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City of Fresno City of Fresno

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									Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report   2005 Program Year

                                    City of Fresno

                   2005 Program Year
  Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report
                        (CAPER)

                     July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2006




                                               1
                                                                                                                      2005 Program Year CAPER


                                                               TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1

Resources Available.............................................................................................................................. 2

HUD Program Year 2005 Annual Action Plan ....................................................................................... 3
  Performance Measurement System ................................................................................................. 4
  Past Performance of Objectives ....................................................................................................... 5
  Summary of FY 2005 Performance Accomplishments ..................................................................... 6

Assessment of Program Year 2005 Annual Action Plan ....................................................................... 8
General Housing Plan .......................................................................................................................... 8
  Goal 1 ............................................................................................................................................. 8
      New Housing Development....................................................................................................... 8
      Mid – Year Projects................................................................................................................. 10
      Community Housing Development Organizations(CHDO)...................................................... 10
      Other CHDO Activities ............................................................................................................ 10
      Status of Previously Funded and Slow Moving Projects ......................................................... 11
  Goal 2 ........................................................................................................................................... 12
      Code Enforcement Activities ................................................................................................... 12
      Housing Rehabilitation Program ............................................................................................. 13
      Slow Moving Projects.............................................................................................................. 14
      Mid – Year Rehabilitation Project ............................................................................................ 16
      First-Time Home Buyer Programs........................................................................................... 16
      Other City Programs ............................................................................................................... 18
      Other Regulatory Information.................................................................................................. 20
      Activities to Promote Access to Affordable Housing ............................................................... 21
      Efforts to Meet Lead-Based Paint Regulations ....................................................................... 22
      Matching Requirements .......................................................................................................... 22
  Goal 3 ........................................................................................................................................... 23
      Relocation ............................................................................................................................... 23
      EOC Transitional Living Center............................................................................................... 23
  Goal 4 ........................................................................................................................................... 24
      General Plan Update............................................................................................................... 24
      Housing Quality Survey Results.............................................................................................. 25
      Activities to Encourage Housing Development ....................................................................... 27
      Mixed Income Opportunity Housing ........................................................................................ 28

Non-Housing Community Development Plan ...................................................................................... 29
  Goal 5 ........................................................................................................................................... 29
      Concrete Reconstruction......................................................................................................... 29
      ADA Infrastructure Compliance............................................................................................... 31
      Neighborhood Park Improvement Program............................................................................. 31
  Goal 6 ........................................................................................................................................... 32
      District Crime Suppression Teams (DCST)............................................................................. 32



                                                                                 i
2005 Program Year – CAPER


                                                              TABLE OF CONTENTS

Anti-Poverty Plan................................................................................................................................. 35
  Goal 7 ........................................................................................................................................... 35
       Continuum of Care Plan.......................................................................................................... 35
       Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Program .............................................................................. 36
       Supporting Housing Program .................................................................................................. 36
       Housing for People with AIDS (HOPWA) ................................................................................ 36
  Goal 8 ........................................................................................................................................... 37
       Consumer Credit Cousneling Services (CCCS) Program ....................................................... 37
  Goal 9 ........................................................................................................................................... 38
       Empowerment Zone Designation ............................................................................................ 38
       Section 108 Loan Repayments ............................................................................................... 39
  Goal 10 ........................................................................................................................................... 39
       CDBG Administration and Monitoring ..................................................................................... 39
       Historic Preservation Program ................................................................................................ 40
       Fair Housing Program ............................................................................................................. 40
       Other Fair Housing Activities................................................................................................... 41
       HOME Administration and Monitoring ..................................................................................... 41
       ESG Administration and Monitoring ........................................................................................ 42
       Affirmative Marketing .............................................................................................................. 43

Additional Resources Available through Collaborative Efforts............................................................. 44
  Fresno Housing Authority ............................................................................................................... 44
  Housing Programs .......................................................................................................................... 44
  Housing-Related Self-Sufficiency Programs ................................................................................... 45

Affirmatively Affirming Fair Housing .................................................................................................... 46
   Analysis of Impediments ................................................................................................................. 46

City of Fresno Self Evaluation of the 2005 Program Year ................................................................... 51
Public Review and Comments ............................................................................................................ 55
Appendix A – CDBG Financial Summary Report ................................................................................ 57
Appendix B – HOME Match Report..................................................................................................... 63
Appendix C – Maps ............................................................................................................................. 67
Appendix D – Grantee Performance Report........................................................................................ 73




                                                                               ii
                                                                             2005 Program Year – CAPER


INTRODUCTION

The City of Fresno receives an annual allocation of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), Home
Investment Partnerships Act (HOME) and Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) funds from the United States
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HUD requires jurisdictions receiving these grants
to prepare a five-year Consolidated Plan, an annual Action Plan and an annual performance report known
as the Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER). The performance report, due to
HUD on September 30 of each program year, must describe the status and accomplishments of all
activities funded by the three entitlement programs during the twelve month period ending June 30, 2006.

Accordingly, the City of Fresno prepared the CAPER report on the progress and performance of the 2006-
2010 Consolidated Plan and the Annual Action Plan. The Annual Action Plan identified specific projects
and programs which were to be implemented in the HUD Program Year 2005. The CAPER report covers
the period of July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2006, which is the time period used by HUD=s Integrated
Disbursement and Information System (IDIS). Also, it is the time period that the City of Fresno refers to as
Fiscal Year 2006 (FY 2006).

The City’s Consolidated Plan provides a strategic plan that identifies the housing and community
development needs of low- and moderate-income residents. One of the City’s primary objectives is to
address the need for increasing the affordable housing opportunities for low-moderate income households;
which includes minorities, persons with disabilities, the homeless, large families, persons living in
substandard housing and persons paying rent that exceeds fifty percent of their monthly income. Programs
were identified that would improve both the quantity and quality of the affordable housing stock in the city.
Other objectives identified in the Consolidated Plan included upgrading the city’s infrastructure needs in
low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, initiating programs to reduce crime, undertaking a code
enforcement program and reducing homelessness in the city.

On April 9, 2002, the City Council adopted the following housing policies: 1) Improve and preserve the
quality of housing in our existing neighborhoods; and 2) Increase the quantity of affordable housing. As
part of the action, the Council approved two recommendations identifying several programs that could be
implemented to address City needs.

The CAPER begins with a narrative that addresses the ten goals in the same order as they are described in
the City of Fresno’s FY 2005-2006 Annual Action Plan. Additionally, this performance report includes
narratives and data provided from each City department using HUD funding, the City Budget Division’s
internal record-keeping system, the HUD-sponsored Integrated Disbursement and Information System
(IDIS) accounting program, and other outside sources receiving HUD entitlement funding.

Throughout the report, references are made to CDBG target areas. A map describing these CDBG target
areas is shown on the next page. The target areas are census tracts and block groups where more than
fifty-one percent of the residents had low and moderate incomes as reported in the 2000 U.S. Census.




                                                     1
2005 Program Year – CAPER


RESOURCES AVAILABLE

Table 1, below, indicates the financial resources available to the City of Fresno from multiple funding
sources under various programs during the 2005 Program Year. Specifically Table 1 includes federal,
redevelopment, and private funds administered by the City of Fresno.


                      Resources Available for Housing and Community Development
          Funding Source                          Program                              Amount
         Consolidated Plan    Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)                  $ 8,705,367
                              HOME Investment Partnerships (HOME)                         3,957,992
                              American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI)                  104,398
                              Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG)                                 335,988
                              Rental Rehabilitation Program (RRP)                           600,000
         Other                SMART Program                                               1,000,000
                              CalHome Program                                             1,000,000
                              Leveraged Funds                                             3,524,076

The City was awarded $1 million of CalHome funds from the State of California to provide low-income first
time homebuyers with mortgage assistance. Additionally, the City received $1 million from the Federal
Aviation Administration for the Sound Mitigation Acoustical Remedy Treatment Program.

                Resources available through the Housing Authority of the City of Fresno
         Program                                         Housing Information

         Public Housing Program                               1,006 households

         Capital Funds                                        226 households

         Farm Labor Housing                                   40 households

         CHFA Section 8 New Construction                      50 households

         Emergency Housing                                    30 units

         Home Ownership Opportunities                         14 units

         Mortgage Credit Certificates (MCC)                   28 households

         Homeowner Training Program                           305 participants

         Section 8 Rental Assistance                          6,095 households

The single largest source of affordable housing in the City is provided by the Housing Authorities of the City
and County of Fresno. The table above provides a listing of the Housing Authority programs. The Housing
Authority manages and maintains 1,006 public housing units in the city of Fresno as of June 30, 2006. The
Housing Authority received $2,134,646 Capital fund from HUD for the 2004 Program Year. The agency
owns and manages 40 farm-labor housing units occupied year-round by farm worker families. The agency
also owns and manages an additional 50 multi-family unit complex financed by California Housing Finance
Agency and subsidized by the Section 8 New Construction Program. The Housing Authority also provides
Section 8 rent subsidies to about 6,095 families.




                                                      2
                                                                             2005 Program Year - CAPER


HUD PROGRAM YEAR 2005 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN

The City’s current Consolidated Plan identifies ten priorities for Community Development Block Grant
(CDBG), Home Investment Partnerships (HOME), the American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI) and
Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) funds. These ten priorities address the most critical housing and
community development needs in the city. Since resources are limited, the City Council must annually
review the priorities identified in the five-year Consolidated Plan, adopt and follow an annual course of
action, called the Annual Action Plan that concentrates on some of the ten priorities. As needs are
addressed, funding levels may shift between priorities from year to year.

Performance Measurement System

During the Program Year HUD implemented a performance measurement system to enable the agency to
capture information on how low and moderate income persons benefit from the federal funds. The City
used program year 2005 federal entitlement funds to continue to promote community, housing, and
economic development for the City’s low and moderate income persons. The City has developed its
objective and outcome measures based upon the needs identified by the Community in the Consolidated
Plan. The City seeks to meet the following objectives:

   •   Availability of Decent Housing
   •   Affordability of Decent Housing
   •   Accessibility to Decent Housing
   •   Accessibility to a suitable living environment
   •   Availability/ Accessibility of economic opportunity
   •   Sustainability of a suitable living environment
   •   Sustainability of decent housing

The activities and projects adopted by the City Council are based upon selecting activities that assist the
City in meeting the outcomes. The City seeks to achieve the following outcomes:

   •   Increase affordable housing opportunities for very-low and low income households;
   •   Improve the existing housing stock for very-low and low income households;
   •   Provide assistance to public agencies and nonprofit organizations providing services to very-low
       and low income households;
   •   Provide assistance for the homeless and those at risk of becoming homeless;
   •   Provide public facility improvements to facilitate neighborhood revitalization, such as infrastructure
       and public works projects;
   •   Pursue increased housing opportunities and assistance for those displaced through either code
       enforcement or redevelopment;
   •   Provide economic development and employment opportunity programs.
   •   Provide funds to increase law enforcement services.
   •   Monitor progress of federal entitlement programs to achieve housing and community development
       needs of the community.




                                                     3
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Past Performance of Objectives

Availability of Decent Housing – HOME funds are used to meet this objective through the New Construction
and CHDO Programs. Last fiscal year the City began the development of three affordable housing projects
to create 80 housing units.

Affordability of Decent Housing – HOME funds are used to for the Home Buyer Assistance Program. This
program has seen success in previous years with the low cost of house prices in Fresno. However, as
Fresno’s house prices catch up with the rest of California there has been a need to increase the amount of
the assistance to meet the needs of LMI households. This increased cost reduces the number of persons
that can be assisted. As an alternative the City also provides mortgage assistance to development
projects.

Accessibility to Decent Housing – Fair Housing Programs and the First-Time Homebuyer Counseling
Program assists the City in ensuring that LMI persons have access to decent housing. The fair housing
program ensures persons are made aware of their rights to live in the environment of their choice and the
homebuyer counseling prepares persons access to information that will enable them to make a housing
choice. Both programs meet their annual goals.

Accessibility to a Suitable Living Environment – Many CDBG areas have blighted conditions that have
accrued over time for lack of a concerted community development effort. Through the CDBG-funded
Concrete Reconstruction Program, the No Neighborhood Left Behind Program, which was a $46 million
dollars bond to provide infrastructure improvements and the CDBG-funded Code Enforcement efforts, the
City has seen a substantial impact on blighted conditions.

Availability/ Accessibility of Economic Opportunity – Under previous Annual Action Plans the City assisted
businesses conducting business or providing services in or to LMI areas through the Inner City Fee
Program. This program met with some minor success, but did not generate the employment opportunities
to substantially impact low income persons. However, the current Annual Action Plan will be amended as
the City seeks to obtain Section 108 funding. Funding will be sought to provide businesses with loans that
will stimulate the local downtown economy, address blighted conditions, and provide employment
opportunities for low income persons.

Sustainability of a suitable living environment – The City continues its effort to work with neighborhood
organizations to suppress crime in low income areas. In conjunction with these efforts is the rehabilitation
of community centers and neighborhood centers that provide programs for low income youth. The City has
invested in rehabilitating the Boys & Girls Club in southwest Fresno, the House of Hope for Youth, the
Marjaree Mason Center for battered women and children, the Ted C. Wills Community Center, and other
heavily populated community service centers.

Sustainability of Decent Housing – HOME-funded programs such as the Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation,
the Rental Rehabilitation, the Emergency Grant and the Senior Paint Program assist the city in maintaining
its affordable housing stock to sustain decent housing. The Emergency Grant and Senior Paint Program
see great success each year. Both Owner-Occupied and the Rental Rehabilitation Programs have been re-
tooled and heavily marketed. Next year’s CAPER will reflect the performance of each of the programs.

In addition to the Consolidated Plan, the City Council adopted local housing policies addressing the
following five priorities:

   $   Public facilities
   $   Housing rehabilitation and acquisition (including code enforcement)
   $   New construction of affordable housing
   $   Crime awareness
   $   Emergency shelters and transitional housing.

                                                     4
                                                                             2005 Program Year - CAPER


The ultimate success of administering the federal funds is based on the ability of the City to allocate its
funds in ways that will maximize the impact on the city’s neighborhoods and its low- and moderate-income
residents. In some cases, such as with the HOME and ESG programs, the City, and/or the agency
receiving the funds, is required to provide "match" funds to meet program requirements. For example,
private donations, volunteer hours, State and local grants to homeless service providers are used to match
ESG Program funds.

A match for the HOME program may be in the form of waived recording fees; program income from the
Rental Rehabilitation Program; the City=s tax increment; sweat equity; and the present value of the interest
subsidy for loans made at rates below market in conjunction with the Home Buyer Assistance Programs.
For this report, "matching funds" are locally-generated funding sources that are required to be contributed
to the project. In other cases, grant funds "leverage" other local funds. In this report, leveraged funds are
generated by the project without being required by the funding source. Examples of leveraging by the City
of Fresno include home loans funded through private lenders in conjunction with the City=s home buyer
assistance programs; financing obtained by private developers that receive HOME funds to develop a
housing project.

In addition to leveraging, the efficient use of funds includes the establishment of valid and cost effective
programs which address the priorities established in the Consolidated Plan. It also includes recognition
that outside organizations may be better equipped than the City to implement certain programs and conduct
certain activities in order to meet specific community needs. The Consolidated Plan process has
developed into a partnership linking numerous public, nonprofit and private organizations for maximum
effect.

The following page reflects a summary of Consolidated Plan Priorities to the program/activity
accomplishments of the 2005 Annual Action Plan.




                                                     5
2005 Program Year – CAPER


SUMMARY OF PY 2005 PERFORMANCE ACCOMPLISHMENTS TO CONSOLIDATED PLAN PRIORITIES

                                           Funding    Amount           Amount                       Goals
Consolidated Plan Goals
                                           Source     Awarded         Expended        Projected                 Actual

General Housing Plan
New Construction of Affordable Housing
   Fresno West Coalition for Economic
   Development                              CDBG      $     75,000       62,500           n/a                     n/a
   CHDO Activities                          HOME            593,799           0           20                       0
   New Housing Development                  HOME          6,536,400                       354                      0

Housing Rehabilitation and Acquisition
   Code Enforcement                         CDBG          3,289,300    3,165,381    21,600 citations        14,188 citations
   Senior Paint Program                     CDBG            200,000      215,315       65 Senior                109 LMI
   Senior Paint Program                      RRP                  0       28,384      households              households
   Emergency Grant Program                  CDBG             25,000        9,685   10 LMI households         Senior Paint
   Home Buyer Assistance                    HOME          2,500,000      430,611    75 LMI persons          10 LMI persons
   American Dream Downpayment Initiative    ADDI            442,633      110,000      25 LMI Hslds           11 LMI Hslds
   Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation    HOME          1,000,000            0   24 LMI households              0
   White Picket Fence Program               CDBG             50,000       49,996           0                15 Senior Hslds
   Rental Rehab Loan Program                HOME            750,000       65,000   30 LMI households         1 household

Residential Displacement an Relocation     Unfunded              0           n/a          n/a                     n/a
General Plan Improvements                  Unfunded              0           n/a          n/a                     n/a

Non-Housing Community Development Plan
Public Facilities and Improvements
    Dickey Youth Project                    CDBG            300,000            0    1 Public Facility         In Progress
    Concrete Reconstruction and Street      CDBG          2,262,400    1,470,354      500 houses              685 houses
    Improvements
    Boys and Girls Club                     CDBG           182,000      182,000     1 Public Facility
    Marjaree Mason                          CDBG           175,500            0     1 Public Facility         In Progress
    Fresno Leadership Foundation            CDBG            69,062       20,000     1 Public Facility         In Progress
Crime Awareness
    District Crime Suppression Team         CDBG           851,700      812,490       67.4% LMI               67.4% LMI
    CARE Fresno                             CDBG            60,000       45,000    2500 LMI Persons            1700 LMI


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                                                                                            2005 Program Year - CAPER


                                                Funding   Amount         Amount                   Goals
Consolidated Plan Goals
                                                Source    Awarded       Expended      Projected               Actual

Anti-Poverty Plan
    Senior Nutrition Program                    CDBG        300,000       242,917   160000 elderly        178,942 elderly
    Enrichment Program                          CDBG        100,000        37,355   300 LMI youth         219 LMI youth
    CCDC                                                                              370 shelter          4,560 shelter
                                                 ESG            2,352       1,802     1480 meals           12,130 meals
    EOC Sanctuary Youth                                                              6,064 shelter        11,762 shelter
                                                 ESG         49,021        51,504    16,600 meals          21,262 meals
    EOC Transitional Living Center
                                                 ESG         18,211
    Marjaree Mason Center                                                           24,000 shelter        32,712 shelter
                                                 ESG         87,558        67,076   70,000 meals          98,211 meals
    Poverello House                                                                  7,000 shelter        19,224 shelter
                                                 ESG         92,363        70,757   250,000 meals         388,888 meals
    Spirit of Woman                              ESG         44,485        34,039   27,795 shelter        43,904 shelter
    Turning Point                                ESG         25,199        19,304    8,130 shelter         9,927 shelter

External Support and Coordination of Services
    Consumer Credit Counseling                  CDBG         40,000        30,000        350          430 LMI persons

Economic Development
    Section 108 Loan Repayment                  CDBG        332,000       326,156        n/a                   n/a

Monitoring
   CDBG Program Administration                  CDBG        985,917       810,657        n/a                   n/a
   HOME Program Administration                  HOME        617,099       577,183        n/a                   n/a
   ESG Program Administration                    ESG         16,799        16,799        n/a                   n/a
   Fair Housing Council                         CDBG         50,000        37,500        n/a                   n/a
   Housing Program Delivery                     CDBG        509,083       389,757        n/a                   n/a




                                                            7
2005 Program Year – CAPER


ASSESSMENT OF PROGRAM YEAR 2005 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN PRIORITIES, NEEDS, GOALS
AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS TO THE CONSOLIDATED PLAN

Within the context of the ten priority needs identified in the City=s Consolidated Plan, ten goals were
adopted in three Plan components. These included the following:

       GENERAL HOUSING PLAN
       Goal 1 - New Construction of Affordable Housing
       Goal 2 - Housing Rehabilitation Program
       Goal 3 - Redevelopment and Relocation
       Goal 4 - Plan Improvements

       NON-HOUSING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN
       Goal 5 - Public Facilities and Improvements
       Goal 6 - Crime Awareness

       ANTI-POVERTI PLAN
       Goal 7 - Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing / Prevention of Homelessness
                 Permanent Housing for Homeless
       Goal 8 - External Support and Coordination of Services
       Goal 9 - Economic Development
       Goal 10 - Monitoring

GENERAL HOUSING PLAN

Goal 1 – New Construction of Affordable Housing: Increase housing opportunities for very low- and
low-income families with an emphasis on households with five or more members through new home
construction and increased ownership opportunities.


