CLIENT LETTER Q2 2009 by nabikovk

VIEWS: 39 PAGES: 4

									                                                                          

                                          CLIENT LETTER 
                                             Q2 2009 
 
Dear Clients, 

It is possible that the last thing you would like right now is a lengthy letter from me.  However, I 
am equally certain that you would like to hear a little about our perspective on the markets, 
economy, recovery and any implications for our portfolio strategies. 
 
Let me start with a quote that resonated with me very strongly.   
 
         “Many of our current challenges are unprecedented.  There are no standard 
         remedies; no go to fixes this time around.” 
          
This is not a quote from one of the many investment research publications that we read.  It is, 
in fact, a direct quote from part of President Obama’s speech at Arizona State University’s 
commencement exercises on May 14th.  The message is consistent with what we have been 
saying for many months. 
 
                                               Overview 
                                                     
At the beginning of January, there was an article in the Los Angeles Times with another quote 
that I thought was relevant.  “What happens when an irresistible force” (the Fed’s actions) “hits an 
immoveable object” – the paralyzed global economy?  “The correct answer is that there is no answer – 
nobody yet has any idea how much permanent damage may have been done to the structural 
underpinnings of U.S. and global capitalism.” 

There is some talk about “green shoots” – or the concept that the economy is stabilizing and 
there are signs of new growth.  Let’s put that into perspective by looking at the performance of 
some major investment indexes over the first quarter of 2009 and the year ended December 
2008. 
        
                                                          Q1 2009       2008
 S&P 500                                                     -11.01    -38.49
 Int'l. Index                                              -13.85%     -43.06
 Commodity Index                                            -6.36%     -36.61
 US Aggregate Bond Index                                     0.12%       3.57
 
While we all would like to believe that the stock market rally during the latter weeks of the first 
quarter (and into the second quarter) was cause for optimism for those whose portfolios 
tracked the above 2008 indexes, we at Silver Oak had no such euphoria.  The first reason for 
our viewpoint was that our clients came through 2008 without experiencing the depths of 
those losses.  Therefore, while all of us would welcome a rally, our clients did not need such a 
rally to make up as much lost ground.   
 
Secondly, we continue to believe that we are engulfed in a secular bear market.  Rallies occur 
regularly during such extended bear markets.  Since this deep recession feels more like a 
depression, we might gain insight from the market movements from 1929 to 1932.  During that 
period of the Great Depression, there were four rallies of 20 percent or more.  Subsequently, 
the market dropped below previous lows.  So far, the Dow has five rallies of 10 percent or more 
which failed to hold. 
 
The first quarter of 2009 was also challenging for bond investors.  In effect, the volatility of the 
equity markets spilled over to much of the fixed income markets.  Following is a chart of some 
major bond indices. 
 
          
                                                         Q1 2009
  Fixed Income Indices                                   Returns
 Barclay's Aggregate                                              0.12%
 Barclay's U.S. Treasury                                         -1.32%
 Barclay's Treasury Inflation Protected Bond                      5.52%
 Barclay's High Yield (Junk Bond)                                 5.98%
 Barclay's 1-10 Year Muni                                         2.45%
 Barclay's Global Government Unhedged                            -4.98%
 
In the Outlook section of this letter, we will address the fixed income markets further.  Looking 
backwards, it is fair to say that the fixed income markets experienced volatility and quite 
disparate returns.  The only good news to report is that by the middle of the second quarter, 
we have seen technical signals indicating that the bond market is normalizing somewhat.  The 
yield spread between Treasuries and other bonds has narrowed considerably.  We see the 
beneficial consequences of this in our portfolios – the prices of the bonds we purchased over 
the past several months have risen due, in part, to the perception of reduced risk. 
                                                    
                                               Outlook 
 
Whether the glass is half empty or half full is always a matter of perception.  While some see 
“green shoots” and conclude we are in recovery mode, we look at the data and observe only 
that the rate of economic decline is beginning to slow meaningfully.  There is a substantive 
difference between these conclusions that bears further commentary. 
 
