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Mayor: Jobs bill will not help Neosho
By Derek Spellman
Joplin Globe Staff Writer


NEOSHO, Mo. — A $26 billion jobs bill passed by Congress will not help Neosho, and the recreation center
might close as the cash-strapped city eyes next year‘s budget, officials said Wednesday.

Meanwhile, Neosho police officers and firefighters who lost their jobs this week are searching for work. Newton
County Sheriff Ken Copeland said his department will provide more law enforcement services inside the city
limits.

And, the City Council next week is to receive a proposed budget that the mayor previously characterized as
being focused on ―survival and stability‖ after Neosho voters defeated a proposed property tax on Aug. 3.

Jobs bill

The U.S. House came back into session Tuesday to pass the $26 billion jobs bill that Democrats contend will
save teachers, police and other government employees from election-year layoffs. President Barack Obama
quickly signed the measure into law.

It was the same day Neosho announced it had laid off nine police officers, a records clerk and seven firefighters,
effective immediately. The police and fire departments will reduce their rolls by an additional four positions in the
coming weeks to help close a projected shortfall in the next fiscal year, which starts Oct. 1.

Mayor Richard Davidson said Wednesday that state officials told him that Missouri‘s share of the federal jobs bill
could not be used to hire police and firefighters — either in Neosho or elsewhere in the state. Missouri is to
receive $189 million for kindergarten through grade 12 education and $209 million for health care spending.

―There is no help there,‖ Davidson said.

The city is hoping that it can obtain grants for some police and fire personnel, although Davidson cautioned that
no one has been able to find any money to restore the lost positions ―anytime soon.‖

‘It’s tough’

Joshua Buckner, 25, was one of the police officers who learned Tuesday that the department could not keep him
on. He had been with the department for two years.

―It‘s tough,‖ he said Wednesday. ―It‘s just something we‘ve got to live with.‖

He wants to return to law enforcement, although he said, ―At this stage, I‘ll take whatever I can find.‖

Asked if the city had given any indication about when it might be able to rehire anyone, he said: ―It‘s just a
waiting game. Nobody really knows.‖



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He said later: ―It is life. I wish the citizens would have voted yes on (the property tax).‖

The Police Department has been about halved in less than a year after factoring in the latest layoffs. Chief Dave
McCracken said the department started the year with 26 personnel. It was already down to 23 before Tuesday‘s
announcement, he said.

The chief acknowledged concerns that the deep cuts to the department could embolden criminals. In addition to
fewer personnel, the department will be discontinuing its investigations and special response teams, and scaling
back services.

Copeland, the sheriff, said Wednesday that his department will step up its efforts inside the city. His department
has an investigations team and a special response team. It will field all child-abuse investigations and help
Neosho police combat drug abuse.

―I want to reassure the residents of Neosho that they are not going to be without police protection,‖ he said.

As for criminals who might think Neosho is more vulnerable now, the sheriff said: ―The criminal element better
think twice because they are still in Newton County.‖

The Fire Department on Wednesday went from 24 full-time firefighters to 17. It will be down to 15 firefighters by
Aug. 24 and down to 14 by Sept. 30, according to information released by the city.

Rec center

The city has faced financial strife since last year, in the wake of falling revenues and sometimes significant cost
overruns that attended an ambitious community development campaign in preceding years.

By the close of the last fiscal year on Sept. 30, the city‘s general fund had borrowed a total of $1.7 million from
an assortment of restricted or earmarked funds and still had virtually no reserves. Former City Manager Jan
Blase and former Finance Director Bob Blackwood were fired earlier this year, after much of that borrowing and
the city‘s financial straits became public.

With the city now in its third round of layoffs since September, the City Council next week is to start discussing
the budget for the next fiscal year.

That budget is expected to propose the closure of the Rec Plex, officials said Wednesday.

―It is in need for repair,‖ said interim City Manager Harlan Moore. ―Right now, we can‘t afford to maintain (it).‖

Todd Banes, parks and recreation director, said the council will make the final decision on whether to close the
center. Echoing Moore, he said the building ―is in pretty bad disrepair‖ and would need a major renovation. The
cost of the work on the building‘s exterior, which would include a new roof, facade repair and new air-
conditioning units, would total $100,000, he said.

The building, which offers games and exercise equipment among other amenities, attracts between 500 and
1,000 visitors per week during the winter, Banes said. He estimated it draws half that amount during the
summer.

If the council decides to close the center, the city would likely place the exercise equipment elsewhere in town

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and put the rest of the equipment up for sale, Banes said. The building itself also could be put up for sale. The
parks and recreation offices housed there would move into the building formerly occupied by the Neosho Area
Chamber of Commerce.

Moore said last week that the police and fire departments would have to cut their budgets by $400,000 each to
balance next year‘s budget. An additional $100,000 is to be cut from City Hall, and while specifics on those cuts
are still to come, Moore said the closure of the Rec Plex would be ―totally separate.‖

Upcoming

A meeting scheduled for Friday at which the Neosho City Council was to receive the proposed budget has been
canceled. The budget is to be delivered to the council Monday either electronically or by packet, as well as
placed on the city‘s website and sent electronically to local media. The council will begin discussions about the
budget Tuesday night in preparation for the fiscal year that starts Oct. 1.




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Federal dollars OK'd Tuesday may take
year to reach area school districts
By Rudi Keller ~ Southeast Missourian