New Housing Development

Willow and Byrd Housing Development (FID)
In June 2005, the City purchased a ten-acre parcel for the construction of affordable housing. A total of
$337,675 in Rental Rehabilitation Program funds was utilized to acquire the property. The City is currently
administering a Request for Proposals to select a qualified development team for the purchase and
development of affordable housing. The City expects to select a development team by December 2006
and schedule start of construction for 75-85 units in fall 2007. The project is located on the southwest
corner of Willow and Byrd Avenues, Census Tract 14.06.

Sierra Gateway Senior Residence – Phase II
The City of Fresno previously set aside $1 million in HOME Program funds for the proposed construction of
68 senior rental housing units by Southern California Presbyterian Homes (SCPH). SCPH was
unsuccessful in their 2006 application for HUD Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Program
funds. The City will continue its support for the project in future years, pending awarding of the Section 202
Program funds. The project is located at the southwest corner of San Jose and Marty, Census Tract 42.12.




                                                      8
                                                                            2005 Program Year - CAPER


Tanager Springs - California and Maple
The City of Fresno conditionally approved HOME funds in the amount of $2.2 million for the Tanager
Springs Apartments project. The project consists of 104 multi-family units. The project sponsor had
originally intended to apply for Federal Low Income Housing Tax Credits; however, allocations from this
funding source were insufficient to support the project. The project sponsor will now apply for the October
2006 round of Multi-Family Housing Program (MHP) funds. If awarded MHP funds, the City will proceed
with approving HOME funds for the project. The project is located at 2121 S. Maple in the, Census Tract
12.02.

Transit Village - Kings Canyon
The City continues its efforts to acquire a five-acre parcel located in southeast Fresno, which will be
developed in conjunction with the Fresno Area Transit as a transit oriented development. The proposed
construction of up to 100 single- and multi-family housing units will be accompanied with a multi-modal
transit station to serve area residents. The City has set aside $1,275,000 in HOME funds for this project.
Site acquisition is expected to take place by December 2006. The project is located on Kings Canyon
Avenue between Willow and Peach Avenues, Census Tract 14.05.

Ventura/Seventh Housing Development
The City has set aside $550,000 in HOME funds for this affordable housing development. The City
proposes to purchase the site and construct up to 80 affordable rental units. The City is currently in
negotiations and completing due diligence for the property acquisition. The City expects to purchase the
property by December 2006 and schedule start of construction for fall 2007. The project is located at 717
S. Seventh Street in the, Census Tract 13.01.

Green Building Project
The City has set aside $300,000 in HOME funds to provide up to six potential homebuyers with mortgage
assistance to purchase an environmental “green built” home. Currently, the developer, Alvis Projects Inc.,
has started construction of the first home. Construction of the first three homes is scheduled to be
complete in spring 2007. The project is a scattered site infill program with homes to be located in Census
Tracts 26.01, 21 and 36.

Land Acquisition
The City of Fresno annually sets aside HOME funds to identify and acquire infill lots throughout the
program year for affordable housing development. The City is negotiating the purchase of ten separate
properties for the development of affordable housing. During the reporting period, the City:

   •   Approved $150,000 in HOME funds for the acquisition of a duplex, at 3435 E. Tyler Avenue (APN:
       454-033-19), by the Fresno Interdenominational Refugee Ministries (FIRM). FIRM will acquire and
       rehabilitate the duplex and provide the rental units as affordable housing. The project is expected
       to be complete in spring 2007. The project is located in Census Tract 25.02.

   •   Approved $425,000 in HOME funds for the acquisition of 164 and 172 N. Echo. The City will oversee
       the project that will rehabilitate the existing units and construct two new single-family homes. The
       project is expected to be completed in summer 2007.




                                                    9
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Mid-Year Projects

Sandstone Apartments
The City of Fresno conditionally approved HOME funds in the amount of $1.25 million for the Sandstone
Apartments project. The project consists of 69 multi-family units. The project sponsor, Amcal Multi-
Housing, was unsuccessful in its spring 2006 Federal Low Income Housing Tax Credit application, and has
re-applied for the July 2006 round of tax credits. If funded, the City will proceed with approving HOME
funds for the project. The project is located at 1515 E. Jensen Avenue, Census Tract 9.

The following projects were cancelled during the program year Broadway Row and Summerset Homes.
Staff will undergo the process of amending the appropriate annual action plan to formally remove the
projects from the proposed use of funds.


Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDO)

Laurel Homes - Central Community Development Center (CCDC)
In June 2005, the City awarded $750,000 in CHDO funds to CCDC for the development of 19 rental units
for persons with disabilities. The project sponsor was also awarded over $2.2 million in Section 811 funds
from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for project development. The project
is currently in design review with the City’s Planning and Development Department. Groundbreaking is
planned for spring 2007. The project is located at 4830 E. Laurel Avenue, in the City of Fresno, Census
Tract 29.02.

South Clara Estates - Fresno West Coalition for Economic Development (FWCED)
In May 2005, the City awarded $550,000 in CHDO funds to FWCED for the development of 10 affordable
single family homes. The CHDO funds will be used for development costs and mortgage assistance. The
project is currently in design review with the City’s Planning and Development Department.
Groundbreaking is planned for early 2007. The project is located at 195 W. North Avenue in the City of
Fresno, Census Tract 10.


Other CHDO Activities

In February of 2006, the City of Fresno requested and subsequently received HOME Technical Assistance
from the Enterprise Foundation, a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Technical
Assistant Consultant. The Enterprise Foundation provided a one-day Community Housing Development
Organization (CHDO) capacity building and training workshop to local area CHDOs. Approximately 20
local housing organization staff members attended to receive training and information about the City and
County’s HOME CHDO program. The goal was to create a more competitive environment among local
CHDOs by increasing their knowledge and capacity to produce quality affordable housing. We believe the
CHDO training provided a clear understanding of the scope of work required to complete affordable
housing development projects.

The City also continued to provide technical assistance as needed to existing CHDO agencies during their
re-certification process, as well as to other nonprofit agencies interested in becoming a CHDO. There were
no new CHDOs certified during the program year.




                                                   10
                                                                            2005 Program Year - CAPER


Status of Previously Funded and Slow Moving Projects

Crossroads
In October 1994, the City provided $2 million of CHDO funds to Habitat for Humanity, for the development
of an 89-lot subdivision located on the northeast corner of Fruit and Jensen in southwest Fresno. Since
then, Habitat has experienced construction delays and in 2002 met with the City to develop a work plan for
completing construction of the 89 units. The work plan proved to be very successful and included
collaboration from two local non-profit builders (Coalition for Urban Renewal Excellence and Self-Help
Enterprises). At of the end of the program year, a total of 49 homes were completed. Habitat completed 31
homes and the Coalition for Urban Renewal Excellence (CURE) completed 18 homes. The remaining forty
homes will be completed within the next two fiscal years.

During the program year, Habitat completed a total of 6 single-family homes. The tables below provide
project household data for these six homes.


                                  Crossroads Single Family Home Project
                                                               Large             Met Section 215
        Activity                     Income Level            Households           Requirements
                             0-30%      31-50%    51-80%
        CURE SFH               -0-         2         4           5                     6




        Race Characteristics of Crossroads Project            Total Households        Hispanic
        Caucasian                                                     1                   1
        African American                                             -0-                 -0-
        Asian                                                         5                  -0-
        American Indian/Alaskan Native                               -0-                 -0-
        Other                                                        -0-                 -0-



Little Long Cheng (Willow/Jensen) – Self-Help Enterprises
The City previously provided $1.2 million in CHDO funds to Self-Help Enterprises for the construction of 30
affordable single-family homes. The City will change the funding designation from CHDO to non-CHDO for
this project to provide mortgage assistance only, and to assist in moving the project forward. The change
will take place in September 2006. Construction is currently underway, and completion is expected to take
place in fall 2007. The project is located west of the northwest corner of Willow and Jensen Avenues,
Census Tract 14.06.

Village at Kings Canyon - Opportunity Builders
In October 2003, the City provided $1 million in HOME funds to Opportunity Builders for the construction of
11 HOME-assisted units in a 48-unit low-income multi-family apartment complex. In May 2005, the City
provided Opportunity Builders with an additional $250,000 loan to cover increased construction and related
costs. The project also received funds from the Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program and through
deferred developer fees. Construction was completed in spring 2006, and final project completion is
expected to take place in September 2006. The City will report on this completed project during the next
CAPER reporting period.




                                                    11
2005 Program Year – CAPER



CURE Single Family Homes
In June 2003, the City of Fresno entered into a $600,000 HOME Agreement with CURE for the construction
of 20 infill single-family homes. During the program year, mortgage assistance was provided to nine
families for the purchase of a newly constructed house. The contract is now complete and all 20 homes
are occupied with low-income families. Household data is provided below.


                                    Cure Infill Single Family Home Project
                                                                   Large           Met Section 215
         Activity                     Income Level               Households         Requirements
                              0-30%      31-50%       51-80%
         CURE SFH               -0-          1           8           5                    9



         Race Characteristics of CURE Project                   Total Households         Hispanic
         Caucasian                                                      5                    5
         African American                                              -0-                  -0-
         Asian                                                          4                   -0-
         American Indian/Alaskan Native                                -0-                  -0-
         Other                                                         -0-                  -0-


Sierra Gateway Senior Residence – Phase I
The City provided $1,250,000 in HOME funds to Southern California Presbyterian Homes (SCPH) for the
construction of 80 senior rental housing units. Additionally, SCPH was awarded over $8 million of HUD
Section 202 Program funds for the development of the project. Project construction started in December
2005. Completion of this 80-unit project is anticipated to occur in spring 2007. The project is located at the
southwest intersection of Marty and San Jose, Census Tract 42.12.

Geneva Village
The City provided $1,500,000 in HOME funds to Squire/ADI for the construction of 142 new multi-family
units at the Geneva Village Apartments. The project is currently under construction, and is expected to be
completed in December 2006. The project is located at 1550 E. Church Avenue, Census Tract 9.


Goal 2 – Housing Rehabilitation Program: Improve the available housing stock for low- and very low-
income households.


Code Enforcement Activities

The City continued to maintain the code enforcement activity to ensure that existing housing is safe and
sanitary. Funding for these activities was from the CDBG Program, City Community Sanitation fees, and
the City General Fund. A total of 14,188 CDBG code violation complaints were processed during the
program year.

In CDBG eligible areas, the City received 1,451 housing code complaints related to health and safety
issues involving both single family and multi-family residential units. Code Enforcement staff received
approximately 8,422 public nuisance and 2,623 zoning cases involving the elimination of visual blight,



                                                     12
                                                                               2005 Program Year - CAPER


trash, inoperable vehicles, and zoning violations, which in part, involved the elimination of illegal land uses
or compliance with property development standards. Code staff also investigated 3,118 weed abatement
cases, 51 dangerous building cases, and 146 sign cases in CDBG areas. Staff focused on the
investigation and correction of all substandard conditions found. Property owners who failed to comply were
subject to citation and legal action. The actions taken in the CDBG-eligible areas included enforcement of
the housing code, dangerous building code, public nuisance ordinance, and zoning ordinance.

Code Enforcement inspectors are instructed to routinely refer housing code violators to the City's Housing
Division=s Rehabilitation Program, the Redevelopment Agency's Minor Repair Program and the Economic
Opportunities Commission Weatherization Program.

The City's Code Enforcement Program expended $3,165,381 of CDBG funds in the program year; the
balances of the funds were carried over to the next program year. Other City resources paid for activities in
non-CDBG areas. Code Enforcement activities are being done in conjunction with public works
improvements and housing rehabilitation to arrest the decline of the CDBG-eligible areas.

         Activity             CDBG Award       Expenditures      Carryover      Accomplishments
         Code Enforcement       $3,289,300        $3,165,381      $123,919    14,188 code violations


Housing Rehabilitation Programs

Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation Program
During the reporting period the City of Fresno revamped the existing owner occupied rehabilitation program
to make it responsive to community needs. On April 4, 2006, the Fresno City Council approved the Home
Improvement Program to provide housing rehabilitation funds to low-income owner households. A total of
$1 million of HOME funds was set aside in the program year for this activity. Due to program start-up time,
the program will be implemented in the 2006 Program Year.

         Activity             HOME Award       Expenditures      Carryover      Accomplishments
         Owner Occupied
                               $1,000,000            -0-        $1,000,000              -0-
         Rehab Program


The Housing Authority also administers an owner-occupied housing rehabilitation contract for senior
households. A total of $400,000 was provided for the rehabilitation of 20 homes. During the reporting
period 17 senior homes were rehabilitated, for total expenditures of $295,463 in HOME funds. The contract
will be completed in FY 2006-2007 with the rehabilitation of an additional four homes. Program year
household data for owner-occupied rehabilitation activities are provided below.

         Activity             HOME Award       Expenditures      Carryover      Accomplishments
         Housing Authority
         Senior Rehab           $400,000         $295,463        $104,537      17 senior households
         Program


                                  Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation
         Activity                                  Income Level                   Large Households
                                            0-30%     31-50%      51-80%
         Senior Housing Rehabilitation         4        10            3                   -0-




                                                      13
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Slow Moving Projects

The Housing Authorities of the City and County of Fresno continues to administer owner-occupied housing
rehabilitation activities funded in previous years. This program provides grants of up to $12,500 for
moderate rehabilitation and up to $29,520 for major rehabilitation, in certain target areas. In FY 2004, the
City of Fresno provided $1.9 million to the Housing Authority for the rehabilitation of 104 owner-occupied
homes. During the reporting period, a total of 23 homes were rehabilitated, with HOME Program
expenditures of $383,083. The Housing Authority will fulfill the rehabilitation contract with the City after
completing one additional house. Completion is expected in December 2006.

                       Housing Authority Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation
        Activity                                  Income Level             Large Households
                                           0-30%     31-50%     51-80%
        Housing Authority Owner-Occupied
                                              5         7         11               3
        Rehab Program


        Race Characteristics of Owner-Occupied
                                                            Total Households
        Housing Rehabilitation                                                       Hispanic
        Caucasian                                                  12                   -0-
        African American                                            6                   -0-
        Asian                                                       1                   -0-
        American Indian/Alaskan Native                             21                   20
        Other                                                      -0-                  -0-
        Total                                                      40                   20


Rental Rehabilitation Loan Program
During the program year, the City implemented a Rental Rehabilitation Loan Program (RRLP). The HOME
funded program offers loans to qualifying property owners to rehabilitate rental housing that consist of 2 to
10 units. Maximum assistance is provided in the form of a 20-year zero-interest loan of up to $15,000 per
unit, with a required private match of 10percent and a five-year deferred amortized loan repayment
schedule.

The City projected 75 LMI households would be assisted. One RRLP project was completed during the
program year. The project was a triplex located in central Fresno. The complex units were in need of a
new roof, front doors, bathroom upgrades, paint, and carpets. After rehabilitation was completed, the
owner informed the City that his tenants were thrilled with the improvements. Beneficiary information is
provided below.
                                        Rental Housing Rehabilitation
        Activity                                       Income Level              Large Households
                                              0-30%       31-50%    51-80%
        Rental Housing Rehabilitation           3           -0-       -0-                -0-


        Race Characteristics of Rental Housing
                                                            Total Households
        Rehabilitation                                                               Hispanic
        Caucasian                                                   3                    2
        African American                                           -0-                  -0-
        Asian                                                      -0-                  -0-
        American Indian/Alaskan Native                             -0-                  -0-
        Other                                                      -0-                  -0-
        Total                                                       3                    2



                                                      14
                                                                              2005 Program Year - CAPER


Senior Paint
The City administers a successful exterior painting program available to the City’s senior citizen residents.
The painting is performed by a licensed contractor and is provided to the program participants as a grant.
During the program year, 109 senior households benefited from the program for a total of $200,000 in
CDBG funds. An additional $58,384 of Rental Rehabilitation Program (RRP) funds were also expended on
the program. Program beneficiary data is provided below.


        Race Characteristics of Senior Paint Program
        Participants                                       Total Households          Hispanic
        Caucasian                                                 92                    46
        African American                                          14                    -0-
        Asian                                                      2                    -0-
        American Indian/Alaskan Native                             1                    -0-
        Total                                                     109                   46


White Picket Fence
The City administers the White Picket Fence Program used in conjunction with the Senior Paint Program.
The program provides funds for fence installation performed by a licensed contractor and helps provide a
sense of security to the participants. The funds are provided as a grant. During the reporting year, 15
households benefited from the program for a total of $49,996 in CDBG funds. The table below provides
race and ethnicity information for the White Picket Fence Program.


        Activity             CDBG Award         Expenditures      Carryover    Accomplishments
        White Picket
                                 $50,000            $49,996           -0-      15 senior households
        Fence
        Senior Paint             200,000            200,000                         109 senior
                                                                      -0-
        Program                                  28,384 (RRP)                       households


        Race Characteristics of White Picket Fence
        Participants                                           Total Households       Hispanic
        Caucasian                                                     14                  4
        African American                                               1                 -0-
        Asian                                                         -0-                -0-
        American Indian/Alaskan Native                                -0-                -0-
        Total                                                         15                  4




                                                     15
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Emergency Grants
The City administers the Emergency Repair Program for owners with homes that have unaddressed health
and safety issues and have received a citation from the City’s Code Enforcement Division. The maximum
grant for the Emergency Repair Program is $6,000. This program was funded with $25,000 in CDBG
funds. There were no Emergency Grants awarded during the reporting period.

        Activity              CDBG Award        Expenditures      Carryover    Accomplishments
        Emergency Grant
                                 $25,000              -0-          $25,000             -0-
        Program


The table below provides overall program data for housing rehabilitation programs administered by the
City.


