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COURSE SYLLABUS_ SPRING 2002

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COURSE SYLLABUS_ SPRING 2002 Powered By Docstoc
					                                COURSE SYLLABUS, SUMMER 2011

PMBA43 MKT 501                                        Professor: Dr. Jule B. Gassenheimer (Dr. G)
Marketing Management

Time:          Monday 6:30-9:30                               Phone: (407) 646-2404
Office:        Crummer 317A                                   FAX: (407) 646-1550
                                                              Home Phone: (407) 898-1226
                                                              Email: jgassenheimer@rollins.edu

Office Hrs:    By appointment. I am available when you need to meet.

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE
This course is designed to build an understanding of the role of marketing within the
development and execution of a firm’s business strategy. The student will: (1) develop an
understanding of marketing concepts; (2) understand the relationships among marketing
environments and business opportunities; (3) understand competitors and competitive
strategies; and (4) develop analytical skills in designing and implementing strategies for target
markets.

Two key roles of marketing are to (1) guide the organization in providing long run satisfaction to
its customers, ideally resulting in a high level of customer loyalty and (2) provide strategic
business growth options for the future. In the course, we first examine business environment
forces that influence marketing strategy. Then, we focus on the market analysis process for
consumer and business-to-business settings. Finally, we learn how the marketing mix
components of product, price, promotion, and distribution are used individually and jointly
toward the development of effective and ethical marketing strategies.

This course is highly useful to managers regardless of their field of specialization, as it provides
knowledge and tools for successful strategy development and execution.

PROFESSOR
A brief biographical sketch of Dr. Gassenheimer is attached (Appendix A).

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS
Essentials of Marketing Management by Marshall and Johnston 2011
The Marketing Plan Handbook 4th edition, by Marian Burk Wood.

Other articles and materials will be provided by the professor as applicable.

BLACKBOARD
I will be utilizing the Rollins Blackboard to help manage the course. You will be able to get
relevant information by logging into the blackboard site.
OVERVIEW OF INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES AND ACTIVITIES

Classes normally will be conducted utilizing a combination of brief lecture, full class discussion,
in-class exercises, breakout groups, mini-cases and discussion of applications papers. From
time to time I may provide some extra reading material for you for immediate discussion or for
discussion at a specified later date.

The course is designed to be "interactive". We all live and work in a marketing environment.
As a result, each of us has experiences that provide insight into the marketing management
process. Your job is to come to class fully prepared to discuss the material that is relevant for
that class period and be willing to contribute his/her ideas to the class discussion.

EVALUATION OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT OR PROFICIENCY
A total of 500 points will be available for the student. These may be earned as follows:
         Participation and contribution to discussion                50
         Applications papers (individual) (5 @ 20 points each)      100
         Exam                                                              150
         Marketing plan (team)*                                            200
         TOTAL                                                             500

*150 points for the written portion and 50 points for the oral presentation. (If for some excused
reason you cannot be present for the final presentation, you must turn in, before the final
presentation, written confirmation from all team members that you have contributed more
than your fair share in making sure the marketing plan presentation materials are appropriate
and professional. Failure to get unanimous support will result in a failing grade for that portion
of the marketing plan.)

Participation and Contribution to Discussion
Your own contribution to the classroom discussion based on your own knowledge and your
experiences is a critical part of the success of the course for everyone. Note that 50 points
depend on your performance in this facet of the course. This is often enough to make a
difference in final grades. I expect informed, interesting, and insightful comments from
individuals in the class. This includes meaningful comments during class discussion as well as
during group breakout sessions. Keep in mind that your grade for participation is not simply a
function of the amount of “air time.” Thus participation grades reflect the quality of
contribution rather than merely quantity of "talk time." Be respectful of other students and
avoid dominating the class discussion.

