program.

One attendee asked for clarification of the boundary for the Camden neighborhood and was told
by City staff that the entire neighborhood was included, not just the historic district. Another
attendee questioned the time period(s) and was told that the timeframe(s) were for federal fiscal
years, not Salisbury’s fiscal year. The same respondent questioned why the program income
generated by previous CDBG grants was not available for use. (This question was not
answered at the time, but these funds are available for use, and this will be clarified in the final
version of the plan.) Finally, two representatives from Urban Salisbury and a City Council
mem ber criticized the inclusiveness of the participation process, especially the selection of
organizations to receive the federal CDBG funds. The City responded that the two Plans were
in draft form and could be changed. In particular, the City would place the documents on its
internet website as well as m ake copies available to the public at loc al libraries and the City’s
offices for comment for 30 days until May 28, 2004. Further, the City Grants / Special Projects
Director shared the tight timeframe for development of the Plans with the attendees, and
explained the need to undertake projects in the first year of operation that were a continuation of
the same types of projects that had been done in the past with CDBG funds, and with the same
agencies.

Public Comments (April 27 – May 28, 2004)

During the 30-day comment period from April 27 – May 28, 2004 the City received only two
letters. One letter was from the President of the W icomico County branch of the National
Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the second was from the
same City Councilwoman w ho spoke at the second Public Hearing. The City Councilwoman’s
letter raised the same general criticisms of the public participation and financial allocation
processes previously brought up at the April 27, 2004 Hearing. The President of the NAACP
cited more specific questions/suggestions concerning the allocation of CDBG funds to the low-
incom e African-American com munity, in general, and the W estside neighborhood, in particular.
W hile im portant issues were raised in both letters, the questions/suggestions were addres sed in
the City’s responses, and none of the issues has resulted in changes in the City’s housing and
com munity development priorities or five-year strategies. Copies of the tw o letters and the City
of Salisbury’s responses are included in Appendix F.




                                                                                                       10
                                    II. COMMUNITY PROFILE


A. City and the Region

The City of Salisbury, incorporated in 1854, is the County Seat of W icomico County. The City
and County are on Maryland’s Eastern Shore on the Delmarva Peninsula with the Chesapeake
Bay on the west and the State of Delaw are on the north (see Map 1: Salisbury on Maryland’s
Low er Eastern Shore). Salisbury is the com mercial/ industrial center of the Low er Eastern
Shore, drawing shoppers and businesses from Delaware, Virginia, and nearby Maryland
counties. Bisected by US Routes 13 and 50, Salisbury is the region’s transportation and
industrial center. Located on the Wicomico River, Salisbury is also Maryland’s second largest
port. The Salisbury-Ocean City-Wicom ico Regional airport, located 4.5 miles outside of the
City, is served by US Airways Express. The City’s higher education needs are served by
Salisbury University and W or-Wic Comm unity College. Salisbury University (with 1500
employees), along with Perdue Farms and Peninsula Regional Medical Center (2000
employees each), are the largest local employers.

For over 20 years comm unity development in Salisbury had focused on suburban residential
and new retail development. W hile the economic health of Salisbury is relatively strong, the
social and economic health of the historic downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods has
been subjected to periods of neglect and disinvestment. This has resulted in a disproportionate
ratio of rental housing to homeownership, a decline in property values and a rise in social
problems and crime. Five years ago the City began to chart a new c ours e designed to rec laim
the dow ntown and adjacent residential neighborhoods. Generally, Salisbury intends to
revitalize the City’s urban core, rehabilitate the stock of housing and reduce crime in the
adjacent neighborhoods, and interconnect the neighborhoods and urban core into a cohesive,
vital com munity.

B. City Government

The City of Salisbury is governed by a Mayor and City Council, com posed of five members.
The Mayor is elected at-large for a four-year term. Salisbury also has a full time Executive
Officer. The five Council members are elected for staggered four-year terms. The City has a
well-developed system of governmental facilities and services that are organized into nine
departments, including the Executive Department or the Office of the Mayor. Some of these
facilities and services , such as police, fire, and public w orks, are adm inistered by the City, while
others, such as health and social services, are administered by W icomico County.

However, unique to Salisbury and W icomico County is the joint City/County Department of
Planning, Zoning and Comm unity Developm ent (PZCD). Beginning in the early 1960s the City
and County established a joint planning office. In 1989 the former joint planning office was re-
designated as the current City/County PZCD.




                                                                                                          10
                III. HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NEEDS


A. Homeless Needs

1. Nature and Extent of Homelessness

The City of Salisbury participates in the Tri-County Alliance for the Homeless Continuum of
Care Planning Group, which is responsible for service coordination and resource allocation for
the homeless in Wicomico, W orcester, and Somerset Counties. A person (adult, child, or youth)
is considered homeless if he or she resides in an emergency shelter or sleeps in places not
meant for human habitation (e.g., streets, parks, alleys, abandoned buildings, or vehicles). The
Alliance is composed of representatives from: (1) city, county, and State government agencies,
(2) local service organizations, (3) faith-based organizations, (4) emergency shelter and
transitional housing providers, (5) food pantries, (6) the Crisfield Housing Authority, (7) the State
and local police, (8) a housing developer, (9) a bank, and (10) formerly homeless individuals.

To better understand the extent of the hom eless problem, the City participated with the Tri-
County Alliance in its bi-annual, Point-in-Time, one-day count of homeless individuals on
February 24, 2004. The staff and volunteers associated with the Tri-County Alliance recruited
survey respondents (homeless individuals) from street locations (parks, library, shopping
centers, etc.), emergency shelters, transitional and supportive housing complexes, State and
County agencies, and community churches. There were 174 surveys completed, representing
a total 241 homeless people in Salisbury, including the 174 respondents, 10 spouses/significant
others, and 67 children. Each survey asked the respondent to identify needed supportive
services and sub-population characteristics. While these numbers are reflective of the
homeless population in Salisbury, they may be slightly low due to the unusually nice weather on
the day that the survey was taken.

The survey indicated that 96 (or 55 percent) of the 174 homeless adult respondents w ere m ale
and 78 (or 45 percent) were female. Further, 74 (or 43 percent) homeless adults were white, 83
(or 47 percent) were African-American, and 17 (or 10 percent) were of other ethnicities and
races. The adults had an average age of 40 years. Most (81 percent) of those surveyed had
been homeless, or had last lived in permanent housing less than 12 months ago. The shortest
period of homelessness reported was less than one month and the longest period reported was
20 years.

Using the information provided by the homeless respondents and in consultation with staff from
the Maryland Departm ent of Hum an Resources, the various needs for em ergency shelter,
transitional housing, and permanent supportive housing were estim ated. For those respondents
who indicated that they had a disability, they were assumed to need permanent supportive
housing. For those individuals and families living on the street as well as those res iding in
emergency or domestic violence shelters, they were assumed to need emergency shelter. For
the individuals and families currently living in transitional housing, it was assum ed that they
needed transitional hous ing.

The survey identified 241 hom eless persons in Salisbury that needed housing, as shown in
Table 1A. Of these, 139 were individuals and 102 were persons in 39 families. The housing
needs of these persons are as follows: (a) 23 individuals and 15 persons in families need
transitional housing; (b) 59 individuals and 45 persons in families need emergency shelter; and
(c) 57 individuals and 42 persons in families need permanent supportive housing. All of the
persons needing a transitional shelter are currently being served by one of Salisbury’s four


                                                                                                        10
transitional shelters (14 at Village of Hope and Center 4 Clean Start, 19 at the Life Crisis
Center, six at Second W ind, and 17 at Hudson Health). For those persons needing permanent
supportive housing, 17 individuals and 31 pers ons in fam ilies, are being served by the Tri-
County Alliance and the Wicomico County Health Department. For those needing emergency
shelter, the Christian Shelter is serving 26 individuals and 25 persons in fam ilies and the Life
Crisis Center is serving four individuals and 15 persons in families. Based on these findings,
there is a gap in emergency shelter beds of 26 individuals and 10 persons in families; as well as
a gap in perm anent supportive housing of 40 beds for individuals and 11 beds for persons in
families.

Over 60 percent of those surveyed exhibited signs of substance abuse and mental illness,
about 30 percent show ed signs of physical disability, and 16 percent w ere v ictim s of domestic
violence. T he 241 hom eless individuals need a wide range of supportive services. S pecifically,
(1)168 (96 individuals and 72 persons in families) need housing placement, (2) 147 (82
individuals and 65 persons in families) need case management, (3) 129 (75 individuals and 54
pers ons in fam ilies) need mental health treatment; (4) 122 (72 individuals and 50 persons in
families) need substance abuse treatment, (5) 108 (75 individuals and 33 persons in families)
need job training, (6) 79 (21 individuals and 58 persons in families) need transportation, (7) 76
persons in families need child care, and (8) 24 (13 individuals and 11 persons in families) need
life skills training. The results of this survey of homeless by the Tri-County Alliance confirm the
findings of the City’s community needs survey. Specifically, the greatest supportive service
needs of Salisbury’s homeless are intensive case management, job training, substance abuse
treatment, and mental health care.

2. Homeless Facilities and Services

The homeless in W icom ico County and Salisbury are assisted prim arily by non-profit
organizations and local ministries. Current facilities include the Christian Shelter, an emergency
shelter with 49 beds; the Life Crisis Center with 19 beds for victims of domestic violence; the
Village of Hope (including Center 4 Clean Start), a transitional shelter that can serve 14 families;
Second W ind, a halfway house for addicts with six beds and Hudson Health Services at Deers
Head Hospital, a special needs facility that can serve 17 homeless individuals. During the
winter, Joseph House Center sometimes uses its Hospitality Room to shelter up to an additional
25 individuals. During the day, the Center provides 20 hom eless persons w ith the opportunity
to take show ers, wash clothes, and rem ain off the street. Finally, if a formal em ergency is
declared by FEMA, the Salvation Army has put cots in its center in Salisbury for the homeless
or those in temporary need of shelter.

The only emergency shelter in Salisbury is the Christian Shelter on Barclay Street in the Church
Street–Doverdale neighborhood. The Shelter is faith-based and has been in operation for 23
years. The Shelter has 49 beds, designated as follows: (1) 17 beds for men, (2) 12 beds for
wom en, and (3) 20 beds in five family rooms. An individual can stay at the Shelter for up to 30
days. The Shelter, which serves an average of 95 homeless persons per month, provided
12,300 bed nights during 2003. As supportive services, each person receives breakfast and
dinner (as well as a bag lunch if they have a job). The Shelter served an average of 1971
meals per month during 2003. Each person is provided a list of landlords with apartments and
job announcements. Also, a volunteer social worker is available to refer individuals to other
service providers. Christian Shelter, because of its lack of beds, denied shelter to an average of
190 persons per month in 2003.

The Life Crisis Center has five room s w ith a total of 19 beds to serve the victims of domestic
violence. T he Center is currently full with four individuals, and 15 persons in fam ilies.


                                                                                                       10
Individuals can stay at the Center for up of 90 days. The Center provides services such as
court assistance, divorce assistance, counseling, and abuse intervention. The Center does not
turn anyone away. If full, they put individuals in other shelters outside of W icomico County (17
in 2003) or a hotel (12 individuals or 36 bed nights in 2003).

Village of Hope, was established by the Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary around 1991/93 with
the development of 14 transitional units for homeless women and children. W ith most women
residents having two children, an estimated 28 persons are served. The maximum am ount of
time the homeless can stay at the Village of Hope is two years. The resident director acts as a
case manager and refers the wom en to other providers for services not offered on-site. The
Village of Hope provides on-site medical care (one doctor) and soon dental care, in conjunction
with the County Health Department. Roughly 800 clients per year are assisted with 2800 doctor
visits. Since State subsidies for daycare have stopped, daycare services are no longer
provided. For a three-year period, 2000-2003, six of the apartments were rented to the Center 4
Clean Start for pregnant women who w ere drug abusers. The Village of Hope turns away three
to five women every time a vacancy arises.

Many of the Village of Hope residents are referred to Joseph House, a crisis center also
operated by the Little Sisters of Jesus and Mary, as are members of the general public. Joseph
House provides the homeless with services, including food (hot meals daily and pantry three
days a week). Joseph House also refers clients to the State “One Stop” Job Market at the
corner of East Main Street and Route 50 and W or W ic Com munity College for job training.
Popular training includes study for a Certified Nursing Assistant or a Licensed Practical Nurse,
physical therapy, and hair dresser programs .

Located in Salisbury at 309 Newton Street, Second W ind is a halfway house for m ale addicts
that has been in operation since 1971. As a transitional residential care facility with six beds,
Second W ind provides limited time services (maxim um of six months) to m en w ho previously
resided at and rec eived assistance at a prim ary or interm ediate care facility. The men are
expected to have employment, behave properly, participate in treatment, attend AA meetings
daily, and generally become self-sufficient.

Hudson Health Center serves individuals affected by substance abuse. At its residences at
Deers Head Hospital, there are 44 beds in four buildings. Of the total, 17 beds are allocated to
the homeless and eight are used as transitional housing for individuals with health problems.
Hudson Health Center serves 200 individual per year, of which 100 come from Salisbury. The
services provided by Hudson include detoxification, 28 day rehabilitation, case m anagement,
addiction counseling, m edical treatm ent, out-patient services, after-care s ervices , fam ily
therapy, and self-help. After the individuals finish treatment, they are transferred to six halfway
homes or 18 transitional apartments. Additionally, these individuals are provided job training.

W hile Hudson Health Center appears to handle the demand, 10 patients, who have been
waiting two and a half weeks, are on a waiting list. T here are s om e barriers to participating in
these services: (1) no day care for children, (2) potential transfer of children to foster care, and
(3) no transportation. Treatment assistance for homeless persons is paid through a $675,000
grant from Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s (DHMH) Alcohol and Drug
Abuse Administration.

Salisbury Urban Ministries, which is located in the Church Street-Doverdale neighborhood,
provides food, clothing, health services, and personal services to the homeless. The food
services include: a food pantry, a soup kitchen on Saturdays (serving 100-150 persons), and a
hot meal for children on Tuesday evenings. Also, they open their building on Saturdays for


                                                                                                       10
personal hygiene, which is used by six to eight persons. Salisbury Urban Ministries also
addresses the needs of the homeless living in the woods and under bridges. Approximately 50
such homeless are served, of which 95 percent are male, all with a wide range of needs. As
reported to staff of Salisbury Urban Ministries, the un-housed homeless need: job training (45),
targeted case managem ent (50), housing (50), substance abuse treatment (45), treatment for
mental illness (45), and life skills training (30). The Ministries also operate a health care
program for 76 homeless, who live in the woods and on the streets. This program is funded by
a grant from the Delm arva Foundation.

The W icomico County Social Services Department (DSS) provides financial support and
services to individuals and families in crisis through its Crisis Intake Center and its Divisions of
Adult Services , Child Protective Services, and In-Hom e Services . During 2003, the Crisis
Intake Center referred 255 individual adults and 100 persons in families to Salisbury area
emergency shelters, particularly the Christian Shelter. In addition, 70 individuals and 95
persons in families were housed in motels. Ten persons were provided substance abuse and
mental health services. The DSS’ Divisions of Child Protective Services and In-Home Services
serve 270 persons in families. Ten of these families are housed in motels. Of these persons,
11 persons are provided job training, nine receive substance abuse treatment, 14 receive
mental health care, and five receive life skills training.

The W icomico County Health Department provides a full range of services to the homeless
through the Behavioral Health Division and the Core Service Agency (CSA). The Behavioral
Health Division operates an Addictions Program and a Mental Health Program. The Addictions
Program provides outpatient substance abuse services including assessment, treatment, and
aftercare and case management services. In particular, this program supports Homeless
Addictions Never Denied Services (HANDS), Center4Clean Start, and Project Challenge. The
Mental Health Program provides psychiatric rehabilitation services for children and families and
targeted case m anagement for children and adolescences and dually diagnosed individuals.
Each homeless individual is assessed and provided medical, psychiatric and substance abuse
services plus employment assistance.

The Mental Health Program has four programs that work with the homeless: (a) outpatient
mental health clinic (OM HC), which includes psychiatric and m edication evaluations, individual,
family, and group psychotherapies, school-based services, and parenting support groups; (b)
psychiatric rehabilitation program (PRP), which provides comm unity-based services for children
and adults who have serious mental disorders; (c) mobile crisis unit (MCU), funded through
W icomico CSA, provides short-term crisis intervention by responding to calls 24 hours/day (from
law enforcement, Life Crisis, Wicomico County Detention Center, the Drill Academy, and
W icomico County Health Departm ent); and (d) the targeted case m anagement (TCM) program.
TCM w orks w ith children, adolescents, and adults that have a mental illness, w ho require
intensive assistance to remain in the comm unity. TCM services include client advocacy and
support, linking clients with needed services. TCM receives PATH funding in the amount of
$11,229 from the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Mental Hygiene
Adm inistration (MHA), through the CSA to provide outreach to homeless individuals.

The CSA funds several program s to assist hom eless persons w ho are seriously mentally ill.
Client support funding is available for transportation, medical assistance, clothing, housing,
food, psychiatric medications, and utilities. The CSA receives a PATH grant from MHA in the
amount of $7,383 to provide rental assistance to individuals with a mental illness w ho are
homeless or at-risk of becoming homeless. Finally, the CSA contracts with a vendor to provide
mental health services at the local detention center.



                                                                                                       10
The CSA also operates the Shelter Plus Care Housing Program as a grantee of MHA. The CSA
receives a $104,556 grant to provide housing subsidies to homeless individuals who have a
severe mental illness. MHA’s Shelter Plus Care Housing Program is a partnership with the local
mental health authorities and their comm unity providers (e.g., in W icomico County the
partnership is between the County Core Service Agency and the W icomico County Behavioral
Health and Hudson Health Services). The W icomico providers administer 12 units for
individuals coming from incarceration with a serious mental illness. The TCM provides case
managem ent services to the individuals s erved by the Shelter Plus Care P rogram . As of April
2004, the Wicomico County Shelter Plus Care Housing Program is serving 20 individuals, all of
whom res ide in Salisbury.

In 2001 the Tri-County Alliance’s analysis of homeless needs indicated that there was a
significant need for permanent supportive housing. Consequently, the Alliance applied for and
received grants from HUD’s Supportive Housing Program to provide such housing to disabled
homeless individuals and families through a case management system. These grants equaled
$666,400 in 2001 (a three year grant for 21 housing units with case m anagem ent), $325,956 in
2002 (a one year grant for 25 units with case management), and $174,712 in 2003 (a two year
grant for 15 housing units only). Of the 2002 grant, $45,000 was for the startup of a regional
hom eless m anagem ent information system . The disabled individual or the head of household
must com plete and then comply with a service plan that addresses counseling, education, job
training/placement, and life skills training. As of April 14, 2004, the Alliance’s Permanent
Supportive Housing Program is serving 74 individuals, of w hich 32 reside in Salisbury.

Finally, the Wicomico County Social Services and Health Departments as well as Shore Up (the
regional Com munity Action Agency) are responsible for assisting Salisbury residents that are at-
risk of becoming homeless. These organizations provide both technical and financial
assistance to help tenants to prevent eviction or to help them relocate to a new apartm ent (i.e.,
grant for the payment of security deposit and first month’s rent). In particular, the Department of
Social Services annually administers roughly $75,122 under MD DHCD’s Rental Allowance
Program (RAP) to prev ent homelessness. Also, the County Departm ent of Health adm inisters
$33,281 from the PATH P rogram for outreach and one-time rental assistance to prevent
eviction. Although MD DHCD targets funds for homeless prevention under the federal
Emergency Shelter Grant Program (ESG), no organizations in Salisbury have applied for these
funds in the past three years.

Most of these prov iders of shelter and services to Salisbury’s hom eless are m em bers of the Tri-
County Alliance for the Homeless. The Alliance was formed in 2001 to develop a Continuum of
Care plan for Somerset, W icomico, and Worcester Counties. The Continuum plan includes a
gap analysis of the needs of the homeless and disabled persons, outlines a comprehensive
strategy, including the required housing and services to resolve the needs, assures that the
housing and services are provided, and reaches out to at-risk individuals as situations arise. A
key in assuring that the needed services are provided is the Homeless Management Information
System (HMIS), which allows the Alliance to track the progress of each homeless person. The
City intends to participate fully in the development and implementation of HMIS in Salisbury and
will provide the information needed to allow the system to operate effectively. The Alliance is
currently working with interested non-profit organizations to submit grant applications to the
Maryland Department of Housing and Comm unity Development in the next several months.

3. Priority Homeless Needs

As indicated in the City’s survey of housing and com munity development needs (Appendix B), a
focus group m eeting of citizens in January 2004, individual meetings with public and private


                                                                                                      10
homeless housing/service providers in the spring of 2004, and the Tri-County Alliance’s Point-
in-Time survey of homeless needs, the overwhelming need of the homeless is additional
emergency shelter and permanent supportive housing. These priority needs, as well as
num erous others, are listed in Table 1A. T he hom eless also need intensive case m anagement,
job training, housing placem ent, substance abuse treatm ent, and m ental health care.




                 Table 1A: Priority Needs of Homeless and Special Needs Populations

                                                       Estimated      Current     Unmet    Relative
                                                       Need           Inventory   Need /   Prio rity
                                                                                  Gap
                                                      Individ ua ls
                   Em ergency Shelter                        59       33          26       H
Be ds / Un its     Transitional Housing                      23       54                   L
                   Permanent Housing                         57       17          40       M
                   Total                                    139       97
                    Job Training                             75                            H
                    Case Management                          82                            H
Estimated           Su bstanc e Abu se T reatm ent           72                            H
Supportive          Mental Health C are                      75                            H
Services            Housing Placement                        96                             H
                    Life Skills Training                     13                            L
                    Transportation                           21                            M
                    Other                                     3                            L
                    Ch ron ic Su bstanc e Abu sers           54                            M
                    Seriously Men tally Ill                  53                            M
Estimated           Dually – Diagno sed                      30                            M
Sub-                Veterans                                 16                            L
populations         Persons with HIV/AIDS                     6                            L
                    Victims of Domestic Violence             12                            L
                    Youth                                     0                            L
                    Ph ysical/Med ical Disability            41                            M
                    Other                                    3                             L
                                           Persons in Families with Children
                   Em ergency Shelter                       45        35          10       H
Be ds / Un its     Transitional Housing                     15        23          -        L
                   Permanent Housing                        42        31          11       M
                   Total                                    102       56
                    Job Training                             33                            M
                    Case Management                          65                            H
Estimated           Su bstanc e Abu se T reatm ent           50                            M
Supportive          Mental Health C are                      54                            M
Services            Housing Placement                        72                            H
                    Life Skills Training                     11                            L
                    Ch ild C are                             76                            H
                    Other                                     2                            L
                    Ch ron ic Su bstanc e Abu sers           37                            M
                    Seriously Men tally Ill                  46                            M
Estimated           Dually – Diagno sed                      26                            M
Sub-                Veterans                                  8                            L
populations         Persons with HIV/AIDS                     4                            L
                    Victims of Domestic Violence             27                            M
                    Youth                                     0                            L
                    Ph ysical/Med ical Disability            33                            M




                                                                                                       10
To help resolve the needs of its homeless citizens and those at-risk of becoming homeless, the
   City plans to participate fully as a mem ber of the Tri-County Alliance for the Homeless. For
example, the City will assist in updating and implementing the regional Continuum of Care Plan.
 The City will do this through active participation in monthly meetings of the Tri-County Alliance,
  through assistance in identifying buildings for potential use as shelter, and through the use of
   CDBG funds (if necessary) as a partial match for federal and State funds to develop and/or
    operate shelters, trans itional housing, supportive housing, and services . The City also will
             provide appropriate data for inclusion in the regional ServicePoint HMIS.