                            Housing Rehabilitation Programs Accomplishments
                                                         HOME      Rental Rehab          CDBG
              Program            Units Rehabilitated
                                                         Funds        Funds              Funds
                                Projected    Actual
        City Owner-Occupied
        Rehab Program                  -0-         -0- $1,000,000             -0-                -0-
        Housing Authority
        Owner-Occupied
        Rehab                          24          23     383,083             -0-                -0-
        Housing Authority
        Owner-Occupied
        Senior Rehab                   20          17     295,463             -0-               -0-
        Rental Rehabilitation          15            3     33,015             -0-               -0-
        Senior Paint                   70         109          -0-       $58,384         $215,315
        Emergency Repair                 3           0         -0-            -0-               -0-
        White Picket Fence             25          15          -0-            -0-           49,996
        TOTAL                         157         167 $1,711,561         $58,384         $ 265,311


Mid-Year Rehabilitation Project

Martin Luther King Square – AF Evans
The City of Fresno provided HOME funds in the amount of $500,000 for the Martin Luther King Square
multi-family housing rehabilitation project. The project will rehabilitate 92 rental units. The project also
received Tax Credit financing (spring 2006), City RDA funds, IRP Loans and private financing. The project
is scheduled for completion in January 2007. The project is located at 911 E. Belgravia Avenue, Census
Tract 9.


First-Time Home Buyer Programs

The City continues to provide assistance to qualified potential home buyers through three First-Time Home
Buyer Programs: The Home Buyer Assistance Program, American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI),
and the State of California CalHome Program. The City anticipated that 125 first-time homebuyers would
be assisted through these programs during the program year.




                                                    16
                                                                               2005 Program Year - CAPER


The Home Buyer Programs are market driven, and in the last three years housing prices have continued to
skyrocket, preventing many lower income potential home buyers from purchasing homes. Additionally,
during the past year, interest rates have started to rise, thus making homeownership less and less
affordable for low-income families. These two factors contributed to a low demand for homebuyer
assistance funds, as, even with the City’s assistance, homeownership was out of reach for low-income
families.

During the program year, the City studied the viability of commencing other homebuyer program activities
to promote affordable homeownership opportunities. During the next program year, the City will develop
several single-family homes in City-administered development projects to provide more affordable homes to
low-income families.

Home Buyer Assistance Program
The City’s Home Buyer Assistance Program provide HOME funds of up to $50,000 to assist low-income
home buyers with the purchase of their first home. The sales price of the home must be below 95percent
of the area median purchase price (as identified by HUD). It was anticipated that this program would also
provide homebuyer assistance to those seeking to purchase homes through development of new homes,
resale of existing units, and affordable infill housing development. The City anticipated assisting 75 families
become first time homebuyers. Unfortunately market conditions dictated a need of 10 families receiving
assistance with this program during the program year. In the Fresno area recent trends indicate housing
prices will encounter a down trend in housing prices. The City expects that these conditions will be
favorable in creating new low income homebuyers in the market.

American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI)
The City has received $442,633 in ADDI funding for fiscal years 2003, 2004, 2005. The program provides
up to 6percent of the purchase price or a maximum of $10,000 (whichever is greater) in assistance for
down payment costs and/or rehabilitation of a newly purchased home. During the program year, a total of
11 families were assisted with this program.

CalHome Mortgage Assistance Program
In addition to the federal funds provided through HUD, the City was awarded $1 million from the State of
California Department of Housing and Community Development (CalHome Program) for first-time
homebuyer activities. HOME funds in an amount of up to $4,000 can be used for closing cost assistance in
conjunction with the CalHome Program. A total of eight households received assistance during the
program year.




                                                      17
2005 Program Year – CAPER


The tables below provide statistical data and the characteristics of the persons served in the Home Buyer
Programs.


                                   Funding                                        Families Assisted
        Activity                   Amount        Expenditures      Carryover     Projected   Actual
        Home Buyer Assistance     $2,500,000         $430,611       2,069,389       60         10
        American Dream
        Downpayment Initiative       442,633            110,000       332,633       25          11
        CalHome Mortgage
        Assistance                 1,000,000             29,771            -0-      14           8
        Total                     $3,942,633           $570,382    $2,402,022       99          29



                                                                      Large         Met Section 215
        Activity                               Income Level         Households       Requirements
                                                    31-     51-
                                         0-30%
                                                   50%     80%
        Home Buyer Assistance              -0-       1       9           8                 8
        American Dream
        Downpayment Initiative            -0-      2        9            7                 7
        CalHome Mortgage
        Assistance                        -0-      1        7            2                 2
        Total                             -0-      4        25           17                17


        Race Characteristics of
        Home Buyer Participants                                 Total Households         Hispanic
        Caucasian                                                      16                   7
        African American                                                1                   0
        Asian                                                          12                   0
        American Indian/Alaskan Native                                  0                   0
        Total                                                          29                   7


Other City Programs

Redevelopment Agency - Rehabilitation Program
The Redevelopment Agency (RDA) of the City of Fresno contracted with the Fresno City Housing Authority
to implement the Community Housing Partnership Program. The RDA provided tax increment housing set
aside financing to provide grants and loans from $6,500 to $29,500 to low and moderate income
households for minor and major rehabilitation of their single family homes. During the program year the
Housing Authority completed rehabilitation projects in eight target areas.

SMART Program
The SMART Program began acoustically treating homes in the airport noise contours in 1995. Acoustic
insulation is a rehabilitation activity that reduces the impact of aircraft noise from the Fresno Yosemite
International Airport on residences in areas determined to exceed an average noise level of 65 Community
Noise Equivalent Level (CNEL). The average cost per home is about $23,400 ($19,900 for modifications;
plus $3,500 per home for consultant design, construction management, and administration costs). Each
property owner signs an aviation easement and owner participation agreement that is recorded on the
property.



                                                       18
                                                                                2005 Program Year - CAPER


From 1995 to July of 2006, 681 homes near the airport were rehabilitated through the SMART Program.
Approximately 40 homes are currently in design as of September 2006. Approximately 80 homes are
scheduled to be completed by June 30, 2007.

Funding for the SMART Program has been 90percent from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airport
Improvement Grants (AIP) and 10percent Airport generated revenues. The funding formula has been
modified by the federal government to be 95percent FAA AIP and 5percent Airport revenue. The City
received and are using FAA grant funding in the amount of $2 million in 2004-2005 and $1 million in 2005-
2006 fiscal year to complete approximately 120 homes.

If you have questions regarding the SMART Program, please contact Matthew Takahashi, Acoustic
Program Coordinator at (559) 621-4532.

Technical Support for Tax Credit Applicants
The City provided technical support for two new tax credit applications to ensure the availability of
additional low-income, multi-family rental units. See the table below for information regarding these two
projects. On each project, the City assisted the State with its application analysis by verifying that the
zoning, building and general information provided in the tax credit application was accurate. Additionally,
the City also conditionally approved HOME financing to both projects.


                                              Tax Credit Projects
                         Reviewed by the City during the program year and submitted for
                first or second round approval to the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee
                                                           HOME
             Project           Location        Units       Funds                      Status
                                                                       Fall 2005 Tax Credits were
         Tanager Springs
                            2121 S. Maple       104     $2,200,000 insufficient to support the project,
         Apartments
                                                                       will apply for MHP in October 2006
                                                                      Did not receive Spring 2006 Tax
         Sandstone
                           1515 E. Jensen        69     $1,250,000    Credit award, have applied for
         Apartments
                                                                      summer 2006 Tax Credits



Tax credit projects require at least twenty-percent of the residents to have incomes less than fifty percent of
the area=s median income and another forty-percent to have incomes less than sixty percent. However, to
be competitive, most successful applications have made higher commitments to assist lower income
persons than the minimum percentages described above.

To obtain the maximum points in the statewide competition for tax credit projects, a project must be located
in a community revitalization area. By definition, CDBG target areas and designated City redevelopment
areas are considered by the State to be community revitalization areas. The City took an extra step toward
making community revitalization area certifications for projects outside these areas. On August 8, 2000,
the City Council authorized staff to administratively designate any area around proposed tax credit projects
as community revitalization areas when certain criteria were met. Applicants needed to request the
establishment of a community revitalization area during the program year. Letters of support were written
by either the City or the Redevelopment Agency for each of the tax credit projects.




                                                       19
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Other Regulatory Information

Access to Housing for Large Families
In an effort to meet the needs of large families, the City continues to encourage the development of
affordable housing for large families (those with five or more persons). Through a variety of City-sponsored
programs, the City assisted 31 large families, during the reporting period, in the following manner:


         Housing Programs                                              Large Households Assisted
         New Rental Housing Construction                                           1
         New Home Ownership Construction                                          10
         Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation                                             3
         Home Buyer Assistance                                                     8
         American Dream Down Payment Initiative                                    7
         Closing Cost Assistance                                                  2
         Total                                                                    31


Affirmative Marketing Plans
The City approved the following two Affirmative Marketing Plans during the program year: 1) One by One
Leadership - EDI Special Project (Lowell Jefferson Neighborhood Rehabilitation Project) and 2) Self Help
Enterprises - Willow & Jensen Project (Little Long Cheng). Additionally, the City has several projects that
are currently in developmental stages. As construction completion of the projects nears, Affirmative
Marketing Plans will be reviewed for compliance with HOME Program regulations.

Meeting the Needs of Persons with Disabilities
The City has been working with the Fresno Center for Independent Living to identify the most pro-active
approach to providing housing assistance to low-income disabled persons. During the reporting period the
City conducted a feasibility study for the formation of a Homebuyer Assistance Program for Disabled
households. The City is currently developing a program better suited to meet the needs of the disabled
population through homeownership assistance.

The City is currently developing a Disabled Accessibility Retrofit Grant Program. The program will provide
grants to seniors or individuals with physical disabilities to make retrofit improvements to their homes. It is
anticipated that the program will be implemented in FY 2006-2007.

Efforts in Meeting Worst Case Needs
The City’s activities under the new construction and acquisition/rehabilitation of rental housing are designed
to meet worst case needs. Worst case needs are defined as households that spend ≥50percent of their
income on rent. As part of the City’s Housing Construction Program, the City seeks out development
partnership opportunities with project owners to encourage rental housing activities that will provide
affordably priced housing units to low-income families. Currently, the City is assisting the following projects
that will assist in meeting worst case needs: Sierra Gateway Senior Residence (Phase I), Laurel Homes,
Geneva Village Apartments, Sandstone Apartments, Tanager Springs Apartments, Village at Kings Canyon
and Martin Luther King Square Apartments.




                                                      20
                                                                             2005 Program Year - CAPER


Activities to Promote Access to Affordable Housing

City Housing staff participated in a number of activities that promoted the City’s affordable housing
programs including rental and homebuyer programs and projects. Many of the events were held in
partnership with HUD and other nonprofit housing agencies. Some of the events that City staff participated
in to further promote access to affordable housing included the following:

   •   Build it Green Tour - Workshop/demonstration
   •   The People's Housing Summit
   •   HOME CHDO Training
   •   Housing California 2006 Annual Conference
   •   One-by-One Pleasanton 2005 - Urban development tour
   •   2005 California Redevelopment Agency Cal-ALHFA Affordable Housing Conference
   •   CalHFA Breakfast Seminar - First-Time Homebuyer Program
   •   Visitability Teleconference - Visitability and Affordable Housing
   •   Housing and Renter’s Education Conference
   •   Affordable Housing Builds Better Communities Conference
   •   HUD’s “Western Regional Housing Summit 2006”
   •   California Redevelopment Association Annual Conference & EXPO
   •   Great Valley Center Conference - “At the Tipping Point”
   •   Television Interview: “Home Repair Programs” Show
   •   Television Interview: “Arriba Valle Central”
   •   Radio Interview: Hmong Language Radio Program
   •   HOMES Day 2006
   •   Fresno Housing Alliance Participation
   •   Opening Doors to The American Dream Workshop
   •   Health and Housing Task Force
   •   El Dorado Park Revitalization Committee Meetings
   •   Passport to Homeownership Fair with Congressman Jim Costa
   •   2005 Central California Fair & Affordable Housing Conference & EXPO

During the reporting period, the City also invested staff time and resources in various other housing
activities to promote accessibility to affordable housing including:

Housing Resource Center - City staff, in partnership with the Community Housing Council of Fresno
established the Fresno Housing Resource center, a community non-profit housing organization that
provides professional homeownership information and education. Services provided include: access to
pre-purchase counseling and credit counseling referrals, access to financing, access to listings of
affordable housing in Fresno County (urban and rural), financial education, including predatory lending
awareness and related housing and economic development services.

Community Housing Council - City staff partners with other local, non-profit and private partners to jointly
address the affordable housing concerns of the Fresno area. During the reporting period, one City staff
member was selected to serve as Board Chairperson of the Community Housing Council.

Refugee Housing Resettlement Task Force - City staff is working with other City agencies and groups to
provide housing resources and assistance to newly arrived refugee families. The City continued to provide
a Refugee Housing Liaison to assist with housing services to the refugee population. During the reporting
period, the City’s Refugee Housing Liaison was selected to serve on the Task Force Board as president.



                                                    21
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Efforts to Meet Lead-Based Paint Regulations

The City has had its federal Lead-Based Paint Practices in place since September 15, 2000. City staff
continued to encourage new contractors to obtain their lead-based paint certifications and to attend lead
based paint workshops to increase their understanding of the process for identifying and minimizing the
hazard by using interim controls and obtaining lead clearances on all affected projects.

Leveraging of Funds for Housing Programs

The City has designed its housing programs to assist low-income families, while leveraging funds in a
sound, business-like manner. The housing projects completed resulted in leveraging a total of $3,524,076.
 The leveraging came from financial investments by owners, lenders and developers participating in the
City=s housing program. See the table below for details.


                                  Funds Leveraged For Housing Programs
        Programs/Projects                Leverage Amount           Leverage Source(s)
        Home Buyer Assistance                   $1,248,980       Primary Mortgage Loans
        Closing Cost Assistance                    817,812       Primary Mortgage Loans
        CURE                                     1,451,041       Primary Mortgage Loans
        Owner-Occupied Housing
        Rehabilitation                               2,575          Private Financing
        Rental Rehabilitation Program                3,668          Private Financing
        Total                                   $3,524,076


Matching Requirements

HUD requires participating jurisdictions to provide a twenty-five percent match for the HOME Program.
HUD has reduced the match requirement for the City of Fresno to zero percent because of local economic
conditions. The City continues to track its matching funds for use in future program years. During the
program year, the City generated a total of $572,254 in matching funds from the following sources:

   •   Program income derived from loan payoffs to the old Rental Rehabilitation Program. This generated
       $148,228 in additional funds to repair rental housing.
   •   Recognition of the present value of interest subsidy for loans made at rates below market. This
       generated a direct benefit of $212,622 for low-income participants through the Homebuyer Program
       and the Home Buyer Assistance Program and Closing Cost Assistance Program.
   •   Fees waived by the Fresno County Recorder. This generated a direct benefit of $903.00 to
       low-income participants in the Home Buyer Assistance Program, $1,920 for Housing Authority
       housing rehabilitation projects, and $744 for development projects.
   •   Sweat equity from Habitat for Humanity Project totaled $32,337.
   •   In addition, the City carried over $4,014,662.61 in excess matching funds from prior years. Total
       matching funds available from the City was $4,586,916.61. Details of the HOME Match Report
       (HUD Form 40107-A) can be found at the end of the CAPER. As a point of clarification, matching
       funds were already provided from the various sources and can be used to meet the matching
       requirements of the HOME program. They are funds on paper and do not constitute real funds that
       could be used for construction activities.




                                                   22
                                                                             2005 Program Year - CAPER


                                          Home Match Amount
        Programs/Projects                  Match Amount               Match Source(s)
        Rental Rehabilitation Program        $148,228       Program income derived from loan
                                                            payoffs to the old Rental
                                                            Rehabilitation Program
        Home Buyer Programs                  $212,622       Recognition of the present value of
                                                            interest subsidy for loans made at
                                                            rates below market
        Habitat for Humanity Project          $32,337       Sweat equity
        Home Buyer Programs                     $903        Fees waived by the Fresno County
                                                            Recorder
        Owner Occupied                         $1,920       Fees waived by the Fresno County
        Rehabilitation (Housing                             Recorder
        Authority)
        Housing Development                     $744            Fees waived by the Fresno County
        Projects                                                Recorder
        Owner Occupied                        $175,500
        Rehabilitation (Housing                                 Sub recipient match per contract –
        Authority)                                              tax increment rehabilitation projects
        Total                                 $572,254


Goal 3 - Residential Displacement and Relocation: Provide increased housing opportunities and
assistance for those displaced through either code enforcement or redevelopment.


Relocation

It is City policy not to cause the relocation or displacement of any persons affected by any housing
program. In the event displacement should occur, appropriate relocation measures will be employed as
required by the City=s relocation procedures pursuant to HUD regulations.


EOC Transitional Living Center

During the 2003 Program Year the City was required to pay relocation benefits to two families involuntarily
displaced from an apartment complex being converted into a transitional living facility. Fresno County EOC
applied and received Supportive Housing Program funds from HUD to acquire and develop a transitional
living center for runaway youth. HUD requires the local jurisdictions, or a developed Continuum of Care, to
act as project sponsor to administer the funds. As tenants were required to leave the complex they were
not provided with relocation benefits in accordance with the federal Uniform Relocation Act.

The City continues to identify and provide relocation assistance to persons displaced from the Fresno
County Economic Opportunities Commission Transitional Living Center Project. Fresno County EOC was
awarded Supportive Housing Program funds in 1993 for the conversion of an apartment complex to a
transitional living facility for persons aged 18-25. Relocation assistance was not provided to persons
residing in the facility prior to its conversion.

The City, EOC and HUD have prepared a work out plan to locate the sixteen families involuntarily displaced
and provide them with the appropriate relocation benefits. During the 2005 Program Year the City did not
provide relocation benefits as no one responded to the outreach efforts.




                                                    23
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Goal 4 - General Plan Improvements: Monitor and complete the update of the City=s General Plan and
update the Housing Element and housing data regarding the development of affordable housing for very
low- and low-income families. Continually improve all other City regulations and processes that affect
housing access and affordability.


General Plan Update

The City completed the update to the General Plan and Housing Element. The 2025 Fresno General Plan
was adopted by the City Council in November 2002. The updated Housing Element was adopted June 18,
2002.

As part of revising the Housing Element, the City conducted a housing quality survey to determine the
condition of the housing units constructed prior to 1960. The survey estimates the number of units in the
city that are in need of rehabilitation and replacement. According to the survey, 88.6 percent of the housing
stock is in sound condition. A summary of the survey results are in the table below. Specific data relating
to the areas surveyed can be found in the table below.

To prepare the Housing Element, the City worked with the Council of Fresno County Governments and the
cities within the county to develop a Housing Allocation Plan to ensure that sufficient low-income housing is
constructed within the county. Incorporation of land-use policies to accommodate a diversity of housing
sizes and types, as well as higher residential densities, provide increased opportunities for affordable
housing.

The 2025 General Plan calls for redistributing a projected population of approximately 10,000 people from
the western and eastern fringes to the central portions of the metropolitan area. Revitalization and
enhancement of the established urban core will continue to be the major focal point of the plan=s vision.
The Plan projects the rehabilitation of 1,000 dwelling units and construction of 1,000 new infill dwelling units
generally within the CDBG target areas. The target area for this redistribution is between Ashlan, Jensen,
Willow and West Avenues.

During the previous program year, the City adopted a revision of the City=s group homes ordinance. The
City removed outdated and questionable terminology and helped solidify the City=s fair housing practices.
Provisions of reasonable accommodations are being integrated into daily decision making by City planning
staff.

One of the priorities of the Mayor and City Council is to revitalize the central city area. To achieve that
objective, the City applied for and received an Empowerment Zone designation from the U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in 2001. The zone became effective on January 1, 2002.

