Report - Southeast Missouri State University

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  Southeast Missouri State University
Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling




               Counseling Programs

             Cape Girardeau, Missouri
                     Fall 2010
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                                                     Table of Contents
                                                    Counseling Program


1. Narrative DESE report


       Characteristics of the University......................................................................................... 3
       Characteristics of the College of Education........................................................................ 3
       General Description of the Program ................................................................................... 4
       Program Requirements........................................................................................................ 5
       Certification Requirements ................................................................................................. 6
       Candidate Characteristics.................................................................................................. 15
       Curriculum of the Counseling Program ............................................................................ 16
       Advising Process ............................................................................................................... 18
       Recent Revisions and Changes to the Counseling Program ............................................. 21
       Description of Field Experiences - School Counseling .................................................... 23
       Diversity of P-12 Classrooms ........................................................................................... 34
       Description of the Conceptual Framework ....................................................................... 35
       Institution’s Goals and Priorities Aligned with National and State Standards ................. 38
       University Annual Assessment Reports............................................................................ 39
       Program Assessment Data ................................................................................................ 45
       Impact on P-12 Student Achievement-From Assessment Report-Employer Surveys...... 56
       Description of Transition Point and Assessments ............................................................ 57
       Subject Specific Faculty ................................................................................................... 58
       Certification Program Resources ...................................................................................... 59
       Technology ....................................................................................................................... 60
       Appendices:....................................................................................................................... 60
       Program Syllabi ................................................................................................................ 60
       Program Faculty Vitas ...................................................................................................... 61
       Assessment Instruments .................................................................................................... 61
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                            DESE Certification Program Report:
                         School Counseling K-8; 7-12; Non-Teaching
                              School Psychological Examiner



Characteristics of the University
        Southeast Missouri State University is a regional comprehensive university serving
approximately 10,000 students. Southeast offers programs through its six academic units: the
Donald L. Harrison College of Business, the College of Education, the College of Health and
Human Services, the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Science and Mathematics and the
School of Polytechnic Studies. Additionally, a general education program is found in the School
of University Studies. Leadership and organizational support for graduate education is found in
the School of Graduate Studies. Off campus courses and programs are administered by Extended
Learning. Southeast Missouri State University serves the region by offering courses in four
centers. The University maintains a commitment to a variety of disciplines and fields of
study. However, nowhere is that commitment felt more strongly than in the College of
Education.


Characteristics of the College of Education
        The College of Education consists of the Departments of Elementary, Early and Special
Education, Educational Administration and Counseling, and Middle and Secondary Education.
Other components that contribute to the excellent learning environment of the College of
Education include the Dean’s Office, the Advising Center, the Field Experiences Office,
International Programs, the Missouri Assessment Center and the Regional Professional
Development Center, the Teacher-Work Sample Partnership, the Technology Use in the
Classroom Initiative, the Instructional Resources and Technology Center, Reading Recovery,
and the state wide Early Literacy Program. In 2006, Southeast Missouri State University became
one of 23 University Training Centers (UTC) in the United States. The UTC provides training
for Reading Recovery teacher-leaders in the state of Missouri. Southeast has also demonstrated
its commitment to teacher preparation by becoming an invited member of the Renaissance
Group. This national group consists of 34 institutions that have made teacher preparation a
priority. The Renaissance Group recognizes that the education of teachers is an all campus
responsibility and that the entire University shares the responsibility for preparing quality
teachers.
      Southeast Missouri State University and specifically the College of Education are
committed to offering programs that are of the highest quality as demonstrated through
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adherence to Professional Standards, high quality assessment practices, and learning experiences
that prepare students to successfully transition into the profession of teaching.


        The Missouri Department of Secondary and Elementary Education (DESE) provides a
specific set of standards for Teacher Candidates in general: Missouri Standards for Teacher
Education Programs and Benchmarks for Preliminary Teacher Education Programs, revised
October 2006 (MoStep). Southeast Missouri State University’s College of Education has cross
referenced these standards with a customized version of the Teacher Work Sample (TWS)*
tailored to our education program.. The TWS is an outgrowth of our five year participation in the
Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality. With DESE’s approval, we use the
TWS as one of the evaluation tools for all teacher candidates as they progress through our
education programs. At Southeast Missouri State University candidates must pass a test of basic
skills (CBASE) over reading, math, and writing prior to admission to teacher education, have a
2.5 cumulative GPA; attain 57 hours, complete EN140 with a minimum grade of C; not be on
disciplinary probation nor have been convicted of a felony; maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5,
and receive no less than a C in all professional education courses, as they progress through the
program. Furthermore, the State of Missouri requires all teacher candidates pass the appropriate
Praxis II test(s) for certification.
       * “The Teacher Work Samples (TWS) are exhibits of teaching performance that provide
       direct evidence of a candidate’s ability to design and implement standards-based
       instruction, assess student learning and reflect on the teaching and learning process.
       Also, teacher work samples are teaching exhibits that can provide credible evidence of a
       candidate’s ability to facilitate learning of all students. Teacher Work Samples are one
       source of evidence along with classroom observations and other measures to assess
       performance relative to national and state teaching standards”


General Description of the Program
       The School Counseling and School Psychological Examiner certification programs have
been continuously approved by the state of Missouri. The program was last fully approved by
DESE in 2002 with no areas of improvement.
       National Recognition
       The School Counseling program submitted a program report for national recognition
from CACREP in 2005 and received notification it was nationally recognized for the next eight
years without any conditions in July of 2005. The process included submitting a full report with
contextual information and data on performance assessments.
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Program Requirements
       A list of the required courses can be found in the Graduate Bulletin, the Department’s
website and on advising sheets. A matrix in the Appendix aligns courses with MoSTEP
standards and the Conceptual Framework.


       Course list
              School Counseling with emphasis in Elementary/Secondary

              CP 610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics (3)
              CP 611 Developmental Theories (3)
              CP 612 Counseling Theories (3)
              CP 613 Social & Cultural Aspects of Counseling (3)
              CP 614 Counseling Skills (3)
              CP 615 Career Development (3)
              CP 616 Group Counseling (3)
              CP 617 Assessment in Counseling (3)
              GR 691 Methods of Research (3)
              CP 630 Foundations of School Counseling (3)
              CP 631 Crisis Intervention and Consultation (3)
              CP 643 Psychodiagnostics and Treatment (3)
              CP 680 Counseling Practicum (3)
              CP 682 Internship - Elementary(3)
              CP 683 Internship - Secondary(3)
              CP 684 Internship - School Counseling (3-6)
              (both elementary and secondary internships required for K-12)
              A total of 9 internship credits required.
              48 Total Credits

              Prerequisites: Teaching Certificate
              OR (No Teaching Certificate):
                EX 390 - Psychology & Education of the Exceptional Child
                OR
                EX 635 - Psychology and Education of Students with Special Needs
              AND
                EA 653-Curriculum for Leaders in Education
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                OR
                 SE 635 - Theory of Learning and Instructional Strategies

Certification Requirements
(http://www.dese.mo.gov/schoollaw/rulesregs/EducCertManual/Index.htm)


MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION
CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL COUNSELOR
(GRADES K-8) Revised April 2009


I. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS: The elementary school counselor, initial student
services certificate, valid for a period of four (4) years from the effective date on the certificate,
will be issued to those persons meeting the following requirements:
A. Recommendation for certification from the designated official of a college or university
approved to train elementary school counselors by the Missouri Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education; and
B. The applicant must possess either:
        1. Completion of a master's degree with a major emphasis in guidance and counseling
        from a college or university meeting approval of the Missouri Department of Elementary
        and Secondary Education based upon the completion of a planned program of at least
        forty-two (42) semester hours of approved graduate credit in courses in guidance and
        counseling with at least twelve (12) semester hours focused upon guidance in the
        elementary schools:
                a. Competence in each of the following areas:
                       1) Human Growth and Development;
                       2) Social and Cultural Diversity;
                       3) Assessment;
                       4) Career Development and Planning;
                       5) Helping Relationships;
                       6) Group Work;
                       7) Structural Components of a Guidance Program
                       8) Program Components of a Guidance Program: Guidance Curriculum,
                       Individual Planning, Responsive Services and System Support;
                       9) Technology;
                       10) Professional Relationships in School, Family, and Community;
                       11) Ethical Standards;
                       12) Legal Standards; and
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                       13) Professional Orientation
               b. Supervised Practice in an Elementary School Guidance Program for at least
               three (3) semester hours; and
       OR
       2. A master’s degree or higher degree in education, school counseling, counseling,
       counseling psychology, or a closely related mental health discipline; and additional
       graduate course work specific to school counseling, as designated by the state-approved
       recommending certification official, including a supervised internship or field experience
       of at least three hundred (300) hours in an appropriate school setting; and


C. The applicant must either:
       1. Possess a bachelor’s degree in education from a state-approved teacher preparation
       program; or
       2. Complete a curriculum in teaching methods and practices, classroom management and
       the psychology of the exceptional child, as specified by the recommending certification
       officer of a state-approved program; and
D. Must achieve a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score on the assessment
designated by the State Board of Education, not to include the principles of learning and
teaching.


MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION
CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR SECONDARY COUNSELOR (GRADES 7-12)
Revised April 2009

I. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS: The secondary school counselor, initial student services
certificate, valid for a period of four (4) years from the effective date on the certificate, will be
issued to those persons meeting the following requirements:
A. Recommendation for certification from the designated official of a college or university
approved to train secondary school counselors by the Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education.
B. The applicant must possess either:
       1. Completion of a master's degree with a major emphasis in guidance and counseling
       from a college or university meeting approval of the Department of Elementary and
       Secondary Education based upon the completion of a planned program of at least forty-
       two (42) semester hours of approved graduate credit in courses in guidance and
       counseling with at least twelve (12) semester hours focused upon guidance in the
       secondary schools.
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               a. Competence in each of the following areas:
                      1) Human Growth and Development;
                      2) Social and Cultural Diversity;
                      3) Assessment;
                      4) Career Development and Planning;
                      5) Group Work;
                      6) Structural Components of a Guidance Program
                      7) Program Components of a Guidance Program: Guidance Curriculum,
                      Individual Planning, Responsive Services and System Support;
                      8) Technology;
                      9) Professional Relationships in School, Family, and Community;
                      10) Ethical Standards;
                      11) Legal Standards;
               b. Supervised practice in a Secondary School Guidance Program for at least three
               (3) semester hours
       OR
       2. A master’s degree or higher degree in education, school counseling, counseling,
       counseling psychology, rehabilitation counseling, or a closely related mental health
       discipline; and complete additional graduate course work specific to school counseling,
       as designated by the state-approved recommending certification official, including a
       supervised internship or field experience of at least three hundred (300) hours in an
       appropriate school setting.


C. The applicant must either:
       1. Possess a bachelor’s degree in education from a state-approved teacher preparation
       program; or
       2. Complete a curriculum in teaching methods and practices, classroom management and
       the psychology of the exceptional child, as specified by the recommending certification
       officer of a state-approved program; and
D. Must achieve a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score on the assessments
designated by the State Board of Education not to include the principles of learning and teaching.


CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGICAL EXAMINER
Revised January 2008
I. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS
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The school psychological examiner, initial student services certificate, valid for a period of four
(4) years from the effective date on the certificate, will be issued to those persons meeting the
following requirements:
A. Completion of a master's degree from a college or university meeting approval of the
Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in one (1) of the following areas:
       1. Counseling Psychology;
       2. Educational Psychology;
       3. School Counseling; and
       4. Education;
B. Recommendation for certification from the designated official of a college or university
approved to train elementary and secondary counselors by the Missouri Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education;
C. Completion of a course in Psychology and/or Education of the Exceptional Child for a
minimum of two (2) semester hours;
D. A minimum of twenty four (24) semester hours of professional preparation at the graduate
level with competencies demonstrated in all areas listed to the satisfaction of a college or
university meeting approval of the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education, including a supervised internship or field experience in school psychological
assessment of at least one hundred fifty (150) hours in an appropriate school setting:
       Courses Areas
             1. Psychological Development: child, adolescent, or developmental psychology;
             2. Psychology of Education;
             3. Statistical methods;
             4. Mental Hygiene or Psychology of Personality;
             5. Psychological Tests and Measures for the Analysis of Student Performance;
             6. Individual Intelligence Tests;
             7. Individual Diagnostic Assessment (other than the Wechsler and Binet); and
             8. Supervised practicum of at least one hundred fifty (150) hours in an educational
             or clinical setting with children and youth of school age in the administration and
             interpretation of individual intelligence tests, formal and informal diagnostic
             procedures and the application of the information to develop instructional
             strategies.
       Competencies
             1. Methods and/or techniques of interpretation of tests;
             2. Analysis and diagnosis of learning problems including special consideration of
             low incidence populations;
             3. Interpretation of formal and informal diagnostic assessments and their
             application for prescriptive instruction;
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                  4. Utilization of knowledge of classroom environment, psychological principles,
                  and test date to plan for management of special needs children;
                  5. Diagnostic interviewing techniques;
                  6. Process of staffing with other professionals to develop instructional strategies;
                  and
                  7. Administration and interpretation of the Wechsler and Binet.
Quality Indicators Alignment to Counseling Courses

       Content and Professional studies for School Counselor Preparation. The unit ensures that
candidates for school counselor certification have completed a graduate program of content and
professional studies that has prepared them to successfully practice as an entry-level Professional
School Counselor.
       The professional school counselor candidate knows and understands learners and how
they develop, and facilitates learners’ academic, interpersonal, social and career growth.
(STANDARD ONE)
Quality Indicators         Performance Indicators                                            SEMO Courses

1.4.1.1                    The professional school counselor candidate:

HUMAN GROWTH               knows and understands theories of individual and family           CP 611 Developmental
AND                        development, transitions across the life-span, and the range of   Theories
DEVELOPMENT:               human developmental variation
The school counselor       knows developmental stages of individual growth                   CP 611 Developmental
candidate knows and                                                                          Theories
understands human
development and            knows and understands theories of learning and personality        CP 611 Developmental
personality and how        development                                                       Theories
these domains affect
learners, and applies      applies factors that affect behavior, including but not limited   CP 611 Developmental
this knowledge in his or   to, developmental crises, disability, addiction,                  Theories
her work with learners.    psychopathology, and environmental factors, in assisting
                           learners to develop healthy life and learning styles

                           applies developmental principles in working with learners in a    CP 611 Developmental
                           variety of school counseling activities                           Theories

1.4.1.2                    The professional school counselor candidate:                      SEMO Courses

CULTURE AND                knows and understands multicultural and pluralistic trends        CP 613 Social and
DIVERSITY:                                                                                   Cultural Aspects of
                                                                                             Counseling
The school counselor
                                                                                                                   11



candidate knows and        knows and understands attitudes and behaviors related to          CP 613 Social and
understands how human      diversity, and how the diversity in families impacts learners     Cultural Aspects of
diversity affects                                                                            Counseling
learning and
development within the     educates students, colleagues and others about diversity and      CP 613 Social and
context of a global        its impact on learning, growth, and relationships                 Cultural Aspects of
society and a diverse                                                                        Counseling
community of families.     facilitates the development of learners’ tolerance and respect    CP 613 Social and
The school counselor       for, and valuing of, human diversity                              Cultural Aspects of
candidate uses this                                                                          Counseling
understanding to assist
learners, parents, and
                           knows and understands how culture affects the counseling          CP 613 Social and
colleagues in
                           relationship and demonstrates cultural awareness and              Cultural Aspects of
developing
                           sensitivity in counseling                                         Counseling
opportunities for
learning and personal
growth.

1.4.1.3                    The professional school counselor candidate:                      SEMO Courses

ASSESSMENT:                knows and understands theoretical and historical bases for        CP 617 Assessment in
                           assessment techniques                                             Counseling
The school counselor
candidate knows and        knows and understands the concepts of reliability and validity    CP 617 Assessment in
understands the                                                                              Counseling
principles of
measurement and            selects, administers, and interprets assessment and evaluation    CP 617 Assessment in
assessment, for both       instruments and techniques in counseling                          Counseling
individual and group
approaches, and applies    applies assessment results to the counseling process              CP 617 Assessment in
these in working with                                                                        Counseling
all learners.
                           knows, understands and applies ethical principles in              CP 617 Assessment in
                           assessment                                                        Counseling

1.4.1.4                    The professional school counselor candidate:                      SEMO Courses

CAREER                     knows and understands theories of career development, career      CP 615 Career
DEVELOPMENT &              decision-making and planning selects and applies career           Development
PLANNING:                  counseling models with learners and selects and applies career
                           counseling models with learners
The school counselor
candidate understands      promotes and supports the career decision-making and              CP 615 Career
career development and     planning of learners                                              Development
planning processes
across the lifespan, and   uses various career assessment techniques to assist learners in   CP 615 Career
assists all learners in    understanding their abilities and career interests                Development
                                                                                                                 12



their career exploration,   uses current career information to assist learners in             CP 615 Career
decision-making and         understanding the world of work and making career plans and       Development
planning.                   choices



1.4.2 The professional school counselor candidate promotes learners’ growth and development
through a district wide, comprehensive model for guidance and counseling for all students.
(STANDARD 2)
Quality Indicators          Performance Indicators                                            SEMO Courses

1.4.2.1                     The professional school counselor candidate:

GUIDANCE                    knows, understands, and conducts guidance needs                   CP 630 Foundations of
CURRICULUM:                 assessments                                                       School Counseling
The school counselor        collaborates with other school personnel in the delivery of the   CP 630 Foundations of
candidate knows,            guidance curriculum                                               School Counseling
understands, and uses
classroom guidance          designs and implements developmentally appropriate                CP 630 Foundations of
methods and                 guidance activities                                               School Counseling
techniques.

1.4.2.2                     The professional school counselor candidate:                      SEMO Courses

INDIVIDUAL                  knows and understands planning and goal setting processes         CP 630 Foundations of
PLANNING:                                                                                     School Counseling
The school counselor        uses various tools, including technology, to assist learners in   CP 630 Foundations of
candidate knows,            personal, educational, and career goal setting and planning.      School Counseling
understands, and uses
planning and goal
setting for the personal,
educational, and career
development of the
learner.

1.4.2.3                     The professional school counselor candidate:                      SEMO Courses

RESPONSIVE                  knows and understands a variety of individual and small           CP 630 Foundations of
SERVICES                    group counseling theories and techniques                          School Counseling
Responsive Services:        knows and understands a variety of crisis intervention and        CP 630 Foundations of
The school counselor        consultation theories and techniques                              School Counseling
candidate knows,
                            selects and uses counseling interventions appropriate to the      CP 630 Foundations of
understands and uses        needs of learners                                                 School Counseling
                                                                                                          13



various methods for       uses appropriate referral resources and procedures           CP 630 Foundations of
delivering Responsive                                                                  School Counseling
counseling services to
learners in the school
community.

1.4.2.4                   The professional school counselor candidate:                 SEMO Courses

SYSTEM SUPPORT:           knows, understands, develops, and manages a comprehensive    CP 630 Foundations of
                          guidance program for all learners                            School Counseling
The school counselor
candidate knows,
 understands and uses     advocates for the guidance program throughout the school     CP 630 Foundations of
various methods to        community                                                    School Counseling
develop and maintain a
comprehensive             knows, understands, and conducts program evaluation to       CP 630 Foundations of
guidance program that     Monitor and improve the guidance program                     School Counseling
serves the needs of all
learners.

1.4.2.5                   The professional school counselor candidate:                 SEMO Courses

TECHNOLOGY:               knows, understands and uses a variety of technology in the   CP 630 Foundations of
                          delivery of guidance and counseling activities               School Counseling
The school counselor
candidate knows,          uses technology to manage a comprehensive guidance           CP 630 Foundations of
understands and uses      program                                                      School Counseling
technology as a
management and
counseling tool in
promoting the personal,
educational,social, and
career development of
the learner.



 The professional school counselor candidate develops and promotes professional relationships
in the school, family, and community.
(STANDARD 3)
Quality Indicators        Performance Indicators                                       SEMO Courses

1.4.3.1                   The professional school counselor candidate:

The school counselor      knows, understands and uses consultation strategies to       CP 631 Crisis
candidate understands,    improve communication and promote teamwork                   Intervention and
develops, and uses                                                                     Consultation
                                                                                                                  14



professional                uses consultation strategies to coordinate resources and efforts   CP 631 Crisis
relationships in the        of teachers, administrators, and support staff                     Intervention and
school, family and                                                                             Consultation
community, through
consultation and            uses consultation strategies to promote school-home                CP 631 Crisis
collaboration, to           relationships through involvement of parents and other family      Intervention and
promote development         members                                                            Consultation
of all learners.

                            uses consultation methods with private and public agencies in      CP 631 Crisis
                            the community that may be involved in the learner’s                Intervention and
                            development                                                        Consultation




The professional school counselor candidate knows, understands, and adheres to ethical, legal,
and professional standards.


Quality Indicators          Performance Indicators                                             SEMO Courses

1.4.4.1                     The professional school counselor candidate:

ETHICAL:                    knows, understands and practices in accordance with the            CP 610 Orientation and
                            ethical principles of the counseling profession                    Ethics
The school counselor
candidate knows,            knows and understands the differences among legal, ethical,        CP 610 Orientation and
understands and             and moral principles                                               Ethics
practices in accord with
the ethical principles of   knows, understands and practices in accordance with local          CP 610 Orientation and
the school counseling       school policy and procedures                                       Ethics
profession.
                            employs ethical decision-making models to recognize and            CP 610 Orientation and
                            resolve ethical dilemmas                                           Ethics

                            models ethical behavior in his or her work                         CP 610 Orientation and
                                                                                               Ethics

1.4.4.2                     The professional school counselor candidate:                       SEMO Courses

LEGAL:                      knows and understands the local, state, and federal statutory      CP 610 Orientation and
                            requirements pertaining to her or his work                         Ethics
The school counselor
candidate knows,            uses legal resources to inform and guide his or her practice       CP 610 Orientation and
understands and adheres                                                                        Ethics
to the legal aspects of
the role of the school      practices in accordance with the legal restraints of local         CP 610 Orientation and
counselor                   jurisdictions                                                      Ethics
                                                                                                                15



                           practices within the statutory limits of confidentiality          CP 610 Orientation and
                                                                                             Ethics

1.4.4.3                    The professional school counselor candidate:                      SEMO Courses

PROFESSIONAL:              participates in professional organizations                        CP 610 Orientation and
                                                                                             Ethics
The school counselor
candidate knows,
understands and            develops and implements a professional development plan           CP 610 Orientation and
implements methods to                                                                        Ethics
promote his or her
professional               uses personal reflection, consultation, and supervision to
development and well-      promote professional growth and development
                                                                                             CP 610 Orientation and
being.                                                                                       Ethics

                           knows, understands, uses and models techniques of self-care       CP 610 Orientation and
                                                                                             Ethics

                           evaluates her or his practice, seeks feedback from others, and    CP 610 Orientation and
                           uses this information to improve performance                      Ethics




Candidate Characteristics
      A full data set covering the last seven years is available for review in the Annual
Assessment Report. The following are summary statements regarding entrance data, candidate
demographics, trends in enrollee and graduate numbers.

Demographics: School counseling students are primarily female and Caucasian.
Enrollees:         Fall 2009      28
                   Fall 2008      23
                   Fall 2007      30
                   Fall 2006      30


Graduates:                 Method of Assessment 7 – Graduation
Graduation                                                     06-07          07-08         08-09
Students that took and passed the CPCE                         17             24            11
Students that graduated with MA in School Counseling           7              16            3
Students that took and passed the Praxis II                    7              12            0
Students that graduated with MA in Community                   8              9             8
Counseling
                                                                                                 16



Students that took and passed the NCE               13          11           9
Students that graduated with Ed.S. in Counseling    4           4            8
Education



Curriculum of the Counseling Program
Counseling Program Mission Statement
        Individuals in today’s society face many complex challenges. To effectively manage
these multi-faceted issues, individuals require effective maturation in self concept and personal
development, positive adjustment to social, cultural, familial and personal relationships,
productive vocational skills, and mastery of the cognitive, behavioral and emotional dynamics
that permeate the human experience. For this reason, the Counseling Program has as its primary
mission the preparation of a diverse group of learners from the Southeast Missouri region, the
nation and the world community who can competently and ethically implement psychological
principles, developmental understanding and counseling techniques to provide clients with the
best opportunity to achieve a healthy functioning in the areas of educational, personal, social,
and career development.
        Working within the human services and education fields demands well-rounded
professionals. For this reason, program offerings and extra-curricular activities challenge
students to develop professionally, personally, and socially. Graduates of the Counseling
Programs are prepared to deliver effective service in a variety of professional job placements
(Career Counseling, Mental Health Counseling, School Counseling, School Psychological
Examiner) and are eligible to stand for licensure or certification in their respective area of
specialty.
Counseling Program Objectives
         As a result of successfully completing the graduate program in counseling, students can
expect to have gained didactic knowledge and supervised experience in skills, functions, beliefs
and characteristics of effective counseling. The following broad goals have been developed to
assist students in gaining an overview of expected accomplishments:
        1. Professional Orientation and Identity – Demonstrate an understanding of the
        counseling profession, develop an identity as a counselor and demonstrate a willingness
        to provide counseling services within the ethical guidelines of the counseling profession.
        2. Counseling Theory – Gain significant knowledge of major counseling theories in the
        context of individual and group counseling, and to apply this knowledge to the actual
        counseling process.
                                                                                                 17