                     B. Housing and Service Needs of Special Populations

     The residents of the City of Salisbury with special needs (e.g., the elderly, physically and
  mentally disabled, persons with drug/alcohol addition or HIV/AIDS) are provided housing and
services through State, County and private non-profit service providers. The primary provider of
  supportive housing and services to this population is the Maryland Department of Health and
  Mental Hygiene (DHMH) through its Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), Mental
     Hygiene Administration, Aids Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration, and
   county health departments. The Wicom ico County Health Department provides funding and
  licensing supervision for comm unity residential programs for people with mental and physical
          illnesses, and services to all special needs populations. The W icomico Health
    Departm ent also refers persons with HIV/AIDS or alcohol/drug addiction problems to local
  non-profit service organizations. W icomico Social Services Department (DSS) also provides
 financial support and services to individuals and families with special needs, primarily through
 its Divisions of Adult Services, Child Protective Services, and In-Home Services. There is no
direct City involvement in the provision of supportive housing or services for people with special
                                     housing and service needs.

                        1. Characteristics of Special Needs Populations

          Developmentally Disabled and Persons with HIV and Addiction Problems

 Based on data provided by the DDA, the Adm inistration serves an estim ated 400 clients (both
   children and adults) in W icom ico County, 155 are provided residential services and 297 are
 provided day services. Approximately, 240 or 60 percent of the dev elopm entally disabled are
 Salisbury residents. All are provided case managem ent. Those in residential care are housed
    three to a house with a counselor. The residents receive housing as well as rehabilitation
    services help with cooking, budgeting, and pers onal hygiene. Those in day care generally
  receive vocational (em ployment help) and recreational assistance. Roughly 148 persons are
waiting for any type of service; there is a waiting list of 52 persons for residential services, 34 for
                            day services, and 118 for support services.

 The DDA works with numerous organizations to help the clients. These organizations include:
   Lower Shore Enterprises (day services), Dove Pointe (medical care), Epilepsy Foundation
(residential services for 35-40 persons), Humanium (day services for 12 and residential services
 for eight), Cerebral Palsy (residential services for 14), Autism Foundation, and Bay Shore (day
 services for 20). Over half of the residential sites supported by the DDA are located in the City
                                            of Salisbury.

    According to the Aids Administration’s 2003 Annual Report, the number, incidence, and
  prevalence of HIV/AIDS in Maryland has declined over the past 10 years. As of Decem ber,
  2002 there were 25,847 persons with HIV/AIDS in Maryland. Eighty-two percent are African


                                                                                                          10
  Am ericans, 65 percent are male (although the numbers of fem ales w ith HIV has been rising),
    and 72 percent are middle-aged (30-49 years old). However, only three percent of these
 individuals live on the Eastern Shore, 224 are in W icom ico County (83 percent of w hom live in
                                           Salisbury).

In calendar year 2002, there were 18 new cases of HIV and 10 new cases of AIDS in Wicomico
    County com pared with 1128 HIV cases and 647 AIDS cases in Baltim ore City. However,
 W icomico County prevalence rates (cases per 100,000 persons) are relatively high compared
 with most M aryland counties. Only Baltimore City, Prince G eorge’s, Dorchester, and Baltimore
  Counties have higher rates than W icom ico County. This is because the number of cases are
                          high compared to the size of the population.

Those individuals with alcohol or drug abuse problems in Salisbury are served basically by non-
 profit service providers. There are tw o residential treatm ent facilities serving W icomico County
and Salisbury. Located in Salisbury at 309 Newton Street, Second W ind is a halfway house for
  male addicts that has been in operation s ince 1971. As a transitional residential care facility
with six beds, Second W ind provides limited time services (maximum of six months) to men who
  previously resided at and received assistance at a primary or intermediate care facility. The
  men are expected to have employment, behave properly, participate in treatment, attend AA
 meetings daily, and generally become self-sufficient. Hudson Health Services on Harting Drive
  in Salisbury provides residential treatm ent to both males and females. Otherwise, Salisbury
      residents with these problems live at home and are provided non-residential services.
    Specifically, six organizations (Center 4 Clean Start, Delmarva Family Resources, Hudson
 Health Services, Peninsula Addiction Services W hite Flint Recovery, and Wicom ico Behavioral
   Health) offer outpatient services. These s ervices include drug treatm ent and rehabilitation.

      Currently, the W icom ico County Departm ent of Social Services’ (DSS) Division of Adult
  Services is providing case managem ent services to 93 individuals. Of these individuals, four
are c hronic substance abusers, six are s eriously mentally ill persons, and six pers ons are dually
     diagnosed. DSS’ Child Protective Services assists 715 youth, of which 68 are victims of
   dom estic violenc e, 53 are chronic substances abus ers, 33 are seriously mentally ill, six are
     dually diagnosed, and one has HIV/AIDS. The DSS’ Foster Care Program provides 149
     children with child care services. Currently, the inventory of assistance to special needs
 populations being provided by DS S’ Adult and In-Home Services is as follow s: elderly (21), frail
  elderly (33), severe mental illness (26), developm entally disabled (7), physically disabled (12),
eight persons with alcohol/drug addictions, and one person with HIV/AIDS. Many, if not most, of
                         these persons with special needs live in Salisbury.

                                           The Elderly

   The major provider of services to Wicomico County and Salisbury’s elderly is MAC or the
  State’s regional Area Agency on Aging. Their office is on Riverside Drive next to Pine B luff
  Village, a senior housing complex, in Salisbury. They have been providing services to the
   elderly since 1972-75, particularly the Congregate Housing Services and Senior Assisted
       Housing Programs. The elderly generally are defined as those persons over 60.

 The Congregate Program is operated at Pine Bluffs Village in Salisbury, serving 72 of the 150
  residents. In fact, this site is the only one on the Eastern Shore. Although the waiting list is
opened every fall to new clients, with a waiting list of 100, many elderly have been on the list for
 over a year. Most of the elderly are 80 years of age and are becoming “frail.” Both males and
 fem ales are s erved, with 75 perc ent of the clients coming from W icom ico County. The elderly
    are helped with laundry, meals, doctor appointments, personal living activities, etc. The


                                                                                                       10
   services are paid for through a State grant which covers roughly 80 percent of cost. They
        charge a fee to cover the remaining costs. Recently State funds have been cut.

    The Sheltered Housing Program uses State funds to pay for elderly services provided by
  contract service providers. Generally services are provided in homes with from 3-15 beds.
    There are nine such homes on the Lower Shore with three in W icom ico, including two in
Salisbury, Destiny Rest Hom e and Sarah/Margaret/M ollie’s Plac e. The form er facility assists six
 elderly and the latter serves 15 seniors. Not only are the elderly provided a place to stay, but
                                    meals and personal care.

   Other assisted living facilities or life care communities in Salisbury that are not supported by
State subsidies include: John Parsons Home, Atria Assisted Living, Tressler Lutheran Village at
Harbor Point, Lakeside at Mallard Landing, and Tranquil Meadows. Other apartment complexes
  for the elderly in Salisbury include Pine Bluff Village, Riverside Apartments, Eastgate Village,
 Lakev iew Center, Pem berton Manor, W aterside Apartm ents, and Gateway Village. Also there
are five other apartment groups for seniors in W icomico County (three in Delmar and one each
                                         in Fruitland and Hebron).

 Other services provided to the elderly by MAC are: Meals on W heels (31,440 served annually);
 legal services; meals (8878 meals annually); a guardianship program (20 clients per year); and
 day care. MAC also provides social services to 150 seniors at the Pine Bluff senior center and
another 100 elderly at centers in Delmar and Willards annually. MAC’s employment services for
   25 elderly residents include senior job training (20 hours/week) and placement at Arby’s, the
   County Department of Social Services, Wicomico Sheriff’s Department and Salisbury Police
   Department. The organization also offers annual medical assistance and senior care to an
estimated 150 elderly as well as general information and referral services to roughly 650 senior
                                             residents.

MAC works with numerous loc al organizations, including the Alzheim er’s Association, Genesis
   Eldercare, Holly Community, Shore Up, United Way, W icomico County Health and Social
Services Departm ents, local businesses, and others through the “Com munity Foundation.” In
   particular, Shore Up operates an adult day care c enter at its offices on Snow Hill Road in
Salisbury. These organizations hold monthly meetings and share information, raise funds, and
 lobby for the elderly. Recently there has been an effort by some of the organizations to m ore
                formally coordinate health services especially for the frail elderly.

 The local Salvation Army also helps Salisbury’s elderly. They operate a senior center at 407
 Oak Street in Salisbury and two others elsewhere on the Lower Shore. The Salisbury Senior
     Center, which has both a gym and a pool, is open Monday through Friday for activities.
Activities for the 250 elderly members include: walking, education info, health services, dancing,
 and c hoir. During Hurricane Isabel, the Salvation Army also provided shelter to an estimated
                              175 persons in the Senior Center’s gym .

                       2. Priority Needs of Special Needs Populations

   Of the populations with special needs, the elderly and/or frail elderly are the largest group in
  Salisbury. W hile there are persons with mental illness, drug/alcohol addiction, HIV/AIDS, and
 others w ith physical or developm ental disabilities in Salisbury, their numbers pale in relation to
 the elderly. According to the 2000 Census, an estimated 2088 households or 23 percent of all
9061 households are elderly (65 years and older) or have seniors living with them . The m ajority
 (1148 or almost 60 percent) of Salisbury’s elderly live in their own homes, 20 percent of whom
have housing problems. W hile a limited number of the other persons with special needs reside


                                                                                                        10
 in residential facilities for between three to 15 persons, the majority of those with drug/alcohol
              addiction, mental illness, developmental disabilities, etc. live at home.

 As indicated in Table 1B, plus a City survey of needs (see Appendix B), a focus group meeting
  of citizens in January 2004, and individual meetings with public and private housing/service
       providers in the spring of 2004, the needs of the elderly rank above those of all other
 populations with special needs. Accessible housing for the elderly and physically handicapped
   is the highest ranking housing need. Similarly, the public service needs of the elderly rank
      highest, followed by the service needs of the disabled and those with alcohol and drug
addiction. To help resolve these needs over the upcoming five years, the City plans to continue
to provide accessibility improvements to elderly homeowners as well as support applications for
   financial assistance by service providers for rehabilitation and/or construction of one or two
                group homes or facilities for three to 10 persons with special needs.


                            Table 1B: Priority Needs of Special Populations

    Special Needs Populations         Prio rity     Unmet   Dollars to Address    Goa ls
                                      Need Level    Need    Unmet Need
                                      (H, M, & L)
    Frail Eld erly                           H      175                                9
    Elderly                                  H      200                               10
    Person s w/ Men tal Illness              H      160                                8
    Developm entally Disabled                M      148                                7
    Physically Disabled                      H      165                                8
    Persons w/ Alcohol/drug                  H      180                                9
    Addiction
    Persons w/ HIV/AIDS                    L        20                                 1
    Total                                           1,048                             52




C. Affordable Housing Needs

The following discussion and analysis of the need for affordable housing in Salisbury is based
primarily on 2000 US Census data, as augmented by data on units assisted with local, State, or
federally-funded program s. G enerally, the disc ussion both analyzes the need for affordable
housing and investigates the supply or stock of affordable units.

1. Household Characteristics

According to 2000 Census data, 23,743 persons reside within the City limits of Salisbury.
Roughly 60 percent of the persons are white, 32 percent are black with the remaining eight
percent composed of other races, including Hispanics and Asians. An estimated 67 percent of
the persons are over 21 years of age, with 12.5 percent over 65 years old or elderly. In
addition, of those 12,761 individuals between 21-64 years of age, 2573 or 20 percent has a
disability. These individuals are further organized into 9067 households with an average
household size of 2.36 persons. Fifty three percent of all households live in families with
children; 47 percent are non-fam ily households or individuals living alone.

The median household income in 1999 in Salisbury was $29,191. However, the median income
for the 2642 black households was $22,870, com pared w ith $31,724 for the 6138 white
households. Roughly 43 percent of all 9233 households earn less than $25,000, while 34
percent earn between $25,000 and $50,000. Only 5.5 percent of the 9233 families earn
$100,000 or more. Of those City residents over 16 years of age, 63.5 percent are in the labor

                                                                                                      10
force and 36.5 percent are not seeking work. Of the 12,385 residents in the labor force, 1011 or
more than five percent are unem ployed. Many households (2286) live on Social Security
income ($10,503 mean SSI), others (1390 households) live on retirement income ($14,119
mean income), and still others (434 households) receive public assistance ($2753 mean
assistance). In 1999, 820 families in Salisbury lived in poverty. Of these families, 426 or 52
perc ent were black families; 578 or 70 percent were families w ith children headed by single
wom en, m ost of w ho were also black (363 fam ilies).

2. Salisbury Households with Housing Problems

The basis of the follow ing housing analysis, as indicated in the Table titled, “Salisbury
Households With Housing Problems, 2000,” is preliminary data prepared from 2000 Census
data and provided by HUD. These preliminary data estimate the significant current needs for
housing assistance by income and family status. Information is provided separately for
extremely low-income (less than or equal to 30 percent of median family income (MFI)), low-
income (greater than 30 percent and less than or equal to 50 percent MFI), moderate-income
(greater than 50 percent and less than or equal to 80 percent MFI), and middle-income (greater
than 80 percent of MFI) households. Data are also detailed for households by tenure type
(renter/owner) and for different family categories (such as the elderly, large fam ilies and single
persons). It describes the extent to which “housing problems,” such as a cost burden greater
than 30 percent of median family income, overcrowding and substandard housing conditions
(without complete plumbing or kitchen facilities), are being experienced by extrem ely low-, low -,
moderate-, and middle-income renters and owners.

Overall, according to 2000 Census data, approximately 3,445, or 38 percent, of all 9,067
households in Salisbury experience some type of housing problem. Of these 9067 households,
roughly 5661, or 62 percent, are renters, while 3406, or 38 percent, are homeow ners. Of the
5661 total renters, 2774 or 49 percent have some type of housing problem. Conversely, of the
3406 homeowners, only 681 or 20 percent have a housing problem.

Housing Problem s (Affordability, Overcrow ding, and Substandard Conditions)

The m ost frequently experienced hous ing problem is lack of affordability. Housing affordability
is the amount of the household income spent on the cost of housing. It is commonly assumed
that a maximum of 30 percent of gross household income should be spent on housing costs,
including utilities. Households spending m ore than that am ount are said to have a cost burden.
Households spending 50 percent or more of gross hous ehold incom e for housing costs are
experiencing a severe cost burden. An estimated 3,460 Salisbury households are cost
burdened and roughly 1550 households are severely cost burdened. Conversely, less than tw o
percent of all Salisbury’s households live in substandard conditions and less than four percent
of City households live in “overcrowded” (e.g., more than one person in each room) housing.

Although not shown, the same data for the City disaggregated by racial or ethnic group
indicates that black households have disproportionately more housing problem s than w hite
households. Specifically, 52 percent of all 2661 black households have housing problems,
while only 31 percent of all 5785 white households have housing problems. If black households
in Salisbury are further split between renters and homeow ners, 56 percent of black renters
(2239 households) have housing problems and only 30 percent of black homeowners (422
households) have housing problems. Although 79 percent of Hispanic households have
housing problems, only 162 or less than two percent of all Salisbury households are Hispanic.
In general, such households are primarily migrants as indicated by 140 of the 162 Hispanic
households being renters, working primarily in agricultural pursuits.


                                                                                                      10
W hile affordability is a concern of households across all income levels, those Salisbury
households with extremely low- and low-incomes have the greatest housing problems. As can
be expected, 80 percent of the City’s extremely low-income and 70 percent of the low-income
households have housing problems. Additionally, 40 percent of the moderate-income
households and almost 10 perc ent of the m iddle-incom e households had housing problems in
2000.

On the other hand, large family households (five or more mem bers), both renters and
homeow ners, have the most housing problems. Other tenure types with significant housing
problems inc lude the elderly and “other” renters (roughly 50 percent each), followed by small
family renters (43 percent) and “other” hom eowners (30 percent).

Extremely Low-Income Households by Type of Tenure with Housing Problems

As expected, housing problems are mos t acutely experienced by the City’s more than 1617
extremely low-incom e households. These households represent an estimated 18 perc ent of all
households. Of these extremely low-income households, 1419, or a vast majority, are renters,
and 198 are homeowners. About 80 percent of the renters have housing problems and 70
perc ent of the homeow ners have housing problems. Almost 60 perc ent of both the extremely
low-income renters and homeowners pay more than 50 percent of their income for rent and/or
mortgage.

Small families (those with two-four members) and elderly (those with one-two members)
households (both renters and homeowners) represent the largest subgroup of extremely low-
income households w ith housing problems. Also, within this incom e group, there are roughly
615 “other” households, mostly renters, with housing problems. Based on the data for these
households, no m atter whether they are renters or ow ners , the highest priority need is
affordability.

Low-Income Households by Type of Tenure with Housing Problems

There are approximately 1391 low-income households (or 15 percent of all households) in the
City of Salisbury. Comparable with extremely low-income households, the vast majority or 1092
low-incom e households are renters, and only 299 low-income households are homeowners.
Roughly 70 percent of all low-income households have housing problems, but 73 percent of
low-incom e renters have hous ing problem s while only 55 percent of low -incom e hom eow ners
have such problems. Unlike the extremely low-income households, only an estimated 20
percent of both low-income renters and homeow ners pay more than 50 percent of their income
for rent and/or mortgage.

Again the largest subgroups of low-incom e households for both renters and hom eow ners are
small families and elderly households. W hile almost 70 percent of the low-income elderly and
small family renters experience housing problems, only 18 percent of elderly low-income
hom eow ners have housing problem s and 100 percent of sm all family low-incom e hom eow ners
experience hous ing problem s. Over 75 perc ent of the non-elderly low-income renters
experience housing problems, but 100 percent of the non-elderly low-income homeowners have
housing problems. The priority need of this population (both renter and homeowner) is also
housing affordability, though to a lesser extent than for extremely low-income households.



Moderate-Income and Middle-Income Households by Type of Tenure with Housing

                                                                                                 10
Problems

There are 1993 m oderate-incom e households and 4066 middle-incom e households in
Salisbury. The former income group represents 22 percent of all households and the latter
accounts for 45 percent. Forty percent of all moderate-income households experience a
housing problem, while only 10 percent of all middle-income households have such problems.

Of the moderate-income households, 66 percent are renters and 37 percent are homeowners.
There is very little variation in the percentage of moderate-income renters with housing
problems, but sm all family moderate-income hom eow ners have disproportionately more
housing problems (63 percent) than other moderate-incom e ow ners . The priority need of this
income group is again one of affordability, both for renter and owner households.

Of the middle-income households, 45 percent are renters while 55 percent are homeowners.
The middle-income households with the most housing problems are large related households,
with 54 percent of renters and 30 percent of homeowners with housing problems. Otherwise,
this income group has few housing problems. Since this income group is not eligible for many
public financial assistance program s for housing, the general lack of housing problems is
fortunate.

3. Housing Characteristics and Market Analysis

Based on the 2000 Census, there are 9769 housing units in the City of Salisbury. Slightly over
50 percent of these units are single family detached structures, while roughly 30 percent have
between three and 20 units per s tructure. An estimated 40 perc ent of the housing w as built
before 1960, another 44 percent was built between 1960 and 1990, and only 1361 units or 13
percent of the housing stock has been built since 1990. The typical residence in Salisbury has
five rooms, but 40 percent of the residences are large with 8.5 percent having more than eight
rooms. An estimated 94 percent of the housing is occupied and six percent are vacant.

Sixty two percent of the City’s housing is rented and 38 percent is owner-occupied. Of the
owner-occupied units, almost 62 percent are valued between $50,000 and $100,000, with the
median house cost being $81,700. Of the renter-occupied units, 42 percent pay between $500
and $750 in monthly rent. Also as indicated by 2000 Census data, over 45 percent of all renters
pay more than 30 percent of their monthly income for rent, while 36 percent spend more than 35
perc ent. Comparatively, only 22 perc ent of all hom eow ners spend more than 30 percent of their
monthly income for housing, w ith 17 percent paying more than 35 percent.

Assisted Housing Inventory

The City’s housing stock also includes 1,776 assisted housing units in 22 separate housing
projects. Of the 22 projects illustrated in the Table, “Salisbury Ass isted Housing Inventory,
2004,” 14 are financed by HUD and eight are funded primarily by the State DHCD. Three of the
MD DHCD projects also include federal HOM E and Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC).
Furthermore, 10 of the HUD financed projects (665 units) have project-based Section 8
vouchers. Also as indicated in the Table, none of the managers of the HUD-assisted units have
chosen to opt out of their contracts. This decision is not unexpected, since incomes are lower
and the number of renters is fewer in rural areas as opposed to those in urban areas. How ever,
the Sec tion 8 contracts for five projects (247 units) will expire within the next five years (e.g.,
two projects (216 units) in 2005, two in 2007, and one in 2008). Consequently, the City will
have to clos ely monitor the renewal decisions for these 247 units, in order to m aintain them in
Salisbury’s affordable housing stock. The City will have to be particularly vigilant in this


                                                                                                       10
upcom ing program year, since both c ontracts expire in mid-year.

Of the 22 assisted projects, at least eight are targeted to very low income elderly and/or deaf
renters (HUD 202 projects, Congregate Housing and State Elderly Rental Housing Program
(ERHP) projects). Five of the projects, those assisted under Section 221(d)(4) of the National
Housing Act, are focused primarily on very low income single pers ons who rent SRO or “Single
Room Oc cupancy” units. Typically the SRO units include no rental subsidies, unlike the
Congregate Housing Program for the low income elderly which covers assistance with activities
of daily living. Regardless of the funding sourc e, all of the assisted units prov ide affordable
housing for Salisbury’s low and moderate income citizens.

                               Salisbury Assisted Housing Inventory, 2004

         P ro je c t N a m e    P ro g ra m N am e   To tal U nits   Se c 8 Un its   Ex pira tion Da te   Opt Out
HU D P roje cts                                          1276        665
Broo kridge To wn hou ses I          221(d)(4)       80                                                   No
Bro okridge T ownhouses II           221(d)(4)       140                                                  No
Co llege Ave A partm ents            221(d)(4)       120                                                  No
Deaf Indep en den t R es II             202          12              12              05/06/2007           No
Deaf Indep en den t R es III            202          9               9               05/03/2008           No
Lak eview A partm ents                  202          37              37              12/20/2021           No
Loretta Village                         202          20              20              07/31/2017           No
Mo ss Hill Tow nho uses                 236          200             160             05/31/2005           No
Pe mberto n M ano r Ap ts               236          209             143             06/30/2024           No
Pine Bluff Village                  Co ng rega te    151             150             01/17/2020           No
Su mmit Apartm ents                                  10              10              03/31/2007           No
Tide Mill Ap artm ents                221(d)(4)      104                                                  No
W aterside A partm ents                Elderly       68              68              11/30/2013           No
W est R oad Ap artm ents              221(d)(4)      56              56              06/30/2005           No
Sta te P roje cts                                    500
Eastgate Village                     Bond            60
Gateway Village I                    ERHP            58
Gatew ay V illage II                 HOME            62
Gatew ay V illage III                ERHP            36
Schumaker Place                      Bond            96
Mitchell’s Landing                   PRHP            24
Salisbury Commons                    HOME            96
Village at Mitchell Pond           HOME/LIHTC        68


Characteristics of the Priority Salisbury Neighborhoods

For numerous reasons, Salisbury has decided to focus its revitalization efforts on four
residential neighborhoods and the Downtown. As illustrated in the Table, “Characteristics of
Priority Salisbury Neighborhoods, 2000,” the data indicate that the four neighborhoods have
higher numbers of renters than homeowners, fairly aged housing stock, and higher than
average vacancy rates. Over 35 percent of renters in the neighborhoods pay more than 30
percent of their monthly income for rent; on the W estside over 50 percent pay more than 30
percent of their income for rent. In addition, the Church Street–Doverdale and W estside
neighborhoods suffer from low median home values and relative overcrowding. Further, roughly
six percent of the residents of the Wes tside and Newtown-North Division Street neighborhoods
live in housing with substandard conditions.

Of the four neighborhoods, the W estside is populated primarily by black households, both
renters and hom eow ners . In the Church Street-Doverdale neighborhood, renters are ev enly
split between black and white households, while roughly 75 percent of the homeow ners are
white. In both the Newtown-North Division Street and Camden neighborhoods, homeow ners

                                                                                                                    10
are almost solely white, but renters are roughly 30 percent black and 60 percent white
households.