It is your responsibility to attend class or get the information and assignments discussed in
class. Obviously, if you are not in class you cannot be recognized for your contribution toward
the weekly discussion.
Checklist for grading Class Participation:
Active listening (including appropriate nonverbal communication)
Treating other students with respect and courtesy (avoid private conversations with
classmates)
Provide depth and completeness in your responses (Including peer and self evaluations.)
Turn in out-of-class assignments on time
Come to class and come to class on time (if you arrive late for class, it is your responsibility to
         come see me at break to insure that your attendance is marked.)
Stay until the end of class
Be an active participant in group exercises
Avoid engaging in non-class related activities during class (e.g., Please, please, please – turn off
         all cell phones, no web surfing unrelated to the class discussion, no text-messaging, no
         e-mailing, no checking e-mail, etc during class).

Applications Papers
This facet of the course provides the opportunity for you to inject some of your own learning
and experience more directly into the mix. This provides you the opportunity to apply ideas to
specific issues, picking companies of your own choosing! Each student will turn in five
application papers throughout the semester.

Submit all application papers to me via the assignment function. This will allow me to give you
feedback before the next paper is due.
We will discuss the assignment in class on that day, so you may wish to keep a copy for your
own reference. Applications papers turned in late will receive an automatic 5 point deduction.
An additional 5 point deduction will be assessed for each additional day the paper is late. (No
exceptions.) If you find you must miss class on the day one is due you must send your paper to
me electronically (via e-mail) before the class session begins. These are individual papers. Do
not work on preparing them with other students. Include references at the end of the
application paper. References could include people, articles, websites, etc. FAILURE TO
INCLUDE REFERENCES WILL RESULT IN AN AUTOMATIC 5 POINT DEDUCTION FROM YOUR
APPLICATION PAPER. Exceeding the page limit will also result in a point deduction. (The number
of points will depend upon how much you go over.)
More details about the applications papers are provided in Appendix B and C of this syllabus.

Marketing Plan
As an integrative experiential exercise, each student team will prepare a comprehensive
marketing plan for a company. (This is no small task.) The marketing plan will be based upon a
proposal and outline submitted by the team and approved by the professor. Consider this a
challenge to incorporate your team’s marketing skills and knowledge into a single project.
Creativity is strongly encouraged. An “A” paper must be truly outstanding and will provide a
proactive, comprehensive strategy (incorporating all elements in the marketing mix) as well as
performance metrics and a realistic timeline for implementation.

The Marketing Plan Handbook provides you a terrific resource to capture the elements for your
marketing plan. The best marketing plan projects will be those that incorporate the learning
from the Marshall and Johnston book within the various sections of the plan. The Marketing
Plan Handbook comes with Plan Pro. Use Plan Pro as a guide. Do not let the cookie cutter
aspects of the template limit your creativity.

STATUS REPORTS
The teams are called on to prepare a status reports for the Marketing Plan project. The report
is due June _20th __. The report is to describe:
        1) What has been done to complete the Marketing Plan project?
        2) What needs to be done?
        3) When the tasks will be done.

The status report should identify specific activities and dates for completion. The status report
is to be typed, presented orally in class, and handed in. Failure to turn in a status report on time
will result in a 10 point deduction from your final marketing plan project grade.

Exam
The exam in this class checks for concepts and content knowledge and also asks you to apply
what you have learned to specific situations. You will need to be up-to-date on your Marketing
Plan. Some of the questions for your exam will ask you to apply concepts and content
knowledge from your text and Marketing Plan Handbook to your Marketing Plan context. You
will be limited in both the time and space available to provide your answers. We will discuss
how you should “prep” yourself for the exam later on. The exam is closed book.

Grade Computation
Your grade in this class is based on a combination of individual and group related work. You
must perform at a high level in both areas to receive an “A.” An A is reserved for students who
do “excellent” work. Don’t confuse good work and excellent work. Excellent work requires that
you do more than the basics well. Think of creativity as one means of surpassing the basics.

On the team project there will be an overall score for the project. Your individual score will be
adjusted based on your team’s peer evaluations. For example, if all members of the team
participate fully in the marketing plan, then your score will be the same as the overall score.
However, if you do not participate fully your score will be adjusted accordingly.