       3. Helping Relationships – Demonstrate effective individual and group counseling skills
       which facilitate client growth and demonstrate the ability to evaluate progress toward
       treatment goals.
       4. Social and Cultural Diversity – Develop an awareness of, and an appreciation for,
       social and cultural influences on human behavior and to recognize the impact of
       individual differences on the counseling process.
       5. Human Growth and Development – Develop an understanding of developmental
       aspects of human growth and appreciation for the nature of human development and its
       integration within the counseling process.
       6. Career Development – Develop an understanding of career development and related
       life factors and the effects on an individual’s mental health and lifestyle and its
       application within counseling.
       7. Group Dynamics – Develop both theoretical and experiential understandings of group
       purpose, development, dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods and
       skills, and other group approaches.
       8. Assessment – Gain knowledge and skills in assessment techniques and apply basic
       concepts to individual and group appraisal.
       9. Crisis Intervention – Gain knowledge and skills regarding working effectively with
       individuals in personal, family and societal crisis.
       10. Psychodiagnosis – Develop a working knowledge of psychodiagnosis, the ethical
       application and its effect on treatment and counseling practice.
       11. Research and Program Evaluation – Develop the ability to read, critique, evaluate,
       and contribute to professional research literature.
       12. Specialization – Demonstrate sufficient knowledge and skills associated with the
       student’s chosen specialty (i.e., career, mental health or school counseling) in the areas of
       service, prevention, treatment, referral, and program management.
       13. Experiential Learning – Develop, through supervised practicum and internship
       experiences, an integration of the knowledge and skills needed to be successful as
       practicing counselors.
       14. Personal Growth and Understanding – Develop, through self-reflection and insight,
       an understanding of oneself and the use of self in the counseling process. Develop a
       personal approach to counseling and client advocacy with a clear understanding of
       counselor functions.
Accreditation
                                                                                                   18



       The Mental Health Counseling Program and School Counseling Program at Southeast
Missouri State University are accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and
Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The accreditation runs through October 31, 2013.
(Note: The Mental Health Counseling Program is currently accredited under the 2001
Community Counseling Standards. The CACREP 2009 standards integrate the Community and
Mental Health standards into one set with a timeline for implementation. The counseling
program has every intention of meeting the CACREP timeline for the Clinical Mental Health
Counseling Program programmatic changes by October 31, 2013.)
       Students graduating from a CACREP program are assured a quality educational
experience. Counseling students can be certified counselors by the National Board for Certified
Counselors (NBCC) once they have passed the National Counselor Examination for Licensure
and Certification (NCE). As a result of the accreditation, the NCE is administered on the
Southeast campus.
       The School Counseling Program at Southeast Missouri State University is accredited by
the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Missouri
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). The accreditation runs through
October of 2010.
Statement of Professionalism
        The Counseling Program and its faculty support the highest level of professionalism as
set forth by "best practices" in the field, as well as ethics and standards of such organizations as
the American Counseling Association (ACA), the National Board for Certified Counselors
(NBCC), the Missouri State Committee for Professional Counselors and Southeast Missouri
State University’s Committee for Research Involving Human Subjects. The Program expects
each student to be knowledgeable of and to act in accordance with these ethics and standards.
        Beyond written standards set forth by related professional organizations, professionalism
embraces a high standard for interpersonal interaction, including respect for people, processes,
and property. The faculty expects prospective counselors to engage in behavior that reflects a
high level of health and integrity. Students should be stable and psychologically well adjusted.
They should possess effective interpersonal skills, a genuine concern for others, and an active
commitment to personal growth and professional development.


Advising Process
Admission to the Counseling Programs
        Admission to the Counseling Program is a multi step process. Students need to pay close
attention to the procedures and accept responsibility to complete required paperwork. For regular
admission leading to a Master of Arts Degree in Career Counseling, School Counseling or
                                                                                                  19



Mental Health Counseling, applicants must successfully complete a three-step process that is laid
out in the Student Handbook.
Student Advisement
       Upon admission to the Counseling Program, the student is assigned an academic advisor.
The advisor will act as the primary source of contact and communication with the department.
Therefore, the department encourages the formation of effective professional relationships
between students and their advisors. Given the number of students in the department, a major
portion of the responsibility for the development of such a relationship falls with individual
students. The department encourages students to show initiative in getting to know their
individual advisors and suggests that they meet with their advisors at least one time per
semester. Should one desire to change advisors, please contact the School of University and
Graduate Studies.
Under the direction of the advisor, the student will:
   1. Receive pre-registration advisement and develop an Initial Study Plan.
   2. Develop a cohesive study plan, which if followed, will lead to candidacy and the degree
      sought and subsequent professional endorsement for licensure and/or certification.
   3. Review progress toward professional goals and degree, revising your study plan
      accordingly.
   4. Receive information with regard to program procedures.
         Students should seek advisement from their assigned advisor only. Utilizing other
sources (e.g., other students, departmental staff, faculty other than the assigned advisor) may
result in misinformation. The department does NOT assume responsibility for problems that
result from advisement from unsanctioned sources. Only the students’ advisor can authorize
registration and an advising hold to be lifted. Students should not ask others to remove this hold.
If one registers for classes without the advisor’s permission, those courses may be dropped.
        It is the responsibility of students to stay in close contact with their individual academic
advisor, keeping the advisor apprised of any changes in student record information (i.e., address,
phone number) and updating alterations made to study plans. This latter issue is especially
important given that not all courses are taught each semester. Altering study plans without
assistance from the academic advisor may inadvertently result in scheduling difficulties, which,
in turn, may affect the individual student’s proposed graduation date.
                                                                                                             20




Advising Sheets
Initial Study Plan: Counseling Program
COURSE        TITLE (Offered -- 1 = Spring, 2 = Summer, 3 = Fall)            CREDIT SEMESTER          YEAR

COUNSELING CORE (CP 610, 612, 614, 616, and 680 must be taken in sequence.)

CP 610        Counseling Orientation and Ethics (1, 3)                       3

CP 612        Counseling Theories (1, 3)                                     3

CP 614        Counseling Skills (1)                                          3

CP 616        Group Counseling (1, 2)                                        3

CP 611        Developmental Theories (2, 3)                                  3

CP 613        Social & Cultural Aspects of Coun. (2, 3)                      3

CP 615        Career Development (2, 3)                                      3

CP 617        Assessment in Counseling (2, 3)                                3

CP 631        Crisis Intervention and Consultation (1)                       3

CP 643        Psychodiagnostics and Treatment (2, 3)                         3

CP 680        Counseling Practicum (3)                                       3

GR 691        Methods of Research (1, 2, 3)                                  3

Total Counseling Core                                                        36 credit hours

SCHOOL COUNSELING MAJOR                                                      CREDIT SEMESTER          YEAR

Prerequisites: Teaching Certificate OR

EA 653        Curriculum for Leaders in Education (3) OR                     3
SE635         Theories of Learning and Instructional Strategies (3)

EX635         Psychology and Ed. of Students with Spec. Needs (1) OR         3
              EX390

CP 630        Foundations of School Counseling (2)                           3

CP 682        Internship – Elementary (1)                                    3

CP 683        Internship – Secondary (1)                                     3

CP 684        Internship – School Counseling (1, 2)                          3-6

(Both elementary and secondary internships required for K-12) A total of 9
internship credits required.

Total School Counseling Major                                                12 credit hours (48 Total)
                                                                                                               21




Study Plan: Psychological Examiner Requirements
      PREREQUISITE: Master's in Counseling or Education
      In addition to the requirements for a School Counseling degree, the following
      courses also must be taken:
     COURSE Title (Offered -- 1 = Spring, 2 = Summer, 3 = Fall)              Credit   Semester    Year

     The following courses are required for the School Psychological Examiner Certificate.

     ED 615      Tests and Measurements OR                                   3
     EX 601      Educational Assessment Techniques

     CP 611      Developmental Theories (1,3)                                3

     CP 617      Assessment in Counseling (2, 3)                             3

     CP 735      Intelligence Testing (1,3) (Pre: Permission of instructor   3
                 and MUST sign up the semester before.)
     A Provisional Certificate can be issued upon request from the school district, completion of the 4
     classes listed above and 1 of the classes listed below. All courses must be completed within 2 years to
     maintain certification.

     PY 571      Introduction to Behavioral Statistics                       3

     CP 733      Advanced Educational Processes (3)                          3

     CP 739      Testing Practicum (1) (Pre: All of the preceding courses    3
                 and permission of instructor and MUST sign up the
                 semester before.)

     CP 643      Psychodiagnostics and Treatment (2,3)                       3

                  TOTAL                                                      24




Recent Revisions and Changes to the Counseling Program
        In the early 1990’s the faculty of the Counseling Programs began the process of aligning
the curriculum with national standards. Up to this point the programs had enjoyed success by
coordinating with other state institutions to meet state licensure and certification requirements.
However the university and the department saw the need to expand the scope of influence to
include national standards in the training of counselors at Southeast Missouri State University.
Therefore the curriculum was aligned to the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related
Educational Programs (CACREP) standards. This resulted in the Community Counseling
                                                                                               22



program receiving initial accreditation by CACREP in 1997. The School Counseling program
was approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Also as a
part of the College of Education the School program was approved by National Council for the
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). However, due to state administrators not agreeing
to the additional credit and curriculum requirements the School Counseling Program did not
meet the more stringent standards of CACREP. The faculty committed at that time to make the
appropriate changes needed and that during the next accreditation cycle that the School
Counseling Program would enjoy the same recognition by CACREP as the Community
Counseling. In 1998, a time line was developed to accomplish this.
        As part of this process, an assessment plan was implemented with a primary goal of
achieving and maintaining accreditation by both CACREP and NCATE. A philosophy of
learning was developed; which included the developing of counselors’ personality and self, the
knowledge needed and supervised experience to verify success. Mission statements and specific
objectives were developed. The curriculum was aligned with the mission statement and each of
the objectives. An assessment plan was put into place to allow curriculum review.
         Increased requirements and appropriate curricular changes including practicum and
internship hours and class size were made in the School Counseling Program. The university
department, agency, or school supervisor is required to submit a written appraisal of the student
school counselor candidate at mid-term and at the end of each term of field experience. This
evaluation form is used to assess school counselor candidate dispositions. The form consists of
four sections: Process Skills (competent); Conceptualization Skills (reflective); Personalization
Skills (caring); and General Supervision Comments. School counselor candidates are rated on a
scale of 1 to 5 in regard to developmental expectations as to skill improvement on ten process
skills (competent), eleven conceptualization skills (reflective), eight personalization skills
(caring), and three general supervision items. The evaluation form was adapted from: Hackeny,
H. & Nye, S. (1973). Counseling strategies and objectives. New York: PrenticeHall. Stokes, J.P.
(1977); Model competencies for attending behavior. Counselor Education and Supervision,17,
2328.
        The comprehensive exam and exit requirements were adjusted to more closely align with
the mission and objectives. Each student develops a Comprehensive Professional Counseling
Portfolio (CPCP). This includes information about the student, information and artifacts for all
courses and experiences of the program, and the Personal Counseling Position Paper. It also
includes evaluations from site and University supervisors, practicum and internship work logs,
and reflective statements for each core area and experience. The exit exam is the Counselor
Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE), a nationally normed comprehensive exam that
consists of 160 objectives and multiple choice questions. Students are required to obtain a
minimum competency score on this exam to complete the degree. These changes resulted in both
the Community and the School programs being accredited in 2005 by CACREP. This was a re-
                                                                                               23



accreditation for the Community program and an initial accreditation for the School program.
By meeting CACREP standards, the School program exceeds the minimum state standards.
        In 2006, CACREP began a major rewrite of the accreditation standards. There were a
number of public forums and opportunities for feedback to be given to the CACREP Board in the
revision of the standards. The counseling faculty at Southeast took advantage of these and
provided input on the new standards by submitting a letter to the CACREP board endorsed by all
program faculty. In addition, counseling faculty attended CACREP forums at several national
conferences to provide feedback to the board in person. In July of 2008, the Board adopted the
CACREP 2009 standards. In August 2008 the counseling faculty began the process of reviewing
our Mission Statement and our Program Objectives to determine any needed changes. A
Proposed Timeline for implementation was developed. To facilitate understanding of the needed
changes, three documents were developed that would represent the way the program would look
after implementing the first phase of the change. These are: Counseling Courses Integrated into
the Program Requirements, Curriculum of the Master of Arts Counseling Programs as Relates to
External Requirements, Curriculum of the Master of Arts Counseling Programs as Relates to
External Standards. All course syllabi were reviewed and updated and by spring 2010 all were
complete.
        Since the early 1990s the Counseling faculty have made significant steps to improve the
program and to improve the quality of education for our students. Accreditation was obtained to
increase national visibility and provide consistence with programs around the country. Increased
assessment procedures were implemented to measure student and program improvement. And
curriculum improvements were made to remain on the cutting edge of standards and practice.
National Recognition:
       The School Counseling program submitted a program report for national recognition
from CACREP in 2005 and received notification it was nationally recognized for the next 8
years without any conditions in July of 2005. The process included submitting a full report with
contextual information and data on performance assessments.