In all four neighborhoods, homeowners are older than renters. At least 25 percent (in the
Newtown-North Division Street neighborhood) and almost 40 percent (in the Wes tside
neighborhood) of the homeowners are over 65 years of age. Conversely, between 85 and 90
percent of the renters in all four neighborhoods are less than 65 years of age. The median
household incom e of all Salisbury households is $29,191, w ith a median of $31,724 for w hite
households and $22,870 for black households. Com paratively, the median incom es of both
black and white households in the Westside neighborhood are much lower, while those in the
Newtown-North Division Street neighborhood are higher. The household incomes in the
Camden neighborhood are similar to the City medians, while the incomes of black households
are higher than those of white households in the Church Street-Doverdale neighborhood.

                        Characteristics of Priority Salisbury Neighborhoods, 2000*
                                Ch urc h S t –
                                  Do ve rda le          Newtown – Division           Westside                   Camden
                             Un its      (% )           Un its     (% )              Un its          (% )       Un its       (% )
To tal U nits                  2104 10 0.0              874        10 0.0            617             10 0.0     1893         10 0.0
 Occ upied                     1985 94 .3               804        92 .0             571             92 .5      1774         93 .7
   Hom eown er                   662 31 .5              387        44 .3             72              11 .7      788          41 .6
   Renter                      1323 62 .9               417        47 .7             499             80 .9      986          52 .1
 Vacant                          119 5.7                70         8.0               46              7.5        119          6.3
Ra ce of H ou se ho ld
 Hom eown er                       662 10 0.0           387              10 0.0       72              10 0.0     788         10 0.0
   W hite                          513 77 .5            354              91 .5        3               4.2        742         94 .2
   Black                           134 20 .2            26               6.7          68              94 .4      34          4.3
 Renter                          1323 10 0.0            417              10 0.0       499             10 0.0     986         10 0.0
   W hite                          597 45 .1            261              62 .6        22              4.4        652         66 .1
   Black                           659 49 .8            131              31 .4        463             92 .8      284         28 .8
Age of Households
 Hom eown er
   Un der 6 5 Years                444 76 .0            291              75 .2        45              62 .5      504         63 .9
   65 Years & Older                218 33 .0            96               24 .8        27              37 .5      284         36 .1
 Renter
   Un der 6 5 Years              1194 90 .2             389              93 .3        457             91 .6      842         85 .4
   65 Years & Older                129 9.8              28               6.7          42              8.4        144         14 .6
M e d ia n Ho u se h old In c om e
   W hite                    $29,746                      $38,182                        $18,958                 $34,836
   Black                     $30,224                      $30,000                        $16,940                 $21,438
Ye ar B uilt
 1980 to Present                   450 21 .4            97               11 .6        134             20 .6      164         8.7
 Pre 1980                        1654 78 .6             777              88 .4        483             79 .4      1729        91 .3
M e d N o of R o om s               5.2                          5.6                           4.4                    5.4
H o us in g Pro b le m s
 Overcrowding                      110 5.6              4                1.0          47              7.8        59          3.4
 Sub Conditions                      34 1.7             45               5.8          34              5.7        41          2.3
Ho us ing Co sts
Med Home Value               $70,400                      $88,500                        $57,300                 $96,300
Me d H om e Costs               $739                          $869                          $923                 $914
3 0% + of In co m e                  89 15 .0           52               14 .8        23              36 .5      204         27 .6
Median Rent                     $558                          $477                           $461                $587
3 0% + of In co m e               485    36 .7          100              35 .2        293             54 .6      407         41 .6
  * Th e 20 00 Censu s data, as cited, co vers the fo llow ing C ens us trac ts (tract 0 00 1, C hu rch St – Do verdale; tract 0 00 2,
       Ne wto wn – N orth Division St, inc luding the D ow nto wn ; tract 000 3, W estside; trac t 00 04 , Cam den ). W hile the
  bo un daries o f the C ens us trac ts and neigh bo rho od s are n ot iden tical, they are co mpara ble w ith two excep tions. T he
   data for N ew tow n – N. D ivision inc lude the D ow nto wn and Camden data also includ e the P inehurst n eighbo rho od .




                                                                                                                                         10
                         Housing Assistance Programs in Salisbury

 Since 1994, the primary organization to increase homeow nership and to improve the quality of
 the hous ing stock in the City has been the Salisbury Neighborhood Housing Services (SNHS).
  SNHS operates five homeownership programs, four repair and renovation programs, and two
property development efforts. In addition, it operates 11 education and comm unity development
       activities. All of the programs are focused on low- and moderate-income families.

To date, SNHS hous ing program s have resulted in an investm ent of $14.25 m illion in Salisbury.
  It has financed first mortgages on 102 homes in the Camden neighborhood, 59 in the Church
Street-Doverdale neighborhood, and 12 on the W estside. Further, SNHS has assisted 36 of the
  homebuyers in the Camden neighborhood, 20 in the Church Street-Doverdale neighborhood,
   and six on the Wes tside with loans for closing costs. SNHS also has financed rehabilitation
       loans on 21 hom es in the Cam den neighborhood, 11 in the Church Street-Doverdale
  neighborhood, and 12 on the W estside. In addition, 17 loans were made to residents in other
areas of the City using funds from the State’s Comm unity Legacy Program and Special Housing
Loans Program . Since 1990, an estim ated $460,000 in CDBG funds has been used to support
 these housing efforts. Thirty three percent of these loans have assisted minorities, 37 percent
have been made to female heads of households, and 41 percent have gone to families making
                                   80 percent or less of the AMI.

   These loans have been augmented by SNHS’ homebuyer education and credit counseling
  programs in order to prepare low - and m oderate-incom e individuals for homeownership. In
 particular, the SNHS operates a pilot Individual Development Account (IDA) program for low-
  income families. The IDA program is designed to help low-income fam ilies develop sound
  budgeting practices and savings habits over a two-year period, while they are accumulating
    money for their down payment. The City provides SNHS with adm inistrative funds (e.g.,
   $28,000 in FY2003) annually to support these programs. However, the demand for these
                      programs far exceeds the funds and staff available.

In addition, the joint City/County Department of Planning, Zoning and Comm unity Development
(PZCD) has operated a Countyw ide housing rehabilitation program , funded w ith CDBG money,
     since 1980. The program is designed to assist low -and m oderate-income hom eow ners
   renovate and repair their homes, especially those with code violations. Over any two-year
 period roughly 35 homes have been rehabilitated, 15 of which are in the City. For the past 10
  years the County also has been the local administrator of a State program to rehabilitate and
 abate lead paint hazards Countywide. Both rental properties and ow ner-occupied housing are
   eligible to receive these funds. Norm ally seven units a year are assisted, four of w hich are
located in Salisbury. Due to the City’s older housing stock, the average cost of lead abatement
 is $38,000-$45,000 per house. However, rehabilitation and/or abatement costs have been as
                                         high as $62,000.

The Salisbury Building, Housing, and Zoning (BHZ) Department is fairly pro-active in inspecting
    housing for code violations. For instance, in CY2003 the City issued 60 citations to have
buildings boarded up, 30 citations for dilapidated structures, 38 condemnation orders, and five
 demolition orders. In the past the City used funds from the State’s HotSpot Crime Prevention
Initiative to demolish roughly 16 vacant, dilapidated homes. Now City General Funds are used
to demolish such blighted structures (i.e., an estimated three homes a year at a cost of $6000-
   $8500 per house). W ithin the last eight years the City has demolished 60-70 abandoned,
blighted homes. Typically, the owner is cited for health/safety/blight code violations and given




                                                                                                    10
    60 days to make repairs and come into compliance; otherwise, the City will demolish the
 structure. Almost all of the homes demolished have been in the Church Street and Westside
                                      neighborhoods.

 Acc ording to the City’s BHZ Director, m uch of the City’s hous ing stock (both rental and owner-
  occupied) is old and costly to repair. Inspections indicate old plumbing, leaking roofs, lack of
  sm oke detectors, etc. W hen c ited, a m ajority of the landlords attempt to m ake the nec essary
 repairs. But many of the elderly homeowners, who are on fixed income, have little or no funds
   to make the needed repairs. In October 2003, the City created a new Rental Registration &
Inspection Program to expand its enforcement capabilities. Hopefully, this program will help the
   City to identify those old, vacant, large homes that could be bought, rehabilitated and added
                                  back into the City’s hous ing stock.

                                   4. Priority Housing Needs

  Both the 2000 Census data (discussed above) and the City’s survey of housing needs (see
Appendix B), as well as the findings from a focus group meeting of citizens in January 2004 and
individual meetings with public and private housing/service prov iders in the spring of 2004 form
      the basis for assigning the following housing priorities. As indicated in Table 2A, the
 households (both renters and owners) with extremely low- and low-incomes have the highest
                                      priority housing needs.

The data in Table 2A reflect the current needs for housing assistance of those with any housing
   problems by income and family status. For example, there are 254 extremely low-income
   elderly renter households in Salisbury, 75 percent (or 190) of who have housing problems.
   W hile such needs extend across both renters and homeowners, the housing needs of the
elderly and small families (renters and homeowners) are the highest. Also ranking high are the
 housing needs of the physically disabled. Accessibility or handicap improvements are ranked
highly by all household types, regardless of income. Other high ranking housing needs include
 down payment/ closing cost assistance and credit counseling for homeowners and lead paint
                           removal for both renters and homeowners.

  To help resolve these needs, the City’s goals are to continue to fund rehabilitation, including
 accessibility improvements and lead paint abatement, of homes occupied by an estimated 40
  extremely low-, low -, and m oderate-income hom eowners. Additionally, the City will seek to
   encourage the development of at least one multi-family rental complex (e.g., 100 units) for
extremely low- and low-income tenants as well as the rehabilitation or construction of one or two
 residential facilities (serving between three and 10 special needs persons) during the coming
                                             five years.




              Table 2A: Priority Housing Needs By Family Status and Income



                                                                                                      10
                     Priority Housing Needs            Priority Need Level by   Unmet   Goa ls

                                                       Income & Family Status   Need

                                                       (High, Medium, Low)
                                                                       H        414     21
                                                          0-30%
                                      Sm all Related                   H        268     13
                                                          31-50%
                                                                       M        160
                                                          51-80%
                                                                       H        75      4
                                                          0-30%
                                      Large Related                    H        114     6
                                                          31-50%
                                                                       M        70
                                                          51-80%
   Renter Households                                                   H        190     10
                                                          0-30%
                                      Elderly                          H        160     8
                                                          31-50%
                                                                       M        73
                                                          51-80%
                                                                       H        473     24
                                                          0-30%
                                      All Other                        H        260     13
                                                          31-50%
                                                                       M        302
                                                          51-80%
                                                                       H        140     10
                                                          0-30%
   Owner Households                                                    H        163     30
                                                          31-50%
                                                                       M        202
                                                          51-80%
   Special Needs Households                                            H                20
                                                          0-80%
   To tal   G oa ls                                                                     160
   To tal   2 15 Go als                                                                 60
   To tal   2 15 Re nte r Go als                                                        40
   To tal   2 15 Ow ne r Go als                                                         20




D. Needs of Public Housing Residents




1. Public Housing Stock




The W icom ico County Housing Authority (W CHA ) owns and manages 277 units of public



                                                                                                 10
housing. There are 100 units of family housing at Booth Street and 75 units of senior housing at

Riverside Apartments. There also are 90 scattered-site units in Salisbury, Fruitland, and

Hebron, of which 50 units are located within the City. The Authority ow ns 12 new hom es. All

W CHA units meet Housing Quality Standards (HQS). Currently, 201 of 277 units are occupied.

W CHA also adm inisters 307 Section 8 vouchers, of which 181 are reserved for City residents.

Currently, 266 vouchers have been issued. The following table show s the distribution of Public

Housing units by number of bedrooms.




                                        Distribution of Public Housing Units



              N o . o f B e dro o m s         Nu m be r of U nits     Pe rce nt o f Un its
                      Efficiency (0)          63                      23%
                             1                70                      25%
                             2                68                      25%
                             3                57                      21%
                             4                15                      5%
                             5                4                       1%
                      To tal Units            277                     100%




  WCHA maintains a single waiting list for both public housing and Section 8 vouchers.

   The following table shows the income and racial characteristics of the families on the

  waiting list. A total of 191 Salisbury families are on the WCHA waiting list for Section 8

   vouchers, 170 of which have incomes less than 30 percent of AMI. Also, 160 of those

   City residents waiting for vouchers have children, 31 are elderly, and 22 families have

 individuals with disabilities. Over 80 percent of the City families on the Section 8 waiting

                                                    list are black.




                             Characteristics of Families on the Waiting List




                                                                                                   10
           Family Type             Public Housing   City Section 8    County Section 8
     Total                                 266      191               186
     Income less than 30%                  206      170               120

     AMI
     In co m e b etw ee n 3 0% -           50       15                40

     50% of AMI
     In co m e b etw ee n 5 0% -           10       6                 26

     80% of AMI
     Elderly                              70        31                18
     Fam ilies with Disabilities           4        22                23
     Fam ilies with Ch ildren             196       160               145
     Black                                235       155               156
     W hite                               28        33                29
     Am erican Indian                      3        1                 0




2. Priority Needs of Public Housing Residents




The following table show s the housing needs of families in Public Housing as ranked by a

recent survey com pleted by the Authority. The housing needs are ranked from “5” or severe to

“1” or low. All of the WCHA residents appear to face both severe housing affordability and

supply needs. In addition, elderly and disabled residents have high accessibility needs. The

majority (334 or 48 percent of all families) of W CHA’s residents earn less than 30 percent of the

Area Median Income (AMI). Another 218 fam ilies or 30 percent of the PHA residents earn

between 30-50 percent of AMI.




According to the WCHA Agency Plan, and reflected in the priorities in Table 4 below, the

Authority wants to improve the quality of housing for all of the residents by improving general

managem ent, improving voucher management, increasing customer service, improving the

reserve level (by a minimum of 25 percent per year), and certifying occ upancy personnel.

W CHA also wants to increase assisted housing choices by conducting outreach efforts to

potential landlords and to strengthen landlords with rental units that meet HUD’s Housing

Quality Standards (HQS).

                                                                                                     10
            Housing Needs of Public Housing Residents by Family Type and Income




  Family Type               Ove rall     Affo rda bility     Su pp ly     Qua lity   Access   Size       Location
   Income less than         334          5                   5            2          2        1          2

        30% AMI
    Income between          218          5                   5            2          1        1          2

   3 0 % - 5 0% o f A M I
    Income between          145          5                   5            2          5        1          2

   5 0 % - 8 0% o f A M I
          Elderly           145          5                   5            2          5        1          2
       Families with        27           5                   5            2          5        1          2

       Disabilities




    The W CHA FY 2003 budget covers maintenance and operation ($375,612) plus capital

restoration and revitalization ($504,984). The allocation for Section 8 assistance is $1,150,556.

        The W CHA restoration and revitalization costs include implementing maintenance

improvements for all units as well as Section 504 handicapped accessibility improvements to 14

units. W hile rehabilitation and modernization are high priorities, the Authority is not considering

any demolition or developm ent/replacement of housing units. W CHA also has no plans to apply

                                                    for a HOPE VI grant.




                                       Table 4: Priority Public Housing Needs




  Public Housing Needs                                Prio rity Ne ed Le ve l                 Estimated Dollars To

                                                      (High, Medium, Low, No Such Need)       Address Need
  Restoration and Revitalization
  Ca pital Impro vements                                                  L
  Modernization                                                           H
  Rehabilitation                                                          H                   $504,984
  Management and Operations                                               M                   $375,612
  Improved Living Environment
  Neig hborh ood Revitalizatio n (n on-c ap ital)                         M



                                                                                                                     10
  Ca pital Impro vements                                       L
  Safety/C rim e P reventio n/D ru g Elimination               H
  Ec on om ic O pp ortu nity                                                     $1,150,556
  Residen t S ervices/ F am ily Self                           M

  Sufficiency
  Total




  The Authority is actively pursuing safety and crime prevention at both the Booth Street and

Riverside complexes. Safety measures are a high priority due to a high incidence of violent or

drug-related crimes as well as occurrences of low level crimes, vandalism, and graffiti. Current

    residents are fearful, and prospective residents do not want to move into the W estside

neighborhood. To address these problems, W CHA is implementing a volunteer resident “block

 watchers” program. There are regular meetings among the PHA managem ent, residents and

Salisbury Police Department. Finally, the County Sheriffs Departm ent does intervention patrols

                                by bike and car at the Booth S treet com plex.




  Another goal is to improve com munity quality of life and economic vitality by implementing

measures to improve the income m ix and de-concentrate poverty by bringing in higher income

households. To promote self-sufficiency, W CHA is providing or assisting with the provision of

 supportive services to improve the residents’ employability. This effort will be accomplished

through a tenant orientation program led by a new tenant services coordinator. The Authority

     currently provides two services to residents to im prov e their economic and social self

  sufficiency. These services are a food pantry serving 10 new public housing and Section 8

 residents, and an after school tutoring program for 20 children. Also, W CHA is continuing to

provide life skills training for residents. At present the Housing Authority does not support any

    activities encouraging the public housing residents to become involved in m anagement.




Despite these activities, the WCHA is currently in trouble with the federal government. W CHA,

once rated “superior” by HUD, is now considered “troubled” and this rating could be lowered to


                                                                                                    10
”default.” As reported in the April 22, 2004 Salisbury Daily Times, the A uthority has two years to

implem ent HUD’s recommended changes or be taken over by the federal governm ent. Not only

   is the Authority operating without a permanent executive director, but it is also plagued by

 improper financial reporting practices. According to the WCHA’s Board Chairman, Chris Mills,

    the Board is working hard to implement the reforms outlined in HUD’s Memorandum of

Agreement. Unfortunately, the County Council appoints W CHA’s Board members; the City has

                                no control of WCHA’s operations.




                                 E. Lead-Based Paint Hazards




   Lead is one of the most significant and widespread environm ental hazards for children in

   Maryland. Children are at their greatest risk from birth to age six when their neurological

systems are being developed. Exposure to lead can cause long-term neurological damage that

      may be associated with learning and behavioral problem s and low ered intelligence.




A major source of lead paint exposure for children comes from dust from deteriorated lead paint

 or renovation of older housing units, primarily those units built before 1950. According to the

MD Department of the E nvironm ent (MDE ), almost 95 percent of such units contain lead paint,

while 75 percent of those units built between 1950 and 1978 probably contain lead paint. Using

this approach, it is estimated that approximately 5,995 of the 9769 housing units in the City may

 have a presence of lead-based paint. Of these, an estimated 4080 are rental units and 1920

   are owner-occupied. Not only are the City’s four Historic Districts located in the Camden,

Church Street, Newtown, and Downtown neighborhoods, but almost 90 percent of the housing

stock in these comm unities was built before 1980. Further, practically 80 percent of the housing

in the W estside neighborhood was built pre-1980. T hus, w ith an estim ated 3000 housing units

potentially having lead paint problems, abatement is a high priority in these four neighborhoods,



                                                                                                      10
             especially for low- and moderate-income fam ilies with young children.




In spite of this large number of potentially contaminated housing units, there has been a steady

 decline in childhood lead poisoning in Wicomico County and Salisbury over the past decade at

   all levels of exposure. As indicated in the MDE’s Annual Report on Childhood Blood Lead

 Surveillance in MD for 1998 and 2002, the annual testing of children one and two years of age

    in areas of risk. In 1998, 919 children in Wicomico County were tested with 91 children

  indicating elevated blood levels. By 2002, 1747 Wicom ico children were tested and only 74

  indicated elevated blood levels. Because a majority of the County housing units built before

 1950 are located in Salisbury, the majority or 75 percent of these children with elevated blood

                          levels probably reside within the City limits.




Much of the decline in childhood lead poisoning is the result of public lead poisoning prevention

 efforts. Such efforts include increased outreach and education, increased enforcement of the

      State law, increased homeowner and landlord awareness of the hazards, improved

maintenance and prevention, and dem olition of older structures. Despite this decline, incidents

           of lead poisoning in children continue to occur well above national levels.




                              F. Barriers to Affordable Housing




  Barriers to affordable housing in Salisbury may include bureaucratic procedures, codes and

      standards, zoning or land use controls, lack of land and financial resources, lack of

coordination, and scattered growth that drives up infrastructure and housing costs. In addition,

some families and individuals may face barriers to fair housing choice because of lack of access

                          or lack of availability of affordable housing.



                                                                                                    10
                                         1. Local Zoning




 Zoning is the primary system by which counties and cities maintain control over the pattern of

 land development within their borders. Zoning regulations allocate parcels of land to different

classifications with certain uses being permitted, while others are proscribed. Zoning practices

   often have the intended or unintended effect of increasing housing costs, and effectively

excluding prospective households from locating affordable housing for purchase or rent. Zoning

   can be used as a positive tool in support of cost effective and efficient design, if housing

 affordability is considered as a part of the jurisdiction's policy. The use of techniques such as

 program s for moderately priced dwelling units , zero lot line housing, mixed use zones, viable

         basic design and performance zoning can help to produce affordable housing.




 Zoning regulations prescribing m inimum lot sizes, minimum setbac ks, and other requirem ents

 may nec essitate the need for larger lots, w hich could drive up the cost of housing and m ake it

 less affordable. In addition, zoning is occasionally used to "zone out" manufactured housing,

 which is an important source of housing for many low- and moderate-income citizens. Zoning

 regulations also may prohibit the development of ancillary dwelling units, even if such units do

not impose a significant cost on other community residents. Ancillary dwelling units, sometimes

   called in-law apartments or "granny flats," are an important tool to increase the supply of

   hous ing for low - and m oderate-income households, particularly single people who require

   minimal space. This and a wide variety of other compatible mixed-use and mixed income

  designs should be permitted by local land use policy and the regulations w hich implement it.




                                2. Governm ental Coordination




                                                                                                     10
   Lack of coordination betw een City and County agencies may create a barrier to affordable

housing. Uncoordinated government efforts can cause delays in funding of affordable housing,

      create conflicting policy / funding priorities across government agenc ies, and add to

  adm inistrative burdens. In addition, multiple and differing program applications in a specific

  agency can lead to delays in processing loan applications and drive up development costs.

  Similarly, environmental review procedures between the City and County agencies also may

   result in barriers to affordable housing. Environm ental regulations prov ide positive public

benefits to all citizens and communities, however, different environmental reviews, rather than a

uniform review process shared by all departments, prolong the affordable housing development

       process, increase costs, create confusion, reduce affordability, and impose undue

    administrative burdens. Moreover, on January 24, 2004 at a City-sponsored meeting on

 housing and community development needs, several participants cited the need for increased

            City-County coordination to develop additional affordable housing units.




                           3. Lack of Adequate Financial Resources




 A widely recognized, yet difficult to overcome barrier to affordable housing in Salisbury is the

 lack of adequate financial resources. Although the City has been supporting the development

 and rehabilitation of affordable housing for the past 10-15 years, Salisbury still has insufficient

 resources to meet the need for affordable homeownership and rental housing. Like all cities,

    the need for increas ed revenue for housing has to com pete with other legitim ate public

                      priorities, such as public works, streets, and safety.




  Limited financial resources are the most significant barrier to affordable housing facing the

residents of the City. This factor prevents Salisbury from fully resolving the need for increased



                                                                                                       10
     homeow nership, for additional units and rehabilitation of existing housing (rental and

 homeow nership) for the elderly and the disabled. These housing needs can, in part, be aided

   by further acquisition and rehabilitation of vacant housing or acquisition and demolition of

                        blighted units, and cons truction of new housing.




                                         G. Fair Housing




One of the greatest barriers to affordable housing for m any Maryland fam ilies is the lack of fair

housing choice. HUD broadly defines fair housing choice as "the ability of persons with similar

incomes to have the same housing choices regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, national

  origin, familial status, or disability." All state and local governments, particularly those that

receive federal funds from HUD, are required to promote fair housing choice and to affirm atively

                                        further fair housing.