Grades are reported as follows:
       A: indicates consistently excellent work
       B: indicates work of the quality normally expected of a graduate student
       C: indicates work that is below the quality expected in graduate study
       F: indicates work that is unacceptable in graduate level of study
       I: Incomplete indicates that the student and instructor have agreed that outstanding
       work will be completed and the grade changed to A, B, C or F by the mid-term point of
       the following term
Grades A, B, and C may be modified by a plus or minus as appropriate. See below scale:
         A:     93 to 100%                   C +: 78 to 79%
         A- :   90 to 92%                    C : 73 to 77%
         B+:    88 to 89%                    C- : 70 to 72%
         B:     83 to 87%
         B-:    80 to 82%

Peer Evaluations
It is expected that every member of each team will participate fully and equally in the analysis,
preparation, and delivery of each team assignment. Team members are required to evaluation
themselves and their peers for their team assignments. I pay a great deal of attention to these.
(See Appendix D).

Individual grades will be determined from the team’s grade and modified based on peer
evaluation of participation. Team members will be asked to evaluate other members using a
letter grade format (A, B, C...). Members receiving an average grade of B or above will receive
the team’s grade. Team members receiving an average grade of C will receive a grade one
letter lower than the team grade. An average grade of D will receive a grade two letters lower
and so on.

Late Assignment Policy
Please exhibit good planning and time management skills throughout the semester. Late
Marketing Plans will result in a 20 point deduction.

MBA Student Code of Academic Honesty
Please refer to this document on the Crummer Website (For your convenience a copy is posted
at the end of the syllabus.)
                                                   SCHEDULE
CLASS/DAY

                                                                                  TEXT      Wood
1     4/25   Marketing in Today’s Global Business Milieu 2                        Ch. 1     Ch. 1
             Elements of Marketing Strategy & Planning                            Ch. 2

2     5/2    (cont.) Elements of Marketing Strategy & Planning                    Ch. 2     Ch. 2
             Perspective on CRM and Marketing Metrics                             Ch. 3
             Managing Marketing Information                                       Ch. 4
             #1 APPLICATION PAPER DUE

3     5/9    Understanding Customers: Business-to-Consumer Markets          Ch. 5           Ch. 3
             Understanding Customers Business to Business Markets           Ch. 6
             Marketing Plan Proposal Due (Topics will be presented in class.)
             #2 APPLICATION PAPER DUE

4     5/16   Segmentation, Target Marketing, Positioning                          Ch. 7     Ch. 4,5
             #3 APPLICATION PAPER DUE

5     5/23   EXAM (3 hours, 150 Points) (No do-overs)                             Ch. 1-7   Ch. 1-5

      5/30   PROJECT PERIOD

6     6/6    The Product Experience: Product Strategy & Building the Brand Ch. 8            Ch. 6

7     6/13   The Product Experience: New-Product Development & Services Ch. 9               Ch. 6
             #4 APPLICATION PAPER DUE

8     6/20   Managing Pricing Decisions                                           Ch. 10    Ch. 7
             STATUS REPORT OF PROJECT

9     6/27   Managing Marketing Channels & the Supply Chain                       Ch. 11    Ch. 8
             Point of Customer Interface: Bricks and Clicks                       Ch. 12
             Guest Speaker

      7/4    4th of July Holiday (Make-up for the 4th of July is the 5th of July.**

10    7/5    Integrated Marketing Communications: Promotional Strategy, Ch. 13             Ch. 9
             Advertising, Sales Promotion, and Public Relations
             Guest Speaker – Joe Rand – Director, Domestic and Resorts Marketing for Disney

11    7/11   Integrated Marketing Communications: Personal Selling,               Ch. 14    Ch. 9
             Direct Marketing, and Interactive Marketing
             #5 APPLICATION PAPER DUE