Tonight, the Advance School Board will meet to consider whether the district can afford $12,000 in raises for
educators. The board will make that decision without knowing when or how much the district will receive from a
new infusion of federal cash into education programs nationwide.
And because of the way Missouri spends public money, a strong possibility exists that no school district will
benefit from the $189 million the state anticipates as its share until the 2011-2012 school year.
On Tuesday, Congress approved a $26 billion funding bill that directs $10 billion to state governments for
education programs and $16 billion to support Medicaid. Along with $189 million for primary and secondary
education, the state expects about $209 million for Medicaid, budget director Linda Luebbering said.
The education funding is to allow school districts to hire or retain educators and support staff. But budgets are
already in place for the school year that begins in coming days, and employment decisions were made months
ago.
Advance, a district in northern Stoddard County that had 452 students last year, cut one elementary school
teaching job as it sought to balance the budget, said Stan Seiler, who is beginning his first year as
superintendent in Advance.
Most area districts avoided layoffs, instead leaving jobs opened by retirements or resignations unfilled, but
almost all will operate this year with a smaller staff.
"We are planning the best we can, but without really solid information about concrete funding from the state,"
Seiler said. "We will have to take a wait-and-see attitude about what will really transpire."
The raises that will be discussed Thursday would go to educators moving up a rung on the district salary ladder.
The district's reserve funds would cover the $12,000 cost if the board agrees, Seiler said.
Seiler and superintendents from five other area districts said Wednesday that they have more questions than
answers about the new round of federal help. Some said they would not reverse any cuts made to balance the
current budget, while others said they would like to reinstate high-priority positions like counselors and
elementary teachers.
Almost all expressed worries that budgets for 2011-2012 school year could bring a new round of reductions and
said it might be better if the state held its share of the new federal funding to soften the impact.
The legislature appropriated $3.45 billion for aid to school districts in the current fiscal year. That figure includes
$246.5 million in federal budget stabilization funds, money that was part of the economic stimulus bill from 2009.
The stabilization fund is now empty and state revenue would have to rebound by $900 million to keep spending
stable in the year beginning July 1, 2011, said Dr. Ron Anderson, superintendent of the Jackson School District.
Jackson cut 10 teaching positions when the school board passed this year's budget.




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"We are most concerned about fiscal year 2012, which is next year as far as the state goes, about what the state
will do with that big gap," Anderson said. "We are probably really looking at that to see if those funds would help
soften that major hole that appears to be a possibility in the budget coming up."
The hurdles that would delay quick distribution of the federal education funds include a requirement that each
state apply for a share, Luebbering said. Other obstacles include a state constitutional requirement that agencies
may not spend money without an appropriation. Also, no fund exists in the state treasury to receive the federal
aid, Luebbering said.
Gov. Jay Nixon will be working with the legislative leadership and the Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education to understand and respond to the federal legislation, Luebbering said.
"There are a lot of things we are trying to find out," she said. "We understand there are a lot of unanswered
questions and things we will have to work through very quickly."
The Meadow Heights School District near Patton cut two elementary teaching slots, the A+ schools coordinator,
a part-time music teacher and a secondary education teacher, superintendent Rob Huff said. Voters rejected a
tax increase Aug. 3. His highest priority would be to restore a fourth-grade elementary teacher to reduce class
sizes.
But if new money doesn't come soon, it may as well wait until 2011-2012, he said, because it could be more
disruptive to learning for children to change teachers.
"If funding becomes available, we will start exploring that option," he said. "But we have to ask at what point in
time does it become more harmful to change."
Kevin Dunn, superintendent in Perryville, is a member of an advisory council to the state commissioner of
education. His district cut 10 positions and a bus route to balance its budget. He said his position on the advisory
council leads him to expect the new federal help will be spent in the 2011-2012 school year. That's the best
choice, he said.
"This money will save jobs because it will lessen the cuts for next year," he said.
The Cape Girardeau School District cut 27 employee positions, said superintendent Dr. Jim Welker. Like Dunn
and others, he is worried about what cuts would have to come next year. If the new federal help comes soon, he
would restore two counselor positions and a school nurse, but otherwise would not relish being forced to restore
jobs that would be cut again in the spring.
"We are planning on starting school tomorrow, and we are not counting on those funds," Welker said.
In the Woodland School District in Marble Hill, superintendent Jennings Wilkinson said he cut one job and has
sufficient reserves, coupled with other spending restrictions, to handle this year's needs. Spending the new
federal money during the 2011-2012 school year makes sense for his district, he said.
"But many schools need that right now, and fiscal 2012, we are being told, could be even more severe than
2011," he said. "But that is a decision that people at the state level will have to make."




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Federal funds are good news for Ozarks
schools, but details are few
Claudette Riley
News-Leader
Area school leaders are eager for details about how federal funds approved to save teaching jobs will be doled
out.
They also want to know how the funds can be spent, what strings are attached and if they will arrive in time to
make a difference for the coming school year.
"There's still too much unknown at this time," said Steve Chodes, chief financial officer for the 24,000-student
Springfield Public Schools. "Details are too few and far between."
An emergency $26 billion jobs bill was approved by the U.S. Congress on Tuesday and immediately signed into
law. It includes $10 billion to help school districts preserve an estimated 160,000 teaching jobs -- more than
1,200 of which are in southern Missouri.
Area school budgets have been strapped by lower-than-expected revenue and steep state funding cuts in
specific areas, such as busing. Many have opted to trim services, shed jobs through attrition and make other
changes for the 2010-11 school year.
The approved Springfield operating budget reflects a loss of nearly 57 full-time positions including 26 teaching
jobs.
Education Secretary Arne Duncan vowed Tuesday to streamline the process so money quickly flows to local
districts. Area school officials are looking to the state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education for
guidance.
Chodes said it's too early to know what to expect or if the funding will arrive in time to add jobs back into the
budget, keeping class sizes relatively stable.
Still, he hopes it will be good for the students. "I'm pleased that Congress has passed the additional stimulus
bill," he said.
Ozark Superintendent Gordon Pace said he hopes for flexibility to use the money during the coming school year
or the next one.
"If that's the case, that's what we would look at," he said of using funding for the 2011-12 year. "We've already
planned our budget, we have already hired pretty much all of our teachers."
Nixa Superintendent Stephen Kleinsmith said he hopes to know by late September how much money to expect
and how it can be spent.
"We don't know what strings or cables will be attached. There are always strings," he said.
Kleinsmith has "mixed emotions" about the funding, which will provide short-term funding but not resolve budget
shortfalls created by a sour economy.
"It's kind of kicking the can down the road," he said. "I'd like to see us deal with it instead of buying our way out
of it. We're postponing the pain."
Still, the extra funding would "shore up shortcomings" and help keep class sizes level.

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"If the stimulus money is given out to everybody, we're certainly going to take it and use it wisely," he said.