                                       Housing Quality Survey Results
                                             Surveyed:                24,600
                                                 Sound:                  21,805
                                                  Minor:                  2,165
                                             Moderate:                      507
                                            Substantial:                     88
                                            Dilapidated:                     34




                                                      24
                                                                                                                                               2005 Program Year - CAPER



Housing Quality Survey Results
                      Total                                                                                                                                           Total
                     Units in      Total                                                                                                                              Units    Percent
Planning    Census   Census       Units in                                                           %                         %                            %        Needing   Needing
  Area       Tract    Tract       Survey      Sound    % Sound   Minor       % Minor   Moderate   Moderate   Substantial   Substantial   Dilapidated   Dilapidated    Work      Work
 Central       1           495   Commercial
 Edison        2           746         303       210    69.30%       59       19.50%         27     8.90%             6         2.00%             1         0.30%         93   30.70%
 Edison        3         1117          314       267    85.00%       29        9.20%         16     5.10%             2         0.60%             0         0.00%         47   15.00%
Roosevelt      4         1294          356       293    82.30%       38       10.70%         20     5.60%             5         1.40%             0         0.00%         63   17.70%
 Central       5         2117          353        86    24.40%      126       35.70%        100    28.30%            27         7.60%            13         3.70%        266   75.40%
 Central       6         2150          340       190    55.90%       79       23.20%         55    16.20%            12         3.50%             4         1.20%        150   44.10%
 Edison        7         1221          350       287    82.00%       53       15.10%          8     2.30%             0         0.00%             2         0.60%         63   18.00%
 Edison        8           252   Commercial
 Edison        9         1633          397       195    49.10%      152       38.30%         43    10.80%             4         1.00%             3         0.80%        202   50.90%
 Edison       10           993         315       303    96.20%        6        1.90%          5     1.60%             1         0.30%             0         0.00%         12    3.80%
 Edison       11           776         301       272    90.40%       25        8.30%          3     1.00%             1         0.30%             0         0.00%         29      9.6
Roosevelt     12         2434          352       342    97.20%        9        2.60%          1     0.30%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         10    2.80%
Roosevelt     13         3504          477       302    63.30%      116       24.30%         55    11.50%             4         0.80%             0         0.00%        175   36.70%
Roosevelt    14-03       2008          300       297    99.00%        3        1.00%          0     0.00%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%          3    1.00%
Roosevelt    14-04       1772          390       376    96.40%       14        3.60%          0     0.00%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         14    3.60%
Roosevelt    14-05       2750          232       180    77.60%       52       22.40%          0     0.00%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         52   22.40%
Roosevelt    14-06       1930          446       384    86.10%       62       13.90%          0     0.00%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         62   13.90%
Roosevelt     15           740          29        26    89.70%        1        3.40%          2     6.90%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%          3   10.30%
 Edison       18         1402             6        4    66.70%        2       33.30%          0     0.00%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%          2   33.30%
 Edison       19           851          13        10    76.90%        1        7.70%          2    15.40%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%          3   23.10%
  West        20         2030          372       314    84.40%       30        8.10%         20     5.40%             5         1.30%             3         0.80%         58   15.60%
 Fresno
  High        21         2199         407        244    60.00%      146       35.90%         15     3.70%             2         0.50%             0         0.00%        163   40.00%
 Fresno
  High        22         1667         356        315    88.50%       26        7.30%         13     3.70%             2         0.60%             0         0.00%         41   11.50%
 Fresno
  High        23         1388         398        324    81.40%       72       18.10%          2     0.50%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         74   18.60%
 Fresno
  High       24          1435          349       155    44.40%      172       49.30%         21     6.00%             1         0.30%             0         0.00%        194   55.60%
Roosevelt    25          2716          400       331    82.80%       59       14.80%         10     2.50%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         69   17.30%
Roosevelt    26          2481          350       290    82.90%       55       15.70%          5     1.40%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         60   17.10%
Roosevelt    27          2719          400       335    83.80%       56       14.00%          9     2.30%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         65   16.30%
Roosevelt    28          1308          350       339    96.90%        9        2.60%          2     0.60%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         11    3.10%
Roosevelt   29-01        2577          357       356    99.70%        1        0.30%          0     0.00%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%          1    0.30%
Roosevelt   29-02        2221          351       345    98.30%        5        1.40%          0     0.00%             1         0.30%             0         0.00%          6    1.70%
Roosevelt    30          2926          290       233    80.30%       55       19.00%          2     0.70%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         57   19.70%
 Hoover     31-01        3911    Airport
 McLane      32          3199          350       341    97.40%           9     2.60%          0     0.00%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%          9   2.60%
 McLane      33          2768          351       339    96.60%           9     2.60%          2     0.60%             1         0.30%             0         0.00%         12   3.40%
 McLane      34          1700          371       363    97.80%           8     2.20%          0     0.00%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%          8   2.20%
 Fresno
  High        35         2213         403        389    96.50%       11        2.70%          3     0.70%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         14   3.50%
 Fresno
  High        36         1773         355        351    98.90%           3     0.80%          1     0.30%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%          4   1.10%
 Fresno
  High        37         2785         400        377    94.30%       21        5.30%          2     0.50%             0         0.00%             0         0.00%         23   5.80%




                                                                                       25
2005 Program Year – CAPER



Housing Quality Survey Results - continued
                             Total                                                                                                                                                                 Total
                            Units in       Total                                                                                                                                                   Units        Percent
Planning     Census         Census        Units in                                                                          %                            %                            %           Needing      Needing
  Area        Tract          Tract        Survey     Sound         % Sound        Minor       % Minor      Moderate     Moderate     Substantial    Substantial   Dilapidated    Dilapidated       Work          Work
  West        38-01             2209           432         356       82.40%             74     17.10%              2        0.50%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%            76      17.60%
  West        38-02             2732           698         650       93.10%             44       6.30%             4        0.60%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%            48       6.90%
  West        38-03             1248            28          28      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             0       0.00%
  West        42-01               600          250         207       82.80%             11       4.40%            13        5.20%            11           4.40%             8          3.20%            43      17.20%
 Bullard      42-02             3,343          400         400      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             0       0.00%
 Bullard      42-04             2,146          350         350      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             0       0.00%
 Bullard      42-05             2,064          354         350       98.90%              4       1.10%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             4       1.10%
 Bullard      43-01             1464           250         250      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             0       0.00%
 Bullard      43-02             2027           300         300      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             0       0.00%
 Bullard      43-03             1938           319         319      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             0       0.00%
Woodward      44-02             3731           400         400      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             0       0.00%
 Bullard      44-04             1200           312         281       90.10%             25       8.00%             5        1.60%              1          0.30%             0          0.00%            31       9.90%
 Bullard      44-98             2457           350         339       96.90%              4       1.10%             7        2.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%            11       3.10%
 Bullard      45-03             2130           350         350      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             0       0.00%
 Bullard      45-04             2282           352         343       97.40%              6       1.70%             2        0.60%              1          0.30%             0          0.00%             9       2.60%
 Bullard      45-05             1893           350         350      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%             0       0.00%
 Fresno
  High        47-02           2982           400           385       96.30%             14       3.50%             1        0.30%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%            15         3.80%
 Fresno
  High          48            3256           400           394       98.50%              6       1.50%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              6        1.50%
 Fresno
  High          49            2265           350           336       96.00%             13       3.70%             1        0.30%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%            14         4.00%
 Bullard        50            1546           300           293       97.70%              7       2.30%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              7        2.30%
 McLane         51            2213           336           261       77.70%             68     20.20%              6        1.80%              1          0.30%             0          0.00%            75       22.30%
 McLane       52-01           3105           435           233       53.60%            187     43.00%             15        3.40%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%           202       46.40%
 McLane       52-02           1253           300           300      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              0        0.00%
 Hoover       53-01           1933           350           342       97.70%              7       2.00%             1        0.30%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              8        2.30%
 Hoover       53-02           2113           350           349       99.70%              1       0.30%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              1        0.30%
 Hoover       53-03           3567           400           400      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              0        0.00%
 Hoover       54-03           1666           350           350      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              0        0.00%
 Hoover       54-04           2737           400           400      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              0        0.00%
 Hoover       54-05           1616           350           350      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              0        0.00%
 Hoover       54-06           1484           350           350      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              0        0.00%
 Hoover       54-07           1259           350           350      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              0        0.00%
 Hoover       54-08                0   State / FSU
Woodward      55-01           5098           400           400      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              0        0.00%
 Hoover       56-03            533           250           250      100.00%              0       0.00%             0        0.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%              0        0.00%
 McLane       58-03           2387           300           192       64.00%            102     34.00%              6        2.00%              0          0.00%             0          0.00%           108       36.00%
 McLane       59-01                0   Non-residential
Note: Census Tract 42.01: The City has surveyed a small portion of the tract (between the Highway City and Herndon Townsites. The data has been added to the existing survey data and the results extrapolated to reflect
                                                        the entire census tract. Census Tracts 5, 6, 13, and 14.04 were also reviewed and modified by City staff.
    Survey Totals         154980         24600         2180         88.64%         2165        8.80%          507         2.06%          88            0.36%          34            0.14%          2794         11.36%

                    Estimate of Total from Survey                   137371                     13640                      3194                          554                            214                       17602




                                                                                                          26
                                                                             2005 Program Year - CAPER


Activities to Encourage Housing Development - To encourage the development of affordable housing,
the Planning and Development Department continues to monitor these specific issues:

a.      Density Bonus
        Provides incentives to developers through the provision of higher densities, financial incentives, or
        fee waivers in exchange for a commitment to provide housing for very low- and low-income
        families or senior citizens.

        Status: This program continues to be available, but has not been utilized during Program Year
        2005.

b.      Higher Densities
        The City has limited acreage designated or zoned for higher density development (20 or more
        units per acre). The addition of property with such a designation provides greater opportunities
        for affordable housing. The General Plan recommended an activity center concept to encourage
        well planned and appropriately clustered higher density, mixed use developments.

        Status: The 2025 General Plan was adopted during the program year, November 2003. The
        activity center concept was incorporated into the Plan. Proposed specific plans will be developed
        to implement the concept.

c.      Policies to Encourage Increased Average Residential Densities
        Recommends that all properties within the City=s sphere of influence be planned for urban
        densities. Utilization of this standard will provide for overall higher planned residential densities
        which can reduce land costs per unit and thus encourage more affordable prices. The Draft
        General Plan proposed to eliminate the rural residential designated land use category and
        designate additional land for higher density categories.

        Status: The adoption of the 2025 General Plan eliminated the rural residential land use category.
        As an outcome of the 4000 or more multiple family unit entitlement application filings:

        $    161 units will be built at a density of 45 units/gross acre;
        $    171 units will be built at 23 units/gross acre or more;
        $    906 units will be built at densities of 17-20 units/acre.

d.      Mixed Density Policies, Ordinances and Zone District Standards
        The City=s planned communities ordinance allows for unified developments that would include a
        mix of residential densities and commercial land uses. Code standards can be adjusted through
        the planned community process to increase overall residential densities while retaining quality
        community design. Increased densities result in decreased land costs per unit and therefore
        encourage decreased per-unit costs to provide greater opportunities for mixed income groups.
        Residential and commercial land uses can be combined within the same project through the
        Commercial Professional (CP) and Residential Professional (RP) zone districts. The goal is to
        create higher density, more urban type mixing of land uses throughout the City.

        Status: The City continues to encourage the use of these provisions to stimulate affordable
        housing development for low and moderate income families.




                                                    27
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Mixed Income Opportunity Housing

Although not in ordinance form, units can be developed and/or sold at market rate with some assistance,
below market rate, or through innovative financing programs. The State Department of Housing and
Community Development encourage cities to increase densities which will allow for a greater mix of income
groups. The City has continued to support to the Housing Authority in obtaining additional Section 8
vouchers for lower income persons in the City. The City also has provided incentives to various nonprofit
organizations to provide greater housing opportunities for lower income people and through its support of
tax credit projects to encourage the mixing of income groups.




                                                   28
                                                                                 2005 Program Year - CAPER


NON-HOUSING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Goal 5 - Public Facilities and Improvements:               Provide public facility improvements to facilitate
neighborhood revitalization.


Concrete Reconstruction

The City continued its ongoing program to concentrate CDBG funds toward the rehabilitation of existing
tree-damaged sidewalks, curbs, gutters and street surfaces as part of its goal to support the revitalization of
low- and moderate-income neighborhoods that are deteriorating or threatened with deterioration. Funding
was accomplished through the use of CDBG monies, Fresno gas tax funds, Measure C, and other sources
as they became available.

The City designated three CDBG eligible neighborhoods to concentrate concrete reconstruction activities.
Projects selected for the improvements must meet two criteria: 1) the existence of drainage facilities and 2)
the existence of some portion of curb and sidewalk. The areas selected in this program year did not need a
full street infrastructure reconstruction; instead, the goal was to provide a renewed and complete
infrastructure. The completion of this project encourages neighborhood revitalization and discourages the
collection of debris and allows for routine cleaning activities such as street sweeping.

The table below identifies Program Year 2005 concrete reconstruction improvement projects paid for with
CDBG funds. Code enforcement, street sweeping, Community Sanitation Division activities, tree trimming,
neighborhood watch, and DCST activities were budgeted as part of each department operating budget.
Any costs paid with CDBG funds for such projects by individual departments are covered under the specific
departmental activity described elsewhere in this report.

In addition to concentrated improvement projects, the City directed a heightened level of other City services
such as, code enforcement and the District Crime Suppression Team (DCST), to these neighborhoods to
address visual blight and crime prevention.


         Project                 CDBG Award        Expenditures       Carryover    Accomplishments
         Concrete
                                  $2,262,400        $1,470,354        $792,046        712 houses
         Reconstruction




                                                      29
2005 Program Year – CAPER



                   Project                     Location               Status
       Sidewalk Paving        Harvard/ Fresno to First              Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Terrace/ Angus to First               Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Orchard/ Clinton to Simpson           Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Simpson/ Fresno to Orchard            Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Angus/ Clinton to Simpson             Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Mariposa/ Harvard to Simpson          Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Cornell/ Mariposa to First            Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Princeton/ Fresno to First            Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Brown/ Fresno to First                Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Ashlan/ Maroa to Blackstone           Complete
       Sidewalk Paving        Golden State/ Shaw to Herndon         Underway
       Sidewalk Paving        Home/ Clark to Cul-de-Sac             Complete
       Concrete Reconstruct   Barton/ Maple/ Tulare/ Kings Canyon   Ongoing
       Concrete Reconstruct   Winery/ Fine/ Huntington/ Tulare      Complete
       Concrete Reconstruct   MLK/ Clara/ Jensen / Grove            Complete
       Concrete Reconstruct   Belmont/ Tulare/ Chestnut / East      Complete
       Concrete Reconstruct   4300 Block North Pleasant             Complete
       Concrete Reconstruct   4300 Block North West                 Complete
       Concrete Reconstruct   4300 Block North Brooks               Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      2800-3000 Block East Princeton        Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      2800-2900 Block East Harvard          Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      2900 Block East Terrace               Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Mariposa and Simpson                  Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Angus and Simpson                     Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Orchard and Simpson                   Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Cornell and Mariposa                  Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Cornell and Angus                     Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Cornell and Orchard                   Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      West and Ashlan                       Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Ashlan and Holt                       Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Calwa and 9th                         Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Calwa and 10th                        Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Calwa and 11th                        Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Calwa and Cedar                       Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Vine and 9th                          Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Vine and 10th                         Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Mason and 10th                        Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Mason and Cedar                       Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      Fine and Tulare                       Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      C Street and Stanislaus               Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      C Street and Tuolumne                 Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      C Street and Calaveras                Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      C Street and San Joaquin              Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      C Street and Amador                   Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      A Street and San Joaquin              Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      A Street and Stanislaus               Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      G Street and Divisadero               Complete
       Wheel Chair Ramps      E Street and El Dorado                Complete




                                       30
                                                                              2005 Program Year - CAPER


ADA Infrastructure Compliance
The City continues its efforts to address compliance issues with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
The City used CDBG funds for the installation of 42 curb cuts and wheelchair ramps that are in compliance
with ADA requirements.


Neighborhood Park Improvement Program

The City has continued its program to improve park and recreational services in lower income
neighborhoods by constructing new facilities and upgrading existing ones. Funding has come from CDBG
monies, HUD Section 108 loan funds, and several State and federal grants. During Program Year 2005,
$300,000 of CDBG funds were allocated to the Dickey Park Youth Center. Those funds were not expended
and were carried over to Program Year 2006. The City acquired the land to construct the facility at the
beginning of the 2006 Program Year.

Additionally the Parks, Recreation and Community Services Division rehabilitated the Ted C. Wills
Community Center. The Senior Lounge was expanded, a computer lab was created, and other structural
improvements were made to the building.


        Project                CDBG Award       Expenditures     Carryover      Accomplishments
        Ted C. Wills
                                  $350,000         $151,162        $198,838       1 Public Facility
        Community Center


During the 2005 Program Year the City awarded CDBG grants to several neighborhood community
agencies to rehabilitate the facilities in which services are provided to low income persons. The Boys and
Girls Club was awarded $182,000 in funds to rehabilitate the center located in West Fresno. Marjaree
Mason Center received $175,500 to rehabilitate the facility that provides services to battered women and
children. The City celebrated a grand opening of the newly refurbished center in August 2006.

        Project                CDBG Award       Expenditures     Carryover      Accomplishments
        Boys and Girls Club      $182,000          $182,000          -0-         1 Public Facility
        Majaree Mason
                                  $175,500            -0-          $175,500      Project Underway
        Center


Chinatown Community Center
The project will provide funds to make some improvements to a building at 934 “F@ Street in the Chinatown
section of the City. The building will be used as a community center for providing social services to the
local residents. No funds were expended during the reporting period.




                                                    31
2005 Program Year – CAPER


West Fresno Healthcare Coalition
During the 2005 Program Year the City amended the Annual Action Plan to reflect a change in the activity
of the service center. The amendment included the West Fresno Healthcare Coalition acting on behalf of
the Ivy-Carver Association to develop a multifaceted service center including education, social and health
services for low income residents of the area.

        Project                CDBG Award       Expenditures      Carryover     Accomplishments
        West Fresno
                                  $173,900          $52,170         $121,730     Project underway
        Healthcare Coalition


Goal 6 - Crime Awareness: Improve public safety and to provide funds to increase law enforcement
services, primarily in CDBG eligible areas. The budget would be allocated from the public services portion
of the CDBG entitlement.


District Crime Suppression Teams (DCST)

The District Crime Suppression Teams were initially formed in April 2002. The teams were designed to
provide an immediate response to violent crimes in progress, and to reduce crime and calls for service by
utilizing a problem solving philosophy.

District Crime Suppression Team officers do not generally respond to routine calls for service from the
public, but instead direct their efforts in a proactive approach to address criminal offenders before they
strike. The District Crime Suppression Teams enhance the level of service provided by patrol officers and
provide an increased visibility of uniformed patrol officers in the neighborhoods they serve.

District Crime Suppression Teams in the Southwest, Central, and Southeast policing districts have focused
on preventing and responding to violent crime quickly, in those neighborhood plagued with higher rates of
crime, and calls for service relating to narcotics, prostitution, gang activity, and violent crime.

These teams placed a strong emphasis on preventing criminal activity through quick apprehension of those
who commit crimes. They worked very closely with other units within the department so that when
suspects were identified they could be quickly apprehended, before having an opportunity to commit
additional crimes. Additionally, they worked closely with allied agencies, such as the California Department
of Correction (Parole), to locate and apprehend dangerous subjects who have violated their parole or
absconded from parole supervision. The District Crime Suppression Teams worked in conjunction with
both Parole and Probation to conduct parole and probation searches of residences of those suspected of
continued criminal activity.