 Various forms of discrimination may exist in Salisbury. For example, some families may face

racial discrimination. Such discrimination may include refusing to rent or sell affordable housing

 to minority households, or the denial of equal credit. Lending discrimination too may have an

   impact on the City’s neighborhoods. W ithout access to capital, a com munity cannot build

  affordable housing, rehabilitate older housing, or es tablis h a healthy residential tax base. In

  addition, refusal to loan to minorities, or women, or the disabled, or other protected classes

                          undermines efforts to integrate communities.




 The City of Salisbury Consolidated Plan defines an Area of Minority Concentration as follows;

  “Cens us tracts where at least 60% of the population w ho res ide within the census tract are

  identified as minority households, as defined by the 2000 U.S. Census.” There is only one

census tract within the City of Salisbury which qualifies under this definition, and that is Census



                                                                                                      10
     Tract 3. Census Tract 3 encompasses the W estside neighborhood of Salisbury. The

             percentage of minority residents residing in Census Tract 3 is 93.24%.




 In addition to racial discrimination, Salisbury residents with developmental disabilities may be

denied access to affordable housing for a variety of reasons. For example, many have resided

in group homes or have been hospitalized and have no credit or rental history. Some persons

with such disabilities are able to w ork on a part-time basis only, while others cannot w ork at all.

Thus , Social Security or Social Security disability benefits provide their major source of incom e.

   Many rental agents do not consider this a valid source of income and will not rent to these

   persons. Even if a person has a Section 8 certificate, there are an increasing number of

 landlords who choose not to accept them. Also, some disabled renters may be discriminated

    against because of their poor rent payment history and unpaid utility bills. Finally, many

 persons with disabilities are stigmatized for no reason, other than their disability. As a res ult,

    many providers are asked to co-sign leases on behalf of persons with such disabilities.




   Persons with physical disabilities (e.g., persons in wheel chairs) may also have difficulties

finding affordable housing. The physically disabled often have lower than average incomes due

to the difficulty of obtaining well paying jobs. Thus, their housing problems may be exacerbated

both by low incomes and by the inability to physically enter into m any housing units, affordable

or otherwise. This iss ue was addressed to som e extent by the Am erican's w ith Disabilities Act.

 How ever, confusion over the Act and lack of guidelines has meant that "accessible" units are

                           often inaccessible to those who need them.




 Despite the prospective existence of barriers to housing choice in Salisbury, the City supports

fair housing choice for all residents. The Mayor issues a proclamation every April in recognition

of Fair Housing m onth, and the HUD Fair Housing poster is displayed on the City bulletin board



                                                                                                        10
      in the lobby of the government office building. Upon com pletion and approval of its

     Consolidated Plan and Annual Action Plan for federal CDBG funds, the City intends to

undertake an Analysis of Impediments (AI) to Fair Housing as required by HUD. The City plans

 to com plete this AI during the s ummer and/or fall of 2004. T his analysis will not only identify

any impedim ents, but also will detail appropriate actions to rem ove any identified impediments.




                              H. Comm unity Development Needs




   Even though the overall Salisbury economy is strong and diversified, recently the City has

   concentrated on revitalizing its historic Downtown. During the mid-nineties over a dozen

    businesses have left and relocated out of the Downtown. In the past decade, two large

     manufacturers, Dresser-Wayne (300-400 employees) and Crown Cork and Seal (120

employees - located outside of the City, but employing Salisbury residents), also have closed.

   In addition, Tyson Chicken in nearby Snow Hill (600 em ployees) and Black and Dec ker in

Easton (1300 employees) have closed. All of these closures have resulted both in lost jobs and

income. Partially compensating for these closures, 10 new sm aller companies (employing 1800

  Salisbury workers) m aking wireless relays have opened. T hese business es, which are off-

 shoots of K&L Microwave, are located at the Salisbury-Ocean City-Wicom ico Regional Airport

outside the City. W hile further expansion and job grow th is expected, the jobs created are m ore

                              technical in nature than those lost.




   Vacancies have arisen in Salisbury’s Downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods have

experienced declining home values and increasing crime. Over the past three to four years, the

City has hosted numerous strategic planning sessions to help identify the problems and needs

and help resolve them. This revitalization effort is largely directed toward the City’s Downtown

and its four adjacent neighborhoods, Church Street–Doverdale, New town–North Division Street,



                                                                                                      10
                                      W estside, and Camden.




                          1. Comm unity Development Needs by T ype




                                         Crime Prevention




 Crim e (both violent and m inor) is a real concern in m any City neighborhoods. As reflected in

    the Salisbury Police Department’s statistics for Part One offenses (e.g., homicide, rape,

robbery, assault, burglary, theft, and arson), serious crimes declined in the late 1990s, but then

    increased with the recession in 2000. Recently Part One crimes Citywide seem to have

  stabilized at the 2000 levels. But such stabilization hides increases in robbery, thefts, and

   assaults as the other Part One offenses have declined. In addition, the number of crimes

 committed Downtow n are minim al com pared w ith those in the four priority neighborhoods. In

particular, indicated by the number of Part One crimes Year-to-Date in 2004, the Camden (79)

and W estside (78) neighborhoods appear to have the most problems. In comparison, Year-to-

      Date in 2004 an estimated 50 Part One crimes have been committed in the Church

     Street–Doverdale neighborhood, 33 in Newtown–North Division Street, and 16 in the

                                             Downtown.




  The City, after discussions with neighborhood representatives, plans to implement several

 actions that would reduce criminal activity. One step, on the Westside near the Booth Street

Public Housing Complex, is to initiate more police walking and bike patrols. Another step, that

the City is implementing, is to improve street lighting in the four neighborhoods and Downtown.

The City has retained an engineering consultant which has identified 21 key Downtown lighting

  improv em ents costing roughly $869,000. Additionally, in conjunction with the local electric

utility, Conectiv, the City has installed bullet resistant shields on eight street lights in the Church



                                                                                                          10
Street neighborhood. This pilot crime reducing lighting program has been so successful that the

      City is considering expansion of it to other high crime areas as well. These lighting

     improvements will make criminal activity more difficult in the impacted neighborhoods.




Between March 1 and March 7, 2004 the Salisbury Police arrested 43 citizens for crimes, 10 of

whom were juveniles. Illustrative of such criminal activity were the arrests of three juveniles on

the last w eekend of February 2004. In one of the incidents, two youth w ere arrested along with

 five adults for possession of cocaine and marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. In

the other incident, the juvenile was alone and was arrested for, among other crimes, carrying a

 handgun; possession of a deadly weapon; possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute;

    possession of marijuana; and pos sess ion of CDS paraphernalia (two counts). To try to

 minimize criminal activity by youth and teenagers, the City Police Comm unity Affairs Unit has

operated numerous programs. One such program is the Earn-A-Bike Program. In the summ er

    of 2003, 18 youth earned a bike as well as community service hours toward high school

  graduation. The City Police Chief also believes the future establishm ent of a Police Athletic

 League could provide the City’s youth with rec reational activities as well as w holesome adult

                                          role models.




                                     Street Improvem ents




  The City’s Dow ntow n and adjacent neighborhoods also suffer from num erous infrastructure

 problems. Issues such as traffic congestion, poor signalization, restrictive acces s, inadequate

river crossings, and insufficient pedestrian crossings have helped to isolate the Downtown from

the neighborhoods, especially the W estside. Thus, a key to revitalization of the Downtown and

 the surrounding neighborhoods is to link both through im proved pedestrian access. Actions to

  accomplish this vision include streetscape improvements and connectivity improvements at



                                                                                                     10
major intersections. As noted above, the City has retained an engineering consultant to identify

 connectivity improvem ents and to estimate their costs. Specifically, the needed infrastructure

improvements for the four priority neighborhoods total $7.7 million, with $1.4 million in Camden,

  $1.8 million in Church Street-Doverdale, $1.2 million for Newtown-North Division Street, and

    $3.3 m illion for W estside. T he City intends to foster innovative partnerships, both w ith

   neighborhood ass ociations and the Cham ber of Com merce’s Beautification Com mittee, to

                                accomplish these im provem ents.




                           Job Creation and Employment Training




     Central to the City’s revitalization effort is the establishment of more businesses in the

Downtown as w ell as the surrounding neighborhoods. The business com munity also supports

Downtown revitalization; in particular Urban Salisbury is implementing the ‘Course of Action’ as

described in the Salisbury Downtown Action Agenda 2001. This Action Agenda focuses on four

 Downtown districts: (1) Old Town District, (2) Office and Institutional District, (3) Development

       District (The Riverfront from Mill Street downstream ), and (4) W est Side District.




 In the Old Town, the Agenda is focused on business retention/recruitment for the ground level

floors, and housing in the upper stories . The City and Urban Salisbury have approved the firm

    of Gillis/Gilkerson as the developer of a mixed-use project for the parking lot site at the

   intersection of South Division and Market Streets. The project would include retail space,

housing for students, and a parking garage. The Developer would like to have the site declared

  a Tax Increment Financing district. In the Office and Institutional District, the priority actions

are: (1) renovation of the Boulevard Theater into a Performing Arts Center, (2) development of a

 senior/multi-us e center, preferably along M arket Street, and (3) conversion of the old Fire Hall

                                     into a mixed-use project.



                                                                                                       10
In the Developm ent District, the Action Agenda focuses on packaging all City-owned sites for a

 design/build project. Ultimately, the intent is to develop several 3-4 story, mixed-use buildings

focusing on tourism . In addition, consideration will be given to creation of a Perdue Museum.

To link these improvements to those proposed for the W est Side District, the City is considering

the designation of the north bank of the W icomico River as a Tax Increm ent Financing district.

In the W est Side District, the development focus is neighborhood convenience stores, housing,

  and industries. The City and the neighborhood will develop a Neighborhood Enhancement

Strategy to improve housing and create jobs for current residents. Continuation of the Perdue

        Plant and Salisbury Plaza shopping center are keys to the future of this District.




    Similarly, the goals of the Greater Salisbury Committee (GSC) and Salisbury-Wicomico

Economic Development (SW ED) are to encourage business growth and job creation in nursing

 and high tech industries, particularly the microwave relays industry. These organizations also

   support developm ent of a small business incubator in the Downtown which would create

additional jobs. Finally, the development of more small black businesses would not only assist

    with the employment of minorities, but it also would facilitate linking the Downtown and

                                            W estside.




   Both public and private financial and technical assistance are needed to encourage new

      businesses to locate and/or expand in the Downtown. Financial incentives, such as

 development of a Tax Increment Financing district and promotion of the Downtown Enterprise

Zone, could be implemented by the City. To improve the skills of the Salisbury work force, the

  City, SW ED, and GSC need to partner with the local educational community. For instance,

    SW ED, in conjunction with Salisbury University, W or-Wic Comm unity College, and the

Partnership for Work Force Quality, has implemented technical training programs. Similarly, the

 Mayor recently volunteered to help Wor W ic Community College raise money for expansion of



                                                                                                     10
their job training program for nurses. However, more of such efforts are needed and the current

  work force needs to participate more fully in them, if they are to benefit from any new jobs .

   Moreover, increased promotional efforts are needed to reach and train minority persons,

                            particularly in the Wes tside neighborhood.




                                 Public Facilities and Services




 Salisbury’s community development needs, as noted above, are mostly consistent with those

  cited in past City strategic planning efforts (e.g., the State Community Legacy process, the

    Mayor’s Neighborhood Roundtable m eetings, and the 2001 Dow ntow n Action Agenda).

 However, along with the need to reduce crime, improve streets, create jobs, and rehabilitate

    affordable housing, Salisbury’s residents indicated the need for youth and neighborhood

  centers, public restroom s in the Downtown to serve the hom eless, and more open space to

 enhance neighborhood vitality. Generally, the residents want additional facilities and services

     that improve their quality of life and minimize slums and blight in their neighborhoods.




 This need to improve the quality of life for Salisbury’s residents is reinforced by the number of

citations and code violations issued by the City’s BHZ Department. For example, in CY2003 the

BHZ Department issued 1458 citations for rubbish, 336 citations for exterior housing violations,

and 147 for interior housing problems. Also, as previously discussed, the current facilities that

 provide emergency shelter are not sufficient to meet estimated demand both for beds and for

  services. The need for a 24/7 emergency shelter with intensive case management services

    was identified as a high priority. In addition, public services in support of the elderly are

                                         severely needed.




                             2. Community Development Providers



                                                                                                     10
  The moving force behind the effort to revitalize the City’s Downtown is the private business

    comm unity. In particular, Urban Salisbury, Salisbury-Wicom ico Economic Development

   (SW ED) and the Greater Salisbury Comm ittee (GSC) have been instrumental in initiating

numerous economic development activities. The City, for its part, acts primarily as a facilitator

 through the Police, Public W orks, and BHZ Departments and a financier through the Mayor’s

 Office. In addition, private social service organizations have provided needed public facilities

 and services, such as senior centers and services and youth activities, throughout the City.




                                 Private Business Com munity




Salisbury is a Main Street Maryland comm unity as designated by DHCD. Urban Salisbury is the

   Main Street revitalization organization for Salisbury. The mem bership of this organization

   includes representatives of the business community, professionals, property owners, and

residents of the Downtown, plus City and County officials. It is responsible for implementing the

  National Main Street Center’s four point approach to commercial revitalization (organization,

 design, prom otion, and econom ic restructuring). The Director of Urban Salisbury is the City’s

   Main Street m anager. Funding for the operation of Urban Salisbury com es from the City,

 mem bership fees, and grants (particularly from USDA’s Rural Development program). Urban

Salisbury is also primarily responsible for implementing the recommendations of the Downtown

 Action Agenda 2001, especially the mixed-use development in Old Town. Additionally, Urban

Salisbury has helped to garner the support of the Downtown business es for revitalization efforts

    by the City in other areas of Salisbury (for example, the Community Legacy Program ).




In the past two years, Urban Salisbury’s efforts have helped to reduce com mercial vacancies in

the Dow ntown through the prom otion of new restaurants and other businesses . Further grow th

in permanent housing and business development also is being pursued. For instance, a major



                                                                                                    10
  Downtown project is being developed by Gillis/Gilkerson on site of the current ground level

 parking lot adjacent to South Division Street with the support of Urban Salisbury. This project

       will result in additional student housing, retail businesses, and elevated parking.




SW ED has been particularly proactive in support of the development of the previously cited 10

new, small companies. After the closure of Grumman Aircraft, SW ED took advantage of federal

 resources from the Base Closure Act to establish a $1.0 million revolving loan fund. Business

    development loans were made to the 10 new start-up businesses. SWED bought and

 renov ated a vacant airport terminal building with State funds to use as a business incubator.

    The building allowed the companies to begin operations without having to invest in new

   structures. As the industries developed, SWED has m ade use of virtually all of Maryland

  Departm ent of Business and Economic Developm ent program s, including CDBG funds. In

 addition to financial assistance, SWED has w orked with the local educational institutions and

the Partnership for W ork Force Quality to train workers for the precision machine shops in these

 businesses. Specifically, SW ED has promoted the training programs at the Vocational Center

and at Wor-W ic Community College. Wor-Wic Com munity College operates a training program

for electronic technicians; however, the school cannot fill all of its training slots. The reason for

           this failure is unclear since the trained workers would double their income.




The GSC has been supportive of the development efforts of Urban Salisbury and SW ED. In the

Downtown, GSC w ould like to see an improved transition between the Wes tside neighborhood

  and the Downtown. In particular, the Director of GSC commented that there seems to be a

physical barrier between the two areas. City encouragem ent of the developm ent of m ore s mall

 black businesses and the creation of more neighborhood playgrounds were recommended as

                              possible solutions to the problem.




                                                                                                        10
  GSC’s first priority, however, is the promotion of regional business developm ent efforts. Its

 current focus is the growth of the Wallops Island Space Center further south on the Delmarva

    Peninsula in Virginia. GSC sees the Salisbury economy benefiting significantly from the

 planned growth in W allops Island, since about one third of the Center’s current employees live

  in Wicomico County. Under current plans, the Space Center will focus on comm ercial and

military activities, as the main location for launching unmanned satellites. In the next five years,

   GSC expects 10-50 businesses in support of the Center to be dev eloped between Dover,

   Delaware and the Center in Virginia. Salisbury, with its central location, is one of the sites

   selected for a pod of businesses. Salisbury is the most desirable location for highly paid

  (incom es of more than $100,000) technicians and m anagement personnel to live. Salisbury

                also has the best housing stock and numerous cultural activities.




                                Private Social Service Providers




 Shore Up is the Community Action Agency for W icomico County and the City of Salisbury. As

    such, Shore Up provides m any services to low - and moderate- incom e persons living in

   Salisbury. These services include: health insurance, prescription drug assistance; rental

    assistance, eviction prevention, homeownership assistance; shelters for homelessness;

employment or job placement; legal assistance; transportation; budget counseling (foreclosures,

 bill payments); and childcare. In 2003, Shore Up served roughly 4,196 individuals of all ages

living in Wicomico County. Of these, an estim ated 80 percent or 3,357 are residents of the City

                                           of Salisbury.




 For example, during 2003 Shore Up helped 2642 low-income elderly in Salisbury through the

   Maryland Energy Assistance Program, Adult Medical Day Care, Foster Grandparents, and

Residential Services. During the same period, Shore Up also assisted 50 handicapped persons



                                                                                                       10
 with health care services. Comparatively, 190 of Salisbury’s youth received services from the

    Youth E mployment Program, Job Start, and W icomico Fam ily Support Center in 2003.

   Transportation services w ere provided to 924 Salisbury residents through the Head Start

Program, the Transportation Assistance Program, and various health care transport and senior

    citizens programs. Also, 266 Salisbury residents received services through the Alcohol

                              Tobacco and Other Drugs Program.




Further, Shore Up provided employment training during 2003 to 137 residents of Salisbury from

    five programs: (1) Project Renaissance, (2) Older Workers Training, (3) Health Assistant

 Training, (4) DSS Health Assis tant Training, and (5) Com mercial Drivers License Training. In

 addition, health serv ice through CHORES and other program s were provided to 230 Salisbury

  residents. Lastly, Shore Up assisted 75 W icomico residents with housing counseling during

                                             2003.




Another major provider of social services to the low-income citizens of Salisbury is the Salvation

  Army. While the Salvation Army primarily operates from a senior center, located at 407 Oak

 Street in Salisbury, they also have two youth clubs in the City and two others elsewhere on the

   Lower Shore. Generally, the Salvation Army assisted over 3000 Salisbury residents (pre-

                        schoolers, youth, fam ilies, and seniors) in 2003.




    The Salisbury Senior Center, which has a gym and pool, is open Monday thru Friday for

   activities. Activities for the 250 elderly members include: w alking, education info., health

services (flu shots, blood pressure checks, etc.), dancing, and choir. One of the two youth clubs

  in Salisbury is on the Westside. Education services (GPA training) are also provided to the

youth at this site. Roughly 65 youth are assisted at the learning center, and a duplicated total of

     62,671 youth (ages 4-15) take part annually (2003) in athletic and other activities. The



                                                                                                      10
   Salvation Army also provided activities for 3358 pre-schoolers (ages 2-5) and after school

                             activities for “latch-key” youth in 2003.




  In addition, funds are provided to low- and moderate-income households to help with food,

clothing, furniture, rent, transportation, and utilities. In 2003 the Salvation Army assisted 1,759

  families with food, 62 with furniture, 827 with clothing, and 120 with rent. They also provide

 assistance with m edical care (722) and m oney to prevent utility cutoffs (251). But little of this

  assistance would have been possible without the help of the Salvation Army’s huge staff of

              volunteers, who provided over 16,878 hours of service in 2003.




                                         City of Salisbury




 Excluding the Mayor’s Office, the three City departm ents m ost involved in helping to prom ote

    comm unity development are the Police, Public W orks and Building, Housing and Zoning

Departments. For example during the first quarter of the City’s FY2004 (July – September), the

   Police were especially active in protecting the citizens and their property. Specifically, the

Police arrested 13 persons and charged them with various Part One crimes, including attempted

  murder, armed assault, robbery, theft, burglary, and others. The Police Crime Prevention /

  Community Affairs unit increased the number of patrols in the Church Street area to reduce

    drug activity and in other neighborhoods to minimize noise disturbances. As part of the

 Telephone Reassurance Program, this unit and its volunteers also phoned 19 seniors who live

     alone to check on them each day. They also helped 18 children “Earn a Bike” through

  comm unity service, kept the citizens informed of crime prevention techniques, and assisted

    Neighborhood Crime W atch comm ittees. Further, the Police conducted an undercover

   operation in the Church Street and Camden “W eed and Seed” areas. The operation was

   successful in arresting an individual for drug activity. Other operations in these areas also



                                                                                                       10
                    resulted in arrests for prostitution and alcohol violations.




  The City’s Public W orks Department, in addition to undertaking numerous water and sewer

  projects, was busy maintaining the streets, lights and parks. In the first quarter of FY2004,

   Public W orks repaired and/or maintained streetlights at 37 intersections, installed and/or

  maintained signal lights at 20 locations, and filled potholes Citywide. The Department also

 cleaned up after Hurricane Isabel, repaired numerous sewer and storm m ains and manholes,

 repaired hundreds of fire hydrants, installed water service, and maintained the S alisbury Zoo.




  Salisbury’s BHZ Department has been busy during the first quarter of FY2004 as well. For

 instance, among other activities, the BHZ issued 171 building permits, five demolition permits,

     and cleaned and placed liens on 24 properties. In fulfillment of its code enforcement

  responsibilities the Department issued 285 citations for rubbish, 79 citations for violation of

 exterior housing requirements, 38 condemnation citations or notices to vacate, and undertook

  three building demolitions. Overall there were 1,513 code violations issued during this time

                                              period.




  Finally, Salisbury’s Mayors O ffice has been instrum ental over the pas t dozen or m ore years

 (1990-2003) in obtaining over $6.1 million in support of housing and community development

 revitalization projects. These funds have included Federal (CDB G Program), State (Hotspot,

Partnership Rental Housing, Program Open Space, W aterway Improvement Grants, Main Street

  Improvement, Community Legacy, Comm unity Parks & Playgrounds, Boundless Playground

  Initiative, and Hotspot Hom eownership Programs), County (Recreation Grants) and private

   (Gannett Foundation) funds. Roughly $1.3 million in CDBG grants have been obtained on

    behalf of non-profit organizations for housing purchase/rehabilitation/resale, design and

construction of transitional housing (Village of Hope), feasibility studies for the Holly Center and



                                                                                                       10
W estside Community Center, and the purchase/installation of the Gallery Building elevator. The

    HotSpot funds were used to provide increased community policing and after-school and

 summ er programs for the youth in the Church Street HotSpot neighborhood. Program Open

 Space funds have been used primarily for playgrounds, tot lots, tennis courts, parks, and the

Marina & South Prong Riverwalks to improve the quality of life for the citizens. The bulk of the

 grants from all sources, $2.8 million, went for housing development and rehabilitation for low-

                              and m oderate-income citizens.




                         3. Priority Comm unity Development Needs




   As discussed above, detailed in the City’s survey of housing and comm unity development

needs in Appendix B, and included in the findings of a focus group meeting in January 2004 and

   individual meetings with public and private service providers, the community development

 needs of Salisbury’s citizens generally reflect those of most people – good paying jobs and a

  safe neighborhood. These priorities, and others, such as child care or youth centers, senior

 services, street improvements, and job training, are listed in Table 2B. The various needs are

    rated high (H), medium (M), and low (L) based primarily on the ranking indicated by the

        respondents to the City’s January 2004 survey of needs detailed in Appendix B.