Additional Facts
Higher education
It is unclear whether and how the infusion of federal funds into the state budget would help Missouri's public
colleges.
"It's possible ... but there is not a clear resolution at this time," said Kathy Love, spokeswoman for Missouri
Department of Higher Education.
Missouri expects to receive from the federal government $209.3 million in health care resources and $189 million
for K-12 education over the next year.
Paul Kincaid, chief of staff for Missouri State University, said it will be a while before public universities should
know how their budgets would be affected.
"It is our understanding that the Governor's Office staff and other state officials are awaiting additional guidelines
and other details from the federal government about how and when this funding may be spent," Kincaid said in a
written response. "... Once that information is available, the Governor and Missouri General Assembly will
develop the state's budget.
"Then, and only then, will we know how it will impact public higher education in both Fiscal Year 2011 (current
year) and Fiscal Year 2012 (next year)."
Now, public colleges in Missouri expect to lose 15 percent or more in state appropriations in 2011-12.
-- Didi Tang




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McCaskill hears tales of red tape
By Ken Newton
St. Joseph News Press
Sen. Claire McCaskill meets with Northwest Missouri residents Wednesday afternoon at the Mo-Kan Regional
Council.
A career in public service has immunized Sen. Claire McCaskill to surprise at some of bureaucracy‘s excesses.
But a tale told in St. Joseph Wednesday left the lawmaker shaking her head.
City Administrator Mike Fisher of Savannah, Mo., did the telling. At a meeting of municipal and county officials
from around the region, he related to the senator a story of the town‘s water plant, its environmental record
spotless, getting a $25,000 federal fine for missing a deadline on filing paperwork the administrator described as
optional.
Ms. McCaskill called it a case of ―bureaucracy gone crazy‖ and suggested, with the intervention of her office, the
town would not have to pay.
―A part of me loves when I find someone who has taken complete leave of common sense and they‘re using the
power of the federal government to beat up on people,‖ she said.
The give-and-take took place as the senator spoke to about 35 people at the Mo-Kan Regional Planning
Commission offices. Her open call for cases of federal shortcomings yielded stories about two-inch piles of
federal paperwork, unreasonable mandates and environmental reviews both time-consuming and unnecessary.
In one case, a local government had to gauge the environmental impact of a project on Native American tribes
that no longer have a presence in Missouri.
Randall Relford, presiding commissioner of Clinton County, told the senator that small counties lack the
resources (staffing and finances) to access federal resources. Larry Atkins, presiding commissioner of Andrew
County, told of a federal requirement of an American manufactured window for a new jail, only no U.S.
companies make such an item.
Ms. McCaskill promised the resources of her staff, saying phone calls probably placed often ease the hardships
of those working through red tape.
Area officials heaped praise on the Mo-Kan group, an economic and community development organization that
provides services (transportation planning, grant writing, among others) to counties and communities in the two
states.
For his part, Tom Bliss, the planning commission‘s executive director, praised Ms. McCaskill for her stand
against federal earmarking, a budgetary process where lawmakers direct money to specific projects.
The senator prefers the federal grant process, which she said delivers money according to a project‘s merit
rather than a politician‘s seniority or committee rank.
―We like it when the playing field is level,‖ Mr. Bliss said, referring to grant applications.
Ms. McCaskill‘s St. Joseph visit completed a Northwest Missouri swing that included town-hall forums in Trenton
Tuesday night and Maryville Wednesday morning.




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Mo. Rep. Skelton criticizes Hartzler over
military
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Democratic Missouri Congressman Ike Skelton is questioning the support of his
Republican opponent for people in the military.
Skelton chairs the U.S. House Armed Services Committee. He said Wednesday he considered Vicky Hartzler's
record during her six years in the Missouri House, from 1995 through 2000, a problem.
The Missouri Democratic Party has leveled similar criticism of Hartzler, citing votes in the late 1990s against
state legislation on overseas voting and National Guard re-enlistment bonuses.
Hartzler's campaign says the Republican nominee strongly supports the military and veterans. Spokesman
Steve Walsh says Democrats are worried about the campaign and are pointing to votes cast more than a
decade ago. Walsh says Skelton is trying to divert attention from his support for wasteful spending.




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Mo. sheriffs back states' immigration
efforts
By CHRIS BLANK
Associated Press Writer
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Missouri sheriffs are giving their support to law officers working to enforce state
and federal immigration laws along the Mexican border.
The Missouri group endorsed a statement that also approved of efforts by states such as Arizona to pass their
own immigration laws and noted that law officers working near the border face increased dangers.
"We realize the failure of the federal government to enforce immigration laws has forced states like Arizona to
pass their own legislation to accomplish this goal, and we applaud those states for doing so," the resolution
states.
Mick Covington, the executive director for the Missouri Sheriffs' Association, said Wednesday the organization
approved the statement during the group's annual meeting earlier this week. Covington said more than 100
members voted to approve it and that no one dissented.
The Arizona law requires that police conducting traffic stops or questioning people about possible legal violations
ask about their immigration status if there is "reasonable suspicion" that they are in the country illegally. It also
makes it a state crime to be in the country illegally. And it becomes a crime for illegal immigrants to solicit work.
Last month, a federal judge blocked most of the law from taking effect, concluding that the federal government
has a good chance of succeeding with its lawsuit challenging Arizona's law. The federal government opposes
the state legislation on grounds that it usurps federal authority over immigration policy. Other critics of the
Arizona law have raised concerns that it could lead to racial profiling.
Arizona has appealed the decision blocking the law from taking effect.
Missouri lawmakers in 2008 approved their own immigration bill that penalizes businesses that knowingly hire
illegal immigrants; orders the Missouri State Highway Patrol to seek special federal immigration training; and
bars Missouri cities from refusing to cooperate with federal immigration authorities.
Under the legislation, Missouri law officers are to verify the immigration status of those whom they arrest.
The Missouri Catholic Conference has argued that the federal government should take the lead in setting
immigration policy.
"If you have every state enforcing immigration policy, you get into some crazy situations," said Mike Hoey, the
executive director for the Missouri Catholic Conference.
Hoey said immigration policy needs to set up an orderly system but also one that demonstrates compassion for
people seeking to migrate and improve their lives. He said the federal government has not shown leadership on
immigration and that has created a vacuum frustrated states have felt compelled to fill.