12    7/18   Marketing Plan Due - In - Class Presentations
                               SCHEDULE FOR THE MARKETING PLAN
                                                                        Wood Chapter Topic
Class       Marshall    Wood   Marshall & Johnston Chapter Topic        Marketing Plan Assignments
Period      Chapter
                        Chap
1 (4/25)    1&          1      Marketing in Today’s Global              Start the process of selecting
            2
                               Business                                 the product or service for your marketing plan.
                               Elements of Marketing Strategy &
                               Planning
2 (5/2)     2 (cont.)   2      (cont.) Elements of Marketing Strategy   Value proposition, Analyzing the current situation
                               & Planning                               (Competitive information and environmental
            3
            4                  CRM & Marketing Metrics                  scanning)
                               Managing Marketing Information           Initial marketing research; demand forecasted and
                                                                        target market selections
3 (5/9)     5           3      Understanding Customers: Business-       Definitive data on the consumer for the product/
                               to Consumer Markets                      service including demographic and other pertinent
            6
                               Understanding Customers: Business-       information.
                               to-Business Markets                      MARKETING PLAN PROPOSAL IS DUE


4 (5/16)    7           4, 5   Segmentation, Target Marketing,          Specific market segmentation, targeting, and
                               Positioning                              positioning.

5 (5/23)                       EXAM (Text Chapters 1-7)                 (6:30-9:30) Closed Book, Closed Notes
                                      ( Wood Chapters 1-5)
6 (6/6)     8           6      The Product Experience: Building the     Develop Product and Brand Strategy
                               Brand
7 (6/13)    9           6      The Product Experience: Product and      Develop Product and Brand Strategy
                               Service Strategy


8(6/20)     10          7      Managing Pricing Decisions               Developing Pricing Strategy.
                                                                        STATUS REPORT DUE
9 (6/27)    11          8      Managing Marketing Channels & the        Developing Channel & Logistic Strategy
                               Supply Chain
            12                 Point of Customer Interface: Bricks
                               and Clicks
10 (7/5)    13          9      Integrated Marketing                     Developing Marketing Communications and
                               Communications: Promotional              Influence Strategy
                               Strategy, Advertising, Sales
                               Promotion, and Public Relations

11 (7/11)   14          10     Integrated Marketing                     Planning Metrics & Implementing Control
                               Communications: Personal Selling,
                               Direct Marketing, and Interactive
                               Marketing
                               Planning Metrics & Implementing
                               Control
12 (7/18)                      MARKETING PLAN PRESENTATIION             MARKETING PLAN DUE
APPENDIX A
                           Biographical Sketch - Dr. Jule B. Gassenheimer
Dr. Jule B. Gassenheimer joined the faculty at Rollins College in the Fall of 2004 as a Professor of
Marketing at the Crummer Graduate School of Business. She teaches Marketing Research, and
Marketing Management. In 2010 she received the Outstanding Marketing Teachers’ Award from the
Academy of Marketing Science and the Cornell Distinguished Faculty Award in the Crummer School at
Rollins.

Before joining the faculty at Rollins, Dr. Gassenheimer was a Gatton Professor of Marketing at the
University of Kentucky. During her sixteen years at the University of Kentucky she taught professional
selling, sales management and marketing theory. During this tenure she worked with Lexmark, the New
Opportunity School for Women, the Kentucky Small Business Association, the International Business
Center and the GAMA Foundation. These projects ranged from the feasibility of opening a call center
for Lexmark, to raising money for a non-profit organization, to the goat farming opportunities in
Kentucky, to the potential for executive educational in the surrounding area, to better understanding
how to get new sales representatives in the insurance industry off to a fast start.

Dr. Gassenheimer has also been involved in Executive Education. She has taught Professional Selling
through the International Business Center at the University of Kentucky and has been involved in
seminars for the International Confectioners Association, Anthem Insurance, UK Food Service, the Sports
Marketing Academy, American Marketing Association, Direct Selling Educators’ Foundation and the
Women’s Business Center. She has also taught a Research Bootcamp for the American Marketing
Association.