Description of Field Experiences - School Counseling
Introduction
        This section is designed to provide information about the practicum and internships in the
Master of Arts program in Career Counseling, Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling
in the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling at Southeast Missouri State
University.
                                                                                                    24



        All masters level counseling programs (Career, Mental Health and School) require
practicum and internship experiences. The purpose of this practicum and internship experience
is to achieve integration of theory into practice, solidify clinical skills, and incorporate students
into the profession of counseling.
         While both the practicum and internship involve actual on-site counseling experience,
each differs in its scope and purpose. The practicum is designed to give the student a limited
experience in a specialized area of counseling and is supervised by both a designated on-site
supervisor and a faculty supervisor. The internship is arranged to provide the student not only
with counseling experience but also with experience in all aspects of professional functioning,
(e.g., referral, assessment, staff presentations, and use of community resources). In addition, the
student receives supervision primarily by the designated on-site supervisor. Both practicum and
internship students are required to attend on campus seminars and group supervision.
        Early planning for practicum and internship experiences is extremely important. Students
must be admitted into candidacy before enrolling in their initial field experience
(Practicum). Students are required to complete all program prerequisites and at least 21 credit
hours in counseling including CP610, CP612, CP614, and CP616 before enrolling in practicum.
The practicum experience is a minimum commitment of 10 hours per week of on-site time for
one full semester. The internship experience is a minimum of 20 hours per week commitment of
on-site time for two semesters. If an individual student is working full-time upon acceptance into
the Counseling Program, the student must consult with the academic advisor. To be successful,
one will be required to find effective, responsible, and ethical ways to fulfill the practicum and
internship experiences and maintain one's employment. Failure to make provisions for the future
may create difficulty in completing the program successfully.
       Students must apply a semester in advance for permission to register for Practicum or
Internship. The Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling administrative assistant
will complete the registration. Space is limited due to the tutorial approach in all practica; you
may be required to wait until the next year to take a practicum or internship.
Ethical Standards
        Students are expected to have a working knowledge of and abide by the ethical standards
that govern professional practice throughout their fieldwork experiences. These include the ACA
ethical standards. Should any specific concerns with regard to appropriate behavior under
specific circumstances arise, students are to immediately contact their university supervisor.
Any violation of ethical or legal standards may result in termination from the Counseling
Program. See the above Student Retention Policy. See
http://www.counseling.org/Resources/CodeOfEthics/TP/Home/CT2.aspx
Liability Insurance
                                                                                                     25



         Litigation involving practitioners in the mental health and counseling professions has
increased dramatically in the last few years. Clearly, the best way to avoid involvement in
litigation is to adhere to professional ethical standards as well as to demonstrate high standards
of personal and professional conduct. Professional and ethical practice minimizes the risk of
litigation but does not eliminate it. Therefore the vast majority of professionals, including the
Counseling Program faculty, consider professional liability insurance a necessity.
       All practicum/internship students are required to have Professional Liability Insurance
before beginning the practicum/internship and maintain it throughout the experience. The
American Counseling Association (ACA) offers affordable rates for professional liability
insurance to student members. Forms to join ACA and applications for insurance may be
downloaded via the ACA website. (www.counseling.org )
       School counselors may have professional liability coverage through their professional
organization at a reduced rate. If they receive their insurance through another organization, they
must provide the faculty supervisor with a copy of the policy. Students receiving their insurance
from ACA will be asked to provide two copies of their policy as proof of liability coverage. One
copy will be kept on file at the university; one copy will be given to the on-site supervisor.
Site Placement
        Practicum and internship sites are currently offered in selected community agencies and
schools. The Counseling Clinical Coordinator, in conjunction with program faculty, is
responsible for placing students in appropriate sites. Site selection is determined by each
student’s professional goals, past experience, and level of expertise. A current listing of
approved internship sites is available from the Counseling Clinical Coordinator and faculty
practicum supervisors. Students are NOT to make contact with the agencies/schools until the
Counseling Clinical Coordinator or the faculty supervisor has informed them to do so. After
which students will follow the requirements of the sites and submit appropriate resumes and/or
participate in an interview process.
        Schools and agencies are not required to accept students for practicum or internship
experiences. Therefore, the counseling program cannot guarantee that an agency or school will
accept students. However, the department and college have well-established working
relationships with university departments, local agencies, and schools. It is increasingly common
that agencies and schools require students to be interviewed. Many agencies and schools accept
applicants for practicum and internship on a selective and competitive basis. Students need to
expect to prepare for these interviews in the same way they would prepare for job interviews.
        If a student chooses to engage in a practicum/internship at a site not previously used for
internship by Southeast Missouri State University counseling students, the student (after
receiving permission from the Counseling Clinical Coordinator) will arrange for a meeting
                                                                                                   26



between the prospective on-site supervisor and the Counseling Clinical Coordinator to determine
the appropriateness of the placement.
Practicum
         Practicum is intended to provide students opportunities to begin practicing counseling
skills at a variety of sites with varied clientele. The practicum is closely supervised by a faculty
instructor who helps the student counselor conceptualize client concerns and determine a strategy
for working with clients.
       Current prerequisites for the first counseling practicum course are available from your
advisor. These prerequisites include admission to candidacy, a grade of "B" or higher in CP 610,
Counseling Orientation and Ethics, CP 612 Counseling Theories, CP 614 Counseling Skills, and
CP 616 Group Counseling and at least nine additional credits or required coursework (e.g.
CP611, CP613, CP615, CP617, CP626, CP630, CP631, CP640, CP643, CP645, GR691).
 Students who have not completed courses, adequately responded to any remediation plans,
removed any incomplete grades or have any grade “C” or lower, may not begin Practicum.
Supervision
        A university department, agency, or school supervisor, will provide the student with one
hour of weekly individual supervision on day-to-day activities. The Council for Accreditation of
Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) requires that the on-site supervisor for
mental health student counselors hold one of the following credentials: Licensed Professional
Counselor (LPC), Licensed Psychologist, or Licensed Psychiatrist. For School Counselors, the
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and CACREP require that
the on-site supervisor hold the appropriate certificate or license from government agency or
appropriate certifying body. Also, a faculty supervisor will meet with the practicum student one
hour per week for individual or triadic (dyadic) supervision. At that time the supervisor will
discuss case issues, theoretical and supervision issues, (e.g., reviewing tape recordings of
counseling sessions, case reviews).
        The university department, agency, or school supervisor will submit a written appraisal of
the student counselor at mid-term and at the end of each term (see Appendix H). Course grades
and credit will be given after the completion of the experience. The faculty member will make
the final decision regarding course grades (after consulting with the site supervisor). Letter
grades will be assigned for these experiences.
Site Supervisors
         On-site supervisors receive information including policies and procedures regarding
practicum and internships requirements. The responsibilities of the site supervisor are outlined
in this information. Additional information and training will be available from time to time.
                                                                                                 27



       Practicum and internship sites and supervisors will be evaluated at the end of each
experience. Continuing as an approved site and supervisor depends on continued compliance
with departmental requirements for practicum/internship, continued ethical and professional
conduct, continued support to the professional philosophy of the department, and favorable
student evaluations. The site evaluation will be composed of a formal student evaluation and
information gained from the site visits. Following the evaluation, the department may reassess
the approved status of sites and supervisors after discussing it with the site supervisors.
Hourly Requirements
         A MINIMUM of 150 hours on-site with a MINIMUM of 40 hours of direct service with
clients is required (some students will have or be required to have more than the minimum
number of hours). It is expected that students will complete their practicum by distributing their
time in the practicum site over at least a 15-week period. In addition, the practicum student is
required to attend the practicum seminar and group supervision, which meets two hours per week
to review and discuss the on-site practicum activities with a faculty member. Reviewing tapes of
counseling sessions, role-playing, presenting cases, and evaluating legal and ethical issues are
examples of seminar and group supervision activities. One hour per week of individual or one
and half hour per week triadic (dyadic) supervision with university faculty supervisor is also
required.
        Most counseling sessions must be routinely audio or video recorded. If your site does not
have the equipment to video record, a video recorder may be checked out from the educational
laboratory on the second floor of the Scully building. If you are not allowed to videotape at your
practicum site, you must request from your university supervisor clients to be seen in the
counseling laboratory.
Practicum Objectives
In the practicum, students will be expected to demonstrate a commitment to implementing and
expanding the following skills:
       1. Demonstrating effective counseling skills.
       2. Establishing and maintaining a helpful and supportive counseling relationship.
       3. Developing and applying appropriate individual counseling techniques.
       4. Maintaining client records, scheduling client appointments, learning about and using
       community resources when appropriate.
       5. Working effectively with supervisors and colleagues, including appropriate analysis
       and presentation of counseling sessions and case studies.
       6. Continuing development of professional behavior.
       7. Displaying enthusiasm for and commitment to the counseling profession.
       8. Expressing a willingness to learn.
                                                                                                  28



       9. Continuing a development of personal traits conducive to effective counseling,
       learning and professional development.
Specific objective will include the following:
       1. The student will complete a minimum workload of 10 clock hours per week on site
       totaling 150 clock hours in one full semester.
       2. The student will demonstrate completion of 40 hours of direct service in a clinical
       mental health, school, or career counseling setting.
       3. The student will engage in one hour per week of individual or triadic supervision and
       an average of two hours of supervision per week in group supervision with a program
       faculty member.
       4. The student will apply counseling skills and methods learned in previous or concurrent
       coursework.
       5. The student will produce their integration of theory into practice.
       6. The student will be able to explain various aspects of professional conduct and ethical
       standards as they apply to practice.
       7. The student will gain experience working with a variety of clients and presenting
       problems.
       8. The student will begin to formulate and articulate a personal approach to counseling.
       9. The student will learn to integrate evaluative feedback to improve their counseling
       skills.
       10. The student will demonstrate their knowledge of research areas of professional
       interest to improve service to clientele.
       11. The student will record counseling sessions either on audio or video equipment for
       review by the instructor, the on-site supervisor and peers.
       12. The student will maintain complete and appropriate logs.
Internship
        The internship is a supervised experience in Elementary School Counseling (CP 682
Internship – Elementary), Secondary School Counseling (CP 683 Internship – Secondary) School
Counseling (CP 684 Internship – School Counseling), and is perhaps the most important and
comprehensive professional experience for counseling graduate students. Designed to allow
application of skills and knowledge gained in a supervised setting, the internship is comparable
to the ultimate choice of a professional work setting.
        Typically this placement continues at the same site and is an extension of the first
practicum. All students must have a total of 9 credits in internship over the course of at least two
(2) semesters. For school counselors, an internship is required in both Elementary School
Counseling and Secondary School Counseling if the student wishes to be certified K-12.
Prerequisites for Internship courses are:
                                                                                                 29



       1. Successful completion of the practicum with a grade of A or B.
       2. Approval of an internship site by faculty internship supervisors. (Elementary School
       Counseling, Secondary School Counseling,).
        A written contract between the University, the internship site, and the student is required
at the onset of a student's internship.
Internship Objectives
       1. To provide opportunity for practicing competencies developed throughout the
       graduate training program.
       2. To acquaint the student with organization structure, protocol, relationships, processes,
       and working conditions.
       3. To encourage the formulation of and identification with a professional role.
       4. To provide an awareness of the process of community organization to meet the needs
       of the client.
       5. To inculcate high standards of professional ethics and provide experience in actual
       interpersonal relationships involving ethical decisions as well as practice in evaluating
       personal motives.
       6. To provide experiences with the realities of everyday agencies or institutional
       employment and introduce the challenges of maintaining a regular counseling schedule.
Internship Requirements
The student is expected to satisfactorily complete the supervised internship experience.
       1. Students will spend a MINIMUM of 600 clock hours at an approved internship site
       that enables them to develop counseling skills and practices (for the total 9 credit hour
       internship experience; this will typically be in two (2) semesters). (School counseling
       students wishing to become certified K-12 should have a minimum 200 hours in one or
       the other appropriate settings – for example 200 hours spent in a high school and 400
       hours in an elementary school, for a total of 600 hours. Students only wishing
       elementary OR secondary will complete all 600 clock hours in the desired setting.)
       2. Students are required to have a minimum of 40% of on-site time in face to face
       counseling services (240 total contact hours).
       3. Students are required to have at least one hour a week of individual supervision with
       their on site supervision (a ratio of 1 hour supervision to 20 hours worth of site time must
       be maintained.)
       4. Students are required to have two hours of group supervision per week with the
       university supervisor. (Exceptions to this may be made in the cases where the site is at a
       distance as described below AND equivalent group supervision can be secured.)
       5. Students are expected to adhere to all site and university policies of the on-site
       practicum and internship placement.
                                                                                                30