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Decision time looming on China Hub
project
By Tim Logan
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
The region's bid to land Chinese air cargo flights is getting down to crunch time.
After two and a half years of talks and planeloads of trade delegations crisscrossing the Pacific, the political and
business leaders pushing the project say they will know by New Year's if their efforts will take off.
A key study they hope can prove a business case for the flights is halfway done, and so far, said Mike Jones,
chairman of the Midwest China Hub Commission, signs are pointing in the right direction. Yet another round of
talks is coming up, with Missouri Sens. Christopher "Kit" Bond and Claire McCaskill set to lead a group to Beijing
this month. A few weeks later, top Chinese aviation officials and airline executives are due to visit St. Louis to
launch a joint study of just how this might work.
"At that point we're going to be in real discussions on the mechanics of this," Jones said. "And I think we'll know
if we have the framework of a deal by year's end."
Helping Lambert's case is a strong rebound in global freight traffic. Through June, 28 percent more goods had
flown through the skies this year than last, according to industry trade groups, and demand is now back above
prerecession levels. Trade between Asia and North America is predicted to grow faster than average in the
years to come, and flights heading west — key to Lambert's effort and U.S. job creation — are expected to make
up two-thirds of that growth, says cargo leasing company Atlas Air Worldwide.
"The volume of activity we need is there," Jones said. "What we have to do is sell St. Louis."
But that, experts say, comes with steep challenges in an air cargo industry accustomed to flying international
freight into established hubs such as Chicago, Atlanta and Dallas.
"A significant amount of export cargo" will have to be won away from those airports if Lambert hopes to succeed,
according to a preliminary report by the Hub Commission's consultants, Houston-based Aerostrata LLC. And
industry experts say that will be difficult.
Cargo 'Travel agents'
Most freight, especially overseas freight, is in the hands not of airlines but of freight-forwarding firms — sort of
the travel agents of the cargo industry — who rent space on both passenger and cargo planes to get goods from
Point A to Point B. The more international flights an airport has, said Mike Webber, a cargo consultant based in
Overland Park, Kan., the more options those forwarders have. That gives the big hubs — with their taxiways full
of foreign-flagged planes — a huge built-in advantage.
"The reason these forwarders are so beholden to the traditional gateways is not because they like them. It's
because they know that if, say, Lufthansa cancels a flight at 8 o'clock, there's another flight at 2," Webber said.
"That's hugely important to them."
A smaller airport with no international passenger flights is simply less attractive, Webber said. And that's what
Lambert is now.
One way to make it more appealing is to offer a faster turnaround. Aerostrata's study points to quicker customs
clearance — 30 minutes, on average at Lambert compared to eight hours at O'Hare — and less runway traffic as
strengths for St. Louis.

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That can help, said Ken Bukauskas, associate director at the cargo consulting firm LeighFisher. Lambert flights
will struggle to compete on price, he predicted; competition helps shippers get lower rates at gateways. But
when you are shipping flowers that wilt by the hour, a quicker trip has value, too.
"Shippers and consumers will be the ones who decide if this is going to work," he said. "If they have to pay too
much more, the market will tell you."
To get a sense of what the market thinks, Lambert has formed a "Shippers Council," about 15 area companies
that do a lot of business in China, such as Emerson Electric, Monsanto and Caterpillar. They may not use the
cargo flights much themselves — many manufacture in China or export goods too heavy and low-cost to go by
plane — but several said they see big benefits for the region.
"We think it could help our customers," said Wendell Knehanz, director of product management for St. Charles-
based Novus International, which makes additives for livestock feed. "There's a real opportunity for added meat
trade between the U.S. and China."
Indeed, when asked what might fill those planes heading west, many Lambert supporters point to food.
Where's the beef?
China's growing middle-class is hungry for high-quality meats, the kind raised in the U.S. farm belt. Flying them
from Lambert makes a lot of sense, said Rex Ricketts, director of the commercial agriculture program at the
University of Missouri Extension. But even that comes with a major hurdle: Right now, China won't import beef
from the U.S.
Talks are under way about changing that. Some experts say it will require the U.S. opening its borders to
Chinese chicken.
While those negotiations wind on, Ricketts is leading a study of what a Chinese market for U.S. beef might look
like and how Missouri farmers might be able to tap into it.
"It's very interesting and complex," he said. "One thing we do know is that we have to have planes fly to make
this happen."
Whatever happens with the project, it will likely start slow, said airport director Rhonda Hamm-Neibruegge,
probably two to four flights a week.
That may not be the economic engine that some of the cargo project backers have pitched it as, but, she said, it
is an essential first step. Carving out a niche for Lambert in the cargo business and hitching St. Louis more firmly
to the world's fastest-growing economy are things that don't happen overnight.
"The thought would be we can prove our case," she said. "And then as growth continues, hopefully we have a
chance to capture more of it here."
But even if building a hub takes time, Jones says he knows the region can't study it forever. State and local
governments and business groups have already spent millions on the effort. If it is not going to work, they have
to be willing to cut bait and move on. That is what makes the next few months so crucial.
"At this point, we're in a sprint. This will not be a marathon," Jones said. "We won't be coming back here three
years from now saying 'Oh, we're almost there.'"




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State treasurer's unclaimed property
team returning to fair
Dennis Rich
Sedalia Democrat


Missouri Treasurer Clint Zweifel expects another successful year as his office‘s unclaimed property team comes
to the Missouri State Fair.
―Of the record $35 million my administration returned in the past fiscal year, $46,761 was returned at the 2009
State Fair. My team is definitely looking to beating that this year,‖ Zweifel said in a statement Wednesday.
Jon Galloway, a Zweifel spokesman, said a range of property, including safety deposit box contents, stocks,
bonds and utility deposits are turned over to the treasurer‘s office each year. The office now holds about $600
million worth of property belonging to 3.5 million account holders.
State law requires financial institutions, insurance companies, public agencies and other business entities to turn
over assets that belong to a customer, client, employee or other owner if there have been no documented
transactions or contact with the owner for five years or more.
Unclaimed property can be searched 24 hours a day, seven days a week at showmemoney.com. According to
Zweifel‘s office, more than 80 percent of account owners also may be eligible to file a paperless claim to receive
their property on this website. Wait times for returns average 15 days, down from 43 days at the end of 2008.
Since January 2009, Treasurer Zweifel has returned $48 million to 138,000 account owners.
The average claim is about $365, Galloway said.
―It could be stocks or bonds or an employee‘s last paycheck they didn‘t pick up, or a paid utility company deposit
you moved and forgot about,‖ Galloway said.
Galloway related a favorite story in the treasurer‘s office about someone whose parents opened a life insurance
policy for them when they were born, but the family moved from the home five years later and it was not until the
person was 70 years old that he found out about the property being held by the treasurer.
―It comes in all shapes and forms,‖ Galloway said.
Galloway said the vast majority of unclaimed property is stocks, bonds and bank accounts.
The office also takes possession of about 900 safety deposit boxes a year.
The boxes sometimes contain what Zweifel considers a special type of property — military medals.
Zweifel helped push for legislation passed this year by the Missouri General Assembly and signed by the
governor, ending the state‘s practice of selling medals after a period of time.
In addition to ending the practice, Zweifel also is working with museums and veterans groups across the state to
display the medals while his office searches for their rightful owners.
The unclaimed property team will be on hand in the Mathewson Exhibition center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each
day of the fair.