Dr. Gassenheimer has also held several leadership positions while at the University of Kentucky. She
chaired both the Graduate Studies Committee and the Undergraduate Studies Committee for the
College of Business & Economics. She was the Director of Graduate Studies for Marketing and the
faculty advisor for Beta Gama Sigma and the Business School’s Graduate Doctoral Student Association.
She also served on the faculty Senate. She is currently a member of the American Marketing Association,
Academy of Marketing Science and the Society of Marketing Advances. She has served as the Vice Chair
of Programming and the Chair of the American Marketing Association’s Sales Special Interest Group. She
is presently on the American Marketing Association’s Academic Council.

Dr. Gassenheimer has published over forty referred journal articles. Her research interest include:
buyer-seller long-term relationships, team selling and channel strategy. She has written two book
chapters and an academic book on marketing exchange. She is on the editorial review board of Journal
of Managerial Issues, Journal of Retailing, and Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice.

Dr. Gassenheimer is a native of Montgomery, Alabama. She received her BSBA from the University of
Denver in Hotel-Restaurant Management, her M.A. in Marketing from the University of Alabama and
her Ph.D. in Marketing from the University of Alabama. Upon receiving her BSBA she joined Hyatt
Corporation in Orlando, Florida. She later moved to Montgomery, Alabama where she spent six years in
industrial sales selling office furniture. Her career path changed dramatically after returning to school to
get her Master’s Degree in Marketing from the University of Alabama. Rather than return to industry,
she chose to join the Marketing Faculty at Jacksonville State University in Jacksonville, Alabama. There
she taught Principles of Marketing, International Marketing, Advertising, and Physical Distribution to
undergraduate students. This experience provided the inspiration to return to school to pursue her
Ph.D. in Marketing.
APPENDIX B

                       Additional Information on the Applications Papers

Concept
An important part of learning is the ability to transfer concepts and thought structures from
one frame of reference to another. To achieve that level of learning, a series of exercises will
be conducted that asks students to individually apply concepts (topical areas) from the course
to a variety of business settings. Five applications papers will be required for the course. These
short papers will provide the basis for part of our classroom discussion on the days of their
submission.

Process
You will be individually assigned to one of five business categories to serve as the foundation
for your first application paper on a given topic. Then, over the semester you will rotate
through the other business categories such that each student will experience each of the five
business categories by the semester’s end.

On the day each assignment is due, you are to submit a paper not to exceed two double-spaced
(no smaller than 11 point Times Roman, Arial or Calibri type, one inch margins around) and be
prepared to discuss your findings in class. The paper may include prose (i.e., paragraphs)
and/or bullet points depending on your preference in communicating your ideas. It should
reflect your views but be based on an understanding of the particular business category and the
industries and firms represented therein. Be very clear about how your write-up relates to the
class topic. Please cite all sources from which you gathered your information. Failure to follow
directions will result point deductions.

However, papers that are off target or incomplete will not receive all the points. Remember
that the course also contains an evaluation component for contribution to class discussion,
both in the full group and in periodic in-class breakouts. This is a great opportunity for you to
use your application papers to fully contribute to the discussion.

Business Categories
You will rotate through the following categories of business:
    Low cost consumer goods (e.g., toothpaste, food products, books, and the like)
    High cost consumer goods (e.g., autos, household appliances, home entertainment,
       home computers, and the like)
    Consumer services (e.g., health care, financial services, entertainment, and the like)
    Business-to-business goods (e.g., office equipment, machinery, aircraft, raw material
       inputs to production, and the like)
    Business-to-business services (e.g., financial, telecommunications, transportation, and
       the like)
Application Paper Assignments
These are scheduled throughout the semester based on our agenda of marketing topics. These
topics are as follows: (See Power Point Slides for the week before the assignment is due for a
detailed breakdown of each Application Paper Assignment).

   1. Marketing Environment (Macro)
      For your assigned business category, select an industry of your choice, briefly identify
      representative firms, and pick a specific organization and briefly explain its operations..
      Then, identify the key macro-environmental forces that influence the market
      opportunities/threats and the marketing strategies for that firm.


