The Anatomy of a Guided Reading Lesson by yaofenji

VIEWS: 13 PAGES: 30

									Assessment & Evaluation in
Guided Reading
• Snapshot of a reader at
  work
• capture information about
  a reader and use it to
  guide instruction
• continuous process that
  relies on observations
  during reading
• referred to as “kid
  watching”
Assessment Tools
• running records
• writing samples
• anecdotal notes
• assess at intervals
  periodically during the
  year
• Oral interview
• Reading log
• Alphabet Recognition Test
• Word Test
• Concepts of Print
• Word Spree/WVI (writing
  vocabulary test)
• Spelling Inventory
• Benchmark Books
• Oral retelling
RUNNING RECORDS
Why and how?
A key to continuous
improvement.
Objective 1




Why?
Research tell us:

Because the ability to obtain meaning
from print depends so strongly on the
development of word recognition
accuracy and reading fluency, both
should be regularly assessed in the
classroom permitting timely and effective
instructional responses when difficulty is
apparent.
                        National Reading
Panel

December 2000
Running records provide:
 • Description of what
   actually occurs while
   reading
 • Diagnostic information on
   how readers process print
 • What a reader knows and
   can do
 • Insights into what needs
   to be learned next
Running Records Provide:
• Qualitative and
  quantitative information
• Picture of progress over
  time
• Documented information
  for stakeholders
• Measure of program
  effectiveness
• Support for instructional
  decisions, grouping,
  reading levels, materials
Objective 2



              How?
                  Non-errors
Correct response
                       

repetition             R

pause                  P

self-correction        sc
                 Errors
 Substitutions
                    reader
  Omissions
                    text
  insertions
     Told           T


Appeal for help     A


“Try that again”    TTA
You’ll need:
• Piece of paper: lined or
  blank
• Pencil
• Student text
• Calculator
Scoring
• Now you’re ready to score.
  You’ll need a calculator.
• Error rate= Number of errors x 100
               Number of words


• Percentage Correct =
  100-error rate
• Self -correction rate is a
  ratio
       SC: (E+SC)
Instructional Levels
• Below 90% = Hard
• 90%-94% = Instructional
• 95%-100%= Easy
Analyzing the Running Record
• Examine each attempt
  and self correction.
• Decide what sources of
  information the reader
  used or neglected to use.
How often should you take a running
record?

• emergent reader- every 2-
  4 weeks
• progressing & transitional
  reader- 4-6 weeks
• fluent reader- quarterly
Oral Retelling
• Follows either oral or silent
  reading
• Take the book from the
  student and say “Tell me
  everything you can remember
  about the story in your own
  words.”
• Teacher takes notes while
  student is retelling.
• If the retelling is
  vague or
  incomplete, say, ”Tell
 me more about..” or “What
 else can you tell about…”
• A retelling can include:
  1. main idea or topic

    2. beginning, middle, end
    3. characters, setting,
 events, resolution,
 problem
    4. important details
    5. specific vocabulary or
 literary language
Anecdotal Notes
• Used to record observations
  during reading/writing.
• Use a clipboard, notebook,
  folder to record notes.
• Focus on one or two children
  while they read.
• Jot down brief comments on
  observable reading behaviors.
• Serves as record.
• Helps direct instruction.
Oral Interview
• Allows the student to talk
  to you about his
  experiences as a reader
  and writer both in and out
  of school.
• Keep the interview
  informal.
• Student can bring a book
  or a writing sample.
    Types of questions:
• What are your reading now? How did
  you choose the book?
• Do you like to read? Why or why not?
• What do you like to read (books,
  genres, authors)?
• Is reading easy or hard? Why?
• What do you do when you come to a
  word you don’t know? (Does it match
  what you observe the child to when
  he reads?)
• What are you working on as a reader?
Writing Sample
• Observing students’ writing
  can provide insights into
  their reading.
• Writing sample provides
  information on what the
  student knows about:
  phonics, language structure, text
  features, conventions of print, and the
  meaning of letters, words, sentences
• Writing samples are
  periodically kept in K-3.
 Assessing Metacognitive strategy
               Use
• Group discussion
• Written reflection responses
  to literature
• Interviews concerning
  strategy use….
Major Point Interview for
Readers- Questioning
• What did you wonder about (or
  question) while you were
  reading?
• What questions do you have
  about the book/text now?
• We have just talked about the
  questions you asked. (Restate
  the student’s responses.) What
  do you understand now that
  you didn’t understand before?
Reading Log Record
• Have the students record
  the books they read during
  the year.
• The student can record
  whether the book was too
  easy, just right, or a
  challenging book.
• They can also record a
  response or other thoughts.
Record metacognitive strategies
• Coding forms
  – Two-column
  – Three-column
  – Based on strategy/ strategies
    being practiced
• Post-it notes placed
  directly on pages to show
  thinking
Three-Column Note Form
Pictures/   Inference   Personal
 quotes                 Response
from the
   text
Organizing the assessment
information
• Binder
• folders
• file box

• MOST IMPORTANTLY: begin
  collecting information in
  the beginning of the year
  so you have a baseline!
When teachers know what students
can do as readers and writers, the
planning and decision-making about
how to group and what to teach during
guided reading is based on sound
instructional information.

								
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