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Adult industry takes law to court
Restrictions could close strip clubs.
By T.J. Greaney
Columbia Daily Tribune
A group of adult business owners and others in the erotic industry filed a lawsuit yesterday to keep Missouri from
implementing a law that would ban full nudity and alcohol at strip clubs and adult stores.
The lawsuit claims state legislators didn‘t follow proper procedures for determining the financial cost of the
legislation and that the new restrictions violate free speech.
Calling the law a ―series of draconian restrictions,‖ the lawsuit asks the court to keep it from taking effect as
scheduled on Aug. 28. It warns the legislation will ―undermine‖ and ―shutter‖ productive businesses and throw
people out of work into the teeth of a depressed economy.
The lawsuit filed in Cole County involves 17 plaintiffs including three exotic dancers listed under pseudonyms,
numerous businesses including Passions Video Inc., an adult video and novelty chain with a Columbia location,
and a trade group for the adult entertainment industry. St. Louis-area resident Mike Ocello, the president of a
national chain of adult businesses, also is suing as an individual taxpayer.
Gene Gruender, owner of Passions, said the new law would cause him to lay off two employees, and it would
result in the closure of most of Missouri‘s strip clubs, likely putting more than 1,000 bartenders, strippers,
bouncers and others out of work.
―When a club has to have strippers dressed with more on than is required at a public pool or a public street,
there‘s no point in it,‖ Gruender said. ―It makes no sense.‖
Gruender said lawyers are confident the law can be overturned on several grounds, including a constitutional
challenge in federal court if need be. ―The only problem is it will cost us a half-million dollars to prove they‘re
right,‖ he said.
Along with banning full nudity and alcohol, the law would bar touching between seminude employees and
customers at sexually oriented businesses. It also requires stores and clubs to close before midnight, and it
prevents new adult businesses from opening within 1,000 feet of schools, churches, libraries or day care
centers.
Seminude employees would have to stay at least six feet from customers in a room of at least 600 square feet.
At particular issue in the lawsuit is the legislature‘s procedure for estimating how much the law would cost the
state and local governments. The lawsuit claims lawmakers ignored a request for a formal hearing on the
expected cost and pinned a total fiscal note of less than $100,000 on the bill.
A trade group, the Missouri Association of Club Executives, claims if adult businesses are restricted as proposed
in the new law, at least 60 percent would close, costing the state about $2.7 million in lost sales tax and
$720,000 in lost state withholding taxes and would put about 1,800 people out of work.
Sen. Matt Bartle, R-Lee‘s Summit, champion of the bill, said because the fiscal note is the centerpiece of the
lawsuit, the law itself is strong.
―The fact that they‘re main frontal assault is procedural rather than substantive is, in my mind, a pretty strong
indication that they know that we‘re solid,‖ he said this morning.



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Bartle said the law will not put the adult industry out of business in the state. It is, he said, designed to cut down
on prostitution, which he thinks is rampant in the clubs.
―There‘s been a market for pornography since the beginning of time,‖ Bartle said. ―This isn‘t going to end the
industry. But there are obvious secondary effects, and prostitution is one of them. And for them to suggest
otherwise is to suggest human nature isn‘t what everybody understands it is.‖
The Associated Press contributed to this report.




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UPDATE: Columbia business part of strip
club lawsuit
By Nicholas Jain
Columbia Missourian
COLUMBIA — A local business owner is among the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed Tuesday that hopes to prevent a
Missouri law from going into effect that would regulate strip clubs and adult stores.
Gene Gruender owns Passions in Boonville and Passions in Columbia, which are listed among more than a
dozen plaintiffs in the suit.
Gruender said a change in state law means he would have to lay off two employees.
He said legislators are ―trying to fix problems that don‘t exist. Everything they‘re trying to fix is already illegal.‖
The law bans nudity and alcohol in the adult businesses. It will also bar touching between seminude employees
and customers and prohibit anyone younger than 18 from entering the clubs and stores. It requires adult
businesses to close before midnight and prevents them from opening near homes, schools, churches, day care
centers, libraries, parks or other sexually oriented businesses.
Gruender's Boonville and Columbia stores have a late-night employee that Gruender said he would have to lay
off if the law goes into effect. He said the jobs pay more than minimum wage and have health insurance.
Gruender said he spent a lot of time in Jefferson City trying to persuade legislators not to pass the law but said,
"politics overtook the common sense." He said he questioned the law's intent to crack down on drugs and
prostitution when those activities are already illegal.
In addition to the Columbia and Boonville stores, Gruender owns a store in Marshall. He said Columbia has
seven adult businesses and that they rarely have any sort of problems with lawlessness.
The lawsuit claims state lawmakers didn't follow the proper procedures for determining the financial cost of the
legislation and that the restrictions violate free speech and expression rights.
Calling the law a "series of draconian restrictions," the lawsuit asks the court to keep it from taking effect Aug.
28.
At particular issue in the lawsuit is the legislature's procedure for estimating how much proposed bills would cost
the state and local governments. The lawsuit claims lawmakers ignored a request for a formal hearing on the
expected cost.
By not holding the hearing, lawmakers failed to account for a significant financial hit to adult businesses that
generate millions in tax revenue and provide a significant number of jobs, the lawsuit states.
The lawsuit also claims the new rules violate free expression rights under the First Amendment. For example, it
states bookstores would be limited in their right to distribute constitutionally protected material, and employees of
adult businesses might not be able to perform as they have in the past or convey their desired message to
patrons.
Attorney Richard Bryant, who filed the suit, said it would be a relatively simple case if the courts accept the
argument that legislators did not follow proper procedures in creating the law. If the court takes up the First
Amendment issue, it would become more complicated, he said.