       6. Students are required to attend all scheduled class meetings. Students are expected to
       come to each class session prepared to present and discuss current client cases on which
       they are working.
       7. Students will develop counseling skills by keeping records, recording sessions, and
       critiquing each session.
       8. Students will seek opportunities to develop skills in each of the following areas:
               A. Individual counseling
               B. Group counseling
               C. Record keeping and accountability
               D. Consultation
               E. Test administration and interpretation
               F. Professional development
               G. Program development
       Note: If the student's internship placement does not afford the direct opportunity for any
       of the above activities, the student is expected to consult with the instructor concerning
       alternative means to develop the needed skills.
       9. Students will keep logs of all practicum and internship activities. (Appendix F)
       10. Students are expected to share their logs with their on-site supervisor regularly for
       comments and suggestions. The logs will be turned in and evaluated by the course
       instructor at the end of the semester.
       11. Students are required to complete all assigned readings.
       12. By the end of the two semesters of internship, the student is expected to demonstrate
       theoretical competency in advanced skills as outlined above.
Documentation
1. Internship hours should be recorded in the student's log.
Distribution of internship hours – Students will spend two semesters in internship. Each
semester, students should record the following hours:
       a. Direct service: Client contact (one-on-one or groups):
       MINIMUM: 40% of total internship hours: 120
       b. Individual supervision with on-site supervisor:
       1 hour/week minimum: 15
       c. Group supervision with university supervisor:
       1 and 1/2 hour/week minimum: 23
       d. Additional hours in staff meetings, case presentations, peer
       and/or supervisor observations, in-service training, transcription
                                                                                                   31



       and analysis of audio/videotapes or other activities approved
       in advance by students' supervisors: minimum: 142
Minimum Total Hours Per Semester: 300
Two Semester Total Minimum Hours: 600
Guidelines for Monitoring Internship Objectives
A wide range of methods may be employed to monitor internship objectives, including:
      Video/audio-recording
      Live observation
      Interpersonal process recall
      Case conferences and departmental meetings
These activities are presented as a minimal frame of references, as well as a general guideline.
Evaluation Criteria for Internship
       1. To receive a grade, the intern must demonstrate ability beyond being merely a
       competent counselor. This will include demonstration of competency beyond the "A"
       level required in practicum (see criteria listed under Grades in practicum section).
       2. Demonstration of the competencies for the internship.
       3. The weekly log.
       4. A journal-narrative account of the internship experiences.
       5. Evaluation of on-site and university supervisors.
       6. Satisfactory participation in the internship seminar including all assignments.
       7. Completion of a minimum of 300 clock hours per semester (600 total) to satisfy the
       internship requirement (see criteria listed under internship).
Expectations of Students
       1. The student is expected to actively participate in group supervision.
       2. The student will be expected to complete the required readings and assignments.
       3. The student will be expected to respond to a variety of skill assessment techniques.
       4. The student will be expected to know about and use a variety of technological
       strategies to enhance learning
       5. The student will be expected to know about legal issues and ethical standards in
       counseling.
Responsibilities of the University Supervisor
       1. Verify that each student is adequately prepared for the practicum and internship
       experience.
       2. Consider the number of students to be supervised in the on-site experiences along with
                                                                                                32



       teaching load and advisement, and other on-campus duties.
       3. Assist the student in selecting the site prior to the beginning of the practicum and
       internship experience. The University supervisor will make the initial contact with the
       on-site supervisor.
       4. Serve as liaison between the University and practicum/internship site to facilitate
       communication.
       5. Be available for consultation and intervention, as necessary.
       6. Maintain confidentiality of those clients whose counseling sessions are taped for
       purposes of student critique. The University supervisor will maintain ethical standards,
       including confidentiality.
       7. Provide supervisory seminars with students to discuss common problems and
       experiences and to assist students in case study presentations.
       8. Meet with individual students during scheduled supervision sessions.
       9. Review student logs detailing activities and hours spent at their site.
       10. Review audio/video recordings of the student's counseling sessions.
       11. Discussion about progress, techniques, procedures, policies, and developing
       relationships with clients and interdisciplinary professionals.
       12. Review student work and accomplishment of goals and objectives to ensure the
       student is progressing and completing the requirements on the site.
       13. Intervention when the student is receiving limited or restricted experiences on site.
       14. Contact with the on-site supervisor a minimum of two times during the semester to
       ensure the student is completing the on-site experience. Make at least one on-site visit to
       meet with the student and the on-site supervisor (if possible). If possible and permissible,
       observe the student in a counseling session at the site.
       15. Maintenance of appropriate records for grading and completion of an evaluation of
       the student's overall performance, including feedback provided by the on-site supervisor.
Responsibilities of the On-Site Supervisor
       1. Possess Master's degree in counseling plus appropriate experience and licensure as a
       Certified School Counselor, Licensed Professional Counselor, Psychologist, or
       Psychiatrist and provide a resume or vita for University records.
       2. Abide by the ethical standards of the appropriate profession.
       3. Have ongoing contact with the university supervisor to assess the progress of the
       student throughout the on-site experience.
       4. Orient the student to the organization. Arrange for appropriate working conditions as
       possible (e.g., privacy, designated setting for counseling). Acquaint student with staff
       members.
       5. Define the student's responsibilities at the site.
       6. Arrange opportunities for the student to observe the on-site supervisor in appropriate
       activities, such as counseling sessions, consultation, and conferences.
                                                                                               33



       7. Arrange for the student to be an active participant in staffing.
       8. Assign appropriate readings.
       9. Have the student become familiar with and administer assessment instruments that are
       used at the site and become actively involved, under supervision, with the scoring and
       interpretation of the results.
       10. Meet with the student at least one hour per week for every 10 site hours in practicum
       supervision, 1 hour for every 20 site hours for internship, and 1 hour per week for
       advanced practicum. This supervision must include listening to case presentations,
       discussing client load, reviewing tapes of sessions, and giving appropriate feedback.
       Remember, the counselor-in-training is a STUDENT and relies on your expertise for
       growth as a helping professional.
       11. Review student logs, accountability sheets and verify work completed.
       12. Ensure that the student spends AT LEAST 40% of on-site time in direct client
       contact activities. Counseling activities should include one-on-one counseling and group
       work (specific hours according to the level of practicum/internship).
       13. Provide opportunity for audio/video recording sessions for critique by the University
       and on-site supervisor.
       14. Complete the necessary evaluation forms, discuss them with the student, and send
       them to the University supervisor by the deadline for the term.
       15. The site supervisor who believes a student's behavior or skills are professionally
       unacceptable should bring this to the University supervisor at the earliest possible time.
       The University supervisor will coordinate with the on-site supervisor to determine
       appropriate action.
       16. The student should be allowed to have a variety of experiences as determined by the
       student's goals and objectives of the site.
Examples of such activities may include but not be limited to:
              School Counseling
              Policies and procedures of the school
              Administrative and teacher consultation
              Parent conferences
              Career, academic and personal counseling
              Appropriate guidance activities in the classroom
              Individual and group counseling
              Program development

Responsibilities of the Student
       1. Initiate contact with the established site supervisor only after approval has been
       granted by the University supervisor.
                                                                                                  34



       2. Be at the site on agreed upon days and BE ON TIME!
       3. Fulfill the at least the minimum numbers of hours required by the training program,
       the state, and/or any licensure or certification laws.
       4. Be familiar with the ACA Code of Ethics and practice professional ethical behavior.
       In essence, consider yourself an "employee" of that school or agency and conduct
       yourself accordingly.
       5. Develop a set of goals and objectives, both personal and professional that are to be
       achieved at the site and as a result of the practicum and internship experience.
       6. Negotiate with the on-site supervisor on appropriate goals and objectives. On-site
       experiences should include, but not be limited to, one-on-one counseling, group
       counseling, attending staffing, completing assigned readings, participating in in-service
       meetings for professional development, organizing and conducting special training
       sessions for parents and interdisciplinary professionals. This plan should develop into a
       contract for internship.
       7. Discharge all responsibilities at the cooperating agencies in a professional manner.
       Specifically, the student must adhere to all conduct rules applicable to the agency's
       employees as well as the state and national boards of the profession. This includes
       appropriate fees, punctuality, and responsible use of time while on site, etc.
       8. Seek feedback, actively and regularly, relative to general involvement and
       performance of responsibilities. Meet as required with the site supervisor for critique of
       work, including direct and indirect service.
       9. Keep a daily log of client contact hours, indirect service hours, and supervisory hours
       in accordance with the supervisor's guidelines.
       10. Secure appropriate liability insurance.
       11. Obtain written consent from all clients in individual and group counseling before
       treatment begins. Obtain written parent/guardian consent for all clients under the age of
       18.
       12. Meet with the on-site and University supervisor for a final evaluation of the
       practicum and internship.




Diversity of P-12 Classrooms
        The College of Education is committed to providing diverse opportunities in a variety of
settings as well as integrated throughout the curriculum. Field experience placements for
candidates are considered based upon the student population’s socioeconomic status, ethnicity,
and their level of disabilities/abilities. Additional opportunities to explore working with diverse
populations are provided through case studies, videos, and instructional materials.
                                                                                                35



Description of the Conceptual Framework
         The conceptual framework, A Competent, Caring, Reflective Professional Educator, was
initially proposed by the Conceptual Framework Committee in 1999-2000. During the 2006
academic year, the Conceptual Framework Committee was charged with reviewing the existing
conceptual framework through collaboration with all faculty members and consultation with P-
12 faculty and administrators. (See minutes of faculty meetings and December 2006 P-12
review). Revisions were made to more accurately reflect a conceptual framework that indicated a
shared vision, coherence, professional commitments and dispositions, commitment to diversity,
technology, and candidate proficiencies that aligned with the College’s goals and Missouri state
standards. Members of the Conceptual Framework Committee were representative of all
educational programs within the College, and the committee sought input from a wide range of
constituents including university students, professionals working in local schools, and colleagues
working in areas other than teacher education (e.g., school administration and counselors).
        Through a series of meetings, committee members participated in reflective dialogue that
reviewed, critiqued, and questioned existing practices and proposed changes, in the context of
developing a vision for how the College would improve preparation of professional educators.
Members used personal experiences, professional literature, data that described outcomes of our
preparation programs, and statements from members of the professional community during these
deliberations. One challenge was identifying the essential elements for each preparation
program while respecting the diverse philosophies and viewpoints found within individual
programs. Another challenge was to come to consensus on working definitions of the three broad
terms of “competent,” “reflective” and “caring” that represented each of the programs within the
College. In addition to Conceptual Framework Committee meetings, faculty from each program
discussed these terms and gave input into a working definition, helping to create a shared
definition across the College.
        The one-year review by the Conceptual Framework Committee yielded a consensus on
retaining the three terms, but rearranging their order within the dome on the model. This
framework of competent, reflective and caring is used to strengthen the knowledge, experience,
and performance of all students involved with the professional preparation programs in the
College of Education. As a result, a competent, reflective and caring professional educator
became the theme of the committee’s report submitted to the entire College of Education faculty
in spring 2007. The report was adopted by the faculty, and A Competent, Reflective and Caring
Professional Educator then became the basis for the college’s conceptual framework model.
Historically, the conceptual framework model of the college was further elaborated upon by the
three areas of teaching, counseling and educational leadership who used the exterior ring of the
model to display state and/or national standards and shared with faculty, staff and students. This
led to the three separate models utilized in the College.
                                                                                               36



        In the fall of 2008, a single model was developed for the College of Education that reads:
Preparing and Sustaining Leaders in Teaching, Counseling, and Educational Leadership Creating
communities of professional learners to enhance student success in P-12 schools. This single
model maintained the three central, fundamental principles of Competent, Reflective and Caring
and the focused areas of diversity, technology and literacy. The new model was presented to
College Council and approved.
        The competent, reflective, and caring professional educator as a model that informs
curriculum practice and assessment has been continually tested as a viable basis for work done
within the College. During the most recent revision of the College’s philosophy statement,
faculty again considered the relevance of this framework and agreed that competent, reflective,
and caring remains the key focus for our work. This work is defined by our shared professional
commitment, the knowledge bases we use in our work (e.g., teaching, research, and services),
and the outcomes we look for in individuals who complete our degree and certification
programs.
       Furthermore, specific dispositions for the unit’s candidates were developed through
collaboration with P-12 personnel during 2005, and reviewed again by P-12 personnel in
December of 2006. (Minutes available in the Exhibit Room).
Alignment of the School Counseling Program with Conceptual Framework Standards
        In 2007, the unit developed Standards based upon the fundamental principles and focused
areas of the Conceptual Framework, and cited their alignment with the objectives on all course
syllabi. The Standards and Proficiencies are based upon the six components of the Framework
that span all programs within the unit. Those components are; Competent, Reflective, Caring,
Diversity, Technology and Literacy. The proficiencies are specific to each of the three
Conceptual Framework Models used within the unit. The following shows the Conceptual
Framework’s alignment to the MoSTEP standards. All School Counseling Program syllabi
contain Conceptual Framework standards. The following is a chart that shows the alignment
between the Conceptual Framework standards and MoSTEP standards.