   2. Competitive Analysis
      For your assigned business category, select an industry of your choice, briefly identify
      representative firms, and pick a specific organization and briefly explain its operations.
      Then, explain the key competitors and competitive forces (Include all 5 of Porters Five
      Forces) that the organization faces and how the organization appears to be fairing in the
      competitive marketplace (what do you consider to be its competitive strengths and
      weaknesses).

   3. Segmentation, Target Marketing, and Positioning
      For your assigned business category, select an industry of your choice, briefly identify
      representative firms, and pick a specific organization and briefly explain its operations.
      Then, for a business unit of the organization identify (1) the segmentation approaches
      utilized by the business unit, (2) its target markets, and (3) its positioning strategies.

   4. Product Life Cycle and Product Strategy
      For your assigned business category, select an industry of your choice, briefly identify
      representative firms, and pick a specific organization and briefly explain its operations.
      Then, discuss the current stage of the product life cycle for its key product/brand. How
      might the life cycle for these be extended? How would you characterize the firm’s
      general product strategy?

   5. Integrative Communication Strategy
      For your assigned business category, select an industry of your choice, briefly identify
      representative firms, and pick a specific organization and briefly explain its operations.
      (1) Explain the integrative communication mix for a business unit of the organization; (2)
      indicate the role and importance of the communication mix components to the success
      of the business unit’s products and services. Be as specific as possible.
                                        APPENDIX C

                                Application Papers Rotation

REMEMBER: These are individual papers….the below are “groupings” not assigned teams and
they just show you which business category you will do in a given week.

Group 1              Group 2              Group 3              Group 4     Group 5
Astacio              Chase                Cox                  Crandall    Cyphers
Daza                 Dual                 Dwyer                Forquer     Fortner
Fry                  Godinho              Heemsen              Hicks       Howlader
Hughes               Kachwalla            Kasen                Ku          Montes
Muscato              Oppenlander          Patil                Porter      Ramirez
Reeck                Saenz                Salazar              Schulz      Srinivasan
Teman                Thompson             Toro                 Trazzera    Walls
White E.             White, M.            Williams


Rotation:                       Groups for Application Paper Topics
                         (Read down the column for your business cat. assignment)
Business Categories             *T#1 T#2      T#3     T#4    T#5
Low Cost Consumer Goods         1     2       3       4      5
High Cost Consumer Goods        2     3       4       5      1
Consumer Services               3     4       5       1      2
B-to-B Goods                    4     5       1       2      3
B-to-B Services                 5     1       2       3      4

*T = Paper Topic (See below).

Application Paper Topics and Due Dates (these numbers reference the chart immediately
above):

T#1 = Marketing Environment (5/2)
T#2 = Competitive Analysis (5/9)
T#3 = Segmentation, Target Marketing, and Positioning (5/16)
T#4 = Product Life Cycle and Product Strategy (6/13)
T#5 = Integrative Communication Mix (7/11)
                                            APPENDIX D
                                FOR TEAM PROJECTS – PEER EVALUATION

GUIDELINES FOR ASSIGNING GRADES
A= Attended all meetings. Work turned in on time. Work was of high quality. Member contributed to
Team goals.

C= Occasionally missed a meeting. Occasionally late meeting deadlines. Work of inadequate quality.
Member made little effort to contribute to team goals.

F= Missed most of the meetings. Work was uniformly late. Work was of poor quality. Member made no
effort to contribute to team goals.

Team #:______                    Name of Team Leader ______________________
Please do not grade yourself on this form. On the next page is a self-evaluation form.