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Sponsoring Sen. Matt Bartle, R-Lee's Summit, said he was heartened that the legal challenge focused on the
process used to approve the law. He said he doesn't see the courts second-guessing the cost estimate.
"I am greatly encouraged that their method of attack is the fiscal note because I think that is extremely flimsy,"
Bartle said.
The law's supporters argue that adult businesses contribute to seedy behavior, demean women, cause divorces
and drive down property values. A Tennessee attorney who developed a model Missouri used in creating its law
has said restrictions on operating hours, nudity and buffers between exotic dancers and patrons have been
upheld elsewhere.
The Missouri attorney general's office said it was reviewing the lawsuit.
State lawmakers have tried for several years to regulate sexually oriented businesses. A 2004 law restricting
highway billboards was struck down by a federal appeals court, and legislation passed in 2005 was declared
unconstitutional by the Missouri Supreme Court because the regulations were added to an unrelated bill.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.




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BLOG ZONE
Carnahan, Martin debate debates as 3rd
District contest heats up
By Jo Mannies, Beacon Political Reporter
U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-St. Louis, and his 3rd District Republican rival -- lawyer Ed Martin -- have agreed
to debates, although they haven't agreed on how many, when or where.
In fact, Martin (left) has announced a series of three weekly debates in August, beginning next Tuesday. Trouble
is, Carnahan (right) wasn't consulted and doesn't plan to show up.
The two apparently have agreed to two debates in September, as proposed by Carnahan, that would be hosted
and moderated by the St. Louis area League of Women Voters. Although the dates have yet to be the set, plans
call for one debate in the St. Louis area and the second in the 3rd District's southern half, in either Jefferson or
Ste. Genevieve county.
Carnahan also has proposed that the Libertarian and Constitution Party candidates be allowed to participate.
But Martin sent out an announcement earlier this week declaring that three more debates will be held on
consecutive Tuesdays: Aug. 17, 24 and 31. Martin says the moderator would be Martin Duggan, former
moderator of KETC-TV's "Donnybrook." Duggan also supports Martin.
That was news to the Carnahan campaign:
"Apparently Ed Martin's long track record of lies didn't stop with scamming Missouri taxpayers out of 2.4 million
in the infamous 'memogate' scandal," said Carnahan communications director Angela Guyadeen. "Debates are
about helping voters better understand where their candidates stand on the issues -- not political stunts designed
to mislead the public. As if voters didn't have enough reason to question Ed Martin's sincerity and honesty, this
latest scam takes the cake."
The events are dubbed "Tuesdays with Martin," which indicate that they'll be held whether or not Carnahan
shows up.
Here's the schedule, as announced by Martin:
6:30-8 p.m., Aug. 17: "American Jobs" – Royale Orleans, 2801 Telegraph Rd. (St. Louis County)
6:30-8 p.m., Aug. 24: "National Debt/Spending/Stimulus" – TBA – (Jefferson County)
6:30-8 p.m., Aug. 31: "Obamacare" – Drury Hotel ballroom, 2111 Sulphur Ave. (St. Louis)




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Campaign staffer retains Graves firm in
Nieves case
Jason Noble
KC Prime Buzz
JEFFERSON CITY | Here‘s a new twist in the situation between a Missouri Senate candidate and the campaign
staffer he allegedly assaulted.
The staffer, Shawn Bell, is now seeking a protection order against the candidate, Brian Nieves, and the matter
will be in court here tomorrow morning with none other than the law firm of Todd Graves representing Bell.
Graves, of course, is the former U.S. Attorney from Kansas City and brother of U.S. Rep. Sam Graves. His
firm‘s entry into the case comes after Bell has already retained a prominent St. Louis attorney, Alan Mandel, for
a civil case against Nieves.
The protection order is the third possible line of legal action connected to the alleged assault. Washington, Mo.,
police are presently conducting a criminal investigation into the matter, and have said they will refer their findings
to the local prosecutor. Mandel, meanwhile, said today he was preparing a civil case that could be filed as early
as next Monday.
According to court filings, Nieves, a state representative from Washington, Mo., will be represented on Thursday
by Michael Payne, an attorney from St. Louis.
Calls to Payne were not returned this afternoon.




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Add CEPJ to Missouri's election season
alphabet soup
Jason Noble
KC Prime Buzz
JEFFERSON CITY | James Harris has a lot going on right now.
In addition to lobbying, campaigning and a sticky legal matter involving one of his employees, he announced
today the formation of a new independent political group.
Harris will be the executive director of the Coalition for Economic Prosperity and Jobs or, if you prefer, CEPJ.
But what does that mean?
The unobjectionable/vague-to-the-point-of-meaninglessness name, the website full of conservative boilerplate
and the board made up of businessmen, professionals and lawyers can only mean one thing: this is a 527 group
looking to raise big money and spend it on commercials between now and November.
(At least one of those board members is directly involved in a campaign: Joseph S. Passanise is the treasurer
for state auditor candidate Tom Schweich‗s campaign committee.)
So look for them in the small print on your U.S. Senate commercials this fall.




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Koster to hold two-day
symposium focusing on water
quality issues at Lake of the
Ozarks
By Jo Mannies, St. Louis Beacon


With pollution closing some Lake of the Ozarks' public beaches, Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster plans
to hold a symposium next week on the lake's water quality problems.
Gov. Jay Nixon is to kick off the two-day gathering, set for next Wednesday and Thursday.
According to Koster's office, "The purpose of the public symposium is to explore the total range of water quality
issues confronting the Lake of the Ozarks today and over the next 20 years."
Click here to review the symposium's agenda.
Today, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources announced that swimming beaches at two state parks
"will be closed this weekend due to E. coli levels higher than the standards" set by the department. Such
announcements have been common throughout the summer.
The affected beaches this weekend are Public Beach 1 at Lake of the Ozarks State Park, and Wakonda State
Park Beach.
E. coli is a bacteria that generally comes from human and animal waste and feces.
The state Department of Natural Resources is closing beaches whenever "a single sample is above 235 E. coli
colonies per 100 milliliters of water, which is also the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency‘s single-sample
guideline for a swimming beach."
The department's aggressive action comes after the controversy last summer over a delay in closing beaches
that exceeded in the standards. Nixon ended up firing or disciplining some DNR officials.