                             Southeast Missouri State University
                              Conceptual Framework Standards
                                    For School Counseling


1. The candidates will demonstrate adequate process skills in the practice of counseling
(competent)
1.1 Explains the nature and objectives of counseling when appropriate.
                                                                                                  37



1.2 Attends to and reflects all important feelings and content
1.3 Summarizes by recapitulating, condensing and crystallizing client’s verbal and
nonverbal statements over a period of time.
1.4 Confronts by describing (rather than evaluating) discrepancies in client’s
behavior or statements.
1.5 Interprets by responding in a manner which helps clients see underlying
feelings or thoughts that were not explicitly expressed.


2. The candidates will engage in reflective practice to improve conceptualization skills in
counseling (reflective)
2.1 Is perceptive in evaluating the effects of own counseling techniques.
2.2 Can articulate theoretical rationale for counseling interventions.
2.3 Uses relevant case data in planning both immediate and long-range counseling
goals
2.4 Bases counseling decisions on a theoretically sound and consistent rationale of
human behavior.


3. The candidates will demonstrate dedication to caring through the development of
personalization skills in the practice of counseling. (caring)
3.1 Demonstrates a personal commitment in developing counseling competencies.
3.2 Invests time and energy in becoming a counselor.
3.3 Accepts and uses constructive criticism to enhance self-development and
counseling skills.
Engages in open, comfortable, and clear communication with peers and
supervisors.


4. The candidates will demonstrate an understanding of the barriers to effective cross-cultural
counseling with diverse populations. (MoSTEP 1.4.1.2) (diversity)
4.1 Knows the detrimental effects of bias and stereotyping including gender, age,
and lifestyle.

4.2 Develops an understanding of social and cultural issues associated with societal
                                                                                                   38



changes and societal subgroups.(MoSTEP 1.4.1.2)

4.3 Demonstrates skills in developing curriculum and delivering an effective
comprehensive guidance program emphasizing cultural diversities and special
needs in a school setting. (MOSTEP 1.4.2.1, 1.4.2.2, 1.4.2.3, 1.4.2.4)


5. The candidates will demonstrate the ability to integrate technology in all facets of counseling.
(technology)
5.1 Knows about and uses a variety of technological strategies to enhance learning
(MoSTEP 1.4.2.5)
5.2 Understands the use of computers in career assessment and in processing,
storage and retrieval of career information.
5.3 Knows, understands, and uses technology as a management and counseling tool
in promoting the personal, educational, social and career development of the
learner. (MoSTEP 1.4.2.2)


6. The candidates will identify, understand, interpret, create and communicate using printed and
written materials associated with varying contexts. (literacy)
6.1 Develops knowledge of curriculum development and the organization,
administration, management, leadership, “best practices” teaching skills, and
evaluation of school based guidance programs. (MOSTEP 1.4.2.1,1.4.2.2, 1.4.2.3,
1.4.2.4)
6.2 Develops and teaches curriculum units for a school based guidance program
that acknowledges the diversity concerns and special needs of the school
population. (MOSTEP 1.4.2.1)
6.3 Develops knowledge of specialized curriculum, and instructional strategies and
responsive services which aid in the development and maintenance of positive
mental health and productive behavior in the school environment. (CACREP 2001
Section VI Standard C.3.d., MoSTEP 1.4.2.3).




Institution’s Goals and Priorities Aligned with National and State Standards
        As indicated during our last accreditation visit, the college should align its standards with
the University’s Goals and Priorities. The University standards were last revised in May of 2008
by the Strategic Planning Committee, and are available in full text in the Faculty Handbook,
                                                                                                  39



Chapter One: Organization and Governance. The following table shows alignment between
NCATE and MoStep standards and the University’s priorities
NCATE and DESE Standards                                     University Priorities revised 2008

1.Content Knowledge, Skills, Dispositions:                   Priority 1 and 2;

2. Assessment System and Unit Evaluation:                    Priority 3;
3. Field Experiences and Clinical Practices:                 Priority 1;
4. Diversity:                                                Priority 1 and 2;

5. Qualified Faculty:                                        Priority 2;
6. Unit Governance: (includes MoSTEP standards 7 & 8)        Priority 4 and 5




University Annual Assessment Reports
Furthermore, the Educational Leadership and Counseling Department submits Annual Student
Learning Outcomes Assessment Reports for review by the University Assessment Committee.
The reports are critiqued in the following five areas and include data from the School Counseling
Program.


                              Southeast Missouri State University
                      Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling
                                      Annual Department
                   Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Report (Counseling)
                                           For 2009


                  Components of the Assessment Unit EdS in Counseling Education
                                  MA in Community Counseling
                                    MA in School Counseling


ASSESSMENT PLAN (COUNSELING)
A.       Graduate Major(s)
         1.       List the Specific Goals and/or Objectives for the Majors
Goal 1: Students will demonstrate Discipline Specific Knowledge, Disposition, and Performance
as required to maintain the programs as established by CACREP (MA in Community and School
Counseling) and NCATE (MA in School Counseling) accreditation standards in preparing entry-
level professional counselor as outlined in the program objectives (see appendix).
                                                                                                  40



Goal 2: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the basic issues in nine core counseling areas,
viz. human growth and development, social and cultural foundations, counseling theory,
counseling skills, group work, career and lifestyle development, appraisal, research and program
evaluation, and professional orientation and ethical issues.
Goal 3: Students will demonstrate basic interviewing and counseling related skills.
Goal 4: Communication Skills: Students will demonstrate competence in oral and written
communication.
Goal 5: Critical Thinking: Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze issues and to apply
theories to specific cases.
Goal 6: Research Skills: Students will demonstrate the ability to do research.
Goal 7: Workplace and Graduate/Professional School Preparation: Students will demonstrate that
they are prepared to succeed in the work place or graduate/professional school.
2.    Ed.S. Goal 1. Specialization preparation: Ed.S students will demonstrate advanced
knowledge and skills in a chosen area of proficiency (e.g. Testing, Mental Health, School).
                                                 41




Table 1. Counseling Program Assessment Process


 Candidate Accepted to Program
                                                                           42




Complete Study Plan             Develop Portfolio Plan of   Advisor Approval
                                Action

Complete Core Counseling               As Needed -
and Major Area Courses                 Remediation Plan

Candidacy


Practicum                                                   1. University
                                                            Supervisor and
Internship                                                  2. Site Supervisor
                                                            Evaluations
Portfolio Defense                                           3. Pass Rate


CPCE                                                        4. Cumulative
                                                            Scores
Praxis II                                                   5. Pass Rate


NCE                                                         6. Pass Rate


Graduates                                                   7. Percentages


Recommendation for Certification and/or                     8. Percentages
Licensure
Student Clinical Site Evaluations                           9. Data Gathered


Post-Graduate Counselor, Supervisor, and Employer Surveys   10. Data Gathered


Faculty to Student Ratios                                   11. Data Gathered
                                                                                                             43



B. Methods
    1. Complete the Following Table for Each Method of Assessment
Method of Assessment                Years   Students    When Assessment      Who Administers the
                                    Used    Assessed    Done                 Assessment/How the assessment
                                                                             is administered
1       University Faculty          5       All         At the end of the    University Faculty Supervisor
        Supervisor Evaluations                          practicum and
                                                        internship
2       Site Supervisor             5       All         At the end of the    Site Supervisors
        Evaluations                                     practicum and
                                                        internship
3       Portfolio Defense           4       MA          At the end of the    At least two faculty
                                                        program
4       Counseling Program          7       MA          At the end of the    Proctored by faculty members.
        Comprehensive Exam                              program              Scored by CCE
        (CPCE)
5       Praxis II                   8       School      At the end of the    Testing Services
                                            Majors      program
                                                                             DESE required
6       NCE                         6       Community   At the end of the    NBCC and Testing Services
                                            Majors      program
7       Graduation                  6       All         At the end of the    Graduate School
                                                        program
8       Recommendation for          4       All         At the end of the    Faculty members and
        Certification and/or                            program              Certification office
        Licensure
9       Student Clinical Site       1       All         After practicum      Practicum and internship
        Evaluations                                     and internship       students.
10      Post-Graduate Counselor,    6       All         After graduation     Faculty Members
        Supervisor, and
        Employer Surveys
11      Faculty to Student Ratios   2       All         At the end of each   Faculty
                                                        semester.
                                                                                                                44




    2. Complete the Following Table for Each Method of Assessment
Method of Assessment             Goal(s)/        Rationale for Using this Method to Address the
                                 Objective(s)    Goal(s)/Objective(s)
                                 Addressed
1       University Faculty       1,2,3,4,5,7     Provides information and data on the student’s knowledge,
        Supervisor               Ed.S. 1         disposition, and performance as they are applied in the workplace.
        Evaluations
2       Site Supervisor          1,2,3,4,5,7     Provides information and data on the student’s knowledge,
        Evaluations              Ed.S. 1         disposition, and performance as they are applied in the workplace.
3       Portfolio Defense        1,2,3,4,5,6,7   Provides a measure of the student’s oral and written
                                                 communication and literacy skills. Provides a measure of the
                                                 student’s skills level accepted by the counseling profession
4       CPCE                     1,2,3,4,5,6,7   Nationally normed test of comprehensive counseling knowledge
5       Praxis II                1,2,3,4,5,6,7   State normed test of comprehensive counseling knowledge
6       NCE                      1,2,3,4,5,6,7   Nationally normed test of comprehensive counseling knowledge
7       Graduation               1,2,3,4,5,6,7   Graduation rates.
8       Recommendation for       7 Ed.S. 1       Post graduation success
        Certification and/or
        Licensure
9       Student Clinical Site    7 Ed.S. 1       Site Satisfaction
        Evaluations


10      Post-Graduate            7 Ed.S. 1       Post graduation success
        Counselor, Supervisor,
        and Employer Surveys
11      Faculty to Student       1               Maintain national standards.
        Ratios



3.    Describe any implemented changes in the Assessment plan (Goals, Objectives, and
Methods of Assessment) since Last Year’s Report.
          Method of Assessment 9 – Graduate School Graduation Surveys.
Beginning in Fall 2008 the Graduate School Graduation was removed and the Student Clinical
Site Evaluations be added. One year worth of data is now included
          Method of Assessment 11 – Faculty to Student Ratios
                                                                                                            45



As required by the new CACERP standards that became effective July 2009, beginning in Fall
2009 Faculty to Student Ratios will be tracked. Data was obtained from Fall 2006 to Summer
2009.


Program Assessment Data
Method of Assessment 1 – University Faculty Supervisor Evaluations
Method of Assessment 2 – Site Supervisor Evaluations


Evaluations                                             05-06          06-07          07-08          08-09
First Column – University Faculty Supervisor            Fac.    Site   Fac.    Site   Fac.    Site   Fac.        Site
                                                        n=35                                         n=25
Second Column – Site Supervisor Evaluations                     n=33   n=43    n=47   n =44   n=48               n=24
Process Skills                                          3.76    4.63   4.22    4.58   4.21    4.36   3.84        3.90
1. Begin the session smoothly                           4.26    4.77   4.39    4.80   4.31    4.45   4.00        3.68
2. Explain the nature and objectives of counseling      4.40    4.62   4.51    4.57   4.50    4.31   3.84        4.23
when appropriate
3. Is relaxed and comfortable in the session            4.59    4.75   4.39    4.57   4.61    4.39   3.76        3.77
4. Attends to and reflects all important feelings and   3.97    4.49   4.47    4.65   4.65    4.45   4.00        4.14
content
5. Assist client to be more specific without leading    3.29    4.66   3.74    4.53   3.93    4.33   3.76        3.86
client to feel “grilled”
6. Restates client’s feeling and content                3.40    4.62   4.32    4.58   4.18    4.43   3.77        4.00
7. Summarizes                                           3.69    4.72   4.26    4.50   4.15    4.29   3.80        3.86
8. Confronts by describing discrepancies (not           2.63    4.43   4.31    4.49   4.05    4.20   4.46        3.67
evaluating)
9. Interprets                                           3.53    4.58   4.05    4.51   3.81    4.34   3.28        3.73
10. Terminates                                          3.81    4.68   3.76    4.57   3.95    4.38   3.76        4.05


Conceptualization Skills                                3.77    4.69   4.36    4.62   4.40    4.39   3.79        3.90
1. Researches referral prior to the first session       3.97    4.79   4.65    4.59   4.69    4.41   4.24        4.40
2. Facilitates realistic goal-setting                   3.59    4.72   4.32    4.69   4.55    4.43   3.55        3.67
3. Encourages appropriate action-step planning          3.44    4.63   4.27    4.64   4.62    4.43   3.45        3.50
4. Employs judgment in the timing and use of            3.69    4.66   4.10    4.46   4.18    4.23   3.16        3.83
different techniques
                                                                                                             46



5. Recognizes discrepancies                                 3.67   4.73   4.49   4.50   4.26   4.37   3.60        3.47
6. Uses relevant case data in planning                      3.81   4.59   4.23   4.57   4.59   4.35   3.80        4.17
7. Uses relevant case data in considering various           3.85   4.59   4.23   4.50   4.45   4.31   3.92        4.13
strategies
8. Bases decisions on a theoretically sound and             3.72   4.55   4.37   4.60   4.25   4.22   3.88        3.86
consistent rationale
9. Is perceptive in evaluating the effects of own           3.80   4.85   4.12   4.74   4.02   4.42   3.64        4.00
counseling techniques
10. Demonstrates ethical behavior                           4.21   4.88   4.86   4.92   4.88   4.79   5.00        4.43
11. Can articulate theoretical rational for interventions   3.69   4.61   4.23   4.59   3.93   4.30   3.40        3.50