Many of the CDBG eligible neighborhoods are plagued with neighborhood “Drug Houses” and street
narcotics sales. This activity negatively impacts the quality of life for the neighborhood. Not only does
narcotics activity lead to violence, it intimidates and causes fear for those who live in the neighborhood.
Crimes Suppression Teams have actively worked to address these locations by conducting undercover
narcotics investigations, serving narcotics search warrants, and utilizing other specialized enforcement
tactics.

Gang members are involved in a wide range of criminal activity, to include graffiti, drug manufacturing and
dealing, thefts, assaults, robberies, and murders. Many of the gang members are on probation and parole.
The connection between gang members and dangerous criminal activity is evident. Because of this
connection, Crime Suppression Teams have also focused their efforts on suppressing gang activity.




                                                    32
                                                                               2005 Program Year - CAPER


District Crime Suppression Team members have often been the first units to arrive at the scenes of violent
in progress crimes such as robbery, assault, and murder. Their quick response and special training, in
tactics, has often times allowed them to make arrests at the scene of a crime, resulting in an enhanced
investigation and a safer community.

In addition to these enforcement activities, DCST teams are involved in many other activities to include
prostitution sting operations, sex offender notifications and residence verifications, and surveillance of
violent criminal offenders and locations of criminal activity.


        Project               CDBG Award       Expenditures      Carryover      Accomplishments
        District Crime                                                         67.4% of LMI persons
                                $851,700          $812,490        $39,210
        Suppression                                                                 impacted


Care Fresno Program

Care Fresno is a non-profit organization that assists the CDBG-funded District Crime Suppression Teams
in lower income neighborhoods. Care Fresno targets neighborhoods that have an established history of
crime patterns. The DCST officers work to address crime in these targeted neighborhoods and then
requests Care Fresno, as needed, to follow up with longer term neighborhood interaction. The mission of
Care Fresno is: ABuilding partnerships to restore and maintain safe neighborhoods.@


        Project               Award         Expenditures       Carryover     Accomplishments
        Care Fresno           $60,000       $43,943            $16,057       1,720 LMI persons

Care Fresno conducted the following crime awareness and prevention services during the 2004 Program
Year.

                                           Care Fresno
                            CDBG Program Year 2005 Performance Measures


        •   450 unduplicated children and youth attended the ten Care Fresno sites on a weekly basis.
        •   20,000 service hours provided for children over a fifty week period.
        •   500 hundred hours of tutoring services provided over a fifty week period.
        •   35 families impacted by the Care Fresno/PIMEC collaborative services.
        •   35 families impacted each week by the Care Fresno/First Five collaborative services.
        •   10 families attended the weekly “Mommy and Me” support group.
        •   45 youth attended the “Life Skills Training” at three separate sites.
        •   250 hours of homework sessions provided at seven Care Fresno sites over fifty weeks.
        •   Care Fresno collaborated with the Fresno Police Department in several block parties.




                                                     33
2005 Program Year – CAPER




                                      Care Fresno Partnerships


    Educational:      Calif. State University Fresno             Fresno Unified School District
                      Fresno Pacific University                  Clovis Unified School District
                      Fresno City College

    Federal:          Dept. of Justice (Weed & Seed)

    City of Fresno:   Fresno Police Dept.                        Fresno Parks & Recreation
                      Police Activities League                   Citizens on Patrol
                      Fresno Fire Dept.

    County of         Health Dept.
    Fresno:

    Nonprofit         Camp Sugar Pine                            Rotary Club
    Organizations:    Ecumenical Association for Housing         The Peter F. Drucker Foundation
                      Evangelicals for Social Action             United Way of Fresno County
                      Fresno Area Churches                       World Impact
                      Hope Now for Youth

    Corporations:     AT & T                                     Imperial Bank
                      Bank Of America                            Macys
                      Blackbeards                                Mc Donald=s
                      Fresno Chiropractic and Rehab              Pizza Hut
                      Gottschalks                                Prudential Insurance
                      Ice-O-Plex                                 Wells Fargo Bank
                                                                 Wild Water Adventures




                                                   34
                                                                           2005 Program Year - CAPER


ANTI-POVERTY PLAN


Goal 7 - Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing / Prevention of Homelessness / Permanent
Housing for Homeless: Continue to provide assistance for the homeless and those in danger of becoming
homeless and improve the communication and service delivery capabilities of agencies and organizations
that provide programs to assist the homeless.


Continuum of Care Plan

The mission of the Fresno-Madera Continuum of Care (FMCoC) is to prevent, reduce and ultimately end
homelessness in the Fresno/Madera metropolitan and rural areas. The Continuum of Care was developed
through an active participatory process involving the City, the local HUD office and agencies serving
veterans, homeless, seniors, persons with disabilities, HIV/AIDS, mental illness, and substance abuses as
well as health organizations and churches. These advocates represent persons that may, or may not, be
homeless, but have special needs that may require supportive housing, including persons with HIV/AIDS.

Goal and priority setting and the identification of obstacles are the responsibility of the participating
homeless providers through the FMCoC. The City and local HUD roles are primarily advice and support.
The FMCoC became the forum by which local priorities were established for local providers in applying for
State Emergency Housing and Assistance Program (EHAP) funding. During the program year, local
agencies received over $2 million dollars in EHAP funds.

During the reporting period the City continued to support the Continuum of Care with a $30,000 CDBG
grant. CDBG funds were awarded to the Continuum to conduct a street survey, prepare the Gaps Analysis,
and provide administrative support to the Continuum functions.

Certificates of Consistency were provided to each of the agencies for their Continuum of Care Supportive
Housing Program and Shelter Plus Care Program. The agencies demonstrated consistency with the
priorities established in the City of Fresno's Consolidated Plan.

The immediate goals of the FMCoC are to secure federal and State funding for its participating agencies,
formalize its membership criteria and expand its membership. The Collaborative has also adopted a
number of planning goals which included:

   $       formalizing and strengthening the Collaborative as the governing instrument for the Continuum,
   $       hiring staff;
   $       enhancing and stabilizing the homeless provider organizations within the Continuum;
   $       developing additional case management and social work services in various programs;
   $       increasing the number of beds for the homeless; and
   $       increasing the amount of affordable housing for transitional housing providers.




                                                   35
2005 Program Year – CAPER


During the 2005 Program Year the FMCoC accomplished the following:

   •   Permanent Supportive House beds were increased by 20 percent, through the addition of 109 new
       PSH beds of which; 78 are new Chronic Homeless beds.
   •   109 new PSH beds were added, 90 percent of which focus upon the delivery of services to the
       Mentally Ill and Substance Abusers.
   •   The FMCoC adopted a new and aggressive 10-Year plan incorporating a new CoC structure
       w/specific Initiatives targeting improvement of “intershelter/ case-managing” —to meet HUD goals.


Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Program

The City continued to fund shelters for the homeless to carry out Consolidated Plan priorities. In Program
Year 2005 ESG funding was provided to: Marjaree Mason Center, Poverello House, Fresno County
Economic Opportunities Commission (EOC) - Sanctuary Youth Center, CCDC, Turning Point of Central
California, Maroa Home and Spirit of Woman.

During the program year, the homeless agencies receiving ESG funding provided over 573,000 meals and
over 121,234 shelter nights to 17,042 homeless persons. The ESG Program requires that the funding
recipients to provide matching funds, an equal amount of funding from non-ESG funding sources. The
agencies reported a total of $845,100 in matching funds during the program.

The results of the program year’s activities, as provided by the quarterly monitoring reports submitted by
the program recipients, are shown in the table below. Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) funding levels for
each of the agencies are also shown in the table below. ESG funding provided reimbursement for shelter
maintenance and repair, security, insurance and utility costs.

There were no slow moving projects during the program year. All 2005 Program Year ESG funds were
committed during the program year. Shelter agencies were funded with contracts executed July 1, 2005.
All fourth quarter Program Year 2005 funds were made in the 2006 Program Year due to the City=s fiscal
year ending June 30, 2006.


Supportive Housing Program

The City does not administer Supportive Housing Grants. All previous SGP grants have been closed.
However, during a routine monitoring visit conducted by HUD staff reflected tenants residing in the
apartment complex were not relocated in accordance with the federal Uniform Relocation Act (URA). HUD,
the City and EOC have developed a strategy to locate and provide benefits to person involuntarily
displaced during the conversion activity. During the 2005 Program Year no families were located and paid.


Housing for People with AIDS (HOPWA)

The City does not receive an allocation of HOPWA funds from HUD. One of the criteria for receiving
HOPWA funds is to have a certain amount of reported AIDS and HIV cases. Last year, Fresno County
received HOPWA funds and subcontracted $55,000 to the Fair Housing Council. Fresno County Health
Services Department provides short term rental and supportive services. The Fair Housing Council
provides fair housing counseling and resource identification services.




                                                   36
                                                                              2005 Program Year - CAPER


                           Summary of Accomplishments under the ESG Program
             Marjaree    Poverello      EOC                                   Turning      Spirit
                                                    EOC TLC       CCDC                                 Total
              Mason       House       Sanctuary                                Point      Woman

  Funding     $87,558      $92,363       $49,021         18,211     $2,352     $25,199     $44,485    $319,189

    Meals     100,440      442,218         6,770         14,870      8.848           0                 573,146

  Units of
               30,755       20,872         9,097          2,752       5,518      9,344      42,896     122,089
  Shelter

 Matching
              $94,000     $115,000       $63,000         $3,000     $4,100    $512,000     $54,000    $845,100
   Funds

                                                                                          County of
                                                                                 State/
             County of      Private                                                       Fresno &
   Source                              Foundation   Foundation    Donations     federal
              Fresno`     Donations                                                          EHAP
                                                                                  funds
                                                                                              fees



Goal 8 - External Support and Coordination of Services: Depending on funding availability, continue to
provide assistance to public agencies and nonprofit organizations providing neighborhood housing
services, supportive services to the homeless, adults with physical and/or mental impairments, the mentally
ill, victims of domestic violence, and households with abused children among others. Coordinate with
public agencies providing job training, life skills training, lead poisoning prevention and remediation and
other education programs that support the City=s housing and community development strategies.


City staff evaluated Program Year 2005 grant applications based upon Consolidated Plan priorities,
community priorities, prior commitments, and the availability of funding. HUD allows the City to fund up to
15 percent of its CDBG allocation for public service activities. The City budgeted and expended 14.99
percent of its CDBG funds for Senior Nutrition Program, Enrichment Program, Care Fresno, Consumer
Credit Counseling Program and the District Crime Suppression Team Program. The Crime Suppression
Team and Care Fresno Programs were discussed earlier in the CAPER under Goal 6.


Consumer Credit Counseling Services (CCCS) Program

CCCS provided consumer education and counseling services to enhance the credit rating for first time
homebuyers and tenants, under the City=s CDBG contract. CCCS programs include:

   $     instruction on the wise use of credit;
   $     development of sound personal financial management skills;
   $     housing consumer rights and responsibilities;
   $     mortgage financing options for low and moderate income families;
   $     shopping for affordable housing;
   $     insurance; and
   $     maintenance




                                                    37
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Activities are made available in English, Spanish, Hmong, Thai, Cambodian and Lao. CCCS conducted
Homebuyer Education and Learning Program (HELP) workshops for a total of 710 persons during the
program year. In an effort to reach out to the Southeast Asian population, CCCS participated in the
Hmong New Year event and met with Asian congregations.


        Project              Award         Expenditures     Carryover     Accomplishments
        Consumer Credit       $40,000         $30,000        $10,000          710 persons


Goal 9 - Economic Development: Promote economic development and redevelopment.


Empowerment Zone Designation

On January 1, 2002, the City was one of only seven cities nationwide to be designated in Round III as an
Empowerment Zone (EZ) by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). This
designation is for a nine-year period and will provide:

   •   Wage Credits including Employment, Work Opportunity and Welfare to Work tax credits.
   •   Specialized Deductions for buildings and equipment, including increased Section 179 and
       environmental clean up cost deductions.
   •   Bond Financing including EZ Facility and Qualified Zone Academy bonds.
   •   Capital Gain incentives such as non-recognition of gain on sale of EZ assets and partial exclusion
       of gain from sale of EZ stock.
   •   Housing Tax credits for newly constructed or renovated rental housing including New Markets Tax
       Credits and Low Income Housing Tax Credits.

Since receiving the federal empowerment designation, job and economic development activities have
focused on three primary areas: 1) job retention and attraction; 2) workforce development; 3) access to
capital. The following is a examination of the successes realized in each of the three areas:

While attracting new companies to Fresno is a significant element in the overall strategy for reducing
Fresno's chronic unemployment, it is recognized that 70 percent of all new jobs will be generated by
existing firms. To acquaint the 2,600 businesses located in the Empowerment Zone with the incentives and
programming available, the Empowerment Zone Board of Directors have produced and distributed
newsletters, produced marketing materials in both English and Spanish, an information based website and
marketing CD. In addition, a professional continuing education program was conducted to provide Certified
Public Accountants with Empowerment Zone information.

The Fresno Empowerment Zone, in close partnership with the Workforce Investment Board, EDD,
Workforce Connection and Center for New Americans have produced two job fairs. These fairs have
attracted over 60 employers and 700 applicants.

The Fresno Empowerment Zone Board of Directors has led an initiative to develop a private sector,
Community Reinvestment Act Microloan program. The fund is expected to cap at $1.1 million in funds and
will focus on loans under $50,000.




                                                   38
                                                                               2005 Program Year - CAPER


Section 108 Loan Repayments - Eligibility: Low/Mod Direct Benefit; Economic Development

Since 1996, the City has received four separate Section 108 loans: 1) the Security Pacific Towers project;
2) the Regional Medical Center project; 3) Senior Resource Center; and 4) Parks/Streets. No new loan
activity occurred during the 2005 Program Year with the exception of repayments.

        Project                    CDBG Award      Expenditures    Carryover     Accomplishments
        Section 108 Repayment        $332,000        $326,156          -0-            N/A


Goal 10 – Monitoring: Establish and implement a monitoring program for the Consolidated Plan and other
housing activities.


CDBG Administration and Monitoring

HUD permits the City to utilize a portion of each grant to prepare the annual funding application and
performance reports, monitor approved activities, develop programs, assure citizen involvement in the
process, provide technical assistance and take necessary steps to ensure federal program requirements
are met.

CDBG administration also includes expenses incurred through the administration of the Emergency Shelter
Grant (ESG). ESG regulations limit administration costs to five percent of the total grant. The actual
implementation of the program exceeds this amount and is charged to CDBG administration. As well,
expenses incurred from staffing citizen meetings, environmental assessment of projects, and other
operational costs are charged to CDBG administration.

City staff conducts monitoring activities based upon the type of project, the complexity of the project and/or
the assistance needed by the entity receiving the funding.

CDBG and ESG Monitoring – During the program year City staff conducted both on-site monitoring and
financial monitoring of all CDBG and ESG funded projects. Prior to executing the CDBG or ESG contract
City staff conducts a pre-contract site visit to ensure the services can be carried out by the agency and to
ensure the site and activity is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Financial Monitoring – Staff conducts monthly and quarterly desk reviews of documents submitted by the
agency when a request for a drawdown of funds is made from the CDBG award. Documents are reviewed
to ensure expenses incurred are CDBG or ESG eligible. The frequency of the desk review depends upon
the how the contract is set up to reimburse the agency.

On-Site Monitoring – Staff conducts on-site monitoring of CDBG and ESG funded activities at least once a
year, but more frequently depending upon the capacity of the agency. The frequency of an on-site monitor
is dependent upon several factors:

   •   Newly funded activities are monitored at least twice a year.
   •   Construction activities are monitored several times through the duration of the project for progress
       and cross-cutting regulations such as prevailing wage.

During the program year the City did not make any findings, however, corrective actions were issued to two
nonprofit agencies for ineligibility of expenses related to the CDBG and ESG Programs. After completing
desk reviews of the reimbursement requests, both agencies requested reimbursement for expenses that
were not related to the funded programs. The City issued a corrective action letter to the agencies allowing
them 30 days to resubmit eligible billings.


                                                     39
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Historic Preservation Program

As part of its administration, the City uses CDBG funds to cover part of its historic preservation program.
The City is a Certified Local Government (CLG) under a Programmatic Agreement with the State Office of
Historic Preservation. As a CLG, the City can independently review projects which use federal funds that
may affect houses and buildings that are, or may be, of historic value. Any house or building, however
modest, that is over fifty years old cannot be demolished, removed or rehabilitated through a federally
funded project without an assessment by the City=s Historic Preservation Project Manager.

The City Council first adopted a Historic Preservation Ordinance in 1979. The Ordinance established a
Historic Preservation Commission which oversees the Official List of Historical Resources. The
Commission also reviews applications and permits affecting potential historic resources within the City
limits.


         Project                Award         Expenditures      Carryover      Accomplishments
         CDBG                                                                  Monitoring and program
                                 $985,917         $810,657        $175,260
         Administration                                                            administration


Fair Housing Program

The City of Fresno adheres to Fair Housing laws and regulations in accordance to HUD requirements. The
City classified its CDBG contribution to the Fair Housing Council as an administrative cost. Education and
fair housing monitoring components are met through a subcontract with the Fair Housing Council of Fresno
County (FHCCC).

Fair housing means that all people will have equal access to housing opportunities regardless of race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial status, sexual orientation, source of income, or national origin. The
City actively and financially supports the FHCCC to further affirmative fair housing counseling, outreach and
education, referral for discrimination complaints, tenant and home buying counseling, and identifying
impediments to fair housing.

The FHCCC deals exclusively with fair housing enforcement and related educational activities and provides
an immediate and direct influence on activities and decisions of local government, housing providers,
financial institutions, insurance companies and low income housing providers involving fair housing issues.
Examples of activities taken by the FHCCC include:

   •    Evaluation of planning and zoning issues and building codes to lessen impacts on seniors and
        persons with disabilities.
    • Analysis of expenditures of federal funds to ensure that requirements to affirmatively further fair
        housing are met.
    • Evaluation of the impact of bank mergers, closures and acquisitions and their impact on those who
        have traditionally suffered discrimination in obtaining mortgages, financing and refinancing as well
        as market penetration into minority and integrated neighborhoods.
    • Ensuring that people receive equal treatment and access to rental housing.
    • Resolution of fair housing disputes and complaints.
Investigation of Housing Discrimination Claims - In Fresno, FHCCC received over 1,007 housing
discrimination complaints during the program year. Of these complaints, 420 cases were located in Fresno
and 123 were opened for further investigation, pending referral to the State, HUD, or a private attorney.




                                                      40
                                                                            2005 Program Year - CAPER


FHCCC also receives landlord/tenant complaints that are outside of fair housing jurisdiction. These
complaints are referred to appropriate agencies, i.e., Central California Legal Assistance, Small Claims
Advisor=s office, Attorney Referral Services, city and county code enforcement entities, or the Better
Business Bureau=s Dispute Settlement Center.

Fair Housing Literature and Translations: Fair housing literature has been developed in English,
Cambodian, Hmong, Laotian, Spanish and Vietnamese. In addition, a fair housing manual for housing
providers was made available. Literature has been distributed to over 106 community agencies and
schools.


        Project            CDBG Award      Expenditures      Carryover     Accomplishments
        Fair Housing         $50,000          $37,500          12,500        City-wide education


Other Fair Housing Activities

The City has participated with the Americans with Disabilities Act Advisory Council and the Committee for
the Employment of Persons with Disabilities to provide information regarding strategies to affirmatively
further fair housing for special needs groups. These groups were also provided information on the City’s
housing programs.