 NAME                                             SCALE

1._________________________         A-----B-----C-----D-----F
Given the opportunity, I would voluntarily work with
this individual again:                  Yes            NO

2._________________________         A-----B-----C-----D-----F
Given the opportunity, I would voluntarily work with
this individual again:                  Yes            NO

3._________________________         A-----B-----C-----D-----F
Given the opportunity, I would voluntarily work with
this individual again:                  Yes            NO

4._________________________         A-----B-----C-----D-----F
Given the opportunity, I would voluntarily work with
this individual again:                  Yes            NO

5._________________________         A-----B-----C-----D-----F
Given the opportunity, I would voluntarily work with
this individual again:                  Yes            NO

For each member provide a justification for your assigned grades on the back of this form. Not
providing justification will result in a 5 point deduction from your individual class participation grade.
Not providing an honest evaluation of your team members is considered a failure to abide by the
Crummer School Academic Integrity Policy.

IMPORTANT DEADLINE:
    This completed document must be returned to me in hardcopy no later than 6:30, July 18th.
      No member of your team’s course grade can be finalized until everyone on your team returns
      these evaluations to me. A late form will result in a 5 point deduction from your individual
      class participation grade.
MKT 501 SELF EVALUATION – Page 1 of 1                                   TEAM # __________

Using the scales below, please rate yourself. (1= extremely low and 7 = extremely high for each of the
descriptives.

Your name: ______________________________________________               Total   ____________


1. EFFORT: I demonstrated initiative and expended sufficient time on the project(s).

                        1       2       3       4       5       6       7

2. PARTICIPATION: I was in attendance for team meetings. I exhibited responsiveness and timeliness
   when tasks were handled remotely and/or electronically.

                        1       2       3       4       5       6       7

3. COMMUNICATION: I made my thoughts and ideas known to the group and was willing to listen to
   others’ points of view.

                        1       2       3       4       5       6       7

4. ACHIEVEMENT: I was successful in understanding the project and contributed significantly to the
   finished project.

                        1       2       3       4       5       6       7

5. TEAM SCOPE: I was able to relate to the overall team mission and to plan and act in the best
   interest of the team’s success.

                        1       2       3       4       5       6       7

On the back of the page, indicate what you believe your own major contributions (or lack thereof) were
to the project(s).

Not providing justification will result in a 5 point deduction from your individual class participation
grade. Not providing an honest evaluation of your contribution is considered a failure to abide by the
Crummer School Academic Integrity Policy.

IMPORTANT DEADLINE:
    This completed document must be returned to me in hardcopy no later than 6:30, July 18th.
      No member of your team’s course grade can be finalized until everyone on your team returns
      these evaluations to me. A late form will result in a 5 point deduction from your class
      participation grade.
                                Crummer School Academic Integrity Policy

The Crummer School expects that all faculty, staff, students, and alumni will strive to maintain the
highest ethical standards. Leadership is a cornerstone of the Crummer experience and integrity is one of
the foundations of leadership. Our philosophy is to practice a standard of integrity here that we know
will help you succeed in your career and attain your life goals. Our policy is to incorporate integrity into a
framework of learning. That is, students who do not adhere to our high standards can expect serious
consequences. We will, also, however, guide and counsel those students such that the incident and its
consequences constitute an opportunity to learn from one’s mistakes.

As an academic community, we define a failure of integrity as failing to maintain the high standards of
ethical behavior that we demand of all members of the community. This includes, but is not limited to,
plagiarism (the use, in any form, of the work of another without attribution, and/or representing
another’s work as one’s own), active complicity in such falsification, and violation of test policies
(receiving help in any form during an examination from a prohibited source). Failure to report evidence
of academic dishonesty is also a violation of Crummer’s Academic Integrity Policy.

Dishonesty is not only an affront to the faculty and your colleagues -- it also reduces grading fairness,
can affect the relative employment opportunities of all our graduates, and lowers the value of a Rollins
College degree. It is vitally important to the entire college community that our graduates enter the
business world with an untarnished reputation for integrity.

Because cheating dishonors Crummer students, faculty, staff, graduates, and supporters worldwide,
allegations of a failure of academic integrity are treated as serious matters that are due prompt and
thorough attention. Each faculty member has the right and the responsibility to administer grades in
their courses. The faculty also, however, recognizes that academic dishonesty is so serious as to warrant
separate attention. This policy, therefore, is designed to make your responsibilities clear and to describe
the process by which the faculty deals with suspected violations of the policy.