                                                                                                   10
                            Table 2B: Priority Comm unity Development Needs




                                               Priority Need    Un m et        Do llars to

        Community Development Needs            (High, Medium,   Need           Address       Goa ls

                                               Low)                            Un m et

                                                                               Need
Public Facility Needs
  Sen ior Centers                                     M
  Neigh bo rho od Centers                             M
  Youth Centers                                       H         1 center                     Zero
  Ch ild C are C enters                               H         2 c enters                   Zero
  Health Facilities                                   M
  Neighb orhoo d Facilities                           M
  Parks and/or Recreation F acilities                 M         3 parks                      3 parks
  Parking F acilities                                 M
Infrastructure Needs
   W ater/Sew er Imp rovem ents                       M
   Street Impro vements                               H         W estside      $234,000      $234,000
                                                                connections
  Sidewalks                                           M
  So lid W aste D ispos al Impro vements              M
  Floo d D rain Imp rovem ents                        M
Public Service Needs
  Senior Services                                     H         350 persons                  Zero
  Handicapped S ervices                               M
  Youth Services                                      M         20 0 youth                   20 0 youth
  Child Care Services                                 M
  Transportation S ervices                            M
  Substance Ab use Services                           L
  Employment Training                                 H         30 persons                   30 persons
  Health Services                                     M
  Lead Hazard Screening                               M
  Crime Awareness / Prevention                        H         65                           65
                                                                street light                 street light
                                                                shields                      shields
Economic Development Needs
  Assistance to For-Profit Businesses                 M
 Techn ical Assistance for Businesses                 M
  Micro-Enterprise Assistance                         M
  Publicly- or Privately-Owned Rehab                  M
  Co mmercial/Indu strial Infrastruc ture             M
  Commercial/Industrial Assistance                    M
  Job Creation/Development                            H         1 bu siness                  1 bu siness
                                                                incubator                    incubator
Planning                                              M


To help resolve these needs over the upcoming five-year period, the City plans to concentrate
primarily on those comm unity development concerns rated high by its citizens. For instance,
not only will the City Police Department expand bike and foot patrols to help reduce crime, but
the City will also undertake and/or expand several crime initiatives. Such initiatives include
expansion of the Earn-A-Bike Program for youth, as w ell as the initiation of a new Police Athletic


                                                                                                            10
League for teens. Further, the City will continue to install bullet-resistant shields on its street
lights in high crime neighborhoods, like the Westside, as funding allows.

As part of its effort to create new jobs and/or increase job training, Salisbury will continue to
work with SWED, the Greater Salisbury Comm ittee, and local schools to identify and encourage
qualified individuals to participate in technical training programs . Also Salisbury may use its
financial resources to investigate and implement, if feasible, a small business incubator in the
Downtown. To facilitate such development, the City may use either its CDBG funds, its CDBG
Revolving Loan funds, or USDA’s Rural Business Enterprise Grant Revolving Loan funds, as
incentives to encourage investm ent by the private business com munity. Further, the City will
investigate the feasibility of implementing a Tax Increment Financing (TIF) district for the
Downtown.

To help improve the streets, sidewalks, and streetscapes in the priority neighborhoods and the
Downtown, and to encourage pedestrians to walk in the neighborhoods as well as to and from
the Downtown, the City will work with mem bers of the Mayor’s Neighborhood Roundtable,
Neighborhood Associations, and the Chamber of Commerce’s Beautification Committee. First
on the City’s list of connectivity improvements is the repair and improvement of the streets and
sidewalks connecting the W estside neighborhood to the Downtow n. Further, Salisbury will
attem pt to renovate and repair several neighborhood parks, playgrounds , and comm unity
centers that serve low- and moderate-income persons, especially youth. For instance, to help
improve the quality of life for local residents, the City will encourage the development of
additional neighborhood playgrounds .




                                      IV. STRATEGIC PLAN


A. Overview



                                                                                                      10
Salisbury’s Strategic Plan details the City’s investm ent priorities for its housing and comm unity
development funds for the Consolidated Plan period of CDBG PY 2004 - 2008. Three national
goals for the use of CDB G housing and com munity development resourc es will guide this
Strategic Plan:
        •       Provide decent housing
        •       Provide a suitable living environment
        •       Expand economic opportunities

Geographic and Overall Priorities

Over the past five years the City of Salisbury has identified and carried out numerous
com munity initiatives to prom ote neighborhood revitalization and to foster stable, safe
neighborhoods. These past initiatives form the basis of the City’s overall housing and
com munity development priorities for the next five years. In particular, the City intends to
prom ote homeow nership as a means toward neighborhood revitalization. These initiatives are
largely focused on four residential neighborhoods (Camden, W estside, Newtown-North Division
Street, and Church Street-Doverdale) and the Downtown (see Map 2: Salisbury’s Census
Tracts/Priority Neighborhoods). These four primary residential neighborhoods are cohesive
geographic areas adjacent to each other and the Downtown. The City plans to provide
comprehensive, multi-year financial assistance, especially housing rehabilitation and
homeow nership development Citywide. Help for the homeless and special needs populations
will be directed to agencies located throughout the City. Efforts will be made to provide
transitional and shelter opportunities for the homeless on a Citywide basis. Sim ilarly, efforts w ill
be made to increase housing choice and opportunity outside areas of minority and low-income
concentration.

Given its limited resources, Salisbury will use innovative approaches and cooperative
partnerships with other public agencies and private organizations to meet its affordable housing
and community development goals and objectives. In general, the City plans to use its CDBG
funds as financial incentives to accomplish its goals and objectives. In order of overall priority,
the City will concentrate first on resolving its affordable housing needs, second its c ommunity
development needs, and third its needs for both the homeless and populations with special
needs. Specifically, the City of Salisbury will pursue the following strategies and objectives to
resolve its affordable housing and comm unity development needs for its extremely low-, low-
and moderate-income citizens.

B. Homeless Strategy

As indicated in the City’s survey of housing and com munity development needs (Appendix B), a
focus group m eeting of citizens in January 2004, individual meetings with public and private
homeless housing/service providers in the spring of 2004, and the Tri-County Alliance’s Point-
in-Time survey of homeless needs, the overwhelming need of the homeless is additional
emergency shelter and permanent supportive housing. These priority needs, as well as
numerous others, are listed in Table 1A above. The homeless also need intensive case
managem ent, job training, hous ing placem ent, substance abuse treatm ent, and m ental health
care. Unlike elsewhere in Maryland, hom eless prevention is not a high priority.

To help resolve the needs of its homeless citizens and those at-risk of becoming homeless, the
City plans to participate fully as a mem ber of the Tri-County Alliance for the Homeless. For
example, the City will assist in updating and implementing the regional Continuum of Care Plan.
The City will do this through active participation in monthly meetings of the Tri-County Alliance,
through assistance in identifying buildings for potential use as shelter, and through the use of


                                                                                                         10
CDBG funds (if necessary) as a partial match for federal and State funds to develop and/or
operate shelters, trans itional housing, supportive housing, and services . The City also will
provide appropriate data for inclusion in the regional ServicePoint HMIS.

Strategy:      Help Homeless Persons and Persons At-Risk of Becom ing Homeless
               Obtain Affordable Housing

Objective 1:   Provide support to organizations to help increase emergency shelter and
               transitional housing space for the homeless (Encourage the development
               of an estimated 20 beds by June 30, 2009).

The City of Salisbury will assist the non-profit organizations (e.g., Village of Hope, Joseph
House, Christian Shelter, Center 4 Clean Start, Life Crisis Center, Second Wind and Hudson
Health Services) and public agencies (such as the County Health and Social Services
Departments) to identify appropriate buildings that can serve as emergency or transitional
shelters for hom eless individuals. Additionally, the City will support the efforts of non-profit
shelter and service providers and the Tri-County Alliance for the Hom eless to identify
appropriate financial resources for facility development, operations and neces sary renovations.
In particular, Salisbury will be supportive of all applications for federal Emergency Shelter Grant
(ESG) and DHCD’s Shelter and Transitional Housing funds to expand the number of beds
available for the City’s homeless.

Objective 2:   Support the operations of homeless shelters and transitional housing
               providers (Serve an estimated 250 additional persons by June 30, 2009).

Salisbury will be supportive of all applications for federal ESG funds to expand the operations
and m aintenance of the existing shelters and transitional housing for the City’s homeless. In
particular, Salisbury will help the local non-profit organizations (e.g., Village of Hope, Joseph
House, Christian Shelter, Center 4 Clean Start, Life Crisis Center, Second Wind and Hudson
Health Services) that operate the available emergency and transitional shelters. Additionally,
the City will seek to coordinate these efforts with W icomico County and the Tri-County Alliance
for the Hom eless to identify appropriate public financial resources.

Objective 3:   Support intensive case managem ent, housing counseling and job training
               for homeless individuals and families (Serve an estimated 130 additional
               persons by June 30, 2009).

The City of Salisbury will be supportive of all applications for federal ESG and State funds to
provide financial resources for case management, housing counseling, job training, and other
needed services for hom eless individuals and fam ilies. Currently, Salisbury’s hom eless are
assisted by the above shelter providers as w ell as the Salvation Arm y, Shore Up, and County
Health and Social Services Departm ents. Howev er, these s ervices are in short supply.
Homeless individuals and families, as well as those at-risk of becoming homeless, have medical
care, transportation, child care and job training needs.




Objective 4: Support the development of permanent supportive housing for the
              homeless and disabled by non-profit organizations and governmental
              agencies (Develop an estimated six additional permanent supportive
              housing units in Salisbury by June 30, 2009).



                                                                                                      10
The Tri-County Alliance for the Homeless has been maintaining a supply of permanent housing
for the homeless and disabled individuals and families in Wicomico, Somerset, and W orcester
Counties since 2001. Specifically, the Alliance maintains about 60 units throughout the region,
of which 21 are in the Salisbury area. This effort has been assisted by three Supportive
Housing grants from HUD. Further, the W icomico County Health Department’s Shelter Plus
Care Housing Program provides 12 units for individuals coming from incarceration with a
serious mental illness. The Alliance plans to apply for these federal funds again in 2004 and
each subsequent year. The City of Salisbury will be supportive of all applications for federal
and State funds to assist the homeless.

Objective 5: Support and encourage the various hom eless organizations to more fully
              coordinate their efforts and develop appropriate data (Support the
              establishment of a formal working agreement among organizations
              in the Salisbury area by June 30, 2006)

In order to better serve those w ho are hom eless in Salisbury, the City will actively support
increased cooperation and coordination by all the v arious shelter and service providers as well
as the faith-based community (i.e., local churches). Since a major goal of the Continuum of
Care is to enhance and increase coordination between shelters and other providers, the
Continuum of Care for the hom eless w ill be m ore fully implemented. The City will do this both
through active participation in monthly meetings of the Tri-County Alliance for the Homeless on
the Continuum of Care and through the use of CDBG funds as a partial match for ESG
applications for the local organizations, if necess ary. The City also will provide appropriate data
for inclusion in the regional ServicePoint homeless management information system.

C. Strategy for Special Populations

Special needs populations include developmentally and physically disabled persons, mentally ill
persons, persons with HIV/AIDS, persons with drug and alcohol addictions, and other persons
such as the elderly and frail elderly. Of these populations, the elderly are both the largest group
and the one with the fastest growth in the City. All of these populations share the comm on need
of affordable housing with appropriate supportive services. Although Salisbury is home to the
only Congregate Housing facility (Pine Bluff Village) for the elderly on the Eastern Shore, the
City is limited in its role and funding to support services for the elderly. Mos t services are
provided through agencies of the State or Wicomico County. However, the City can impact the
stock of housing for the elderly, especially those who are disabled, and other populations with
special needs.

The majority (1148 or almost 60 percent) of Salisbury’s elderly live in their own homes, 20
percent of whom have housing problems. W hile some of the other persons with special needs
reside in residential facilities for between three to 15 persons, most of those with drug/alcohol
addiction, mental illness, developmental disabilities, etc. live at home.

As indicated in Table 1B above, plus a City survey of needs (see Appendix B), a focus group
meeting of citizens in January 2004, and individual meetings w ith public and private
housing/service providers in the spring of 2004, the needs of the elderly rank above those of all
other populations w ith special needs. Accessible housing for the elderly and physically
handicapped is the highest ranking housing need. Similarly, the public service needs of the
elderly rank highest, followed by the service needs of the disabled and those with alcohol and
drug addiction. To help resolve these needs over the upcoming five years, the City plans to
continue to provide accessibility improv ements to elderly homeowners, as w ell as support
applications for financial assistance by service providers for rehabilitation and/or construction of


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one or two group homes or facilities for three to 10 persons with special needs.

Strategy:      Assist in the Provision of Housing Options for Persons with Special Needs

Objective 1:   Finance accessibility alterations for existing owner-occupied units (Alter an
               estimated 10 units by June 30, 2009).

The City of Salisbury will annually provide a substantial portion of its CDBG resources for the
rehabilitation of owner-occupied housing units, including the rem oval of architectural barriers. In
particular, the City will continue working with the Salisbury NHS and the joint City/County PZCD
Department to provide rehabilitation assistance to extremely low-, low- and moderate-income
hom eowners, especially the elderly and/or disabled.

Objective 2:    Support the rehabilitation and/or development of facilities for persons with
                 special needs by non-profit organizations and governmental agencies
                 (Encourage the rehabilitation/development of one or two residential
                 facilities for persons with special needs by June 30, 2009).

Salisbury will be supportive of all applications for federal and/or State funds to expand the
supply and operations of housing and/or residential facilities for the City’s populations w ith
special needs (e.g., the elderly, those with mental illness, developmental disabilities,
alcohol/drug addiction). Federal Congregate Housing and Sheltered Housing funds and/or MD
DHCD Group Home funds are possible sources of finance. The City also will assist the non-
profit organizations and public agencies to identify appropriate buildings that could serve as
group hom es for these pers ons. In particular, Salisbury will help the local non-profit
organizations (e.g., MAC, Second W ind and Hudson Health Services) and public agencies (e.g.,
W icomico County Health and Social Services Departments) that support the operation of
residential facilities and the provision of services to these populations. Specifically, the City will
support the rehabilitation and/or development of one or two (serving from three to 10 persons)
new residential facilities for persons with special needs.

D. Affordable Housing Strategy

Not only the 2000 Census data and the City’s survey of housing needs (see Appendix B), but
also the findings from a focus group meeting of citizens in January 2004 and individual
meetings with public and private housing/service providers in the spring of 2004 form the basis
for assigning the City’s affordable housing priorities. As indicated in Table 2A above, the
households w ith extremely low- and low-incomes have the highest priority housing needs .
W hile such needs extend across both renters and homeowners, the housing needs of the
elderly and small families (renters and homeowners) are the highest. Also ranking high are the
housing needs of the physically disabled. Accessibility or handicap improvements are ranked
highly by all household types, regardless of income. Other high ranking housing needs include
down payment/ closing cost assistance and credit counseling for homeowners and lead paint
removal for both renters and homeowners.

To help resolve these needs, the City’s goals are to continue to fund rehabilitation, including
accessibility improvements and lead paint abatement, of homes occupied by an estimated 40
extremely low-, low -, and m oderate-income hom eowners. Additionally, the City will seek to
encourage the development of at least one multi-family rental complex (e.g., 100 units) for
extremely low- and low-income tenants, as well as the rehabilitation or construction of one or
two residential facilities (serving between three and 10 special needs persons) during the
coming five years. Salisbury also will continue to support housing counseling and down


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payment and closing cost assistance for these populations.

Strategy :     Promote Increased Homeownership Opportunities and Preservation of
               Affordable Housing

Objective 1:   Provide assistance to extremely low-, low- and moderate-income
               homeowners for housing rehabilitation (Help an estimated 40 households
               by June 30, 2009).

The City will spend at least 20 percent of its annual CDBG funds for the rehabilitation, including
accessibility improvements and lead paint abatement, of the existing owner-occupied housing
units. Encouraging existing homeowners to invest in the housing stock is the key to maintaining
healthy neighborhoods. To continue to keep its neighborhoods strong, the City will continue
working with the Salisbury NHS and the joint City/County Department of PZCD to provide
rehabilitation assistance to extrem ely low-, low - and m oderate-income hom eowners. Given its
limited funds, the City will give priority for funding to four neighborhoods, Camden, Westside,
Newtown-North Division Street, and Church Street-Doverdale.

Objective 2:   Preserve and expand the supply of affordable housing through acquisition
               with rehabilitation, demolition and/or new construction (Acquire, demolish
               and/or rehabilitate, and resell an estimated five housing units by June 30,
               2009).

The Salisbury BHZ Department will continue to identify existing vacant, substandard housing
units suitable either for acquisition and rehabilitation or demolition and new construction and
resale as an appropriate strategy to expand and preserve affordable housing. W orking with
private organizations, such as the local Habitat of the Low er Shore and SNHS, the City will
identify suitable sites and properties. G iven the high price of new construction, even w ith public
subsidies, and the limited supply of available units, the City will focus this strategy primarily on
its four priority neighborhoods.

Objective 3:   Support housing counseling, down payment and closing cost assistance
               for first-time low- and moderate-income homebuyers (Assist an estimated
               1750 additional persons by June 30, 2009).

Homeownership counseling, including creditworthiness help, and down payment/closing cost
assistance for firs t-tim e buyers also w ill be supported by the City. Specifically, the City will
continue to provide funds to appropriate HUD-certified housing counseling agencies, such as
SNHS , to assist low- and moderate-incom e fam ilies and individuals to bec ome hom e-owners.
In particular, the City and SNHS will seek to help low -income W CHA tenants, w ho wish to
becom e homeow ners . Currently, the SNHS assists approximately 350 households a year, in
part with assistance from the City in the form of administrative funds. However, it is expected
that the current need for housing counseling and down payment/closing cost help is greater
than can be addressed with current resources. Additionally, there m ay be a shortage of units
and subsidies available for homeownership, once people complete the courses.


Objective 4:   Support the expansion of affordable housing opportunities for first-tim e
               homebuyers (Encourage an estimated 350 households to seek alternative
               housing financing by June 30, 2009).

The City will encourage low- and moderate-income households to seek mortgage financing


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prov ided by the State DHCD and by private banks and the SNHS . This initiative will primarily
benefit households with incomes at 50 percent and above of AMI. In particular, the City and
SNHS will seek to help low-income W CHA tenants, who wish to become homeowners.
Obstacles to the accomplishment of this goal include shortage of affordable units for sale.

Objective 5:   Support the developm ent of affordable housing opportunities for extremely
               low- and low-incom e renters (Encourage the development of one new multi-
               family rental project by June 30, 2009).

The City will encourage the development of at least one new multi-family rental complex
(roughly 100 units) by private non-profit or for profit housing developers. Such a development
would be targeted primarily to extrem ely low- and low-incom e households needing affordable
housing. City support may include property tax deferrals and/or the extension of water and
sewer. Salisbury has prov ided sim ilar incentives to prom ote the rental complexes at Mitchell’s
Landing and the Village at Mitchell’s Pond, the form er was financed with State Partnership
Rental Housing m oney and the latter w ith federal HOM E and Low Income Tax Credits.

Meeting Underserved Needs

Unfortunately, local resources are insufficient to address all the City’s housing needs. The City
has been supporting housing rehabilitation for extremely low-, low- and moderate-income
hom eowners for the past 15 years. Basically, the City has leveraged federal CDBG and State
funds to serve its households. Despite becoming a HUD entitlement jurisdiction and receiving a
five-year stream of resources, the City’s housing needs will continue to outstrip its resources.
Thus , Salisbury will continue to develop partnerships and seek additional sources of funds to
provide rehabilitation, accessibility improvements, and lead paint abatement as well as housing
counseling, down payment, and closing cost assistance to its citizens.

Also, the City’s resourc es are insufficient to address m ost rental rehabilitation needs, especially
lead paint abatement. Although the City has an aggressive code enforcement program for
rental property, it does not currently assist landlords w ith rehabilitation costs. For its part,
however, W icomico County does help landlords with lead paint abatement costs, if the tenant(s)
meets the required income qualifications. But such assistance still is insufficient. Therefore,
meeting rental rehabilitation needs within the City will require Salisbury to develop creative
partnerships and innovative solutions.

E. Comm unity Development Strategy

As discussed above, detailed in the City’s survey of housing and comm unity development
needs in Appendix B, and included in the findings of a focus group meeting in January 2004 and
individual meetings with public and private service providers, the community development
needs of Salisbury’s citizens generally reflect those of most people – good paying jobs and a
safe neighborhood. These priorities, and others, such as child care or youth centers, senior
services , street improvem ents, and job training, are listed in Table 2B above.

To help resolve these needs over the upcoming five-year period, the City plans to concentrate
primarily on those comm unity development concerns rated high by its citizens. For instance,
the City Police Department will undertake and/or expand several crime prevention initiatives
directed especially at the youth, including the Earn-A-Bike Program and the initiation of a new
Police Athletic League. Further, the City will continue to install bullet-resistant shields on its
street lights in high crime neighborhoods, like the W estside, as funding allows. As part of its
effort to help create new jobs and/or increase job training, Salisbury will continue to w ork with


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the private business sector and the local schools to identify and encourage qualified individuals
to participate in job training programs . Salisbury also may use its financial resources to
investigate the feasibility of implementing a small business incubator and a Tax Increment
Financing (TIF) district in the Downtown. Salisbury will also help to improve the streets,
sidew alks, and streetscapes in the priority neighborhoods and the Dow ntow n. Further,
Salisbury will attempt to renovate and repair several neighborhood parks, playgrounds, and
comm unity centers that serve low- and moderate-income persons, especially youth.

Strategy: Improve the Safety and Livability of Neighborhoods

Objective 1:   Support infrastructure improvements that improve safety,
               accessibility and connectivity (Improve pedestrian accessibility at
               six key intersections in the neighborhoods adjacent to Downtown
               by June 30, 2009).

The City will work with members of the Mayor’s Neighborhood Roundtable, Neighborhood
Associations, and the Chamber of Commerce’s Beautification Committee to improve the streets,
sidewalks, and streetscapes in the priority neighborhoods and the Downtown in order to
encourage pedestrians to walk in the neighborhoods as well as to and from the Downtown. The
needed streetscape and landscaping improvements were specified in the City’s 2001
Comm unity Legacy application, and the accessibility improvements were specified in the
recently completed Pedestrian Connectivity Study. The cost of the needed improvements by
neighborhood is: Cam den, $1.4 million; Church S treet-Doverdale, $1.8 m illion: Newtown-North
Division Street, $1.2 million; and Westside, $3.3 million. The total cost of all needed
improvements exceeds $7.7 m illion. The City does not have the financial resources to satisfy
these needs immediately. Thus, over the coming five years Salisbury will use its CDBG funds
for those improvements considered most crucial and for which innovative financial
arrangem ents can be developed.

Objective 2:   Support improvement or construction of comm unity facilities Citywide
               (Construct or improve an estimated three parks and/or playgrounds by
               June 30, 2009).

The City of Salisbury will work w ith other City and County agencies and private and non-profit
organizations to develop appropriate public facilities to m eet the needs of its residents. This will
include renovation and repair of neighborhood parks, playgrounds, and comm unity centers that
serve low and moderate income persons, especially youth. For instance, to help improve the
quality of life for local residents, the City will encourage the development of additional
neighborhood playgrounds.

Objective 3: Improve security and public safety Cityw ide, especially in the priority
              neighborhoods (Place bullet-resistant shields on an estimated 55 street
              lights in high crime areas and roughly 10 new lights in the priority
              neighborhoods by June 30, 2009).

The City through its Police Department has implemented improved security in the Downtown
and the priority neighborhoods. These actions include regular foot and bike patrols, use of
COPS resourc es, and coordination w ith the Neighborhood Associations. However, security will
not be adequately improved until there is better lighting in the Downtown and the surrounding
neighborhoods. The recently completed Downtown Lighting Study identified 21 key
improvements; the total cost of which is estimated at $869,000. Using its CDBG funds as an
incentive, the City will seek to develop financial partnerships with Urban Salisbury and the


                                                                                                        10
neighborhoods to m ake these improvem ents. In addition, the City will expand the use of bullet-
resistant shields on street lights in high crime areas, such as Church Street-Doverdale. A
recent pilot program which placed shields on eight street lights in the Church Street
neighborhood, has been highly successful. This program was undertaken with assistance from
the W eed & Seed program and Conec tiv (the local electric utility).

Objective 4: Improve public safety through increased support of productive
              youth activities (Serve an estimated 100 additional youth through the
              Earn-A-Bike Program and help an estimated 100 youth by creating a
              Police Athletic League).