HOME Administration and Monitoring

The City approximated HOME program administration at $617,099, based upon program income
information available. The City expended $607,913 in HOME funds during the program year to administer
the program; the amount permitted by the grant, and carried over $9,186 into the next program year.

HOME Monitoring – During the program year City staff monitored the construction progress of housing
development activities; occupancy monitoring for the Homebuyer Programs, and affordability requirements
on existing housing development projects funded under the HOME Program. Each development project is
assigned a project manager that monitors the project from pre-development to completion. The monitoring
consists of site visits, compliance with housing quality standards, compliance with the contract’s scope of
work, and prevailing wages. There were no findings issued during the 2005 program year on HOME
funded projects.


        Project               HOME Award      Expenditures    Carryover    Accomplishments
        HOME                                                                   Monitoring and
                                $617,099        $607,913        $9,186
        Administration                                                     program administration




                                                    41
2005 Program Year – CAPER


HUD Regulations limit HOME administrative costs to 10 percent of the entitlement and program income.
However, there are certain program delivery costs that are eligible under the CDBG Program. During the
program year, $509,083 was awarded for staff to offset the costs of delivering the City’s Housing
Rehabilitation, HOME-CHDO, and Home Buyer Programs.


        Project                CDBG Award       Expenditures      Carryover    Accomplishments
        Housing      Program
                                  $509,083         $389,757         $119,326          N/A
        Delivery


ESG Administration and Monitoring

The City also budgeted $16,799, the full 5 percent administrative costs permitted for the ESG program. The
City conducted 14 on- site monitoring visits to the agencies during the program year to ensure program
compliance.


        Project                Award         Expenditures      Carryover   Accomplishments
        ESG Administration                                                 Monitoring and program
                                $16,199         $16,199            -0-
                                                                               administration




                                                   42
                                                                            2005 Program Year - CAPER


Affirmative Marketing - Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business
Enterprise Analysis

The City has adopted a policy statement expressing a commitment to use Disadvantaged Business
Enterprises (DBE), which includes the former Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) and Women Business
Enterprise (WBE) in all aspects of contracting financed in whole and in part by the federal government. The
policy is to create a level playing field on which DBEs can compete fairly for federal contracts and
subcontracts. In compliance with rules and regulations contained in 49 CFR Part 26, the City DBE policy
and commitment are directed at construction projects and procurement of professional services, supplies,
equipment, and materials. The objective of the DBE program is to involve disadvantaged business
enterprises in all aspects of federal contracts.

The City Manager has general responsibility for implementing the DBE policy. The DBE program is
routinely administered by the City’s DBE/Small Business Coordinator in the General Services Department.
The DBE Liaison Officer is responsible for carrying out technical assistance activities for disadvantaged
business enterprises and for disseminating information on available business opportunities so that
disadvantaged business enterprises are provided an equitable opportunity to bid on City contracts. The
objectives of the DBE Program are listed, as follows:

   •   To aggressively seek out and identify firms owned and controlled by socially and economically
       disadvantaged individuals who are qualified to provide the City with required goods, materials,
       supplies, and services needed for the City’s operations.
   •   To develop and implement information and communication programs and procedures geared to
       acquaint prospective DBEs with the City for contracting and procurement procedures and
       requirements.
   •   To contribute to the economic stability and growth of DBEs in the Fresno metropolitan area.
   •   To attain the annual DBE participation goals as established with the Federal Transit Administration,
       the Federal Aviation Administration, the Federal Highway Administration, and any other federal
       agencies requiring goal submission and to meet all federal guidelines in the administration of this
       program.

The City has an Affirmative Marketing Policy and has developed a plan for use in accordance with HOME
Program regulations. The Policy is applied to all programs where required by the HOME Program.




                                                    43
2005 Program Year – CAPER


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AVAILABLE THROUGH COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS


Fresno Housing Authority
The following information was received from the Fresno City and County Housing Authorities:

The Housing Authority of the City of Fresno (Housing Authority) acquires well-located, market-rate, multi-
family rental complexes for the purpose of maintaining affordable rents. The Housing Authority acquires
these projects through a variety of financing instruments. Since the program was implemented in January
1994, there have been 290 rental units acquired by this method. The Housing Authority receives an annual
allocation of Capital Funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. These funds
are used in the major rehabilitation of Public Housing units throughout the City, and $2.13 million was
received in 2005.

The City also prepared Certifications for additional HUD FY 2006 SuperNOFA applications under the
following three Housing Authority program applications: Healthy Homes Demonstration Program, Family
Self Sufficiency Program, and Mainstream Housing Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities.

Housing Programs

The single largest source of affordable public housing in the Fresno area is the Housing Authority. In its
role as a provider of affordable rental housing, the Housing Authority provides the following tenant services:
Public Housing Units - The Housing Authority manages and maintains 1,006 public housing units in twenty
complexes within the city. Vacancy rates continue to be almost nonexistent. As of June 30, 2004, one
percent of all public housing units were vacant.

Since 1990, over $30 million has been spent on rehabilitating complexes throughout the city. During the
2002 Program Year, the Housing Authority received nearly $1.84 million from HUD=s Capital Fund Program.
This program and similar programs in the past have allowed the Housing Authority to modernize nearly all
of the complexes in the City, since 1980. In the last 12 years, all complexes in West Fresno have received
modernization funding.

Section 8 Units - Within the city, the Housing Authority provides Section 8 rent subsidies to about 6,095
families, including the Welfare to Work, Beyond Housing (for elderly/disabled families), and Family
Unification programs. The Housing Authority also offers programs that assist low-income home buyers:

Homeownership Opportunities Program - The Homeownership Opportunities Program allows current public
housing tenants who are prospective home buyers to accumulate a down payment, called a Home
Ownership Reserve. This reserve comes from the Housing Authority’s budgeted maintenance costs.
Tenants of single family homes owned by the Housing Authority receive the benefit of accumulating any
maintenance reserve on the assumption that they perform routine maintenance themselves on their lease
option home, thereby saving the Housing Authority labor and material costs. A training course is provided
to tenants teaching them the skills necessary to perform routine maintenance tasks as well as useful
information about home ownership. This course has been a key ingredient to the success of the
Homeownership Opportunities Program.

Mortgage Credit Certificate Program - A Mortgage Credit Certificate (MCC) program is administered by the
Housing Authority. This program provides first-time home buyers a 15 percent tax credit on annual interest
paid on the primary mortgage. The credit is taken annually as long as the owner occupies the residence
and maintains the original mortgage. Twenty-eight MCCs were issued by the Housing Authority to home
buyers.



                                                     44
                                                                          2005 Program Year - CAPER


Housing-Related Self-Sufficiency Programs

Over the years, the Housing Authority has developed a variety of programs to help address problems and
encourage families to achieve economic self-sufficiency. These programs include the following: Family
Self-Sufficiency Program, Resident Initiatives, Family Education Centers, Karl Falk Memorial Scholarship
Program, Youth Mentor Program and Building Stronger Families Program.




                                                  45
2005 Program Year – CAPER


AFFIRMATIVELY AFFIRMING FAIR HOUSING


Analysis of Impediments

The City, through its policies, programs and practices, supports and promotes fair housing. The City has
formally certified that it affirmatively furthers fair housing as a matter of City policy, and as a condition of
receiving federal funds. The Analysis of Impediments (AI) is a comprehensive review and analysis of
policies, procedures and practices, in both the private and public sectors, which impede protected classes
from fair housing choices. In the AI the City details the impediments and effects fair housing discrimination
has on all protected classes. The document was adopted by the City Council on December 14, 1999, and
has been accepted by HUD.

The Analysis of Impediments identified the following eight impediments and corresponding actions that the
City would take to address those impediments over several years. Under each action, there is a listing of
the City=s activities that were undertaken during the program year to address the impediment. Details of
many of these activities are provided elsewhere in the Annual Action Plan Goals and Accomplishments
section of the CAPER. Notations are made in this section indicating where those details can be found.

Impediment 1: Substantial Number of Neighborhoods in Need of Revitalization.

Action: Rehabilitate housing, upgrade infrastructure and improve services necessary to increase the
supply of safe, decent and affordable housing for low income households including minorities, persons with
disabilities, the homeless and large-family households.

Rehabilitation Programs - The City continued its efforts in the rehabilitation of housing and the completion
of deferred maintenance. Accomplishments were met through the Owner Occupied Housing Rehabilitation
Program, Senior Paint and Emergency Repair Grant Program, the Rental Rehabilitation Program and the
Redevelopment Agency=s Repair Program. A detailed listing of the programs can be reviewed under Goal
2.

Accessibility - CDBG, HOME and ESG funding applications include a section highlighting the inclusion of
accessibility features.

Lead-Based Paint - During the program year, the City evaluated its projects for compliance with lead-
based paint regulations. Information regarding the status of the City=s compliance can be found under Goal
2.

Infrastructure - Annual CDBG expenditures in millions of dollars were made to construct or reconstruct
streets, curbs, gutters and sidewalks, upgrade streetlights and install accessibility features in low-income
areas. A detailed listing of the new features can be reviewed under Goal 5. In addition the City used CDBG
funds to install 48 curb cuts in compliance with the ADA. These curb cuts at intersections provide persons
in wheel chairs access to neighborhood sidewalks.

ADA Building Upgrades - The City continued ongoing public building upgrades to comply with Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements and monitoring of compliance features.

Crime Prevention - Funding was directed to the District Crime Suppression Team (DCST) to directly
address crime within low income neighborhoods. Care Fresno, a nonprofit agency, works with the Police
Department to reduce crime in neighborhoods, particularly in apartment complexes. The agency designs,
coordinates and manages self-sustaining programs to help targeted neighborhoods maintain healthy and


                                                      46
                                                                             2005 Program Year - CAPER


safe living environments with the ultimate goal of crime prevention. Many of the activities Care Fresno
provides are targeted to at-risk youth. Activities include homework sessions, parental mentoring, and
special programs such as Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) classes to teach problem solving skills. Goal 6
details specifics on both DCST and Care Fresno activities.

Code Enforcement - The Code Enforcement Unit has continued its work week to include Saturday and
Sunday to better respond to enforcement calls that occur on the weekend. A detailed listing of program
accomplishments can be reviewed under Goal 2.

Impediment 2: Insufficient production of affordable units and rehabilitation of existing units by nonprofit
organizations and private sector developers.

Action: Increase new construction production and rehabilitation of existing affordable housing by
increasing the expertise and capacity of the nonprofit housing community and stimulating the private sector.

Nonprofit Housing Organizations - During the program year, City staff worked with prospective
Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs).

Tax Credit Projects - City staff provided technical support for the review of two tax credit applications for
the development of affordable multi-family units. During the program year approximately 173 units were
submitted for review to the State Tax Credit Allocation Committee. To assist in making the projects
competitive, the City developed a process in August 2000, where Tax Credit Community Revitalization
Areas could be designated administratively. As a result, the City began seeing local housing projects
approved. Details on the tax credit applicants can be reviewed under Goal 2.

Mobilehome Parks - City continued to administer the Mobilehome Rent and Stabilization Ordinance with
City General Funds. Approximately two-thirds of mobile home park residents are elderly, receive a fixed-
income, are unemployed and in lower income categories. The Rent and Stabilization Ordinance seeks to
protect mobile home park residents from excessive rent increases, while at the same time providing mobile
home park owners a just, fair and reasonable return on their investment.

Impediment 3: Inability of low-income families to purchase adequate housing.

Action: Increase the number of qualified home buyers, the number of loans approved for low- income
individuals or households (including minority, persons with disabilities, homeless and large-family
households), and the number of homes purchased in low-income areas including an increase in personal
income through economic development activities.

Assistance to Prospective Home buyers - The City continued its efforts to improve the production of
affordable housing for low-income families through financial support of nonprofit organizations, such as
CDBG-funded Consumer Credit Counseling. This agency provides homeowner education, credit and
budgeting education through its series of workshops and confidential counseling. During the program year,
the agency conducted 52 home buyer education classes in which 70 percent were of low and moderate
income. The Housing Authority also has a first-time homebuyer training program. This will enhance Goal
2.

CHC - The Community Housing Council (CHC) is a group of lenders and housing experts that address
housing issues within the community. They sponsor and provide the format and details for housing trade
shows. The City provides the meeting room and staff representation for the group.




                                                     47
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Housing Seminars - Housing seminars are provided to prospective homeowners by lenders and nonprofit
agencies. Staff participated in numerous activities to promote and encourage participation in the City=s
home buyer programs. Many of the events were in partnership with HUD and other nonprofit housing
agencies. City Staff participated in a variety of home buyer and neighborhood events, Fair Housing
Conference and HUD events. Details are listed under Goal 1.

Economic Development - Funding is directed toward programs such as the Inner City Fee Reduction
Program, Economic Development Program and Enterprise Zone incentives to stimulate economic
development and employment for low-income persons. The City received a HUD Empowerment Zone
designation in fall 2001. See Goal 9 for details.

Home Buyer Assistance Program - The Home Buyer Assistance Program and the Closing Cost
Assistance Program assists first time home buyers with the down payment needed to purchase a home.
During the 2005 Program Year, 10 Home Buyer Assistance were provided to homeowners. Additional
information can be reviewed under Goal 2.

Home Ownership - The Housing Authority provided Mortgage Credit Certificates and Homeownership
Opportunities Program loans to further assist low-income families in purchasing adequate housing.

HMDA - During the program year, the City did not conduct an analysis of the Home Mortgage Disclosure
Data (HMDA) prepared by the Federal Reserve System. The last analysis was done in November 1999,
when the City completed one for the 1992-1997 data. Further analysis will be done in the next fiscal year,
since the City needs about three to four years of data to identify meaningful trends. Previous studies have
indicated an overall positive trend in home lending patterns. The differences between Caucasians and two
protected groups declined substantially during the period. However, there still appears to be a disparity
between African-American and Caucasian home mortgages. For details, refer to the City=s Analysis of
Impediments.

Affirmative Marketing - The City has an Affirmative Marketing Policy (Equal Opportunity Housing). The
policy assures that housing units funded with City HOME Program funds are marketed in such a way that
those that are socially and/or economically disadvantaged are informed when units become available and
are encouraged to apply and have an equal opportunity to rent or own a home. There weren’t any HOME-
funded housing projects were required to prepare and implement a plan during the program year. A copy
of the policy is on the City=s web page.

Impediment 4: Insufficient participation of low-income group and minority volunteers in housing planning,
programs and decision-making processes.

Action: Continue to promote diversity of composition on all appointed Boards, committees, Task Forces
and Commissions that reflect the cultural, social, racial, economic, family make-up, sex, health, disabilities,
age and other characteristics of the population; continue to promote volunteerism and participation in
community activities affecting housing.

Mayor=s Appointments - The Mayor maintains an eleven-member Mayor=s Organization of Volunteer
Expertise (MOVE) which included African Americans, Hispanics, Southeast Asians, and Caucasians.

Languages - The City continues to print housing information in a variety of languages.

Impediment 5: Inability to maximize the potential for zoning, building and safety codes to positively impact
housing supply and programs due to outdated U.S. Census data and General Plan.



                                                      48
                                                                            2005 Program Year - CAPER


Action: Obtain year 2000 census data as soon as available. Complete current General Plan update and
prepare new Housing Element. Review and improve City codes and ordinances. Improve and step up
enforcement and permitting processes.
General Plan - The 2025 General Plan was completed in November 2002. See Goal 4 for details.

Housing Element - The City of Fresno adopted the revised Housing Element on June 18, 2002. See Goal
4 for details.

Reasonable Accommodations - The City adopted a reasonable accommodation ordinance. See Goal 4
for details.

ADA Plan - The City hired a consultant in March 2002 to prepare a Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan to
identify needs and to develop an implementation strategy to meet Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
requirements. The Plan identifies ADA deficiencies in City buildings and public works facilities, including
curb cuts improvements. As part of this process, fifty people participated in a City-conducted open house
to discuss ADA issues.

ADA Advisory Committee - The City ADA Advisory Committee meets ten times a year with City staff to
identify and review issues that adversely affect persons with disabilities. Some of those issues were
pedestrian accessibility to sidewalks, crosswalks and intersections and street lighting.

Impediment 6: Difficult for local, state and federal programs to eliminate housing discrimination.

Action: Document, investigate and monitor registered complaints of housing discrimination. Increase
community awareness and knowledge of fair housing rights and responsibilities. Implement program for
recognizing, monitoring and deterring discrimination even in its subtlest forms.

Fair Housing Council - The City provides funding to the Fair Housing Council to provide fair housing
education to the general public, local and regional training and mediation services between tenants and
landlords.

RentSense - The public can access and explanation of fair housing laws and practices 24 hours a day
through RentSense, a taped housing and referral service.

Housing Information - The City posts housing, training and workshop information on its Website.

Impediment 7: Lack of sufficient housing and services for those who are homeless or threatened with
homelessness.

Action: Improve services and increase housing opportunities for the homeless and those threatened with
homelessness including minorities, persons with disabilities and large-family households.

ESG - The City is committed to meeting the needs of the homeless and those threatened with
homelessness. The City continues to meet this goal through the use of the Emergency Shelter Grant
(ESG) Program. Details of agencies receiving ESG can be reviewed under Goal 7.

Collaboration - City staff continues to play an active role in the Continuum of Care Collaborative meetings
to ensure that needs of the homeless are met. See details under Goal 7.

Workshops - The City conducted two application workshops to assist applicants in preparing City funding
requests related to accessing CDBG, HOME and ESG funds.


                                                    49
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Monitoring - The City regularly monitors ESG recipients to ensure that funding is used properly and in
accordance with federal regulations. During the program year, staff has utilized its monitoring handbook
which provides for uniform review and monitoring procedures of funding recipients.

Police Support - The Police Department has developed relationships with the Fresno Rescue Mission,
Poverello House and the Marjaree Mason Center for Victims of Domestic Violence, so that they are able to
refer persons to the appropriate center that are in need of these services. In addition, services for runaway
youth are directed to Sanctuary Youth Center for youth that are either homeless or unable to live with their
parents or guardians. The Police Department also has chaplains available to assist the homeless, when
needed.

Impediment 8: Inadequate financial resources for implementation of housing plans and programs.

Action: The City will (a) seek additional funding with the community, nonprofit and private sector groups,
other cities and counties, regional partners, legislative advocates and state and federal agencies, (b)
match, leverage and invest funding to maximize purchasing power, (c) continue to streamline development
processes to avoid duplications of efforts, and (d) take actions to stimulate economic development.

Leveraging - Grant funds administered by the City are used to maximize their effectiveness through
leveraging of funds and matching its funds. During the program year, the City leveraged over $3.5 million
in private funds with its CDBG, HOME and ESG funds.

Other Funding Sources - City staff continues its research to identify other sources of funds to assist in
meeting the needs of the community. During the reporting period the City applied and was granted State
CalHome funds to assist first time home buyers with the down payment of a house purchase.

Matching Funds - During the year, the City HOME program generated an additional $572,254 in matching
funds in program income. The funds were derived from program income from the Rental Rehabilitation
Program (RRP); loan payoffs; the present value of interest subsidy for loans made at rates below market;
present value of interest subsidy created by seller and broker buy-down of interest rates for loans; fees
waived by the Fresno County Recorder; sweat equity; and cash contributions from other non-City
programs.