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MISSOURINET
Missouri expects $209 million for
Medicaid
by Bob Priddy on August 11, 2010
Missouri is going to get almost 400-million dollars from the federal jobs bill sent to President Obama by the
House. But some of that money won‘t be spent for a year. Some of the money in the bill is for healthcare,
specifically for Medicaid progrms, and for education. State education leaders are waiting to see what kind of
strings and guidelines are attached to their $189 million. The state knows $209 million is for Medicaid.
But budget director Linda Luebbering says those funds will not be added to state finances for the fiscal year that
started last month. The Governor and the legislature had agreed earlier in this calendar year to tuck that extra
Medicaid money aside for the fiscal year that starts a year from now—because the state expects a giant shortfall
in program funding for fiscal year 2011-2012. Luebbering says the $209 million will take a bite out of that shortfall
estimated by various sources to be between $600 million and one billion dollars.
At the start of the carlendar year the state was looking for 300-milion dollars, not 200 million. She says the new
bill starts phasing down the extra Medicaid money the states would be getting—all states, not just Missouri.
Regardless, she says, passage of the bill is good news for Missouri.




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Former Sen. Talent says US neglecting
vital parts of defense (AUDIO)
by Brent Martin on August 11, 2010
A former United States Senator from Missouri, who served on a panel reviewing military planning, says the
nation has been neglecting vital parts of its national defense.
Congress appointed former Senator Jim Talent to the bipartisan panel that evaluated the Defense Department‘s
Quadrennial Defense Review and found it came up short.
―Well, our panel found that in very, very important ways we are not providing for or planning for the needs of the
national defense,‖ Talent tells the Missourinet. ―And that this is already compromising American security and will
get worse in the future.‖
The good news, according to Talent, is that the trends can be reversed.
The panel‘s report states the sustainability of the volunteer military is at risk.
―Because it‘s under tremendous stress,‖ according to Talent, ―and in part that‘s a size issue. I mean, you know,
Missourians know, that there are men and women doing their third and fourth tour of duty in Iraq and
Afghanistan in part because it‘s too small.‖
The co-chairman of the panel, William J. Perry and Stephen Hadley, wrote in an OpEd piece in the Washington
Post:
We deduced four enduring national interests that will continue to transcend political differences and animate
American policy: defense of the homeland; assured access to the sea, air, space and cyberspace; the
preservation of a favorable balance of power across Eurasia that prevents authoritarian domination of that
region; and providing for the global ―common good‖ through such actions as humanitarian aid, development
assistance and disaster relief.
We identified the five gravest potential threats to those interests likely to arise over the next generation: radical
Islamist extremism and the threat of terrorism; competition from rising global powers in Asia; the continued
struggle for power in the Persian Gulf and the Greater Middle East; an accelerating global competition for
resources; and persistent problems from failed and failing states.
The panel makes several suggestions. Among them: increasing the size of the volunteer military, especially a
buildup of the Navy; upgrading the nation‘s weapons and military equipment; increasing the ability of the
Defense Department to come to the aid of homeland defense, including cyber attacks; and making it more
attractive to stay in the military rather than retire early.
The panel would like to see the nation integrate civilian agencies with the military. It calls for an end to a Cold
War mentality that separated the two and prevents America from using its full range of national power. The
report says America needs substantial change to respond to the crises of a modern world.
The report acknowledges that the nation remains at war on two fronts, but it states that the Defense Department
must look beyond Iraq and Afghanistan. It states America faces challenges unique to this century, yet also has
opportunities it must seize. The federal government, according to the report, must prepare now for the long-term
threats the country will face.
Talent says the nation must ponder the question what is America‘s role in the world?



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―What is it we‘re doing? How can we recruit supporters? And what foundation of power, military and civilian, do
we need to do it?‖ Talent asks.
He says it appears leaders in Washington are listening.
AUDIO: Brent Martin reports [:60 MP3]
AUDIO: Brent Martin interviews former Sen. Jim Talent on QDR [17 min. MP3]




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Missourians getting into (AMTRAK)
training (AUDIO)
by Bob Priddy on August 11, 2010
AMTRAK ridership has taken off and last month was a big one for all of the passenger trains serving Missouri.
AMTRAK has three routes in Missouri and all of them saw double-digit surges in ridership last month. The most
prominent route is the Kansas City to St., Louis service, The Missouri River Runner trains, that showed an
almost 26 percent increase in ridership in July, compared to July, 2009.
Ridership topped 22-thousand, almost a record high for a month, and the best total since July, 2001.
The transportation department‘s railroads team leader, Rod Massman, says several factors are involved but one
stands out. On time performance, he says, is ―really, really good‖ and has stayed at that level for about two
years.
July was a big month for other AMTRAK routes that serve Missouri. The Texas Eagle ridership from Chicago,
through St.Lous to Poplar Bluff and on to San Antonio was up 13 percent. The Southwest Chief from Kansas
City to La Plata and on to Chicago showed a 28 percent jump in rider numbers.
Massman says the department is looking for more federal grants to improve the Kansas City to St. Louis line to
make sure passenger service continues to be on time as freight service regains strength in an improving
economy.
Bob Priddy and Rod Massman talk trains 5:47 mp3