The Salisbury Police Department currently operates several program s to prov ide the City’s
youth with productive learning experiences and to keep them off the streets away from crime.
One such activity is the successful Earn-A-Bike Program that provides bikes to youth who
undertake police-s upported com munity service activities. The City intends to expand this
Program. In addition, the City proposes to work with local social service providers, churches,
and schools to investigate the feasibility of establishing a Police Athletic League. By the
summ er of 2004 the Police Department will be fully staffed and the creation of such a program
would be possible. The provision of police-supervised recreational activities would provide the
City’s youth with constructive fun-filled activities as well as adult mentors.

Strategy:      Provide Services and Financial Incentives to Assist with Em ployment,
               Empowerm ent and Self Sufficiency

Objective 5:   Continue to promote technical job training for all low- and moderate-
               income citizens (Encourage an estimated 30 persons to seek job training
               by June 30, 2009).

The econom y of Salisbury is diversified and grow ing with high tech m anufacturing busines ses.
This growth generates the need for more employees, particularly those with the technical skills.
For the existing Salisbury residents to benefit economically from this growth, the current work
force and future high school graduates need to be trained with appropriate technical skills. The
City intends to continue to work with SW ED, the Greater Salisbury Comm ittee, and local
schools to identify and encourage qualified individuals to participate in technical training
program s. For its part the City will act a liaison and link SW ED, Salisbury University, W or-W ic
Com munity College, and the Partnership for W ork Force Quality with the faith-based com munity
(i.e., local churches) to promote the training programs within the priority neighborhoods. The
intent is to increase the incom es of low - and m oderate-income persons, thereby helping them to
becom e more self-sufficient.

Objective 6: Provide financial incentives and technical assistance to encourage
             mixed-use development (commercial and residential) in the Downtown
             (Identify potential sites and evaluate the feasibility of a small business
              incubator by June 30, 2006).

Salisbury’s Downtown has a strong and active government and judicial center with many
professional offices, restaurants, and service establishments. However, the job opportunities
Downtown are not as diversified as the overall economy. As a consequence, the City and
Urban Salisbury are encouraging more mixed-us e development in the Dow ntown. To facilitate
such development, the City may use either its CDBG funds, its CDBG Revolving Loan funds, or
USDA’s Rural Business Enterprise Grant Revolving Loan funds, as incentives to encourage
investm ent by the private business com munity. Also, Salisbury may use its CDBG resources to


                                                                                                      10
investigate and implement, if feasible, a small business incubator in the Downtown. The
prospective establishment of several new small businesses not only will help to revitalize the
Downtown, but also c reate new jobs for Salisbury residents.

Objective 7: Investigate and im plement, if feasible, new public financing tools
              (Investigate the feasibility and creation of a Tax Increment Financing
              district by Decem ber 30, 2006).

Urban Salis bury is promoting mixed-use developm ent or rehabilitation in the Dow ntow n. In
particular, the Gillis/Gilkerson project being developed for the parking lot at the intersection of
South Division and Market Street and the mixed-use tourism proposal on the City-owned
property on the north side of the Wicomico River downstream of Mill Street are two such
developments. These investments can be encouraged by timely financial incentives. One
incentive the City will investigate is the feasibility of implementing a Tax Increment Financing
(TIF) district for the entire Dow ntown. This District, which c ould be established by City
Ordinance, would provide the City and Urban Salisbury with an annual stream of funds to
support future redevelopment projects. Once the TIF district is established, the City (and
possibly County) tax revenue from Dow ntown development attributable to an increase in
assessed value would be placed in a separate fund for use by Urban Salisbury to encourage
additional mixed-use redevelopm ent. If the fund grows large enough and the income stream is
dependable, Urban Salisbury could use it to borrow capital funds to support major
redevelopment projects.

F. Other Requirem ents

1. Public Housing Strategy

W CHA is comm itted to providing housing opportunities, self-sufficiency opportunities, and
customer satisfaction to enhance the quality of life for its extremely low-, low- and
moderate-income residents. The Authority’s existing five-year Agency Plan following the
Quality Housing and W ork Responsibility Act of 1998, is currently being revised. This planning
requirement is sim ilar to that for the Cons olidated Plan. The purpose of the Agenc y Plan is to
em pow er and equip W CHA to exercise optim um flexibility in meeting local housing needs within
the com munity, while also meeting its own needs.

The FY 2000-2004 Five Y ear Agency Plan outlines actions the Authority will undertake to
address the following areas of concern: imm ediate operations, current policies, resident
concerns and needs, and programs and s ervices for residents for the upcoming fisc al year.
Additionally, the Agency Plan will serve as a management, an operational and an accountability
tool for W CHA. The goals and objectives of WCHA’s Agency Plan are as follows: (1) increase
rehabilitation and modernization of units; (2) improve the resident comm unity’s quality of life and
economic vitality; and (3) promote resident’s self-sufficiency. The Agency’s Plan includes no
resident initiatives.

Despite these activities, the WCHA is currently in trouble with the federal government. W CHA,
once rated “superior” by HUD, is now considered “troubled” and this rating could be lowered to
”default.” As reported in the April 22, 2004 Salisbury Daily Times, the A uthority has two years to
implem ent HUD’s recommended changes or be taken over by the federal governm ent. Not only
is the Authority operating without a permanent executive director, but it is also plagued by
improper financial reporting practices. According to the WCHA’s Board Chairman, Chris Mills,
the Board is working hard to implement the reforms outlined in HUD’s Memorandum of
Agreement. For example, the Board will begin to interview 10 plus candidates for executive


                                                                                                       10
director on May 12, 2004.

Unfortunately, W CHA’s Board is appointed by the W icomico County Council, Salisbury has no
control of WCHA’s operations. Regardless the City plans to monitor closely W CHA’s activities,
especially the allocation of 181 City Section 8 vouchers (previously transferred to WCHA by the
City) and the selection of an executive director. The Mayor intends to detail the City’s concerns
in a letter to the Authority in the coming months.

2. Lead-based Paint

The County’s Health Departm ent and the joint City/County Departm ent of PZCD work
continuously to reduce the threat of lead-based paint contam ination in the County and City
housing stock. T he Health Department staff periodically inspects all dilapidated or poorly
maintained single-family homes. For those that fail inspection or for which lead paint hazards
are found, the ow ners are notified of the need to m ake improvem ents or lead paint abatement.
If the unit is located in Salisbury and beyond repair, the City may dem olish it. If the unit is
owned and occupied by a low-income household, the Health Department usually refers the
homeow ner to the joint City/County Department of PZCD or SNHS for rehabilitation and lead
paint hazard reduction assistance. However, both the County and City often learn of lead paint
problems only after som eone living in the house falls sick and they are referred to the County
Health Department for testing.

Rental units in the City are inspected on the bas is of complaint, random selection, or ins pector-
driven selection. If an inspector observes chipped or peeling paint, the tenant is provided
written information on lead paint hazards and referral to the County Health Department for
testing. The County Health Department, in turn, often refers the landlord whose apartments are
contaminated to the joint City/County PZCD for lead paint abatement assistance. Despite the
age of most of the City's rental as well as owner-occupied housing, the incidents of lead-based
paint poisoning have been falling over the past few years.

The City will continue to follow thes e lead paint abatem ent procedures. In addition, the City
plans to have its CDBG s taff, the staff of SNHS, and the staff of the joint City/County
Departm ent of PZCD distribute educational materials on the hazards of lead-based paint.

3. Barriers to Affordable Housing

Since the City has yet to complete its Analysis of Impediments, it has not determined whether
any local zoning or any lack of local coordination result in creation of barriers to development of
affordable housing. How ever, Salisbury's ability to im plem ent an affordable housing strategy is
constrained by the amount of funds allocated under the CDBG program, $360,000 per year, and
modest staff resources. To overcome this barrier and any others that may eventually be
identified (such as zoning or coordination barriers), the CDBG program staff will continue to
work closely with representatives from other City, County, State and federal agencies and the
private sector to both change relevant regulations and programs and to leverage resources.

Taking into consideration these factors, the City will undertake the following actions to m aintain
its existing stock and expand affordable housing in the future.

   •   Provide funds for the rehabilitation of homes owned by extremely low-, low- and
       moderate-income households
   •   Identify, acquire, demolish or renovate, and resell housing for homeownership by low-
       and moderate-income households


                                                                                                      10
   • Identify rental units in need of rehabilitation through the City's new Rental Registration and
       Inspection Program
   • As sis t first-time homebuyers by promoting construction of new units by non-profit housing
       developers (e.g., Habitat on the Lower Shore), if possible and appropriate
   • Continue to provide funds for housing and credit counseling and down payment and
       closing cost assistance for first-tim e hom ebuyers
   • Support the construction of new rental housing (financed with federal Low Income
       Housing Tax Credits) with property tax deferrals and/or the extension of water and sewer

It is hoped that these strategies and the continued use of innovative finance programs through
the Maryland DHCD will continue to provide for the affordable housing needs of the citizens of
Salisbury.

4. Anti-poverty Strategy

The City of Salisbury is committed to addressing the needs of its citizens who live at or below
the poverty level. Generally, the City, in conjunction with other public agenc ies and private
organizations, will seek to provide extremely low- and low-income households with various
opportunities to gain the know ledge, skills, and m otivation to becom e fully self-sufficient.
Specifically, the City will continue to pursue resources and innovative partnerships to support
the development of affordable housing, rental assistance, homelessness prevention, emergency
food and shelter, health care, family services, job training, and transportation. Partners with the
City in these anti-poverty efforts are numerous Wicomico County agencies as well as WCHA,
Shore Up, the Salvation Arm y, SW ED, GSC, local banks and educational institutions (e.g.,
Salisbury University and W or W ic Com munity College).

5. Institutional Structure and Public/Private Coordination

A newly established department within City government, with assistance from the joint
City/County Department of PZCD, will be responsible for the administration of the CDBG
program . Specifically, in order to fully implement its CDBG Program , the City will hire new staff
with appropriate education, skills, and experience. W hile the City will assume administration of
the CDBG Program, it will award grant funds to the joint City/County Department of PZCD and
SNHS to undertake most of the housing activities. Further, the staff will be charged with forging
partnerships with other public agencies (State and County) as well as with private housing
developers, non-profit service organizations, and the business comm unity. The success of
many of the strategies and objectives detailed in the City’s Consolidated Plan will depend,
primarily, on the energy and creative efforts of this CDBG staff.

The City does and w ill continue to work regularly with the M aryland DHCD to address its
housing and community development priorities. Additionally, the City works closely with non-
profit organizations, such as the Salisbury NHS and Habitat of the Lower Shore, to provide
first-time homebuyer opportunities. These creative partnerships will help the City access
housing resources, such as funding from the Federal Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing
Program, which may not otherwise be available. The City also will work with W CHA in all issues
concerning the Housing Authority’s residents, especially in helping those desiring to become
hom eowners. For instance, the City will help W CHA and/or SNHS identify financial resources to
provide housing counseling to WCHA residents wanting to become homeow ners. In addition,
sinc e the Authority has recently been designated as “troubled,” Salisbury will m onitor closely
W CHA’s allocation of the City’s Section 8 vouchers.

The City will continue to hold m onthly meetings of the M ayor’s Neighborhood Roundtable to

                                                                                                      10
obtain comm ent on the success of the City’s programs and to identify new housing and
community development problems. Salisbury also will continue to coordinate its econom ic
development or job training and creation activities with the business comm unity (e.g., Urban
Salisbury, GSC, SW ED) and the local educational institutions (particularly W or W ic Com munity
College and S alisbury University).

City staff also plans to participate regularly as a member of the Tri-County Alliance for the
Homeless. This Alliance, which includes most of the City’s private shelter and transitional
housing providers, is responsible for program and funding decisions that directly affect
Salisbury’s homeless. However, because these organizations do not appear to w ork closely
with each other, the City will work to encourage the participants of the Alliance to m ore form ally
coordinate their activities. Such improved coordination w ill permit the City and the Alliance to
better serve Salisbury’s homeless.

As such there are no serious gaps in the City’s institutional delivery system. How ever, to
adequately address the needs of Salisbury’s homeless, there is a significant need for increased
cooperation and coordination am ong the m any housing developers and social service providers.
All of these actions, once coordinated and implemented, should benefit all of Salisbury’s citizens
and help to revitalize the City’s urban core, rehabilitate the stock of housing and reduce crime in
the adjacent neighborhoods, and interconnect the neighborhoods and urban core into a
cohesive, vital com munity.

6. Monitoring

The City of Salisbury plans to have its CDBG staff review all funded projects to ensure
compliance with all federal and State regulations and to insure project goals are met during
implementation. Staff also will review projects upon completion for proper documentation and
compliance with federal and State regulations. HUD requires that the City have an annual audit
of all federal dollars according to OMB circular A-133. This annual audit reviews all financial
expenditures and assesses whether or not the City complied with all laws and regulations
governing the CDBG program.

The City CDBG staff intends to monitor all public service activities annually, generally half way
through the program year. They will review documents and financial records for compliance
with sub-recipient agreements, laws and regulations, and fulfillment of goals and objectives.
City staff also will monitor capital projects before construction at pre-bid and pre-construction
meetings, and during construction. Monitoring for such projects will include com pliance with
Davis-Bacon requirements, certified payroll requirements and verification of requests for
payment.




City of Salisbury
Revised June 16, 2004




                                                                                                       10
                               APPENDIX A:
                            CITY OF SALISBURY
                       CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN


Participation
The City of Salisbury will provide for and encourage citizen participation in the
development of priority housing and community development needs eligible for funding
by the federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program. In particular,
the City will encourage citizen participation in the development of the Consolidated Plan,
the Annual Action Plan, any amendments, and the performance report. The City will
also encourage citizen participation in the method of fund distribution.

The City will especially encourage the participation of low-to-moderate income persons,
including minorities, and advocates for those with physical and/or mental disabilities, the
elderly, and others with special needs. In addition, the City will encourage the
participation of residents of public and assisted housing, recipients of tenant-based
assistance, officials of the local Public Housing Agency, and representatives of the
homeless. In particular, the City will encourage the participation of those deemed to be
prospective beneficiaries of the Program, and those residents in areas and
neighborhoods to be served by the Program.


Access to Information
The previously cited citizens, public agencies, and other interested parties, including
those citizens directly affected, will be provided adequate information on the Program,
including the anticipated amount of CDBG funds that will be available for the current
fiscal year, and the range of activities that the City may undertake with these CDBG
funds. They also will be provided the opportunity to review and submit comments on
any of the identified housing and community development needs, the amount of funds
expected to be received, and the activities proposed to be undertaken to resolve the
identified needs.


Anti-displacement
The City proposes to take all reasonable steps to minimize the displacement of any
persons in undertaking all CDBG-funded activities. However, if any persons are
displaced, the City will provide the affected persons with assistance as outlined in the
City of Salisbury Residential Anti-Displacement and Relocation Assistance Plan, or will
require the grantee to provide this same level of assistance.


Plan Publication
The City of Salisbury will widely publish its Consolidated Plan in order to provide its
citizens the opportunity to review and comment on it. In particular, a summary of the
Consolidated Plan and/or the Annual Action Plan will be published in the Daily Times


                                                                                          4
and on the City of Salisbury website. In addition, summaries and/or complete copies of
the Plan will be made available at the Wicomico County Free Library and at the
Salisbury / Wicomico County Government Office Building. A selected number of copies
of the Consolidated Plan and Annual Action Plan will be distributed free to the public
(upon request).


Public Hearings
The City will also schedule and hold at least two (2) Public Hearings to solicit citizen
comments on its Consolidated Plan and Annual Action Plan. Although held at different
stages of the program year, these hearings will address housing and community
development needs, proposed activities to resolve the needs, and program
performance. These hearings will be held at times and locations that are convenient to
both potential and actual beneficiaries. All locations will be accessible to those with
physical disabilities. If the City expects that a significant number of non-English
speaking residents will be participating in the hearing, the City will attempt to provide an
interpreter for the non-English language expected to be most prevalent among people
at the hearing. All such hearings will be scheduled separately from the regularly
scheduled City Council meetings.


Notice of Public Hearings
Adequate advance notice of each public hearing will be provided to all of Salisbury’s
citizens. In particular, at least two (2) weeks prior to a public hearing a notice will be
published in the Daily Times and on the City of Salisbury website. This notice will
include sufficient information on the hearing, including the purpose, date, time, location,
and any important constraints.


Access to Meetings
All meetings and public hearings related to the CDBG Program will be held in
reasonably accessible locations.


Comments
In preparing its Consolidated Plan, the City of Salisbury will consider the views of its
citizens, public agencies, and all other interested parties. In particular, prior to
submission of the Plan to HUD for approval, the City will provide for at least a thirty (30)
day citizen comment period.


Substantial Amendments
The City of Salisbury may amend its Consolidated Plan as the need arises. Any
amendments to the Consolidated Plan will provide for a 30-day public comment period.
The City will give citizens reasonable notice and an opportunity to comment on the
proposed amendment. All citizen comments provided to the City either orally or in


                                                                                           4
writing will be considered prior to implementing the Plan change. A summary of these
citizen comments and the City’s decision and reasoning with respect to their acceptance
will be included with the changes or “substantial amendments” to the Plan.

The City of Salisbury will use the following criteria to determine whether a change is
substantial enough to warrant an amendment to the City’s Consolidated Plan:

      The purpose of a CDBG activity is the eligible activity. A change in the purpose
      is considered “substantial” when the eligible activity changes, e.g., from
      rehabilitation to demolition.

      The scope of a CDBG-funded activity means the type of action within the eligible
      activity changes. A “substantial change” in scope occurs when the effect within
      the eligible activity changes, e.g., a substantial change in the number of housing
      units to be rehabilitated.

      The location of a CDBG-funded activity is the site where the funded activity takes
      place. A change in location is considered “substantial” when the service area of
      the activity changes.

      The beneficiaries of a CDBG-funded activity are the persons or groups targeted
      to receive the benefits of that activity. A change in beneficiaries is considered
      substantial when the sponsor or the City cancels the project or the category of
      the people served changes.

      A change in budget will be deemed “substantial” if the budget revision is
      proposed resulting in a transfer between approved projects and activities of a
      cumulative amount more than 10% of the grant award.


Performance Reports
The City of Salisbury will submit a performance report to HUD on the City’s CDBG-
funded activities outlined in the Annual Action Plan. Like the Consolidated Plan, the
citizens will be provided with an opportunity to comment on the performance report.
Prior to submission of this performance report to HUD, all citizens will be provided a
fifteen (15) day comment period. Any citizen comments provided either orally or in
writing to the City will be considered prior to submission of the report. A summary of the
citizen comments will be attached to the report.


Plan Availability and Access to Records
The City of Salisbury’s Consolidated Plan, Annual Action Plan, any substantial
amendments to either document, and the performance report will be made available to
the public. In particular, all of these documents, as well as any related documents, will
be available to any interested party, upon request, in the City of Salisbury Mayor’s
Office, 125 North Division Street (Room 304), Salisbury, Maryland 21801-4940.


                                                                                            4
Technical Assistance
If needed, and requested in writing, the City of Salisbury will offer technical assistance
directly to groups representing low-to-moderate income persons, neighborhood
organizations, and community service organizations. Alternatively, the City may refer
these groups to a competent local organization that can provide such assistance.
Generally, such assistance would include the development of project proposals for
CDBG-funding assistance.


Complaints
Any written complaints from citizens with respect to the Consolidated Plan, the Annual
Action Plan, any amendments, and the performance report will be responded to by the
City within a reasonable period of time. Such a response will be provided by the City
within fifteen (15) days, if practicable.




Approved by the Salisbury Mayor and City Council
March 22, 2004




                                                                                             4
                               APPENDIX B:
                           CITY OF SALISBURY
                HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NEEDS


        Starting on January 13, 2004 and continuing throughout the month, the City of
Salisbury distributed a survey of housing and community development needs to a
sample of the City’s citizens. The City also placed the survey on its Internet website
in order to obtain the comments of other residents, not formally solicited by mail. The
purpose of the survey, as well as a community meeting held by the City on January
24, 2004, was to obtain information on the priority needs of the citizens in order to
facilitate the development of the City’s Consolidated Plan for the US Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Approval by HUD of the City’s Consolidated
Plan, and an Annual Action Plan (or various projects to resolve the identified and
prioritized needs), is necessary for the City to obtain its allocation of Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds. HUD estimates that Salisbury will receive
roughly $360,000 in federal fiscal year (FY) 2004 CDBG funds.

I. Survey of Housing and Community Development Needs

       The survey was distributed to an estimated 158 citizens of the City of
Salisbury. In general, these citizens either were neighborhood advocates or public or
private providers of social/community services. As of February 4, 2004, 60 citizens,
an estimated 38 percent of those solicited, had responded to the survey. These
respondents included: community advocates (27), social service providers (5),
members of professional organizations (4), City staff (4), Church ministers (6),
housing developers (6), and eight other categories of respondents. In addition, these
60 respondents and/or the organizations they represent serve multiple neighbor-
hoods of the City, Wicomico County, as well as the neighboring counties. In
particular, 22 respondents’ organizations operated Citywide and 11 operated
Countywide, while four organizations served residents of the Lower Shore counties,
including Wicomico County and Salisbury. The remaining respondents lived in 18
different Salisbury neighborhoods, including the Camden Heights/Mid-Camden,
Church St.-Doverdale, Newton, Pinehurst, and Westside neighborhoods.

       The complete results of the survey are illustrated in an Appendix to this report.
The results, however, contain the priority needs of only those respondents who chose
to rank the various needs. Several of the respondents chose to prioritize only those
categories of need and individual needs with which they were familiar. In other words,
numerous surveys were only partially completed.

       The survey solicited the citizens’ priority needs in eight categories: rental
housing, homeownership, housing for persons with special needs (e.g., elderly,
physically disabled, persons with AIDS), public facilities (e.g., senior centers, parks,
health facilities), public infrastructure (e.g., water, sewer, sidewalks), public services
(crime prevention, daycare, transportation), and economic development. The


                                                                                         1
respondents were asked to prioritize their needs in a range from one (1) equaling
“Very Low Need” to five (5) equaling “Critical Need.”

       As indicated in the following table, the highest ranking category of need overall
was homeless needs (3.62), while two categories, rental housing needs (3.22) and
housing for persons with special needs (3.25), ranked lowest. The ranking of the five
remaining categories (homeownership housing, public facilities, public infrastructure,
public services, and economic development) ranged between 3.55 and 3.25. Thus, it
appears that most of the respondents’ prioritization of needs ranked close to the
overall average of 3.50.

        Needs Category          Overall Needs      Advocates        Providers
    Rental Housing                    3.22         2.93             3.51
    Hom eownership                    3.55         3.48             3.61
    Special Needs Housing             3.25         3.07             3.43
    Ho m eless                        3.62         3.43             3.81
    Public Facilities                 3.48         3.44             3.51
    Infrastructure                    3.48         3.45             3.50
    Public Services                   3.50         3.33             3.67
    Economic Development              3.42         3.41             3.42


       Among the overall individual needs (depicted in the Appendix), down
payment/closing cost assistance for homeowners, youth centers and job
development/creation had a priority above 4.00. Other overall individual needs
that ranked relatively high (above 3.80) were related either to homeless needs
(such as emergency shelters for families, job training, and mental health care),
public services (e.g., crime prevention) and infrastructure (e.g., streets and
roads). Comparatively, housing for migrant workers, new construction for both
rental housing and homeownership, and housing for persons with AIDS, all
had overall low priorities, below 3.00. Similarly, land acquisition for rental
housing, project-based rental assistance, SRO housing, services for persons
with AIDS, and financial assistance for commercial redevelopment, averaged
(around 3.00) relatively low overall. In addition, several respondents highly
ranked the need for lead paint removal for rental and owner-occupied housing,
recycling facilities, tax increment finance, and several others not listed in any
of the categories.

       However, these overall survey priorities differ depending on whether the
respondent is a community advocate/citizen or a service provider. Of the 60
respondents, 27 were community advocates/citizens and 33 were service
providers. For community advocates, homeownership needs ranked the
highest and rental housing needs ranked the lowest. But for service providers,
the highest category of need was homelessness and the lowest was shared by
economic development and housing for persons with special needs. The
community advocates ranked two individual needs highly – job creation (3.96)
and down payment assistance for homeowners (3.92). But the advocates
ranked 10 individual needs low (below 3.00), with six rental housing needs


                                                                                      1
ranked the lowest. Conversely, service providers ranked eight individual needs
high (above 4.0), with job creation (4.38) and down payment assistance for
homeowners (4.33) ranked the highest. Only two individual needs were ranked
low or below 3.0 by the providers, housing for persons with HIV and
commercial redevelopment finance.

