SMOKING

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					SMOKING

YEAR 8- WELLBEING
     WHAT IS A CIGARETTE?
    A cigarette contains over 4000 chemicals. Many of them
     cause cancer and they include;

1.   TAR- this is a black, sticky substance that contains poisonous
     chemicals.
2.   NICOTINE- chemical in tobacco that causes addiction.
3.   CARBON MONOXIDE- poisonous gas.
4.   HYDROGEN CYONIDE- poison used in the gas chambers in
     WW2.
5.   METALS- nickel, arsenic and cadmium.
6.   RADIOACTIVE COMPONENTS
7.   PESTOCIDE
BRAINSTORMING ACTIVITY

 LIST ALL THE DIFFERENT NAMES
    YOU HAVE HEARD USED FOR
    CIGARETTE.

     WHAT CAN JUST 1 DO?
 Increase carbon monoxide levels in lungs.
 Nicotine goes to the brain and muscle tissue.
 Heart rate increases.
 Blood pressure increases.
 Skin temperature decreases.
 Lung capacity decreases.
 Bad breath.
 Eye and nasal passages become irritated.
 Tremors in your hands
 Your airways leading to your lungs can become blocked.


Number these from 1-10 of importance, with one being
  the most severe effect and 10 being the least.
        NICOTINE

 STIMULANT- Speeds up our bodies so that
  out heart rate, blood pressure, and our
  bodies in general works harder than it
  needs to.

 Can you name any other stimulants?
            ALARMING FACTS
• Smoking killed 100 million people in the 20th
century and is predicted to kill 1 billion people in
the 21st century.
• Worldwide, there are approx. 1.1 billion people
who smoke.
• Every day approx. 6000 young people try a
cigarette for the first time. 3000 of them become
daily smokers.
• I out of every 2 smokers die prematurely.
           HEALTH FACTS
• Regular smokers have 1 in 6 chances of developing
lung cancer.
• Smoking is the most common form of cancer of the
throat and mouth.
• Increases chances of developing stomach ulcers.
• Smokers are 10 times more likely to get heart
disease or have a stroke.
UNPLEASANT EFFECTS ON
THE BODY SMELL- smokers cannot smell
               
                   how they smell
               to others and can also suffer bad
                   breath.
                TASTE- taste buds don’t work as
                   well so you
                may not enjoy your food properly.
                PREGNANCY- Females have
                   more trouble falling
               pregnant and may have painful
                   menstruations.
               Smoking can also harm the baby if it
                   continues through pregnancy.
                CIRCULATION- Narrowing of the
                   veins may lead to poor circulation.
                HAIR/NAILS- greasy and unclean.
                TEETH- Yellow
         RISK RATING QUIZ
AS A CLASS COMPLETE THIS SURVEY

                                      YES   /   NO
 Do your parent(s) smoke?
 Do your friends smoke?
 Do you belong to a club where you
are permitted to smoke?
 Do you like the smell of smoke?
RISK RATING SURVEY 2
 INDIVIDUALLY COMPLETE THIS SURVEY

              what do you think when you see someone
               smoking?
 Stupid       1       2       3         4         5    Cool

              how do you feel when you think about
               smoking?
 Disgusted        1       2   3     4         5       Excited

              do you asssociate smoking with...
 good times? 1            2   3    4        5 poor health?
         TEENAGE SMOKERS

 Teenage smoking rates in Victoria are
  particularly high;
- approx. 33% Girls (aged 16-17 yrs) smoke
  regularly.
- approx. 30% Boys (aged 16-17 yrs) smoke
  regularly.
 If kids start smoking before age 15, they are
  likely to be smokers as adults.
           ADULTS VS TEENS
 Percentage of adult smokers by year and gender
    Year          males               females
   1945           72                    26
   1964           58                    28
   1969          45                     28
   1974           45                    30
   1976           43                    33
   1980           41                    31
   1983          40                     31
   1986           33                    29
   1989           30                    27
   1992           28                    24
   1995           27                    23
   2001           22                    22

DISCUSS HOW THESE FIGURES COMPARE TO THE % OF TEENAGERS AND
   WHAT TRENDS IT SUGGESTS.
        INFLUENCES ON TEENS TO SMOKE