We have said previously that hope is not a good investment strategy.  Yet the bullish media 
commentators seize on a glimmer of hope to conclude we are in a sustainable rally.  We believe 
it is more accurate to first note that the government initiated the greatest series of 
unconventional interventions in market history.  Therefore, it is not surprising that the 
government has bought a certain amount of stability.  But a sustainable rally will surely depend 
on true organic growth in the private sector.  Based on the preponderance of the economic 
data, it is still doubtful that the conditions for organic growth exist. 
 
 Our observation is that the U.S. will be remaining dependent on the government for growth for 
the foreseeable future.  We are witnessing the downsizing of many corporations who are 
seeking to minimize losses by laying off more workers and reducing plant capacity.  Credit will 
be more difficult to obtain than in the past which can be expected to reduce the growth rate 
which corporate America historically enjoyed.  Further, the government has intruded into the 
boardroom of numerous sectors of our economy – banks and autos being the most obvious.   
 
Let us be perfectly clear about this government intrusion into heretofore private enterprise – a 
major transition in capitalism has occurred.  The year 2009 is a demarcation point representing 
a period when government (with our public acquiescence) decided that private market, laissez‐
faire, free market capitalism was history.  A new model is evolving that entails the government 
deciding the fate of stockholders and in some cases the senior debt holders.  A model in which 
the government establishes the remuneration of corporate CEOS.  Not only will redistribution 
and reregulation lead to slower economic growth, but asset values should be negatively 
affected.  
 
A recent PIMCO newsletter described this situation as moving to a “new normal”.  They 
observed that some of the recent abrupt changes to markets, households, institutions, and 
government policies are unlikely to be reversed in the next few years.  In response to mounting 
damage to human welfare, governments inevitably are dragged into the fray.  Their 
unconventional responses are, by definition, uncertain in their effectiveness yet consequential 
in disrupting some long‐standing symbiotic relationships.  They end this observation with an 
interesting analogy.  “Think of this as the economic equivalent of a drug trial being applied to 
huge populations: there is a case for the medicine, yet there also remains considerable 
uncertainty about effectiveness, lags and side effects.”   
 
To illustrate the point, PIMCO offered an interesting observation.  Let’s say that you have 
$1,000 to invest.  Your choice of investment is between two companies that deliver packages.  
One is called The U.S. Post Office.  The other is called Federal Express.  If FedEx deserves a P/E 
ratio of 12, wouldn’t the value of the Post Office be substantially less?   
 
                                                      
                                                 
                                           Conclusion 
 
We do not wish to be deceived by the euphoric sighting of “green shoots” and the claims for 
new bull markets in a multitude of asset classes.  “Getting worse more slowly” is not a signal 
that the ingredients for growth have returned.  Stable and secure income, we believe, is still the 
order of the day.  We have rebuilt our portfolios since last August.  They have been 
reengineered to withstand major shocks from the economic realities of our tumultuous times.  
The cornerstone of those portfolios represents bonds that not only generate annual income of 
greater than 5%, but some also have appreciated in value up to another 5%.    
 
Our approach has been to selectively add other, more risky, elements to our portfolios where 
we believe the risk/reward ratio justified taking the risk.  Some of these positions will act as a 
hedge or insurance policy.  They will provide a buffer to our portfolios in the event of continued 
(or renewed) weakness in the global economies.   
 
Please understand that risk taking will likely not be rewarded with significant returns until the 
global economy stabilizes and the rules of order under these more government‐intrusive 
markets are more clearly defined.  We are in synch with PIMCO’s conclusion that the “new 
normal” should trump “green shoot” exuberance for some time to come.   
 
Therefore, we recommend remaining focused on our lower volatility portfolios which still offer 
the prospect of excellent returns in this unstable environment.  Our approach has been to 
communicate frequently with you, our clients, to obtain your feedback on the level of risk you 
feel is appropriate for you.  While our overall recommendations have resulted in lower risk 
portfolios in general, we are always interested in fine‐tuning them based on your feedback. 
 
If you should have any questions, please do not hesitate to call us.  We always welcome the 
opportunity to chat with you.   
 
Sincerely, 
 
 
Joel H. Framson 
President   

								
To top