Personalization Skills                                      4.52   4.81   4.81   4.78   4.77   4.65   4.64        4.66
1. Is aware of on feelings in the session                   4.37   4.67   4.91   4.65   4.68   4.54   4.36        3.73
2. Recognizes own values                                    4.13   4.76   4.86   4.67   4.70   4.52   4.56        3.71
3. Demonstrates a personal commitment in                    4.57   4.88   4.93   4.87   4.79   4.74   4.76        4.43
developing competencies
4. Invests time and energy in becoming a counselor          4.65   4.92   4.93   4.92   4.88   4.78   4.76        4.59
5. Accepts and uses constructive criticism to enhance       4.65   4.92   4.79   4.87   4.86   4.66   4.76        4.55
self-development
6. Engages in open communication                            4.65   4.75   4.74   4.87   4.81   4.77   4.76        4.55
7. Recognizes own competencies and skills                   4.57   4.78   4.66   4.65   4.65   4.59   4.56        3.64
8. Recognizes own deficiencies and actively works to        4.57   4.78   4.68   4.76   4.75   4.62   4.56        3.91
overcome them


General Supervision Comments                                4.71   5.00   5.00   4.79   4.83   4.74   4.84        4.28
1. Completes case report and case notes punctually          4.61   5.00   5.00   4.68   4.76   4.65   4.76        4.32
2. Keeps supervision appointments                           4.73   5.00   5.00   4.89   4.97   4.78   4.76        4.45
3. Maintains practicum/internship summary log               4.81   5.00   5.00   4.82   4.77   4.77   5.00        4.08



Analysis:
The counseling program trains strong clinicians. Both Site supervisors and University
supervisors rate students high.
                                                    47




Method of Assessment 3 – Portfolio Defense
  Year        Attempted Passed Pass Rate
  2008-2009 11             11       100%
  2007-2008 11             11       100%
  2006-2007 14             14       100%
  2005-2006 18             18       100%
  2004-2005 18             18       100%
  2003-2004 31             31       100%
  Total                             100%


Analysis:
Students have done well on the Portfolio Defense.
                                                                                                        48




Method of Assessment 4 – CPCE (Comprehensive Professional Counseling Exam)
Core Area – 2008-2009         Mean                                       Mean    Stand. Dev.

National Comp. is Fall 2008   Fall    Spr.    Sum.    Avg.    National   Diff.   Fall    Spr.   Sum.   National

N=                            3       2       6       11      750

Human Growth & Development    9.00    11.50   12.67   11.46   12.14      -0.68   0.82    0.50   2.21   2.50

Social & Cultural             11.33   9.00    11.17   10.82   10.24      0.58    0.94    1.00   2.11   2.32

Helping Relationships         13.33   13.50   15.67   14.64   12.87      1.77    2.05    0.50   0.75   2.63

Group Work                    12.67   12.50   14.67   13.73   11.45      2.28    0.94    1.50   1.60   2.75

Career & Lifestyle            8.33    9.50    10.67   9.82    8.56       1.26    2.87    2.50   0.94   2.20

Appraisal                     12.33   12.00   13.33   12.82   11.82      1.00    0.47    2.00   1.37   2.21

Research & Evaluation         9.67    10.00   12.33   11.18   9.89       1.29    3.09    1.00   2.69   2.72

Professional Orientation      12.00   12.50   14.50   13.45   11.91      1.54    0.00    1.50   0.96   2.45

Total                         88.67   90.50   105.0   97.91   88.89      9.02    6.02    6.50   8.56   14.36



Core Area – 2007-2008         Mean                                       Mean    Stand. Dev.

National Comp. is Fall 2006   Fall    Spr.    Sum.    Avg.    National   Diff.   Fall    Spr.   Sum.   National

N=                            5       3       16      24      774

Human Growth & Development    12.80   13.67   11.69   12.17   11.44      0.73    2.05    3.21   2.73   2.36

Social & Cultural             12.80   10.00   10.56   10.96   10.03      0.93    1.48    1.73   1.82   2.23

Helping Relationships         12.80   13.67   12.18   12.50   12.00      0.49    1.79    .58    1.64   2.18

Group Work                    14.40   13.00   12.50   12.96   11.55      1.41    1.14    1.73   1.63   2.56

Career & Lifestyle            10.00   9.33    10.19   10.04   8.77       1.27    2.24    1.53   1.28   2.23

Appraisal                     10.80   11.00   10.50   10.63   10.34      0.28    0.84    1.73   1.63   1.84

Research & Evaluation         10.60   12.33   11.06   11.12   10.80      0.32    1.14    2.08   1.80   2.34

Professional Orientation      13.00   11.67   12.13   12.25   12.18      0.07    2.55    1.53   2.00   1.99

Total                         97.20   94.66   90.81   92.62   87.12      5.50    9.23    6.43   8.42   12.25
                                                                                                         49




Core Area – 2006-2007         Mean                                       Mean    Stand. Dev.

National Comp. is Fall 2006   Fall    Spr.    Sum.    Avg.    National   Diff.   Fall    Spr.   Sum.    National

N=                            5       3       9       17      774

Human Growth & Development    9.60    12.00   12.78   11.46   11.44      0.02    1.34    1.00   2.17    2.36

Social & Cultural             10.00   9.33    13.11   10.81   10.03      0.78    2.12    1.15   1.17    2.23

Helping Relationships         11.60   14.00   11.22   12.27   12.00      0.27    2.50    1.00   2.11    2.18

Group Work                    12.00   12.00   12.33   12.11   11.55      0.56    2.64    1.00   2.50    2.56

Career & Lifestyle            9.60    8.67    10.78   9.68    8.77       0.91    2.30    1.53   1.86    2.23

Appraisal                     10.20   9.00    10.67   9.96    10.34      -0.38   1.92    1.73   2.24    1.84

Research & Evaluation         11.00   13.00   11.78   11.93   10.80      1.13    2.23    2.65   1.72    2.34

Professional Orientation      12.00   12.00   13.33   12.44   12.18      0.26    1.87    1.00   1.94    1.99

Total                         86.00   90.00   96.00   90.67   87.12      3.55    14.08   7.94   11.52   12.25



Core Area – 2005-2006         Mean                                       Mean    Stand. Dev.

National Comp. is Fall 2005   Fall    Spr.    Sum.    Avg.    National   Diff.   Fall    Spr.   Sum.    National

N=                            10      22      0       32      488

Human Growth & Development    11.90   10.55           11.23   11.47      -0.24   2.47    2.13           2.19

Social & Cultural             10.20   11.59           10.90   11.25      -0.35   1.87    2.13           2.06

Helping Relationships         12.60   11.55           12.08   11.42      0.66    0.84    2.02           1.89

Group Work                    12.30   10.95           11.63   11.60      0.03    2.67    2.01           2.36

Career & Lifestyle            9.90    10.14           10.02   9.57       0.45    1.59    1.70           2.06

Appraisal                     10.70   9.23            9.97    9.75       0.22    1.95    2.05           2.05

Research & Evaluation         11.80   10.05           10.93   10.80      0.13    2.62    2.42           2.42

Professional Orientation      11.60   12.50           12.05   12.45      -0.40   1.64    1.74           2.07

Total                         91.00   86.56           88.78   88.31      0.47
                                                                                                50




The Mean Score as per CACREP core subject area – Trend data prior to Fall 2005
                               Spr 03   Sum 03   Fall 03   Spr 04   Fall 04   Spr 05   Sum 05

Human Growth & Dev             10.62    13.63    11.86     11.00    12.2      11.65    9.5

Social & Cultural              11.00    12.85    11.29     10.50    9.6       9.9      10.0

Helping Relationships          12.23    12.31    12.00     10.71    10.80     12.35    9.25

Group work                     13.15    14.77    14.43     10.71    11.60     12.65    10.0

Career & Lifestyle             11.00    10.38    9.43      9.29     8.0       11.25    10.25

Appraisal                      11.77    9.92     10.71     9.43     10.20     10.50    8.75

Research & Program Eval.       9.31     9.46     9.71      11.29    9.60      9.45     8.0

Professional Orient & Ethics   10.85    14.54    13.0      12.07    12.4      11.15    11.75




Analysis:
In 2005-2006 the program’s students scored on average 0.47 points above the national
comparison group. In 2006-2007 they scored 3.55 points above the national comparison group.
In 2007-2008 students scored on average 5.50 points above the national comparison group. In
2008-2009 students scored on average 9.02 points above the national comparison group. See
graph below.
                                                                                            51




Method of Assessment 5 – Praxis II - Counseling
 Year                  Attempted        Passed       Pass Rate   Mean      S.D.
 2008-2009             N/A              N/A          N/A         N/A       N/A
 2007-2008             12               12           100%        675.45    27.7
 2006-2007             5                5            100%        675.00    31.09
 2005-2006             12               12           100%        656.67    53.17
 2004-2005             9                9            100%        643.33    40.41
 2003-2004             21               21           100%        666.00    62.54
 2002-2003             14               14           100%        680.00    81.85
 2001-2002             7                7            100%        675.71    40.77



Analysis:
        The Praxis II has pass score of 590. Our students score significantly above that.


Method of Assessment 6 – NCE
 Year                  Attempted   Passed     Pass Rate
 2008-2009   October   3           3          100%
             April     6           6          100%
             Total     9           9          100%
 2007-2008   October   3           3          100%
             April     8           8          100%
             Total     11          11         100%
 2006-2007   October   5           4          80%
             April     9           9          100%
             Total     14          13         93%
 2005-2006   October   4           4          100%
             April     7           7          100%
             Total     11          11         100%

Analysis:
                                                                                                52



      No students have failed the NCE in the last 3 year. The last student that failed was in
October 2006.
Method of Assessment 7 – Graduation
Graduation                                                  06-07       07-08   08-09
Students that took and passed the CPCE                      17          24      11
Students that graduated with MA in School Counseling        7           16      3
Students that took and passed the Praxis II                 7           12      0
Students that graduated with MA in Community                8           9       8
Counseling
Students that took and passed the NCE                       13          11      9
Students that graduated with Ed.S. in Counseling            4           4       8
Education



Analysis:
       Graduation rates are down slightly but enrollment has improved with the expected
graduation rate to follow.


Method of Assessment 8 – Recommendation for Certification and/or Licensure
   Number Recommended                         06-07    07-08        08-09
   National Certified Counselor (NCC)         13       11           9
   Provisional School Counselor               8        7            2
   School Counselor                           21       16           12
   Provisional Psychological Examiner         8        3            8
   Psychological Examiner                     11       15           8
                                                                                                               53




New Method of Assessment 9 – Student Clinical Site Evaluations
    Evaluations (Scale 1-5 with 1 being the best.)                                     08-09
                                                                                       n =11
    1. The staff was well qualified and experienced.                                   1.55
    2. The facilities for students were adequate.                                      1.55
    3. Orientation to the agency/school was adequate.                                  1.82
    4. Opportunities for discussion with the staff were adequate.                      1.45
    5. The assignments met my learning objectives.                                     1.45
    6. Staff were supportive of students.                                              1.45
    7. The agency/school provided opportunities for obtaining required hours.          1.91
    8. The agency/school provided agreed upon resources for                            1.55
    meeting learning objectives.
    9. I was given a manageable workload at this practicum/internship site.            1.55
    10. I recommend that this practicum/internship site be considered for internship   1.73
    placement in the future.



Analysis
This new method of assessment should provide additional information regarding counseling
sites.
Method of Assessment 10 – Post-Graduate Counselor, Supervisor, and Employer Surveys
The following is the results of our Spring 2007 Program Evaluation. Graduates, Supervisors and
Employers for the last 3 years responded. A 42 percent response rate was achieved (142 were
sent out and 60 were returned). Below are the results. This is completed once every three years
as required by national standards.