      For various reasons, these survey results are preliminary in nature. First,
only some of the City’s providers of public services and almost no private
sector businesses responded to the survey. Second, not all of the 60
respondents prioritized all of the individual housing and community
development needs due to a lack of knowledge or concern. Once these
weaknesses are resolved or overcome, the priority ranking of the City’s
housing and community developments needs may change. Consequently,
these results should be considered only as a starting point to the City of
Salisbury’s identification and prioritization of its housing and community
development needs.

II. Community Meeting Needs, January 24, 2004

        On January 24, 2004, the City held a community meeting to further identify,
refine, and prioritize the City’s housing and community development needs. Most of
the citizens, previously surveyed, were invited to participate in the meeting. Eleven
citizens chose to attend. Of these, five participants were community advocates, three
were members of a professional organization (Urban Salisbury), one was a non-profit
housing developer (Salisbury NHS), one was a County Health Department official,
and one was a State official. Generally, five of the participants were community
advocates and six were service providers.

        Using the above survey results as a starting point, the meeting facilitators first
compared the needs identified in the survey with those identified in other City
strategic planning efforts. Many of the above needs also had been previously
identified in the Mayor’s neighborhood meetings, the Community Legacy planning
process, and a revitalization effort that resulted in the Salisbury Downtown Action
Agenda. In particular, down payment assistance for homeowners, owner-occupied
rehab, street improvements, crime prevention, and job creation had been previously
identified as City needs. Conversely, there also were needs that had been prioritized
in the survey, but that had not been specified in the City’s previous strategic planning
efforts. Specifically, homeless needs, (e.g., emergency shelters and services for the
homeless) as well as housing for the frail elderly, for disabled persons and those with
mental illness had not been previously identified.

       Then the participants were divided into three groups focusing on: (1) rental
housing and homeownership needs, (2) homelessness, special needs housing, and
public services, and (3) economic development, infrastructure, and public facilities’
needs. Each group was asked to identify and prioritize the needs for their respective
categories. If a participant was a service provider, he/she described the needs for


                                                                                        1
which services were currently being offered and those for which current resources
were insufficient. If the participant was a community advocate, he/she described the
various needs which still have to be resolved in their neighborhoods. Then these
unresolved or unmet needs were recorded. Next each focus group reviewed the list
of needs to eliminate or combine duplicate needs. Finally, the group voted on the
three top priorities. These priorities for the three focus groups are shown below.

Rental Housing and Homeownership Needs

1. Coordinate the provision of credit counseling with finance for low and moderate
income families.
      Lenders need to offer credit counseling or develop more flexible criteria for loans and grants for
      hom e buyers with less than perfec t credit. These individuals often find it difficult or im possible
      to qualify for grants or loans to rehab or purchase property. Thus, many do not even attem pt
      to buy a home.


2. Increase affordable housing opportunities.
      The City should provide additional financial incentives to create mo re units of affordable
      housing, since the current stock of housing for low and moderate incom e families is lim ited.


3. Increase the distribution of information on affordable housing programs.
      Although the City has programs to help individuals buy or repair their homes, information on
      these program s is rarely m ade available to potential applicants. The City should develop and
      im plement a housing educational program to fill this gap.


4. Develop a major housing initiative in partnership with the County.
      The City and County need to develop a m ajor funding initiative to increase afforda ble owner-
      occup ied housing and im proved housing quality (e.g., rehabilitation).


Homeless Needs, Special Needs Housing, and Public Service Needs

1. Increase the stock of accessible housing, especially for persons with special needs
(e.g., the elderly and disabled).
      The stock of affordable hou sing is not sufficient to me et the need s of the elderly and physically
      disabled. Th e C ity should develo p financial ince ntives to assist hom eowners an d landlords with
      han dicap m odifications.


2. Establish an emergency shelter.
      There is only one emergency shelter for the hom eless in the Salisbury area, the Christian
      Shelter. This shelter is generally filled and has to turn persons away, due to lack of space.
      Various providers (e.g., Joseph House, Salvation Army, Village of Hope) offer services to the
      hom eless, but none operate a fu ll-time em ergency shelter with b eds. The City sho uld work with
      local service providers to resolve this shelter gap.


3. Reduce crime and increase public safety.
      The City needs to incre ase public safe ty and pre vent crim e in all of the lo cal n eighborh oods. In
      addition, the C ity needs to increase p ublic assistan ce for job training, transpo rtation, health
      care, and day care.


Public Facility, Infrastructure, and Economic Development Needs


                                                                                                                1
1. Promote business development.
       Th e City should use finan cial incen tives, like T ax Increm ent Finan cing an d Enterprise Zo nes,
       to increase the tax base and to help new businesses to develop. The City also should provide
       funding for rehab of comm ercial and mixed-use buildings in the Urban Core.


2. Improve public infrastructure (e.g., street, intersection, and sidewalk
improvements) in the Urban Core and surrounding neighborhoods.
       The City should facilitate pedestrian traffic in the Urban Core. Residents in the surrounding
       neighb orhoods should be able to wa lk to jo bs, businesses, se rvices, and public tra nsp ortation.
       Im proving public infrastructure would help the City’s visitors to access the m any recreation and
       heritage opportunities. Specifically, the City should im plement the recomm endations of the
       Connectivity Study.


3. Increase job creation.
       Th e City, in pa rtnersh ips with the loca l schools, colle ges, an d State a gen cies, should incre ase
       em ploym ent training effo rts to assist local workers to access higher paying jo bs.


III. Housing and Community Development Needs Summary

        A summary of the City of Salisbury’s housing and community development
needs, as prioritized by roughly 60 community advocates/citizens and service
providers, indicates that the City’s needs are highly comparable with those of most
Americans. Salisbury’s citizens want more jobs (especially good-paying ones) and
more affordable rental and owner-occupied housing (especially shelter for the
homeless). Furthermore, these needs, as identified by the survey respondents and
meeting participants, are consistent with those cited in past strategic planning efforts
(e.g., the Community Legacy process, the Mayor’s neighborhood meetings, and the
Downtown revitalization process). For instance, past City efforts emphasized the
need for increased affordable owner-occupied housing, improved public infrastructure
(particularly streets and sidewalks), decreased crime, and more jobs. The survey
respondents ranked most of these needs highly, as did the meeting participants.
However, the survey respondents and meeting participants also prioritized highly the
need for shelters and services for the homeless, handicap modifications for both
rental and owner-occupied housing, housing for the elderly and physically disabled,
and credit counseling for low and moderate income families.

       However, because these housing and community development needs
represent the priorities of only a sample of Salisbury citizens, the City plans to seek
further citizen ratification of these priorities at a Public Hearing on February 4, 2004.
Moreover, the City plans to hold meetings with additional public and private sector
representatives. In particular, the City will seek the priorities of City and County
health officials, police, public works staff as well as bankers, realtors, college officials,
and hospital personnel. Once the priorities of these Salisbury citizens are added to
those already identified, the City will begin to draft its Consolidated Plan and Annual
Action Plan to resolve its housing and community development needs.




                                                                                                                  1
February 10, 2004
Salisbury Office of the Mayor
     APPENDIX: SURVEY HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NEEDS


           Nee ds C atego ry             Advocates    Service P roviders   Ov era ll

RENTAL HOUSING NEEDS                           2.93   3.51                 3.22
Acquisition                                    2.59   3.43                 3.01
Moderate Rehabilitation                        3.00   3.48                 3.24
Substantial Rehabilitation                     3.13   3.61                 3.37
New Construction                               2.43   3.03                 2.73
Tenant-based Rental Assistance                 2.73   3.76                 3.25
Project-based Rental Assistance                2.67   3.43                 3.05
Preservation of Existing Stock                 3.21   3.70                 3.46
Ene rgy Efficiency Im provem ents              3.43   3.78                 3.61
Ho using for Migrant W orkers                  2.50   3.25                 2.88
Ren tal H ou sing for the Elde rly             3.13   3.80                 3.47
Re ntal H ousing for Single Persons            2.87   3.28                 3.08
Re ntal H ousing for Sm all Fam ilies          3.08   3.72                 3.40
Re ntal H ousing for La rge F am ilies         3.38   3.39                 3.39
 Other: Handicapped Modifications
 Other: Lead Paint Removal

HOMEOWNERSHIP NEEDS                            3.48   3.61                 3.55
Do wn Paym ents / Closing C osts               3.92   4.33                 4.13
Moderate Rehabilitation                        3.60   3.64                 3.62
Substantial Rehabilitation                     3.56   3.71                 3.64
New Construction                               2.88   3.14                 3.01
Ene rgy Efficiency Im provem ents              3.56   3.56                 3.56
Ha ndicappe d Modifications                    3.36   3.26                 3.31
 Other: Lead Paint Removal

HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH
SPECIAL NEEDS                                  3.07   3.43                 3.25
Frail Elde rly                                 3.29   3.79                 3.54
Persons with HIV/AIDS                          2.58   2.92                 2.75
Perso ns w/ Alc oho l/Dru g Addictions         2.75   3.46                 3.11
Perso ns w/ Dev Disabilities                   3.29   3.50                 3.40
Perso ns w/ Phy Disabilities                   3.29   3.39                 3.34
Perso ns w/ Men tal Illness                    3.21   3.54                 3.38

HOMELESS NEEDS                                 3.43   3.81                 3.62
Em erge ncy Shelters fo r Fam ilies            3.75   4.10                 3.93
Em ergency Shelters for Men                    3.42   3.59                 3.51
Em ergency Shelters for Wom en                 3.46   3.77                 3.62
Transitional H ousing for Fa m ilies           3.42   3.97                 3.70
Transitional Housing for Men                   3.17   3.64                 3.41




                                                                                       1
     APPENDIX: SURVEY HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NEEDS


          Nee ds C atego ry              Advocates    Service P roviders   Ov era ll

HOM ELESS N EEDS (C ON T.)
Transitional Housing for Wom en                3.33   3.76                 3.55
Sup portive Services for F am ilies            3.38   3.76                 3.57
Supportive Services for W om en                3.25   3.69                 3.47
Supportive Services for Men                    3.17   3.59                 3.38
Operations/Maintenance o f Fac ilities         3.57   3.78                 3.68
Job Tra ining fo r the H om eless              3.75   3.90                 3.83
Case Managem ent                               3.42   3.97                 3.70
Substa nce Abuse T reatm ent                   3.25   3.82                 3.54
Mental Health Care                             3.63   4.00                 3.82
Physical Heath Care                            3.54   3.75                 3.65
Housing Pla cem ent                            3.38   3.76                 3.57
Life Skills Training                           3.38   4.00                 3.69
  Other: Clothes

PUBLIC FACILITY NEEDS                          3.44   3.51                 3.48
Sen ior Cen ters                               3.29   4.00                 3.65
Youth C enters                                 3.83   4.17                 4.00
Ne ighborhoo d/Co m m unity Facilities         3.75   3.48                 3.62
Ch ild Care C enters                           3.67   3.79                 3.73
Parks and Recreation                           3.46   3.19                 3.33
He alth Facilities                             3.13   3.59                 3.36
Park ing Fac ilities                           3.28   3.11                 3.20
Police Stations/Substations                    3.12   3.29                 3.21
Fire Stations/Sub stations                     3.36   3.21                 3.29
Libraries                                      3.52   3.26                 3.39
  Other: Cell Phone T owers

INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS                           3.45   3.50                 3.48
Solid Waste Disposal                           3.64   3.57                 3.61
Flood D rain Improvem ents                     3.52   3.43                 3.48
W ater Im provem ents                          3.40   3.46                 3.43
Street/Road Im provem ents                     3.72   3.96                 3.84
Sidewa lk Im provem ents                       3.42   3.31                 3.37
Asbestos Rem oval                              3.04   3.25                 3.15
Ha ndicap Im provem ents                       3.44   3.54                 3.49
  Other: Pedestrian Connections
  Other: Recycling Facilities




                                                                                       1
     APPENDIX: SURVEY HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NEEDS


          Nee ds C atego ry              Advocates    Service P roviders   Ov era ll

PUBLIC SERVICE NEEDS                           3.33   3.67                 3.50
Sen ior Services                               3.50   3.80                 3.65
Ha ndicappe d Services                         3.31   3.39                 3.35
Youth Services                                 3.50   3.57                 3.54
Services for Persons with HIV/AIDS             2.84   3.21                 3.03
Services for the Mentally Ill                  3.12   3.59                 3.36
Services for Sub stance Abusers                3.00   3.39                 3.20
Services for the Dev Disabled                  3.15   3.53                 3.34
Transp ortation Services                       3.54   3.77                 3.66
Em ploym ent Training                          3.52   3.90                 3.71
Crim e Prevention                              3.67   3.97                 3.82
Housing Counseling                             3.48   3.48                 3.48
Da y Care Services                             3.36   3.83                 3.60
After Scho ol Progra m s                       3.52   4.06                 3.79
He alth Services                               3.12   3.86                 3.49

ECON DEVELOPMENT NEEDS                         3.42   3.41                 3.42
Job Developm ent/creation                      3.96   4.38                 4.17
Com m ercial/Industrial Infrastructure         3.28   3.50                 3.39
Com m ercial/Ind Financial Assistance          3.16   3.43                 3.30
Micro-Business Su pport                        3.35   3.50                 3.43
Sm all Business Lo ans                         3.64   3.71                 3.68
Fac ade Imp rovem ents                         3.42   3.10                 3.26
Streetscape Im provem ents                     3.74   3.24                 3.49
Bro wnfield s Redevelopm ent                   3.25   3.00                 3.13
Te ch Assistanc e for Sm all Business          3.24   3.32                 3.28
Banking for Co m Re develo pm ent              3.17   2.89                 3.03
  Other: Downtown Redevelopment
  Other: Tax Increment Finance




                                                                                       1
                                             APPENDIX C:
                                          CITY OF SALISBURY
                                    RESIDENTIAL ANTI-DISPLACEMENT
                                   AND RELO CAT ION ASSIST ANCE PLAN




        The City of Salisbury, Maryland, hereby agrees to comply with all requirements of the
Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (“URA”), as
amended, as described in 49 CFR Part 24; and with the Housing and Comm unity Development
Act of 1974 (“HCD Act of 1974”), as amended, as described in 24 CFR Part 42.

      The City of Salisbury will replace all occupied and vacant previously occupied, low- and
moderate-income dw elling units demolished or converted to a use other than as low- and
moderate-income housing in connection with activities assisted with funds provided under the
HCD Act of 1974, as amended.

All replaced housing will be provided within three (3) years of the comm encement of the
dem olition or rehabilitation relating to conversion. Before obligating or expending funds that will
directly result in such demolition or conversion, the City of Salisbury will make public and subm it
to the Baltimore, Maryland HUD Office the following information in writing.

       A.     A description o f the p ropo sed a ssisted a ctivity;

       B.     The location on a map and num ber of dwelling units by size (number of bedrooms) that will be
              dem olished or co nverted to a use other than a s low- and m ode rate-inco m e dwelling u nits as a
              direc t result of the a ssisted a ctivity;

       C.     A tim e schedule for the comm encem ent and completion of the demolition or conversion;

       D.     The general location on a map and approxim ate num ber of dwellings units by size (number of
              bed room s) that will be p rovided as replace m ent dw elling u nits;

       E.     The source of funding and a tim e schedule for the provision of replacement dwelling units; and

       F.     The basis for concluding that each replacement dwelling unit will rem ain a low- and
              m od erate-incom e d we lling for at least ten (10 ) years from the da te of initial occ up an cy.

        The City of Salisbury will provide relocation assistance, as described in 24 CFR 42.350, to
each low- and moderate-income household displaced by the acquisition or demolition of housing
or by the conversion or rehabilitation of low- and moderate-income dwelling to another use as a
direct result of assisted activities.

         In addition, in consideration of the financial assistance received from the HUD CDBG
Program, particularly when such assistance is used for acquisition, rehabilitation, demolition, or
conversion which results in displacem ent not covered by the URA, the City of Salisbury accepts
the following as the anti-displacement and relocation standards by which the local CDBG project
will be administered, including determination of entitlement to and payment of relocation benefits:

Definitions

       A. The term "tenant" includes any family, individual, business, nonprofit organization or
          farm that is a renter. It also includes any ow ner-occupant displaced as a direct result
          of non-URA acquisition by the City of Salisbury with the power of eminent domain, and
          any displaced owner-occupant of a mobile home w ho rents the site.
                                                                                                                    3
       B. The term "displaced" refers to a tenant w ho m oves from his or her dwelling if:

               i.     The tenant has not been provided a decent, safe and sanitary dwelling unit on the
                      property following the com pletion of the assisted activity, at a monthly cost for rent and
                      utilities that does not exceed the greater of:

                          a.The tenant's cost for rent and utilities at the tim e that the City of Salisbury enters
                              into a contract for _______________________               (type of) assistance with the
                              owner; or
                          b.Thirty (30) percent of the tenant household's gross incom e; or

                ii.   If temp orary relocation is required, the tenant is not reim bursed for all reasonab le
                      out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with the tem porary relocation.

Eligibility Criteria for Benefits

       A. Any tenant legally occupying the property at the time that the City of Salisbury enters
          into a contract to provide assistance for the acquisition or rehabilitation; and

       B. Any tenant who legally moves into the property between such event and the actual
          acquisition, conversion, demolition, or rehabilitation without receiving prior written
          notice of his or her possible displacement as a result of the planned acquisition,
          conversion, demolition, or rehabilitation.

Benefits

  Any tenant who is to be displaced as a result of CDBG financed rehabilitation, acquisition,
  conversion, or demolition, but whose displacement is not subject to the URA, will be provided
  with relocation assistance, including at a minimum;

        A. Reasonable moving expenses;

        B. Advisory services needed to help in relocating;

        C. Interim living costs;

        D. Security deposits and credit checks; and

        E. For a displaced residential tenant:

               i.     Re ferral to a t lea st one su itable, decent, safe and san itary replacem ent dwelling unit.
                      City of Salisbu ry Com m unity Developm ent staff shall advise tenants of the ir rights
                      under the Federal Fair Housing Act, 42 U.S.C. §§ 3601—3619, and of replacement
                      housing opportunities in such a manner that, wherever feasible, they will have a choice
                      between relocation within their neighborhood and other neighborhoods; and

               ii.    Each pe rson m ust be offered rental assistance equal to 60 tim es the am ount necessary
                      to reduce the m onthly rent and estim ated average m onthly cost of utilities for a
                      replacem ent dwelling (com parable repla cem ent dwelling or decent, safe, and sanitary
                      replacement dwelling to which the person relocates, whichever costs less) to the “Total
                      Tenant Paym ent”, as determined under 24 CFR Part 813.

General Policies



                                                                                                                      3
      A. The City of Salisbury Comm unity Development staff will assure compliance with the
         provisions of benefits to displaced residential tenants. How ever, the City of Salisbury
         may enter into a written agreement with a sub-recipient, or the owner of the assisted
         property, under which either may pay all or part of the cost of the required relocation
         assistance.

      B. The cost of relocation assistance and other benefits shall be paid from CDBG funds or
         such other funds as may be available from any source.

      C. If any owner or occupant of assisted property disagrees with the determ ination of
              the City of Salisbury that these requirem ents do not apply to an acquisition or a
         displacement, the person may appeal that determination to:

              U. S. Department of Housing & Urban Development
              Comm unity Planning and Development
              10 South How ard Street, 5 th Floor
              Baltimore, Maryland 21201

      D. Consistent with the goals and objectives of the CDBG Program, the City of Salisbury
         will take every preventable action to minimize the involuntary displacement of persons
         from their homes and neighborhoods. Examples of action which, among others, may
         be taken to minimize or prevent displacement include:

              i.     Stage rehabilitation of assisted housing to allow tenants to remain during and after
                     rehabilitation, working with empty buildings or groups of empty units first, so they can
                     be rehabilitated first, and tenants m oved in before rehabilitation of occupied units or
                     buildings is begun.

              ii.    Establish tem pora ry reloc ation fac ilities in orde r to hou se fam ilies whose
                     displacement will be of short duration, so they can m ove back to their neighborhoods
                     after rehabilitation or new construction.

              iii.   Provide coun seling to assist home owners and renters to understand the range of
                     assistance that may be available to help them in staying in the area being revitalized.




ATTEST/WITNESS                                             Barrie P. Tilghm an, Mayor
                                                          (Typed Name of Chief Elected Official)


______________________________
                                                          ____________________________________
                                                          (Signature)


_____________________
Date




                                                                                                                3
                                         APPENDIX D:
                                      CITY OF SALISBURY
                                          GLOSSARY


Affordable Housing “Affordable Housing” is generally defined as housing where the occupant
is paying no more than 30 percent of gross incom e for gross housing costs, including utility
costs.

AIDS and Related Diseases The disease of acquired imm unodeficiency syndrome or any
conditions arising from the etiologic agent for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

Alcohol/Other Drug Addiction A serious and persistent alcohol or other drug problem that
significantly limits a person's ability to live independently is defined as an “Alcohol/Other Drug
Addiction.”

Area of Low-Income Concentration Areas identified by Census block groups where at least
51% of the households have an income that is less than 80% of the area median income, as
defined by the 2000 U.S. Census.

Area of Minority Concentration Areas identified by Census tracts where at least 60% of the
population who reside within the census tract are identified as minority households, as defined
by the 2000 U.S. Census.

Assisted Household or Persons For the purpose of identification of goals, an “Assisted
Household or Person” is one which during the period covered by the annual plan will receive
benefits through the Federal funds, either alone or in conjunction with the investment of other
public or private funds. The program funds providing the benefit(s) may be from any funding
year or combined funding years.

For instance, a renter is benefited if the person takes occupancy of affordable housing that is
newly acquired, newly rehabilitated or newly constructed, and/or receives rental assistance
through new budget authority. An existing homeow ner is benefited if the home is com pletely
rehabilitated. A first-tim e homebuyer is benefited if a home is purchased. A hom eless person is
benefited if the person is served at an emergency shelter, or becomes an occupant of
transitional or permanent housing. A non-homeless person with special needs is considered as
being benefited if a supportive service is provided and received. Households or persons who
benefit from more than one program activity are counted only once. To be included in the
goals, the housing unit mus t, at a minimum , satisfy the HUD Section 8 Housing Quality
Standards. (See 24 CFR Section 882.109)

Committed Generally means there has been a legally binding comm itment of funds to a
specific project to undertake specific activities.

Cost Burden Greater Than 30% The extent to which gross hous ing costs , including utility
costs, exceed 30 percent of gross income, based on data published by the U.S. Census
Bureau.

Cost Burden Greater T han 50% (Severe Cost Burden) The extent to which gross housing
costs, including utility costs, exceed 50 percent of gross income, is defined as a “Severe Cost
Burden,” as based on data published by the U.S. Census Bureau.


Glossary, City of Salisbury Consolidated Plan, CDBG PY 2004-2008                             Page 1
Disabled Household A household composed of one or m ore persons at least one of whom is
an adult (a person of at least 18 years of age) who has a disability. A person shall be
considered to have a disability if the person is determined to have a physical, mental or
emotional impairment that: (1) is expected to be of long-continued and indefinite duration, (2)
substantially impedes his or her ability to live independently, and (3) is of such a nature that the
ability could be improved by more suitable housing conditions. A person shall also be
considered to have a disability if he or she has a developmental disability, as defined in the
Developm ental Disabilities Ass istance and Bill of Rights Act (42 U.S.C. 6001-6006). The term
also includes the surviving member or members of any household described in the first
sentence of this definition who were living in an assisted unit with the deceased member of the
household at the time of his or her death.