 Need to conform
 Media images
 Family (parents smoke)
 Friends- seen to be cool, more interesting
 Believe smoking can calm them down,
  relieve stress, help them to concentrate,
  help them to lose weight or help them to
  have a good time.
 Complete the WHY SMOKE worksheet
        % DECREASING

 The percentage of teens smoking is
    dropping consistently. List some
    possible reasons for this decline.
*
*
*
*
          NO. OF TEENS SMOKING
          DROPPING DUE TO……..
 Increase in retail cost by
  70% since 2000.
 More education programs
  in schools for teenagers.
 Mass media campaigns.
    SELLING TO UNDERAGE

 $200 fine and being prosecuted in
  magistrates court. If found guilty,
  they may incur a fine of $5000,
  lose their ability to sell tobacco
  products for a specified time and
  be forced to pay court costs.
WATCH THESE 3 ADVERTISMENTS
  AND COMPLETE ATTACHED
        WORKSHEET
          PASSIVE SMOKING
• Breathing in another persons smoke from their cigarette.

The process of smoking produces three different types of
tobacco smoke:

1. Mainstream smoke – this is smoke directly inhaled by the
smoker through a
burning cigarette.
2. Exhaled mainstream smoke – this is smoke breathed out by
the smoker.
3. Sidestream smoke – this is smoke which drifts from the
burning end of a
cigarette.
    PASSIVE SMOKING CONT.
 Sidestream smoke contains many cancer causing
  chemicals and other toxic substances. In some cases
  their levels are thirty times higher than in the smoke
  inhaled by the smoker. For example, compared to
  mainstream smoke, sidestream smoke contains greater
  amounts of ammonia, benzene, carbon monoxide,
  nicotine and some carcinogens from the same amount of
  burnt tobacco.
 However, because sidestream smoke is mixed with air
  before being inhaled, passive smokers don’t receive
   the same concentration of toxic chemicals as active
  smokers, who draw the tobacco smoke directly into their
  lungs. This means active smoking is more dangerous
  to health than passive smoking.
 PASSIVE SMOKING EFFECTS

 In adults
• Heart disease
• Lung cancer
• Irritation of the eyes and nose
 In children
• Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS or cot death)
• Lower birthweight (where the mother was exposed to
    ETS)
• Bronchitis, pneumonia and other lung/airways infections
• Asthma, and worsening of asthma in children who
    already have this disease
• Middle ear disease (otitis media or ‘glue ear’)
• Respiratory symptoms (coughing, wheezing)
Passive smoking Advertisement
Watch this advertisement and discuss ways that the
impacts of Passive smoking can be limited for YOURSELF.




     * Complete the “It’s my air, too” worksheet.
               HARM MINIMISATION
 There is a range of approaches to
    prevent and reduce drug related harm
    including;
•   Prevention.
•   Early intervention.
•   Specialised treatment.
•   Supply control.
•   Safer drug use.
•   Abstinence.
   CONTINUED

•Harm minimisation does not
condone or encourage drug
use!!
•It aims to reduce the risks and
promotes healthier, alternative
behaviours.
WHEN YOU STOP SMOKING
 20 MINUTES- Blood pressure starts to drop.
 8 HOURS- Carbon monoxide clears from the blood
    stream.
   1 DAY- lungs notice a change, begin clearing the mucus
    and tar.
   2 DAYS- nicotine completely clear. Craving begin to
    ease.
   1 WEEK- more energy, better senses.
   3 MONTHS- lungs working better.
   6 MONTHS- half the chance of having a heart attack.
   10 YEARS- Same health wise as someone who has
    never smoked.
                                                            QUIZ
                                                                        TRUE   FALSE
1.It is illegal to smoke cigarettes under 16yrs.

2. A cigarette is a vehicle for rapidly delivering nicotine to the brain.

3. It is illegal to buy cigarettes under the age of 16.

4. Most people become regular smokers because they
   decide to.
5. All cigarette packets must carry a health warning.

6. You are dependant on nicotine within the 1st 100 cigarettes.

7. Tobacco is responsible for more deaths than any other drug.

8. Tobacco only harms smokers.

9. It is legal to sell cigarettes to anyone under 16.

10. Each time you smoke a cigarette, chemical changes
Are taking place in your brain.

				
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posted:9/1/2011
language:English
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