If you have evidence of academic dishonesty you have an obligation to bring this evidence to the
attention of the course instructor(s) in which the violation(s) occurred. If the instructor is presented with
evidence of a potential violation either from a student or by his or her own discovery, the faculty has
prescribed the following steps be taken:

        1.      The instructor(s) of the course(s) in which the suspected violation occurred will meet
                with the Director of the relevant MBA program. The Program Director will conduct any
                investigation considered necessary by the instructor and Director including, but not
                limited to, collecting physical evidence and interviewing witnesses. In all but the most
                unusually sensitive cases, the Program Director will discuss the allegations with the
                suspected student.

        2.      The Program Director will immediately alert the Academic Integrity Chairperson (a
                faculty member appointed by the Dean).

        3.      Upon the conclusion of the Director’s investigation the Academic Integrity Chairperson,
                the Director, and the instructor will meet to discuss the results of the investigation. The
                accused student has the right to appear before this panel and speak on their own
                behalf. Three outcomes are possible:
             a. They may agree the allegations are unfounded and no further action is necessary, or
             b. They may agree that the allegations are true or partly true and agree upon a suitable
                penalty, or
             c. They may disagree on whether the allegations are true or partly true or they may
                disagree on a suitable penalty.

If the three parties agree that no violation has occurred (3.a above), the student is so notified and
no further action is taken. If the three parties agree that a violation has in all probability
occurred (3.b above), the student who violated the policy is notified and the Associate Dean
writes a letter to the student that shall be placed in that student’s file describing the allegations,
the results of the investigation, the basis for the decision, the terms of the penalty and the
student’s further rights to appeal. The matter is then reported to the Crummer faculty at their
next regularly scheduled faculty meeting.

        4.      If the three parties do not agree (3.c above) or they agree that dismissal from the
                program is indicated, an Academic Integrity Committee is appointed by the Dean. This
                Committee consists of three faculty members -- two who have not taught the accused
                student in class, plus the Academic Integrity Chairperson -- and two currently enrolled
                MBA students representing different programs from the one in which the accused
                student is enrolled. These students must affirm that they do not have a personal
                relationship with the accused. This committee reviews the case and makes a
                determination as to facts and appropriate punishment, including dismissal, if warranted.
                The accused student has the right to appear before this panel and speak on their own
                behalf. If the committee agrees that no violation has occurred (3.a above), the student is
                so notified and no further action is taken. If the committee agrees that a violation has in
                all probability occurred (3.b above), the student who violated the policy is notified and a
                letter is inserted in the student’s file describing the allegations, the results of the
                investigation, the basis for the decision, and the terms of the penalty. The matter is then
                reported to the Crummer faculty at their next regularly scheduled faculty meeting.

        5.      Students have the right to appeal an unfavorable decision. If the student disagrees with
                a decision reached by the instructor, Program Director, and Academic Integrity
                Chairperson, the student may appeal to an Academic Integrity Committee, formed by
                the Dean. If the student disagrees with a decision reached by the Academic Integrity
                Committee, the student may appeal to the Dean. The Dean’s decision is final. Results of
                all appeals are reported to the Crummer faculty at their next regularly scheduled faculty
                meeting.

While it is difficult to prejudge violations of academic integrity and each case is considered on its own
merits and punishments are designed to fit the severity of the violation, punishments generally can
range from an F on the assignment in which the violation occurred, to special assignments (Written and
practical) in the area of ethics and integrity, to public apologies to classmates and faculty, to an F in the
course, to dismissal from the program with or without the right to reapply.

In all cases the student’s right to privacy is respected. Students who bring a charge under this policy to
the attention of the instructor can expect to be notified when the case has reached a conclusion. They
are not, however, entitled to be informed of the findings or the penalty.

____________________________                                       ________________________
Signature Printed Name                                             Printed Name

Date________________________

				
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