                                                     50
                                                                            2005 Program Year - CAPER


CITY OF FRESNO SELF EVALUATION OF THE 2005 PROGRAM YEAR

The City began the first year of its 2006-2010 Consolidated Plan. The City, by way of its FY 2005-2006
Annual Action Plan, focused on ten priorities identified in the Consolidated Plan and described, at the
beginning of this CAPER report. On an annual basis, various priorities will be emphasized over the five
year Consolidated Plan period, as the City responds to community input, needs and accomplishments. The
following highlights some of the activities that have taken place with Community Development Block Grant
(CDBG), Home Investment Partnerships (HOME), Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) and other City
resources during the past program year:

Housing Policy Adopted
On April 9, 2002, the City Council adopted the following housing policies: 1) Improve and preserve the
quality of housing in our existing neighborhoods; and 2) Increase the quantity of affordable housing. As
part of the action, the Council approved two recommendations identifying several programs that could be
implemented to address City needs. In addition, the City has requested technical assistance from HUD
through their consultant, ICF Consulting, to evaluate and modify the City=s housing programs.

Empowerment Zone
The City of Fresno has been an Empowerment Zone community since 2002. The designation provides a
variety of incentives to businesses located or wanting to locate in specific lower- income neighborhoods.
There are also incentives to employ lower-income residents.

Housing Rehabilitation
The City improved the condition of 167 housing units during the program year through the various
rehabilitation programs. The City=s SMART Program completed noise abatement activities on 40 homes.
The goals for the City=s major rehabilitation program were less than projected.

During the program year the Housing Authority continued to in its efforts to meet the goals of the 2004
contract with the City. During the program year the Housing Authority rehabilitated 17 houses from its 2004
contract with the City of Fresno. The Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation Program has returned to the City for
retooling of the program.

New Housing Construction
During Program Year 2005 Habitat for Humanity - Crossroads Project completed six affordable housing
units. The City=s goal as established in the Housing Element was 500 units.

Homeownership Programs
The City assisted 10 families with homeownership during the program year through the Home Buyer
Assistance Programs. The program exceeded its 2004 Program Year goals. Each program has been
impacted by a substantial increase in housing prices in the past two years. For many years, Fresno had
been known for its affordable living while other areas in the state experienced increases in housing costs.
The City reduced its goals for Program Year 2005 to reflect the market. The Home Buyer Assistance
Program continued to primarily benefit minority households with more than 100 percent minority customers
served during the program year.

Under the City=s New Development Program the City provided mortgage assistance to 6 families through
the CURE project.

Large Families
One of the goals of the Consolidated Plan is to address the needs of large families. Through the Home
Buyer Assistance Program, the Closing Cost Assistance, and Owner Occupied Housing Program, the City
assisted 31 large families.


                                                    51
2005 Program Year – CAPER


Habitat for Humanity
The City and Habitat for Humanity have worked together to complete the subdivision known as Crossroads.
This project which utilized CHDO funds for infrastructure improvements. Habitat for Humanity, the project
developer, is behind schedule in constructing the houses. During the program year, six homes were
constructed.

Tax Credits
The City was instrumental in supporting two tax credit projects involving during the program year, which
exceeded the goal projected in the Annual Action Plan. The tax credit projects reviewed during the program
year total 163 units. In the last three years, the City has taken a proactive position in assisting the State in
their analysis and in creating community revitalization areas. These actions have reportedly made a
difference in project approval in this very competitive process.

Support of Grant Applications
The City has actively supported local agencies and nonprofit organizations applying for federal grant funds.
During the 2005 Program Year, the City supported Housing Authority efforts in obtaining HUD grant funding
for its programs. The City supported local homeless providers in applying for HUD=s Supportive Housing
Program funds. The City also supported fair housing groups in obtaining HUD funds and Fresno City
College in obtaining special assistance for minority students. The City provided 32 Certificates of
Consistency with the Consolidated Plan and the Empowerment Zone Strategy during the program year.

Mobilehome Ordinance
The City has had a rent control ordinance in place since 1988 to protect low income persons who own their
units and are often subject to unfair space rent increases.

Lead Based Paint
The federal government has had major public health concerns about lead-based paint and has ordered
cities and counties to remove lead-based paint as part of its housing rehabilitation program. The City was
one of only a few cities in the state that met the September 15, 2000, deadline for complying with federal
Lead-Based Paint regulations.

Crime Prevention
During the program year crime fell 3.2 percent in CDBG eligible areas. Additional details can be found
under Goal 6.

Code Enforcement
The City addressed more than 14,188 code violations during the year. City staff continues to use other
funds to educate the public on applicable municipal codes that assist in sustaining low income
neighborhoods.

Street Improvements
Nearly every low income neighborhood has received public works infrastructure improvements in the past
five years.

Neighborhood Facility Improvements
During the program year the City has rehabilitated one of its oldest community centers, Ted C. Wills. The
center received structural rehabilitation and created a Senior Lounge will a computer lab. Additionally the
City provided funds for the rehabilitation of core structures within low and moderate income areas. The
Boys and Girls Club received $182,000 to rehabilitate the structure; Marjaree Mason Center, a shelter for
battered children and spouses was awarded $175,500 in CDBG funds to rehabilitate the exterior of the
building, and $69,000 was awarded to the One By One Leadership Organization to rehabilitate a
neighborhood resource center.


                                                      52
                                                                               2005 Program Year - CAPER


Continuum of Care Collaborative
The City continues to support the efforts of the Continuum of Care Collaborative (a group of homeless
service providers) in their effort to access Supportive Housing Program funds to address the needs of
homeless persons. By working together, local agencies were able to obtain more than $2 million from HUD
in Supportive Housing Program and Shelter Plus Care funds.

Matching Funds
The City has exceeded matching requirements for the HOME and ESG programs.

Staff Training
The City staff participated in a number of training sessions to remain current on federal program
requirements. The subject of these workshops included managing the CDBG and HOME Program,
program financing, fair housing, HUD’s Housing Summit.

Citizen Participation Plan
The City continues to provide opportunities to for citizens to participate in the grant funding process, review
and comment on community development and housing projects. The City conducted four public hearings
during the program year, and two application workshops.

Drawdown Rates
The City continues to draw down CDBG funds on a quarterly basis and meets the timeliness test 45-days
prior to the end of the program year. However, City staff continues to work diligently on ensuring the
drawdown and commitment requirements under the HOME Program are met. The City has aggressively
outreached to nonprofits and CHDOs in an effort to increase new construction development.

HUD Monitoring of Entitlement Programs
HUD did not meet monitor the City during the program year. However, City staff continues to monitor the
entitlement programs in compliance with HUD rules and regulations.

Program Year questions from HUD
At the conclusion of each program year HUD reviews the CAPER from each jurisdiction for to ensure
compliance with federal regulations. After review of the program year 2005 CAPER, HUD posed several
programmatic questions to the City. Below in bold print are HUD questions with City responses following.

Why was the ADDI program so much more successful than the other housing programs?
The ADDI program is used in conjunction with both the HOME funded and State funded homebuyer
assistance programs the City administers. As a result, the number of ADDI loans exceeds the reported
number of HOME loans.

For all activities, it appears that the majority of persons served were in the 51-80 percent income
level. Why was this?
All of the City’s programs are set up to serve very-low to low income households. In the homebuyer
program, due to the high cost of housing and relatively low income levels, we continue to primarily qualify
low-income (51 to 80% AMI) households for the program. Our rehabilitation program is focused on owner
occupied housing, which again typically serves low-income existing homeowners.

In terms of serving very-low income households, our rental rehabilitation program, which was initiated last
year, typically serves this income group. We anticipate rehabilitating approximately 30 very-low income
housing units this reporting year. In addition, our HOME funded Federal Low Income Housing Tax Credit
projects primarily serve very-low income households. Geneva Village, currently under construction, will
have approximately 80 units out of a total of 142 for very-low income households. And, Sandstone
Apartments, with construction to commence in January 2007, will have 48 units out of a total of 68 units for
very-low income households.


                                                      53
2005 Program Year – CAPER


What is the status of the "re-tooling" of the Owner Occupied Rehabilitation Program? Is HUD
technical assistance required?
As you are aware, the City of Fresno is now operating owner occupied rehabilitation programs previously
under administration by the Fresno Housing Authority. The program is now in an ongoing status will
numerous projects under way. In addition, four (4) new staff positions have been created and filled to help
assist in the administration of the rehabilitation programs. HUD technical assistance is not needed at this
time.

Relocation
As mentioned in previous sections of this report, the City began administering a relocation plan on the EOC
Transitional Living Center project. This activity is being conducted to address residents that were
involuntarily displaced as a result of the grant project awarded to EOC.

Federal Requirements
CDBG funds were used to primarily address the needs of lower income persons. All projects undertaken
were eligible and each met the national objectives of their respective programs. In the program year over
99 percent of the CDBG funds met the national objective to benefit lower income persons. Administrative
costs for the CDBG program were at 10 percent; well below the HUD limit of twenty percent. HOME
administrative costs were at ten percent and ESG at five percent.

In summary, the City, along with its many community partners, continue to work to make significant
progress in meeting goals set forth in its Consolidated Plan. This does not negate the fact that there are
still unmet needs that require attention. With a continued five-year focus on the ten priorities as noted in
the Consolidated Plan, the City anticipates similar progress toward meeting the needs of low- and
moderate-income persons, which include minorities, persons with disabilities, the homeless, large families,
senior citizens, persons living in substandard housing and persons paying rent that exceed 50 percent of
their monthly income.




                                                    54
                                                                           2005 Program Year - CAPER


PUBLIC REVIEW AND COMMENTS


Written Comments

Comments on the CAPER may be made to the City by two methods:

1.     Mail or hand deliver to:               2. Send comments by electronic mail to
                                                 crystal.smith@ci.fresno.ca.us
       City of Fresno
       Planning and Development Department
       ATTN: Crystal Smith
       2600 Fresno Street, Room 3076
       Fresno, California 93721-3605

All comments must be received no later than the close of business on September 28, 2006, at 5:00
p.m.

At the end of the 15-day public review, written comments will be reviewed by the Director of the Planning
and Development Department. A copy of any written comments will be included in this section of the
CAPER and submitted to HUD.

Results of the Comment Period

No public comments were received during the public review period.

Changes to Text During 15-Day Review Period

No changes were made to the final CAPER report with the exception of this section being updated and the
final performance reports being included within the report.

Comments Received During the 2005 Program Year

Application Hearing – 2/22/06: Received comments from the public requesting CDBG funds are not used
by City Departments.

Public Comment Letter – 5/06: Received public comment letter from the Friends of Dickey Youth objecting
to the site of the new Dickey Youth Center. Staff responded to the group and to HUD defending the site
selection and the compliance with federal environmental regulations.

List of Documents Available to the Public

Documents available to the public are: 2006-2010 Consolidated Plan; 2004 Consolidated Annual
Performance and Evaluation Report; 2005 Annual Action Plan; Citizen Participation Plan; Analysis of
Impediments. Additionally, the CAPER has been placed on the City=s website at www.ci.fresno.ca.us and
at the Central Library.

Amendments

There were no amendments made to the 2005 Annual Action Plan during the 2005 Program Year.



                                                   55
2005 Program Year – CAPER




                    PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK




                                 56
                         2005 Program Year - CAPER




     APPENDIX A

      FINANCIAL SUMMARY
CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY REPORT




             57
2005 Program Year – CAPER


IDIS - C04PR26                              U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT                                DATE: 09-28-06
                                               OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT                                  TIME:    18:56
                                              INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM                                 PAGE:         1
                                               CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2005
                                                         07-01-2005 TO 06-30-2006
                                                                FRESNO, CA


             PART I:    SUMMARY OF CDBG RESOURCES

                        01   UNEXPENDED CDBG FUNDS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                           6,086,626.08
                        02   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                               8,705,367.00
                        03   SURPLUS URBAN RENEWAL                                                                   0.00
                        04   SECTION 108 GUARANTEED LOAN FUNDS                                                       0.00
                        05   CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                                       980,905.01
                        06   RETURNS                                                                           826,595.30
                        07   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AVAILABLE                                                   0.00
                        08   TOTAL AVAILABLE (SUM, LINES 01-07)                                             16,599,493.39


             PART II:   SUMMARY OF CDBG EXPENDITURES

                        09   DISBURSEMENTS OTHER THAN SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS AND PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION     8,704,578.52
                        10   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT                           0.00
                        11   AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT (LINE 09 + LINE 10)                           8,704,578.52
                        12   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                                   1,536,223.63
                        13   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS                                      326,155.87
                        14   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                                0.00
                        15   TOTAL EXPENDITURES (SUM, LINES 11-14)                                          10,566,958.02
                        16   UNEXPENDED BALANCE (LINE 08 - LINE 15)                                          6,032,535.37


             PART III: LOWMOD BENEFIT THIS REPORTING PERIOD

                        17   EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD HOUSING IN SPECIAL AREAS                                              0.00
                        18   EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD MULTI-UNIT HOUSING                                                    0.00
                        19   DISBURSED FOR OTHER LOW/MOD ACTIVITIES                                             7,877,983.22
                        20   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT                                                 0.00
                        21   TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT (SUM, LINES 17-20)                                            7,877,983.22
                        22   PERCENT LOW/MOD CREDIT (LINE 21/LINE 11)                                                  90.50%


             LOW/MOD BENEFIT FOR MULTI-YEAR CERTIFICATIONS

                        23   PROGRAM YEARS(PY) COVERED IN CERTIFICATION                              PY    PY         PY
                        24   CUMULATIVE NET EXPENDITURES SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT CALCULATION                            0.00
                        25   CUMULATIVE EXPENDITURES BENEFITING LOW/MOD PERSONS                                            0.00
                        26   PERCENT BENEFIT TO LOW/MOD PERSONS (LINE 25/LINE 24)                                          0.00%




                                                                       58
                                                                                                  2005 Program Year - CAPER


IDIS - C04PR26                              U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT             DATE: 09-28-06
                                              OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT               TIME:    18:56
                                             INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM              PAGE:        2
                                              CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2005
                                                        07-01-2005 TO 06-30-2006
                                                               FRESNO, CA




            PART IV:   PUBLIC SERVICE (PS) CAP CALCULATIONS

                       27   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PUBLIC SERVICES                              1,533,669.27
                       28   PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR           219,463.42
                       29   PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR          420,827.00
                       30   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS                                 0.00
                       31   TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS (LINE 27 + LINE 28 - LINE 29 + LINE 30)       1,332,305.69
                       32   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                  8,705,367.00
                       33   PRIOR YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                            754,984.99
                       34   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP                              0.00
                       35   TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP (SUM, LINES 32-34)                         9,460,351.99
                       36   PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PS ACTIVITIES (LINE 31/LINE 35)               14.08%


            PART V:    PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION (PA) CAP

                       37   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                      1,536,223.63
                       38   PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR                 0.00
                       39   PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                0.00
                       40   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS                                 0.00
                       41   TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS (LINE 37 + LINE 38 - LINE 39 +LINE 40)        1,536,223.63
                       42   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                  8,705,367.00
                       43   CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                          980,905.01
                       44   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP                              0.00
                       45   TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP (SUM, LINES 42-44)                         9,686,272.01
                       46   PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PA ACTIVITIES (LINE 41/LINE 45)               15.86%




                                                                      59
2005 Program Year – CAPER


IDIS - C04PR26                            U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT   DATE: 09-28-06
                                            OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT     TIME:    18:56
                                           INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM    PAGE:        3
                                            CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2005
                                                      07-01-2005 TO 06-30-2006
                                                             FRESNO, CA


LINE 17 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 17

                 NONE FOUND


LINE 18 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 18

                 NONE FOUND




                                                                    60
                                                                                                                  2005 Program Year - CAPER


IDIS - C04PR26                             U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT                              DATE: 09-28-06
                                             OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT                                TIME:    18:56
                                            INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM                               PAGE:        4
                                             CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2005
                                                       07-01-2005 TO 06-30-2006
                                                              FRESNO, CA


LINE 19 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES INCLUDED IN THE COMPUTATION OF LINE 19

                 PGM    PROJ    IDIS                                               MATRIX      NTL
                 YEAR    ID    ACT ID   ACTIVITY NAME                               CODE       OBJ        DRAWN AMOUNT
                 ----   ----   ------   ----------------------------------------   ------     -----   ----------------
                 2002   0006     4781   HOME OWNERSHIP/HOUSING DEVELOP             05R        LMH             1,500.00
                 2002   0009     4783   CODE ENFORCEMENT                           15         LMA               186.00
                 2002   0009     4783   CODE ENFORCEMENT                           15         LMA               618.54
                 2002   0009     4783   CODE ENFORCEMENT                           15         LMA               589.27
                 2003   0007     5004   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA             3,493.88
                 2003   0007     5004   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA             5,643.87
                 2003   0007     5004   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA            16,723.59
                 2003   0009     5243   DICKEY PARK YOUTH CENTER                   03F        LMA               720.00
                 2004   0002     5104   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           150,306.78
                 2004   0003     5105   CARE FRESNO                                05I        LMA            15,000.00
                 2004   0005     5107   INNER CITY FEE REDUCTION                   18A        LMA            12,500.00
                 2004   0007     5198   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA           406,717.61
                 2004   0007     5198   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA               503.05
                 2004   0008     5109   CODE ENFORCEMENT                           15         LMA           377,024.56
                 2004   0009     5242   DICKEY PARK YOUTH CENTER                   03F        LMA             8,967.00
                 2004   0011     5148   SENIOR HOT MEALS                           05A        LMC            25,649.78
                 2004   0011     5148   SENIOR HOT MEALS                           05A        LMC            89,804.05
                 2004   0014     5163   CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING                 05         LMC            10,000.00
                 2004   0015     5144   SENIOR PAINT                               14A        LMH            25,210.00
                 2004   0015     5164   EMERGENCY GRANT                            14A        LMH            11,600.00
                 2004   0016     5173   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                         05         LMA            38,381.10
                 2004   0016     5173   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                         05         LMA            25,726.42
                 2004   0016     5173   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                         05         LMA             9,539.85
                 2004   0017     5292   TED C WILLS COMMUNITY CENTER               03         LMA            58,184.33
                 2004   0017     5292   TED C WILLS COMMUNITY CENTER               03         LMA            28,829.27
                 2004   0017     5292   TED C WILLS COMMUNITY CENTER               03         LMA            64,148.21
                 2004   0018     5232   FRESNO CENTER FOR NEW AMERICANS            01         LMC            28,000.00
                 2004   0018     5233   LAO FAMILY COMMUNITY OF FRESNO INC         01         LMC            34,000.00
                 2004   0018     5233   LAO FAMILY COMMUNITY OF FRESNO INC         01         LMC            37,004.19
                 2004   0018     5233   LAO FAMILY COMMUNITY OF FRESNO INC         01         LMC             1,784.18
                 2004   0018     5233   LAO FAMILY COMMUNITY OF FRESNO INC         01         LMC            32,215.81
                 2004   0019     5231   CURE                                       14A        LMH            40,000.00
                 2004   0020     5230   HOUSE OF HOPE                              03         LMA            45,000.00
                 2004   0020     5230   HOUSE OF HOPE                              03         LMA            14,000.00
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           149,649.12
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           270,760.89
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           199,760.77
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA            51,545.68
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           140,773.24
                 2005   0003     5254   CARE FRESNO                                05I        LMA            15,000.00
                 2005   0003     5254   CARE FRESNO                                05I        LMA            15,000.00
                 2005   0003     5254   CARE FRESNO                                05I        LMA            15,000.00