                                                                                               Mean    Mean
                                                                                               (1-5)   (1-5)
Counseling Core                                                                                2004    2007
A Graduate of the SEMO Counseling Program:                                                     N=31    N=60

1. Has a basic understanding of the duties of a counselor.                                     4.47    4.55
2. Has knowledge of the basic foundational theories of counseling.                             4.48    4.48
                                                                                                          54



3. Has established an integrated personal theory of counseling.                             4.06   4.25
4. Has an understanding of personal limitations as a counselor.                             4.13   4.37
5. Has demonstrated effective counseling skills.                                            4.43   4.54
6. Has demonstrated ability to plan and implement a group counseling program.               4.35   4.45
7. Has demonstrated abilities to facilitate group counseling.                               4.26   4.32
8. Has applicable knowledge on human lifespan development and developmental theory.         4.33   4.32
9. Has demonstrated a commitment to learning and understanding diversity issues.            4.32   4.52
10. Has shown recognition of awareness of possible prejudices and biases.                   4.39   4.43
11. Has demonstrated ability necessary to provide career counseling.                        4.24   4.46
12. Has demonstrated the capability of evaluating the needs of clients.                     4.29   4.51
13. Has demonstrated ability to obtain and understand current research.                     4.19   4.41
14. Has demonstrated ability to conduct research.                                           3.89   4.07


School Counseling                                                                           2004   2007
Complete for School Counselors only                                                         N=20   N=51
1. Has demonstrated adequate preparation for role as a school counselor.                    4.45   4.53
2. Has understanding of the importance of consulting in order to increase the capacity of   4.80   4.51
the learning environment.
3. Has demonstrated a current knowledge of prominent issues that affect schools and         4.60   4.49
students.
4. Has demonstrated understanding of the Comprehensive Guidance Program.                    4.50   4.61
Community Counseling
Complete for Community Counselors only                                                      N=14   N=20
1. Has demonstrated adequate preparation for work in the community counseling setting.      4.46   4.00
2. Has demonstrated knowledge of various community agencies and the services provided.      4.21   4.05
3. Has demonstrated ability to diagnose and treat clients.                                  4.29   4.05
4. Has demonstrated ability to work in an interdisciplinary environment.                    4.36   4.25



Analysis:
The results of the current 2007 Post-Graduate Counselor, Supervisor, and Employer Surveys are
consistent with the 2004 surveys. Sample size and return rate was significantly improved.
                                                                                                                55




Method of Assessment 11 – Faculty to Student Ratios


Faculty to Student Ratios   Fall 06   Spr 07   Sum 07   Fall 07   Spr 08   Sum 08   Fall 08   Spr 09   Sum 09
Full-Time Faculty (9 cr)*   3.3       3.3      3.3      5.3       4.3      3.5      4.0       4.0      4.0
Full-Time Student (9 cr)*   33.3      30.7     33.3     42.7      39.0     43.0     44.3      45.7     37.8


Faculty/Student – 1 to X    10.0      9.3      10.0     8.1       9.1      12.3     10.3      11.4     9.5
* Summer = (6 cr)



Analysis:
The 2009 CACREP standards require that counseling programs Faculty to Student Ratios do not
exceed 1 to 10. Therefore the Faculty to student ratios will be monitored to verify adherence to
national standards. (CACREP Standard reads: I.N. Institutional data reflect that the ratio of full-
time equivalent (FTE) students to FTE faculty should not exceed 10:1.) Analysis reveals that the
counseling program has exceeded the ratio of 1 to 10, 3 out of the last 4 semesters.
                                                                                                          56




II. Response
A. In reviewing the data, no specific changes in curriculum and instruction is justified at this
time. The new CACREP standards require several changes in the programs.
B. Based upon reviewing the present assessment the following data collection and analysis will
be considered and reviewed by the faculty for adoption as assessment procedures:
         1. Method of Assessment 11 – Faculty to Student Ratios. As required by the new
         CACERP standards that became effective July 2009, beginning in Fall 2009 Faculty to
         Student Ratios will be tracked. Data was obtained from Fall 2006 to Summer 2009. This
         level of monitoring for the Faculty to Student ratios is new. Beginning next year ratios
         for Masters level classes and Specialist level classes will be monitored separately.
         Faculty to Student Therefore more time will be needed to stabilize the analysis.
         2. Monitor CP611 to determine if the slight reduction in CPCE score is a pattern or an
         anomaly.
         3. CACREP new standard is that post graduate surveys be done annually. Beginning
         Fall 2009 this will be done.


Impact on P-12 Student Achievement-From Assessment Report-Employer Surveys


School Counseling                                                                           2004   2007
Complete for School Counselors only                                                         N=20   N=51
1. Has demonstrated adequate preparation for role as a school counselor.                    4.45   4.53
2. Has understanding of the importance of consulting in order to increase the capacity of   4.80   4.51
the learning environment.
3. Has demonstrated a current knowledge of prominent issues that affect schools and         4.60   4.49
students.
4. Has demonstrated understanding of the Comprehensive Guidance Program.                    4.50   4.61
                                                                                                     57




Description of Transition Point and Assessments
                               Transition Point Assessments
                                for the Counseling Program


Admission to         Admission to        Admission and     Portfolio Defense/    Program
Counseling           Practicum           continuation of   Graduation            Completer
Professional                             Internship                              Follow-up
Education Program
Program Pre-reqs.    Complete the        Successful        Review by             Post-graduate
Complete             Prerequisites for   completion of     Counseling            counselor,
                     the practicum.      Practicum.        Committee             supervisor and
Stage One:
                                                                                 employer surveys,
GPA>3.0,             Successful          University        Completion of all
                                                                                 graduate school
MAT/GRE /50%ile      promotion to        supervisor and    course
                                                                                 graduation
Three letters of     candidacy with a    Site supervisor   requirements
                                                                                 surveys
recommendation       3.5 > overall       Evaluations,
                                                           Presentation of
Result: Accepted     GPA                 during and at                           Praxis pass rate
                                                           counseling tape
Provisional Status                       the conclusion
                                                           and position paper.   NCE pass rate
(OR)                                     of the
GPA > 2.75                               internship        Pass the CPCE
MAT/GRE
complete,
Three letters of
recommendation
Approval by
Counseling
Admission
Committee
Result: Accepted
for Probationary
Status
Stage Two:
(complete in
CP610) and
Screening
                                                                                                           58




Rotation of Classes for Cohort Program - Malden

Spring 2010                              Spring 2011                          Spring 2012
CP 610 Counseling Orientation &          CP 614 Counseling Skills#            CP 682 Internship – Elementary#
Ethics*
CP 612 Counseling Theories#              CP 631 Crisis Intervention and       CP 683 Internship – Secondary#
                                         Consult.+
                                                                              CP 684 Internship – School
                                                                              Counseling#
Summer 2010                              Summer 2011                          CP 686 Internship – Mental Health#
CP 611 Developmental Theories#           CP 616 Group Counseling#             CP 645 Marriage & Family Coun.*
                                                                              (MH)
CP 630 Foundations of School             CP 617 Assessment in Counseling+
Counseling*
Elective for Mental Health
Fall 2010                                Fall 2011                            Summer 2012
CP 615 Career Development#               CP 643 Psychodiagnostics &           CP 613 Social & Cultural Asp. of
                                         Treatment*                           Couns*
GR 691 Methods of Research+              CP 680 Counseling Practicum#         CP 684 Internship – School
                                                                              Counseling#
CP 640 Mental Health Counseling*                                              CP 684 Internship – Mental Health#
(MH)


*Weekend (Friday night/Saturday) @ Cape Girardeau campus
#Weeknight (late afternoon/evening)@ Malden campus
+Web-based (one meeting required)
Actual course delivery format and sequence are subject to change.




Subject Specific Faculty
        Faculty who deliver the pedagogical and content portions of this program are a mix of
full-time and adjunct faculty. Full vita can be found in the appendices. Listed below are faculty
who taught in the Counseling program during the 2009 calendar year (spring, summer, and fall)
Insert list of faculty, rank and course assignments:
            Dr. Verl Pope           Professor                         614,
            Dr. Janice Ward         Associate Professor               614, 680, 616, 735
            Dr. Julieta Leitner     Associate Professor               612, 616,
                                                                                                   59



       Dr. Melissa Odegard Assistant Professor                615, 613, 680, 640
       Dr. Travis Smith    Assistant Professor                617, 610, 611, 680


Discuss faculty evaluation results from most recent evaluation Cycle:
       All counseling faculty received Level II Merit for the 2009 Academic Year. This is the
highest level of merit that faculty can achieve.
Discuss support for adjuncts:
        Adjuncts regularly contact the Counseling Program Coordinator in regard to any
questions, concerns, or needs that they have in regard to their teaching assignments. They are
regularly invited to attend departmental and college functions and meetings.
Discuss how subject specific faculty collaborate and communicate formally between/among
professional education faculty:
        All counseling faculty have program meetings on Tuesdays each week. An agenda is
prepared and distributed along with appropriate handouts. Counseling faculty meet with
Educational Leadership faculty once per semester and on an as needed basis. The Counseling
Coordinator attends College Leadership Team meetings and College Council meetings monthly.
New Counseling faculty are assigned a mentor and work closely together on all professional
areas as needed.


Certification Program Resources
        The Counseling program is provided sufficient funding and resources to support a high-
quality program. The university provides substantial funding for undergraduate and graduate
education in the College of Education budget (See budget details in the appendix) which
supports most budget needs to the program along with a dean’s budget which supports
professional development. These budgets sufficiently support on-campus and clinical work
essential for the preparation of professional educators including the costs of field supervision. In
addition, the unit has diligently pursued outside funding through grants which have provided
additional funds for a variety of targeted and broad areas (see grant budget details)
        The unit has sufficient full-time and adjunct faculty to ensure program coherence and
integrity. In addition, the unit has made use of adjunct faculty who can bring extensive school-
based experience to the program. The College has a Dean, 3 Department Chairs (MSE, EESE
Ed. Leaderhip and Counseling), 2 Directors (Field Experiences, Director of Certification and
Assessment) and 3 Coordinators (Advising, Educational Leadership and Counseling). There is
also a sufficient number of administrative assistants, graduate assistants and student workers
serving as support personnel.
                                                                                             60




Technology
        In terms of resources, students have access to technology through a variety of computer
labs on campus and to knowledge resources through Kent Library; faculty members also have
curricular resources available through the RPDC, and the Center for Scholarship in Teaching and
Learning (CSTL): and the Instructional Resources and Technology Center (IRTC) in the COE is
available for use by Southeast faculty, staff, and students, as well as P-12 teachers in the
University’s service region. Faculty and classroom computers are typically replaced on a four
year cycle. The replacement plan includes one machine for each faculty member and classroom
technology package. In instances where a faculty member chooses a laptop over a desktop
computer, the cost of the laptop will be covered up to the cost of a basic desktop machine, with
the remainder being the department’s responsibility. The costs of these replacements are covered
by allocation of Information Technology Committee funds.




Appendices:
Program Syllabi
CP 610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
CP 611 Developmental Theories
CP 612 Counseling Theories
CP 613 Social & Cultural Aspects of Counseling
CP 614 Counseling Skills
CP 615 Career Development
CP 616 Group Counseling
CP 617 Assessment in Counseling
CP 626 Advanced Career Counseling
CP 630 Foundations of School Counseling
CP 631 Crisis Intervention and Consultation
CP 640 Mental Health Counseling
CP 643 Psychodiagnostics and Treatment
CP 645 Marriage & Family Counseling
CP 680 Counseling Practicum
CP 682-4 Internship -- Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
CP 685 Internship -- Career
CP 686-7 Internship -- Mental Health
GR 691 Methods of Research (Counseling Program Supplement)
                                                                                                  61




Program Faculty Vitas
Julieta Monteiro.docx
Melissa Odegard's Vita.doc
Travis Smith Vita2.doc
VERL T.docx
WardCurriculum Vita.docx




Assessment Instruments
Comprehensive Professional Counseling Portfolio
        Each student will develop a Comprehensive Professional Counseling Portfolio (CPCP).
This will include information about the student. It will also include information and artifacts for
all courses and experiences of the program. It will include the Personal Counseling Position
Paper. It will include evaluations from site and university supervisors and practicum and
internship work logs. And it will include reflective statements for each core area and
experiences.
Final Master’s Objective Examination
        The CPCE is a nationally normed comprehensive exam that consists of 160 objective,
multiple choice questions. Students are allowed four hours to complete the exam. Students will
be required to obtain a minimally competency score on this exam. (This minimal competency
point will be set at 1.0 standard deviations below the national mean for the current
administration.) Students will be allowed to retake this exam up to three times in the next three
regularly scheduled administrations. The exam will be scheduled each semester – including
summer (3 times a year). Students should make arrangements to take the exam when scheduled,
as no special administrations will be allowed. Students must register for GR 698 Master’s Final
Comprehensive Examination (0 cr) during their final semester. If students are not enrolled in
regular coursework during the semester GR 698 is scheduled, a minimum enrollment fee must be
paid.
Final Master’s Oral Examination
                                                                                                62



         Each student will professionally and adequately defend his or her Personal Counseling
Position Paper and Comprehensive Professional Counseling Portfolio. This will be done as it
relates to the individual’s ability as a professional counselor. This will be demonstrated by the
student presenting a case study from the internship experience, including a video tape of a
counseling session, to the student’s oral exam committee (appropriate releases will need to be
secured). This committee will be made up of two or three graduate level faculty (two of whom
must be tenure track counseling faculty), of the student’s choosing, and chaired by the student’s
advisor. The committee will evaluate the student on his or her professionalism, ability to provide
appropriate and ethical counseling services, comprehensive integration of the learning
experience, and the congruence of the position paper and the case study.


Field Experience/Counselor Dispositions Form
Supervisor Evaluation Form

				
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