Economic Independence and Self-Sufficiency Programs Any programs undertaken by
Public Housing Agencies (PHAs) to promote economic independence and self-sufficiency for
participating families. Such programs may include Project Self-Sufficiency and Operation
Bootstrap programs that originated under earlier Section 8 rental certificate and rental voucher
initiatives, as well as the Fam ily Self-Sufficiency program. In addition, PHAs may operate
locally-developed program s or conduct a v ariety of special projects designed to prom ote
econom ic independence and self-sufficiency.

Elderly Household For HUD programs, a one or two person household in which the head of
the household or spouse is at least 62 years of age.

Elderly Person A person w ho is at least 62 years of age is defined as elderly.

Existing Homeowner An owner-occupant of residential property who holds legal title to the
property and who uses the property as his/her principal residence.

Extremely Low-Income Households A household whose income is between 0 and 30
percent of the median income for the area, as determined by HUD with adjustments for smaller
and larger households, is defined to have an “extremely Low Income” level. HUD may establish
income ceilings higher or lower than 30 percent of the median for the area on the basis of
findings that such variations are necessary due to prev ailing levels of construction costs or fair
market rents, or unusually high or low hous ehold incom es.

Family The definition of a “Family” is included in 24 CFR 812.2 (T he National Affordable
Housing Act definition required to be used in the CHAS rule differs from the Census definition).
The Bureau of Census defines a family as a householder (head of hous ehold) and one or m ore
other persons living in the same household who are related by birth, marriage or adoption. The
term "Household" is used in combination with the term "related" in the CHAS instructions, when
compatibility with the Census definition of family (for reports and data available from the Census
based upon that definition) is dictated. (See also "Hom eless Family")

Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) Program A program enacted by Section 554 of the National
Affordable Housing Act which directs Public Housing Agencies (PHAs) and Indian Housing
Authorities (IHAs) to use Section 8 assistance under the rental certificate and rental voucher
program s, together with public and private resources, to provide supportive services , to enable
participating fam ilies to achieve econom ic independence and self-sufficiency.

Federal Preference for Admission The preference given to otherwise eligible applicants
under HUD's rental assistance program s who, at the tim e they seek housing assistance, are


Glossary, City of Salisbury Consolidated Plan, CDBG PY 2004-2008                             Page 2
involuntarily displaced, living in substandard housing, or paying m ore than 50 percent of family
incom e for rent. (See, for example, 24 CFR 882.219.)

First-Time Homebuyer An individual or family who has not owned a home during the
three-year period preceding the HUD-assisted purchase of a home that must be used as the
principal residence of the homebuyer. Further, any individual who is a displaced homem aker
(as defined in 24 CFR 92) or a single parent (as also defined in 24 CFR 92) may not be
excluded from consideration as a first-time homebuyer on the basis that the individual, while a
homem aker or married, owned a home w ith his or her spouse or resided in a home owned by
the spouse.

For Rent Year-round housing units which are vacant and offered/available for rent. (U.S.
Census definition)

For Sale Year-round housing units which are vacant and offered/available for sale only. (U.S.
Census definition)

Frail Elderly An elderly person w ho is unable to perform at least 3 ac tivities of daily living (i.e.,
eating, dressing, bathing, grooming, and household management activities) is considered to be
“Frail.” (See 24 CFR 889.105.)

Group Quarters Facilities providing living quarters that are not classified as housing units,
including prisons, nursing homes, dormitories, military barracks, and shelters. (U.S. Census
definition)

HOME The HOME Investment Partnerships Program, which is authorized by Title II of the
National Affordable Housing Act.

Homeless Family A family that includes at least one parent or guardian and one child under
the age of 18, a homeless pregnant woman, or a homeless person in the process of securing
legal custody of a person under the age of 18, is defined as a “Hom eless Family.”

Homeless Individual An unaccompanied youth (17 years or younger) or an adult (18 years or
older) without children is considered a “Hom eless Individual.”

Homeless Youth An unaccom panied person 17 years of age or younger who is living in
situations described by terms "Sheltered" or "Unsheltered" is defined as a “Homeless Youth.”

HOPE 1 The HO PE for Public and Indian Housing Hom eow ners hip Program , which is
authorized by Title IV, Subtitle A of the National Affordable Hous ing Act.

HOPE 2 The HOPE for Homeow nership of Multi-family Units Program, which is authorized by
Title IV, Subtitle B of the National Affordable Housing Act.

HOPE 3 The HOPE for Homeow nership of Single Family Homes Program, which is authorized
by Title IV, Subtitle C of the National Affordable Housing Act.

Household One or more persons occupying a housing unit constitutes a household. (See
also the term, "Family") (U.S. Census definition)




Glossary, City of Salisbury Consolidated Plan, CDBG PY 2004-2008                               Page 3
Housing Problems Households w ith housing problems include those that : (1) occupy units
meeting the definition of “Physical Defects”; (2) meet the definition of “Overcrowded”; and (3)
meet the definition of “Cost B urden Greater than 30% .”

Housing Unit An occupied or vacant house, apartment, or a single room (SRO housing) that
is intended as separate living quarters is defined as a “Housing Unit.” (U.S. Census definition)

Institutions/Institutional Group quarters for persons under care or custody are defined as
being in an “Institution.” (U.S. Census definition)

Large Related A household of five or more persons related to the householder by blood,
marriage or adoption is defined as being “Large Related.”

Lead-Based Paint Hazard Any condition that causes exposure to lead from lead-contaminated
dust, lead-contam inated soil, lead-contam inated paint that is deteriorated or present in
accessible surfaces, friction surfaces, or impact surfaces that would result in adverse human
health effects is considered to be a “Lead-Based Paint Hazard,” as established by the
appropriate Federal agency. (Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992
definition)

LIHTC   “LIHTC” is the acronym for the federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Program.

Low-Income Households whose incomes do not exceed 50 percent of the median income for
the area, as determined by HUD with adjustments for smaller and larger families, is considered
to be a “low-Income” household. HUD may establish income ceilings higher or lower than 50
percent of the m edian for the area on the basis of HUD's findings that such variations are
necessary because of prev ailing levels of construction costs or fair market rents, or unusually
high or low fam ily incom es. NOTE: HUD incom e limits are updated annually and are available
from local HUD offices. (This term corresponds to low- and moderate-income households in the
CDBG Program .)

Moderate-Income Households whose incomes do not exceed 80 percent of the median
income for the area, as determ ined by HUD, w ith adjustments for sm aller or larger fam ilies, is
considered to be a “Moderate-Income” household. HUD may establish income ceilings higher or
lower than 80 percent of the median for the area on the basis of HUD's findings that such
variations are necessary because of prevailing levels of construction costs or fair market rents,
or unusually high or low family incomes. (This definition is different than that for the Section 8
Program .)

Non-Elderly Household A household which does not m eet the definition of "Elderly
Household," as defined above.

Non-Homeless Persons with Special Needs This category includes elderly persons, frail
elderly persons, persons with AIDS, disabled families, and families participating in organized
programs to achieve econom ic self-sufficiency.

Non-Institutional Group quarters for persons not under care or custody are defined as being
“Non-Institutional.” (U.S. Census definition)

Occupied Housing Unit A “Housing Unit” that is the usual place of residence of the
occupant(s) is defined as “Occupied.”


Glossary, City of Salisbury Consolidated Plan, CDBG PY 2004-2008                          Page 4
Other Household A hous ehold of one or more persons that does not meet the definition of a
“Small Related” household, “Large Related” household or “Elderly” household is defined as
“Other.”

Other Income Households whose incomes exceed 80 percent of the median income for the
area, with adjustments for smaller and larger families as determined by HUD, is defined as
having “Other Incom e.”

Other Vacant Year-round “Housing Units” that are not “For Rent” or “For Sale” are vacant,
such as housing units “Awaiting Occupancy” or “Held.”

Overcrow ded A housing unit containing more than one person per room is “Overcrowded.”
(U.S. Census definition)

Owner A household that owns the housing unit it occupies is defined as an “Owner.” (U.S.
Census definition)

Physical Defects A housing unit lacking a complete kitchen or bathroom is defined as one
with “Physical Defects.” (U.S. Census definition)

Primary Housing Activity A means of providing or producing affordable housing (such as
rental assistance, production, rehabilitation or acquisition) that will be allocated significant
resources and/or pursued intensively to address a particular housing need. (See also
"Secondary Housing A ctivity")

Project-Based (Rental) Assistance Rental as sistance prov ided for a project, not for a specific
tenant, is considered to be “Project-Based.” Tenants receiving project-based rental assistance
give up the right to that ass istance upon m oving from the project.

Public Housing CIAP “CIAP” is the acronym for Public Housing Comprehensive Improvement
Assistance Program.

Public Housing MROP       “MROP” is the acronym for Public Housing Major Reconstruction of
Obsolete Projects.

Rent Burden Greater Than 30% The extent to which gross rents, including utility costs,
exceed 30 percent of gross inc om e, based on data published by the U.S. Census Bureau, is
defined as a “Rent Burden.” (See also Cost Burden)

Rent Burden Greater Than 50% A “Severe Rent Burden” is the extent to which gross rents,
including utility costs, exceed 50 percent of gross income, based on data published by the U.S.
Census Bureau. (See also Severe Cost Burden)

Rental Assistance Rental assistance payments provided as either project-based rental
assistance or tenant-based rental assistance.

Renter A household that rents the housing unit it occupies, including both units rented for cash
and units occupied without cash payment or rent. (U.S. Census definition)

Renter-Occupied Unit Any occupied “Housing Unit” that is not owner-occupied, including
units rented for cash and thos e occupied without payment of cash rent.


Glossary, City of Salisbury Consolidated Plan, CDBG PY 2004-2008                             Page 5
Secondary Housing Activity A means of providing or producing affordable housing (such as
rental assistance, production, rehabilitation or acquisition) that will receive fewer resources and
less emphasis, than primary housing activities to address a particular housing need, is defined
as a “Secondary Housing Activity.” (See also "Primary Housing Activity")

Section 215 Section 215 of Title II of the National Affordable Housing Act defines "affordable"
housing projects under the HOME program.

Service Needs The particular services identified for special needs populations, which typically
include transportation, personal care, housekeeping, counseling, m eals, cas e management,
personal emergency response, and other services to prevent premature institutionalization and
assist individuals to continue living independently.

Severe Cost Burden      See Cost Burden Greater Than 50%.

Severe Mental Illness A serious and persistent mental or emotional impairment that
significantly lim its a person's ability to live independently.

Sheltered Families and persons w hose primary nighttime residence is a supervised publicly-
or privately-operated shelter, including emergency shelters, transitional housing for the
homeless, domestic violence shelters, residential shelters for runaway and homeless youth, and
any hotel/m otel/apartm ent voucher arrangem ent paid because the person is hom eless. T his
term does not include persons living doubled up or in overcrowded or substandard conventional
housing. A facility offering permanent housing is not a shelter, nor are its residents homeless.

Small Related A household of two to four persons which includes at least one person related
to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption.

Standard Condition A housing condition which meets all applicable local and State codes for
habitation.

Substandard Condition but Suitable for Rehabilitation A housing condition which does not
meet local and State hous ing codes, corrections of w hich are a financially feasible alternative to
demolition.

Substandard Condition and not Suitable for Rehabilitation Any dwelling units that are in
such poor condition as to be neither structurally nor financially feasible for rehabilitation are
defined as being “Substandard and Not Suitable for Rehabilitation.”

Substantial Amendment A major change in an approved housing strategy, such as a change
to the five-year strategy, which may be occasioned by a decision to undertake activities or
programs inconsistent w ith that strategy.

Substantial Rehabilitation Rehabilitation of residential property at an average cost for the
project in exces s of $25,000 per dwelling unit is considered “Substantial.”

Supportive Housing Housing, including “Housing Units” and “Group Quarters,” that have a
supportive environm ent and include a planned service com ponent.

Supportive Service Need in FSS Plan The plan that PHAs adm inistering a Family
Self-Sufficiency program are required to dev elop to identify the services they will provide to


Glossary, City of Salisbury Consolidated Plan, CDBG PY 2004-2008                            Page 6
participating families and the source of funding for those services. The supportive services may
include child care; transportation; remedial education; education for completion of secondary or
post secondary schooling; job training, preparation and counseling; substance abuse treatment
and counseling; training in homemaking and parenting skills; money managem ent, and
household management; counseling in hom eownership; job developm ent and placem ent;
follow-up assistance after job placement; and other appropriate services.

Supportive Services Any services (e.g., case managem ent, medical or psychological
counseling and supervision, child care, transportation, and job training) provided to residents of
“Supportive Housing” for the purpos e of facilitating the independence of residents.

Tenant-Based Rental Assistance A form of rental assistance in which the assisted tenant
may move from a dwelling unit with a right to continued assistance. The assistance is provided
to the tenant, not to the project.

Total Vacant Housing Units Unoccupied year-round “Housing Units.” (U.S. Census
definition)

Unsheltered Families and individuals whose primary nighttime residence is a public or private
place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human
beings (e.g., streets, parks, alleys) are defined as being “Unsheltered.”

Vacant Awaiting Occupancy or Held Vacant year-round “Housing Units” that have been
rented or sold and are currently awaiting occupancy, and vacant year-round “Housing Units”
that are held by owners or renters for occasional use. (U.S. Census definition)

Vacant Housing Unit Unoccupied year-round “Housing Units” that are available or intended
for occupancy at any time during the year.

Year- Round Housing Units Occupied and vacant “Housing Units” intended for use
throughout a year. Housing units for seasonal or migratory use are excluded. (U.S. Census
definition)




Glossary, City of Salisbury Consolidated Plan, CDBG PY 2004-2008                           Page 7
                                                  Appendix E
                                           CERTIFICATIONS
                                                 for the
                                            City of Salisbury

In accordance with the applicable statutes and the regulations governing the consolidated plan
regulations, the jurisdiction certifies that:

Affirmatively Further Fair Housing -- The jurisdiction will affirmatively further fair housing,
which means it will conduct an analysis of impediments to fair housing choice within the
jurisdiction, take appropriate actions to overcome the effects of any impediments identified
through that analysis, and maintain records reflecting that analysis and actions in this regard.

Anti-displacement and Relocation Plan -- It will comply with the acquisition and relocation
requirements of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act
of 1970, as amended, and implementing regulations at 49 CFR 24; and it has in effect and is
following a residential anti-displacement and relocation assistance plan required under section
104(d) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, in connection
with any activity assisted with funding under the CDBG program.

Drug Free Workplace -- It will or will continue to provide a drug-free workplace by:

1.     Publishing a statement notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution,
dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the grantee's workplace
and specifying the actions that will be taken against employees for violation of such prohibition;

2.      Establishing an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about -

        (a)      The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace;
        (b)      The grantee's policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace;
        (c)      Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs;
                 and
        (d)      The penalties that may be imposed upon employees for drug abuse violations
                 occurring in the workplace;

3.     Making it a requirement that each employee to be engaged in the performance of the
grant be given a copy of the statement required by paragraph 1;

4.    Notifying the employee in the statement required by paragraph 1 that, as a condition of
employment under the grant, the employee will -

        (a)      Abide by the terms of the statement; and

        (b)    Notify the employer in writing of his or her conviction for a violation of a
criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace no later than five calendar days after such
conviction;


Certifications for Action Plan – CD BG PY 20 04                                            Page 1
5.      Notifying the agency in writing, within ten calendar days after receiving notice under
subparagraph 4(b) from an employee or otherwise receiving actual notice of such conviction.
Employers of convicted employees must provide notice, including position title, to every grant
officer or other designee on whose grant activity the convicted employee was working, unless
the Federal agency has designated a central point for the receipt of such notices. Notice shall
include the identification number(s) of each affected grant;

6.     Taking one of the following actions, within 30 calendar days of receiving notice under
subparagraph 4(b) with respect to any employee who is so convicted -

        (a)    Taking appropriate personnel action against such an employee, up to and
including termination, consistent with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as
amended; or

        (b) Requiring such employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or
            rehabilitation program approved for such purposes by a Federal, State, or local health,
            law enforcement, or other appropriate agency;

7.    Making a good faith effort to continue to maintain a drug-free workplace through
implementation of paragraphs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

Anti-Lobbying -- To the best of the jurisdiction's knowledge and belief:

1.      No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of it, to
any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a
Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of
Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal
grant, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the
extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract, grant,
loan, or cooperative agreement;

2.      If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any
person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a
Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of
Congress in connection with this Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement, it will
complete and submit Standard Form-LLL, "Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying," in accordance
with its instructions; and

3.      It will require that the language of paragraph 1 and 2 of this anti-lobbying certification be
included in the award documents for all sub-awards at all tiers (including sub-contracts, sub-
grants, and contracts under grants, loans and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients
shall certify and disclose accordingly.

Authority of Jurisdiction -- The consolidated plan is authorized under State and local law (as
applicable) and the jurisdiction possesses the legal authority to carry out the programs for which
it is seeking funding, in accordance with applicable HUD regulations.


Certifications for Action Plan – CD BG PY 20 04                                              Page 2
Consistency with Plan -- The housing activities to be undertaken with CDBG funds are
consistent with the strategic plan.

Section 3 -- It will comply with section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968,
and implementing regulations at 24 CFR Part 135.




________________________________________                  Date_______________________
Barrie P. Tilghman
Mayor
City Of Salisbury, Maryland




Certifications for Action Plan – CD BG PY 20 04                                        Page 3
                                    Specific CDBG Certifications

The Entitlement Community certifies that:

Citizen Participation -- It is in full compliance and following a detailed citizen participation
plan that satisfies the requirements of 24 CFR 91.105.

Community Development Plan -- Its consolidated housing and community development plan
identifies community development and housing needs and specifies both short-term and long-
term community development objectives that provide decent housing, and expand economic
opportunities primarily for persons of low and moderate income. (See CFR 24 570.2 and CFR 24
part 570)

Following a Plan -- It is following a current consolidated plan (or Comprehensive Housing
Affordability Strategy) that has been approved by HUD.

Use of Funds -- It has complied with the following criteria:

1.       Maximum Feasible Priority. With respect to activities expected to be assisted with
CDBG funds, it certifies that it has developed its Action Plan so as to give maximum feasible
priority to activities which benefit low and moderate income families or aid in the prevention or
elimination of slums or blight. The Action Plan may also include activities which the grantee
certifies are designed to meet other community development needs having a particular urgency
because existing conditions pose a serious and immediate threat to the health or welfare of the
community (and other financial resources are not available);

2.       Overall Benefit. The aggregate use of CDBG funds, including section 108 guaranteed
loans, during program years 2004, 2005 and 2006, shall principally benefit persons of low and
moderate income in a manner that ensures that at least 70 percent of the amount is expended for
activities that benefit such persons during the designated period;

3.      Special Assessments. It will not attempt to recover any capital costs of public
improvements assisted with CDBG funds, including Section 108 loan guaranteed funds, by
assessing any amount against properties owned and occupied by persons of low and moderate
income, including any fee charged or assessment made as a condition of obtaining access to such
public improvements.

        However, if CDBG funds are used to pay the proportion of a fee or assessment that
        relates to the capital costs of public improvements (assisted in part with CDBG funds)
        financed from other revenue sources, an assessment or charge may be made against the
        property with respect to the public improvements financed by a source other than CDBG
        funds.

        The jurisdiction will not attempt to recover any capital costs of public improvements
        assisted with CDBG funds, including Section 108, unless CDBG funds are used to pay




Certifications for Action Plan – CD BG PY 20 04                                             Page 4
        the proportion of fee or assessment attributable to the capital costs of public
        improvements financed from other revenue sources. In this case, an assessment or
        charge may be made against the property with respect to the pubic improvements
        financed by a source other than CDBG funds. Also, in the case of properties owned and
        occupied by moderate-income (not low-income) families, an assessment or charge may
        be made against the property for public improvements financed by a source other than
        CDBG funds. Also, in the case of properties owned and occupied by moderate-income
        (not low-income) families, an assessment or charge may be made against the property for
        public improvements financed by a source other than CDBG funds if the jurisdiction
        certifies that it lacks CDBG funds to cover the assessment.

Excessive Force -- It has adopted and is enforcing:

1.      A policy prohibiting the use of excessive force by law enforcement agencies within its
jurisdiction against any individuals engaged in non-violent civil rights demonstrations; and

2.      A policy of enforcing applicable State and local laws against physically barring entrance
to or exit from a facility or location which is the subject of such non-violent civil rights
demonstrations within its jurisdiction.

Compliance with Anti-discrimination laws -- The grant will be conducted and administered in
conformity with title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 USC 2000d), the Fair Housing Act
(42 USC 3601-3619), and implementing regulations.

Lead-Based Paint -- Its notification, inspection, testing and abatement procedures concerning
lead-based paint will comply with the requirements of 24 CFR §§570.608;

Compliance with Laws -- It will comply with applicable laws.




________________________________________                     Date_______________________
Barrie P. Tilghman
Mayor
City Of Salisbury, Maryland




Certifications for Action Plan – CD BG PY 20 04                                            Page 5
                              APPENDIX TO CERTIFICATIONS

INSTRUCTIONS CONCERNING LOBBYING AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE
REQUIREMENTS:

A.      Lobbying Certification

        This certification is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed
        when this transaction was made or entered into. Submission of this certification is a
        prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31,
        U.S. Code. Any person who fails to file the required certification shall be subject to a
        civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.

B.      Drug-Free Workplace Certification

       1.      By signing and/or submitting this application or grant agreement, the grantee is
providing the certification.

        2.       The certification is a material representation of fact upon which reliance is placed
when the agency awards the grant. If it is later determined that the grantee knowingly rendered a
false certification, or otherwise violates the requirements of the Drug-Free Workplace Act,
HUD, in addition to any other remedies available to the Federal Government, may take action
authorized under the Drug-Free Workplace Act.

         3.     Workplaces under grants, for grantees other than individuals, need not be
identified on the certification. If known, they may be identified in the grant application. If the
grantee does not identify the workplaces at the time of application (or upon award, if there is no
application), the grantee must keep the identity of the workplace(s) on file in its office and make
the information available for Federal inspection. Failure to identify all known workplaces
constitutes a violation of the grantee's drug-free workplace requirements.

        4.       Workplace identifications must include the actual address of buildings (or part of
buildings) or other sites where work under the grant takes place. Categorical descriptions may
be used (e.g., All vehicles of a mass transit authority or State highway department while in
operation. State employees in each local unemployment office, performers in concert halls or
radio stations).

         5.      If the workplace identified to the agency changes during the performance of the
         grant, the grantee shall inform the agency of the change(s), if it previously
identified the workplaces in question (see paragraph five).

       6.     The grantee may insert in the space provided below the site(s) for the
performance of work done in connection with the specific grant:

                 Place of Performance:            Salisbury Mayor’s Office
                                                  125 North Division Street
                                                  Salisbury, Maryland 21801-4940



Certifications for Action Plan – CD BG PY 20 04                                             Page 6
Check ___ if there are workplaces on file that are not identified here.

The certification with regard to the drug-free workplace required by 24 CFR part 24, subpart F.


         7.      Definitions of terms in the Non-procurement Suspension and Debarment common
rule and Drug-Free Workplace common rule apply to this certification. Grantees' attention is
called, in particular, to the following definitions from these rules:

                 "Controlled substance" means a controlled substance in Schedules I through V of
                 the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812) and as further defined by
                 regulation (21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15);

                 "Conviction" means a finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or
                 imposition of sentence, or both, by any judicial body charged with the
                 responsibility to determine violations of the Federal or State criminal drug
                 statutes:

                 "Criminal drug statute" means a Federal or non-Federal criminal statute involving
                 the manufacture, distribution, dispensing, use, or possession of any controlled
                 substance;

                 "Employee" means the employee of a grantee directly engaged in the
                 performance of work under a grant, including: (i) All "direct charge" employees;
                 (ii) all "indirect charge" employees unless their impact or involvement is
                 insignificant to the performance of the grant; and (iii) temporary personnel and
                 consultants who are directly engaged in the performance of work under the grant
                 and who are on the grantee's payroll. This definition does not include workers not
                 on the payroll of the grantee (e.g., volunteers, even if used to meet a matching
                 requirement; consultants or independent contractors not on the grantee's payroll;
                 or employees of subrecipients or subcontractors in covered workplaces).




Certifications for Action Plan – CD BG PY 20 04                                            Page 7

				
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