                                                                     61
2005 Program Year – CAPER


             2005   0006    5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA             56,404.23
             2005   0006    5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            316,550.40
             2005   0006    5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            209,647.20
             2005   0006    5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            150,951.57
             2005   0006    5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            228,784.48
             2005   0006    5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            508,015.97
             2005   0007    5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            591,457.80
             2005   0007    5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            229,208.57
             2005   0007    5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            540,471.17
             2005   0007    5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            729,993.78
             2005   0007    5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            542,473.33
             2005   0007    5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            531,776.79
             2005   0008    5293   DICKEY PARK YOUTH CENTER           03F   LMA             15,268.53
             2005   0008    5293   DICKEY PARK YOUTH CENTER           03F   LMA              2,765.60
             2005   0009    5259   SENIOR MEALS & NUTRITION PROGRAM   05A   LMC             46,927.07
             2005   0009    5259   SENIOR MEALS & NUTRITION PROGRAM   05A   LMC             61,836.10
             2005   0009    5259   SENIOR MEALS & NUTRITION PROGRAM   05A   LMC             92,055.36
             2005   0009    5259   SENIOR MEALS & NUTRITION PROGRAM   05A   LMC             42,098.34
             2005   0011    5261   CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING         05    LMC             10,000.00
             2005   0011    5261   CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING         05    LMC             10,000.00
             2005   0011    5261   CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING         05    LMC             10,000.00
             2005   0012    5276   SENIOR PAINT                       14A   LMH             55,389.18
             2005   0012    5276   SENIOR PAINT                       14A   LMH             28,764.61
             2005   0012    5276   SENIOR PAINT                       14A   LMH             17,452.35
             2005   0012    5276   SENIOR PAINT                       14A   LMH            113,709.05
             2005   0012    5299   EMERGENCY GRANT                    14A   LMH              5,183.48
             2005   0013    5262   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                 05D   LMC              5,776.57
             2005   0013    5262   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                 05D   LMC             26,578.15
             2005   0013    5262   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                 05D   LMC              5,000.00
             2005   0015    5300   WHITE PICKET FENCE PROGRAM         14A   LMH             15,968.00
             2005   0015    5300   WHITE PICKET FENCE PROGRAM         14A   LMH              8,829.00
             2005   0016    5264   JEFFERSON HOUSING PROJECT          01    LMH              5,811.37
             2005   0016    5264   JEFFERSON HOUSING PROJECT          01    LMH              3,774.13
             2005   0017    5313   BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF FRESNO        03    LMA            182,000.00
                                                                                     ----------------
                                                                            TOTAL:       7,877,983.22




                                                                62
                    2005 Program Year - CAPER




APPENDIX B
HOME MATCH REPORT




      63
2005 Program Year – CAPER




                                           HOME Match Report
    Date of                                                                  Match
     HOME        Project                HOME                 Activity       Liability
  Commitment       I.D.              Investment               Type          Incurred          Balance
    07/01/05   Excess match from prior year                                              $4,014,662.61
    06/30/06   Program income from Rental Rehabilitation Program (RRP)                      148,228.00
    06/30/06   Present value of interest subsidy for loans made at rates below market       212,622.00
    06/30/06   Sweat equity for Habitat for Humanity project                                 32,337.00
    06/30/06   Waived recording fees - Home Buyer Programs                                      903.00
    06/30/06   Waived recording fees - Subrecipient's Rehabilitation Projects                 1,920.00
    06/30/06   Waived recording fees - Housing Projects                                         744.00
    06/30/06   Subrecipient Match - Tax Increment Rehabilitation Projects                   175,500.00
                                                                                         $4,586,916.61

   06/28/04       5055               $5,207.38                 2                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/28/05       5191                2,880.20                 2                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5007                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5008                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5009                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5010                1,526.30                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5033                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5034                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5035                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5036                2,952.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5037                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5038                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5039                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5040                2,952.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   06/25/04       5041                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5042                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5059                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5061                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5062                1,175.20                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5063                1,144.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5064                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5065                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5066                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5067               12,500.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5068                1,232.50                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5069                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5070                2,952.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5071                2,952.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5072                2,952.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5079                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   09/28/04       5080                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   12/09/04       5088                1,250.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   12/09/04       5089                1,243.50                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   12/09/04       5090                7,605.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   12/09/04       5091                2,952.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61
   12/09/04       5092                2,952.00                 1                  0.00    4,586,916.61



                                                     64
                                                         2005 Program Year - CAPER




                             HOME Match Report
  Date of                                            Match
  HOME       Project      HOME           Activity   Liability
Commitment     I.D.    Investment         Type      Incurred               Balance
 12/09/04     5093       2,952.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 12/09/04     5094      15,350.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 12/09/04     5095       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 12/09/04     5096      14,760.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 12/09/04     5097       1,211.50           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5098       2,940.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 12/09/04     5099       1,123.50           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 12/09/04     5101       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 12/09/04     5102      17,799.30           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 12/09/04     5145       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 01/10/05     5149       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 02/28/05     5170       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 02/28/05     5171       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 02/28/05     5172       1,203.50           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5179       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5180       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5181       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5182      11,150.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5183       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5184       1,250.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5185      11,629.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5186      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5187      12,498.52           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5188      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5189      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5192      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5193      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5194      29,695.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5195      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5196      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5197      12,350.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5199      29,520.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5201      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5202      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5203      12,500.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 06/23/05     5204      11,950.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 09/22/05     5226      14,420.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 09/22/05     5227      14,725.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 09/22/05     5228      14,780.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 09/22/05     5229       6,888.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 11/30/05     5245      14,863.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 11/30/05     5246      34,277.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 11/30/05     5247      15,633.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 11/30/05     5248      15,633.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 11/30/05     5249      15,633.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61
 11/30/05     5250      15,633.00           1               0.00       4,586,916.61


                                    65
2005 Program Year – CAPER



                                   HOME Match Report
   Date of                                                   Match
    HOME       Project          HOME             Activity   Liability
 Commitment      I.D.        Investment           Type      Incurred           Balance
   11/30/05     5251          15,633.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   01/24/06     5278          21,169.24             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   01/24/06     5279          14,378.92             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   01/24/06     5280          15,583.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   01/24/06     5281          15,633.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   02/23/06     5289          15,633.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   02/23/06     5290          14,383.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5294          31,325.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5295           3,133.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5296           3,133.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5297           3,133.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5309          33,015.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5311           3,133.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5312           3,133.00             1               0.00   4,586,916.61
   09/22/05     5236          17,284.50             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   09/22/05     5237           4,152.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   09/22/05     5238           4,152.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   09/22/05     5239           4,152.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   09/22/05     5240           4,152.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   11/30/05     5273           4,149.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   11/30/05     5274           4,149.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   11/30/05     5275          39,977.17             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   01/24/06     5287          38,606.98             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   01/24/06     5288           4,149.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   02/23/06     5291          59,232.90             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5302          39,193.33             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5303          60,281.98             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5304          60,390.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5305          11,920.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5307          14,149.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5317          32,474.93             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5318          44,300.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5319          60,390.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5320          14,149.00             3               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/28/04     5056           5,652.00             4               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5308         503,123.62             4               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5314         156,963.11             4               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/30/04     5060         476,375.69             5               0.00   4,586,916.61
   08/15/05     5200        1,267,101.60            5               0.00   4,586,916.61
   09/22/05     5241          30,435.00             5               0.00   4,586,916.61
   11/30/05     5270          30,435.00             5               0.00   4,586,916.61
   05/22/06     5301          30,435.00             5               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/21/06     5310          36,157.47             5               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5315          30,435.00             5               0.00   4,586,916.61
   06/27/06     5316          30,379.50             5               0.00   4,586,916.61
     Total                  $4,011,684.84                         $0.00


                                            66
             2005 Program Year - CAPER




APPENDIX C
   MAPS




   67
2005 Program Year – CAPER




                            68
     2005 Program Year - CAPER




69
2005 Program Year – CAPER




                            70
     2005 Program Year - CAPER




71
2005 Program Year – CAPER




                    PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK




                                 72
                       2005 Program Year - CAPER




   APPENDIX D
GRANTEE PERFORMANCE REPORT




          73
2005 Program Year – CAPER


IDIS - C04PR26                              U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT                                 DATE: 09-28-06
                                               OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT                                  TIME:    18:56
                                              INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM                                 PAGE:        1
                                               CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2005
                                                         07-01-2005 TO 06-30-2006
                                                                FRESNO, CA


             PART I:    SUMMARY OF CDBG RESOURCES

                        01   UNEXPENDED CDBG FUNDS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                           6,086,626.08
                        02   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                               8,705,367.00
                        03   SURPLUS URBAN RENEWAL                                                                   0.00
                        04   SECTION 108 GUARANTEED LOAN FUNDS                                                       0.00
                        05   CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                                       980,905.01
                        06   RETURNS                                                                           826,595.30
                        07   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AVAILABLE                                                   0.00
                        08   TOTAL AVAILABLE (SUM, LINES 01-07)                                             16,599,493.39


             PART II:   SUMMARY OF CDBG EXPENDITURES

                        09   DISBURSEMENTS OTHER THAN SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS AND PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION     8,704,578.52
                        10   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT                           0.00
                        11   AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT (LINE 09 + LINE 10)                           8,704,578.52
                        12   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                                   1,536,223.63
                        13   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS                                      326,155.87
                        14   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                                0.00
                        15   TOTAL EXPENDITURES (SUM, LINES 11-14)                                          10,566,958.02
                        16   UNEXPENDED BALANCE (LINE 08 - LINE 15)                                          6,032,535.37


             PART III: LOWMOD BENEFIT THIS REPORTING PERIOD

                        17   EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD HOUSING IN SPECIAL AREAS                                              0.00
                        18   EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD MULTI-UNIT HOUSING                                                    0.00
                        19   DISBURSED FOR OTHER LOW/MOD ACTIVITIES                                             7,877,983.22
                        20   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT                                                 0.00
                        21   TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT (SUM, LINES 17-20)                                            7,877,983.22
                        22   PERCENT LOW/MOD CREDIT (LINE 21/LINE 11)                                                  90.50%


             LOW/MOD BENEFIT FOR MULTI-YEAR CERTIFICATIONS

                        23   PROGRAM YEARS(PY) COVERED IN CERTIFICATION                              PY    PY         PY
                        24   CUMULATIVE NET EXPENDITURES SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT CALCULATION                            0.00
                        25   CUMULATIVE EXPENDITURES BENEFITING LOW/MOD PERSONS                                            0.00
                        26   PERCENT BENEFIT TO LOW/MOD PERSONS (LINE 25/LINE 24)                                          0.00%




                                                                       74
                                                                                                  2005 Program Year - CAPER


IDIS - C04PR26                              U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT             DATE: 09-28-06
                                              OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT               TIME:    18:56
                                             INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM              PAGE:        2
                                              CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2005
                                                        07-01-2005 TO 06-30-2006
                                                               FRESNO, CA




            PART IV:   PUBLIC SERVICE (PS) CAP CALCULATIONS

                       27   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PUBLIC SERVICES                              1,533,669.27
                       28   PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR           219,463.42
                       29   PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR          420,827.00
                       30   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS                                 0.00
                       31   TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS (LINE 27 + LINE 28 - LINE 29 + LINE 30)       1,332,305.69
                       32   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                  8,705,367.00
                       33   PRIOR YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                            754,984.99
                       34   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP                              0.00
                       35   TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP (SUM, LINES 32-34)                         9,460,351.99
                       36   PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PS ACTIVITIES (LINE 31/LINE 35)               14.08%


            PART V:    PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION (PA) CAP

                       37   DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION                      1,536,223.63
                       38   PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR                 0.00
                       39   PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR                0.00
                       40   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS                                 0.00
                       41   TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS (LINE 37 + LINE 38 - LINE 39 +LINE 40)        1,536,223.63
                       42   ENTITLEMENT GRANT                                                  8,705,367.00
                       43   CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME                                          980,905.01
                       44   ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP                              0.00
                       45   TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP (SUM, LINES 42-44)                         9,686,272.01
                       46   PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PA ACTIVITIES (LINE 41/LINE 45)               15.86%




                                                                      75
2005 Program Year – CAPER


IDIS - C04PR26                            U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT   DATE: 09-28-06
                                            OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT     TIME:    18:56
                                           INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM    PAGE:        3
                                            CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2005
                                                      07-01-2005 TO 06-30-2006
                                                             FRESNO, CA


LINE 17 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 17

                 NONE FOUND




                                                                    76
                                                                                             2005 Program Year - CAPER



IDIS - C04PR26                            U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT        DATE: 09-28-06
                                            OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT          TIME:    18:56
                                           INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM         PAGE:        4
                                            CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2005
                                                      07-01-2005 TO 06-30-2006
                                                             FRESNO, CA


LINE 18 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 18

                 NONE FOUND




                                                                    77
2005 Program Year – CAPER



IDIS - C04PR26                             U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT                              DATE: 09-28-06
                                             OFFICE OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT                                TIME:    18:56
                                            INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT AND INFORMATION SYSTEM                               PAGE:        5
                                             CDBG FINANCIAL SUMMARY FOR PROGRAM YEAR 2005
                                                       07-01-2005 TO 06-30-2006
                                                              FRESNO, CA


LINE 19 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES INCLUDED IN THE COMPUTATION OF LINE 19

                 PGM    PROJ    IDIS                                               MATRIX      NTL
                 YEAR    ID    ACT ID   ACTIVITY NAME                               CODE       OBJ        DRAWN AMOUNT
                 ----   ----   ------   ----------------------------------------   ------     -----   ----------------
                 2002   0006     4781   HOME OWNERSHIP/HOUSING DEVELOP             05R        LMH             1,500.00
                 2002   0009     4783   CODE ENFORCEMENT                           15         LMA               186.00
                 2002   0009     4783   CODE ENFORCEMENT                           15         LMA               618.54
                 2002   0009     4783   CODE ENFORCEMENT                           15         LMA               589.27
                 2003   0007     5004   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA             3,493.88
                 2003   0007     5004   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA             5,643.87
                 2003   0007     5004   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA            16,723.59
                 2003   0009     5243   DICKEY PARK YOUTH CENTER                   03F        LMA               720.00
                 2004   0002     5104   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           150,306.78
                 2004   0003     5105   CARE FRESNO                                05I        LMA            15,000.00
                 2004   0005     5107   INNER CITY FEE REDUCTION                   18A        LMA            12,500.00
                 2004   0007     5198   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA           406,717.61
                 2004   0007     5198   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                        03K        LMA               503.05
                 2004   0008     5109   CODE ENFORCEMENT                           15         LMA           377,024.56
                 2004   0009     5242   DICKEY PARK YOUTH CENTER                   03F        LMA             8,967.00
                 2004   0011     5148   SENIOR HOT MEALS                           05A        LMC            25,649.78
                 2004   0011     5148   SENIOR HOT MEALS                           05A        LMC            89,804.05
                 2004   0014     5163   CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING                 05         LMC            10,000.00
                 2004   0015     5144   SENIOR PAINT                               14A        LMH            25,210.00
                 2004   0015     5164   EMERGENCY GRANT                            14A        LMH            11,600.00
                 2004   0016     5173   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                         05         LMA            38,381.10
                 2004   0016     5173   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                         05         LMA            25,726.42
                 2004   0016     5173   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                         05         LMA             9,539.85
                 2004   0017     5292   TED C WILLS COMMUNITY CENTER               03         LMA            58,184.33
                 2004   0017     5292   TED C WILLS COMMUNITY CENTER               03         LMA            28,829.27
                 2004   0017     5292   TED C WILLS COMMUNITY CENTER               03         LMA            64,148.21
                 2004   0018     5232   FRESNO CENTER FOR NEW AMERICANS            01         LMC            28,000.00
                 2004   0018     5233   LAO FAMILY COMMUNITY OF FRESNO INC         01         LMC            34,000.00
                 2004   0018     5233   LAO FAMILY COMMUNITY OF FRESNO INC         01         LMC            37,004.19
                 2004   0018     5233   LAO FAMILY COMMUNITY OF FRESNO INC         01         LMC             1,784.18
                 2004   0018     5233   LAO FAMILY COMMUNITY OF FRESNO INC         01         LMC            32,215.81
                 2004   0019     5231   CURE                                       14A        LMH            40,000.00
                 2004   0020     5230   HOUSE OF HOPE                              03         LMA            45,000.00
                 2004   0020     5230   HOUSE OF HOPE                              03         LMA            14,000.00
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           149,649.12
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           270,760.89
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           199,760.77
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA            51,545.68
                 2005   0002     5253   CRIME SUPPRESSION                          05I        LMA           140,773.24
                 2005   0003     5254   CARE FRESNO                                05I        LMA            15,000.00
                 2005   0003     5254   CARE FRESNO                                05I        LMA            15,000.00


                                                                     78
                                                                                   2005 Program Year - CAPER


2005   0003   5254   CARE FRESNO                        05I   LMA             15,000.00
2005   0006   5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA             56,404.23
2005   0006   5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            316,550.40
2005   0006   5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            209,647.20
2005   0006   5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            150,951.57
2005   0006   5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            228,784.48
2005   0006   5257   STREET IMPROVEMENTS                03K   LMA            508,015.97
2005   0007   5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            591,457.80
2005   0007   5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            229,208.57
2005   0007   5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            540,471.17
2005   0007   5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            729,993.78
2005   0007   5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            542,473.33
2005   0007   5258   CODE ENFORCEMENT                   15    LMA            531,776.79
2005   0008   5293   DICKEY PARK YOUTH CENTER           03F   LMA             15,268.53
2005   0008   5293   DICKEY PARK YOUTH CENTER           03F   LMA              2,765.60
2005   0009   5259   SENIOR MEALS & NUTRITION PROGRAM   05A   LMC             46,927.07
2005   0009   5259   SENIOR MEALS & NUTRITION PROGRAM   05A   LMC             61,836.10
2005   0009   5259   SENIOR MEALS & NUTRITION PROGRAM   05A   LMC             92,055.36
2005   0009   5259   SENIOR MEALS & NUTRITION PROGRAM   05A   LMC             42,098.34
2005   0011   5261   CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING         05    LMC             10,000.00
2005   0011   5261   CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING         05    LMC             10,000.00
2005   0011   5261   CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING         05    LMC             10,000.00
2005   0012   5276   SENIOR PAINT                       14A   LMH             55,389.18
2005   0012   5276   SENIOR PAINT                       14A   LMH             28,764.61
2005   0012   5276   SENIOR PAINT                       14A   LMH             17,452.35
2005   0012   5276   SENIOR PAINT                       14A   LMH            113,709.05
2005   0012   5299   EMERGENCY GRANT                    14A   LMH              5,183.48
2005   0013   5262   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                 05D   LMC              5,776.57
2005   0013   5262   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                 05D   LMC             26,578.15
2005   0013   5262   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM                 05D   LMC              5,000.00
2005   0015   5300   WHITE PICKET FENCE PROGRAM         14A   LMH             15,968.00
2005   0015   5300   WHITE PICKET FENCE PROGRAM         14A   LMH              8,829.00
2005   0016   5264   JEFFERSON HOUSING PROJECT          01    LMH              5,811.37
2005   0016   5264   JEFFERSON HOUSING PROJECT          01    LMH              3,774.13
2005   0017   5313   BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF FRESNO        03    LMA            182,000.00
                                                                       ----------------
                                                              TOTAL:       7,877,983.22




                                                  79

								
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