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EDITORIALS … & Letters to the Editor
Project protecting our water
An ongoing effort to plug abandoned wells benefits all of us.
Springfield New-Leader
Have you read about the tainted water wells in Rogersville? Following the debate about coal tar sealants in
Springfield? Concerned about E. coli in fresh water?
Environment-minded folks worried about keeping underground water supplies safe can spread the word about a
project in our region that deserves more attention -- and participation.
The Finley River 319 Project, which takes part of its name from Section 319 of the federal Clean Water Act, has
money available to help plug abandoned water wells located in the watershed of the Finley River.
If you own less than 40 acres among the hundreds of square miles of watershed area -- or if you know someone
who does -- check out this project.
It uses money leftover from a 2006 Environmental Protection Agency grant through the state Department of
Natural Resources to pay for 80 percent of the cost to plug the wells -- which can become conduits for pollutants
to travel underground and can create safety hazards, especially older, hand-dug ones. Sometimes, their
locations are not clear to passersby and serious fall injuries can result.
Justin Jenkins, Finley River 319 Project manager, said about $70,000 is still available for plugging work. With up
to $1,000 available per well, the money could help end hazardous infiltration before it reaches the important
underground aquifer.
Jenkins, who works with the Christian County Soil and Conservation District, said applicants have to meet
certain criteria regarding maximum acreage owned within the watershed boundaries (you can own other land
elsewhere). He also stressed commercial property is not eligible.
If you're interested and unsure of the boundaries of the watershed, give Jenkins (417-581-2719 ext. 10) a call
anyway. District officials can visit your property to help in the application process.
Worries about E. coli in the Rogersville area helped to justify an extension of the EPA grant for this purpose.
Later discovery of chemicals in Rogersville wells further convinced officials this is a good plan.
There's a deadline problem, too, though. Act quickly if you want to know more because projects must be
completed by January 2011.
Tell someone about the project if you think it can help. We all should support measures now to avoid costly,
taxpayer-funded cleanups or investigations of contamination in the future.
Avoiding at least part of the threat at a minimal cost is the civic- and safety-minded thing to do.
Our Voice
This editorial is the view of the News-Leader Editorial Board. Thomas A. Bookstaver President and Publisher
David Stoeffler Executive Editor Dave Iseman Editorial Page Editor Cheryl Whitsitt Managing Editor




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Hoeman: Health care remains important
state issue
Springfield News-Leader
On Aug. 3, Missouri voters sent a strong message that they expect their elected officials to keep working on
health care reform. There is a consensus that our current system is unsustainable, but that does not mean that
we will settle for just any solution. We are willing to keep this issue alive until we get it right.
For the past 30 years I have practiced internal medicine, so health care is not a political issue to me; it is my
entire life. During my time in practice, the manner in which we deliver health care has changed drastically. As we
consider changes to our system going forward we must not lose sight of some basic guiding principles.
First, we must ensure that everyone has access to affordable coverage. For all the debates about the federal
health care bill, no one is talking about the people who want coverage but are unable to get it. All too often I see
patients in my office who lose their insurance coverage when they lose their jobs. When people who cannot
afford their own health care coverage become sick, we all ultimately pay the costs.
Second, we cannot allow those with pre-existing medical conditions to be denied the coverage they so
desperately need. This includes eliminating lifetime benefit caps for those with serious chronic health problems.
In addition, we must ensure that the quality of care we are delivering lives up to the high standards we have
developed over time. When I am in my office with patients making decisions about a course of treatment, there is
no room for the government, nor is there room for private insurance companies who are primarily concerned with
their bottom lines.
Finally, we must devise a system that is easy for patients to navigate. Anyone who has had to deal with the
maze that is private insurance can tell you, there has to be a better way. When dealing with an illness, the last
thing families need is to worry about whether or not their treatments will be covered and if they will be able to
figure out the complex system of forms.
There are no easy answers when it comes to heath care. Anyone who offers a simplistic solution to fix the
problems simply doesn't understand the complex system we are faced with overhauling. If I am elected to the
Missouri Senate, I will use my experience to fight for solutions that are workable, that provide access to health
care, and do not sacrifice quality of care or limit available treatments.
Michael Hoeman, M.D. is a candidate for Missouri State Senate in the 30th District.




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Voices: Campaigning at taxpayer
expense
By Stephen E. Smith
Special to The Joplin Globe
CARTHAGE, Mo. — A few days ago I received a letter ―prepared, published and mailed at taxpayer expense‖
(according to a statement on the page) from Congressman Roy Blunt. I must assume that everyone in the district
received the same letter.

Mr. Blunt claims what he calls a ―National Energy Tax‖ is going to increase unemployment in Missouri. (He gives
a right-wing think tank address to prove his claim.) It is more likely that Mr. Blunt is, as usual, going to bat for the
corporations who are terrified by the prospect of improvements in alternate energy. After all, that might cut into
their profits and unleash us from our addiction to fossil fuels.

Mr. Blunt goes on to say he voted against the health care bill, which he terms a ―government takeover.‖ It is, of
course, nothing of the kind. I am all for a bill that will keep insurance companies from denying us coverage,
dropping us for pre-existing conditions and cutting us off if we cost them too much money. He suggests the bill
be repealed and replaced with ―common sense health care solutions.‖ Those would be the solutions never
introduced or passed during the Bush administration.

Never mind that no less than the Congressional Budget Office projects that the health care bill will lower the
budget deficit by as much as $104 billion in the first 10 years of its existence. I‘m sure he thinks we shouldn‘t
worry our heads with the facts the right-wing noise machine prefers to ignore.

Finally, Mr. Blunt says that the Obama stimulus isn‘t working. He says that‘s because unemployment remains
above 9 percent. Many of us recall that unemployment was well over 10 percent when Reagan was president.
Somehow we survived that. Would Mr. Blunt have preferred multinational investment companies and the major
U.S. automakers have gone out of business?

If we want to cut the deficit, I suggest passing a law preventing elected officials from sending thinly veiled
campaign letters ―prepared, published and mailed at taxpayer expense.‖

Every little bit helps!

Stephen E. Smith

Carthage




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USA Today

8/12/10
Kansas City — The number of canceled flights at Kansas City International Airport soared in June, but airline
officials said it is unclear why. The airport released statistics that showed 103 flights were canceled in June,
compared with 59 in June 2009. Cancellations also rose in May, to 72 from 45 the year before.


8/11/10
No update


8/10/10
Columbia — Student leaders at the University of Missouri-Columbia are hoping a new spot for tailgating before
football games will be acceptable to university officials. Missouri Student Association President Tim Noce has
been trying to find a replacement location since the university closed Reactor Field to tailgaters last year. The
field had become the site of underage drinking.


8/9/10
Columbia — Hundreds of motorcycle riders are in the area for the National Bikers Roundup. Even before the
33rd annual bikers roundup came to the fairground north of here, local officials said they expected the city and
Boone County would see an influx of $6 million to $11 million from the weeklong rally. Anywhere from 35,000 to
50,000 visitors are expected.




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