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					General assembly > brussels 29 november 2010




                AnnuAl RepoRt of Activity
                                               2010
AnnuAl RepoRt of Activity 2010
> General Assembly, Brussels 29 November 2010
This annual report of activity 2010, written in October 2010, provides us with an overview of our activities,
priorities, project and contributions, in preparation for the discussions at out General Assembly on 29
November 2010. It covers the period from December 2009 to the end of 2010.




tAble of contents
1.   EUROCADRES´ positions, opinions, agreements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
     a. EUROCADRES’ opinion on EU 2020. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
     b. Commission proposal and European Council conclusions -EUROCADRES’
        comments on Europe 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
     c. EUROCADRES Comments to the Commission’s new initiative concerning
        Working Time Directive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
     d. EUROCADRES view on European Social Agenda in the field of labour market,
        social affairs and equality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     e. EUROCADRES’ opinion Mario Monti’s Single Market Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
     f. EUROCADRES’ View of the EU’s Global Policy - More And Better Globalisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
     g. EUROCADRES’ key messages concerning EU’s trade policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
     h. EUROCADRES´ reply to the Commission consultation on future trade policy, July 2010 . . . . . . . . 24
     i. EUROCADRES´ opinion of the proposal for a directive on conditions of entry and
        residence of third- country nationals in the framework of an intra-corporate transfer . . . . . . . . . . 31
     j. Ongoing Bologna - Experiences, challenges, outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
     k. Agreement with CEPLIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

2.   Project and networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
     2.1. New project processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
     2.2. StartPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
     2.3. mobil-net. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
     2.4. Innovation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
     2.5. Restructuring in the public sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
     2.6. New project proposals for 2011-2012. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
     2.7. femanet core group members. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

3.   Financial situation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
     TREASURER’S REPORT ON FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
     Auditor’s report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

4.   Updated list of Executive Committee members,
     Presidium members and members of the Secretariat, EUROCADRES’Working groups . . . . . 48
5.   Considerations and issues: A view forward for EUROCADRES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

6.   Calendar of activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
    ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



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            1. euRocADRes´positions, opinions,
               AgReements




            a) EUROCADRES’ opinion on EU 2020

            1. EUROCADRES gEnERAl POSitiOn On EU 2020

            The Commission working document on EU 2020 is a promising starting point. The major challenges of the
            European Union and some replies to them are well listed in this short draft strategy.

            EUROCADRES shares the Commission opinion that the economic and employment crisis, globalisation,
            environmental and climate questions, level of knowledge and skills in Europe, sustainability of pub-
            lic finances and ageing are those major challenges which we shall be faced with.

            The three key priorities of the draft strategy, i.e.»1) Creating value by basing growth on knowledge, 2)
            Empowering people in inclusive societies and 3) Creating a competitive connected and greener econ-
            omy» are skilfully selected. It is delightful that the inclusive society is playing the key role in this context. 

            EUROCADRES also supports the general goals of the strategy (social market economy, competitiveness
            etc), but the exact formulation of this «ideological» aim of the EU should be the following: Europe has to
            be a social and environmentally-friendly market economy which is based on knowledge and competitive-
            ness with a human face.
             
            2. in addition to these general views, EUROCADRES would like to underline, in particular,
               the following messages

            a. There must be a balance between different key pillars of the EU 2020 strategy. Social, environmental,
               knowledge and economic pillars are equal and complementary. The approach of the EU 2020 docu-
               ment is somewhat better and more balanced than the view of the revised Lisbon strategy of 2005 in
               which other pillars became subordinate to competitiveness.
            b. Education, research and innovations have to remain key priorities and the EU 2020 document is com-
               pletely on the right track. Cutting spending in these areas would be preposterous and undermine
               the possibilities for a new economic rise and competitiveness. Education has a double task. It creates
               opportunities for employability and strengthens competitiveness. On the other hand, it has a cultural
               task in «creating» inclusive societies and enlightened citizens. That should be recognized also in the
               EU 2020 strategy. Education is not only university-studies, but also vocational training and all type of
               training and education that takes place in workplaces and educational institutions.
            c. The balance between flexibility and security in change has to be underlined. This vital balance is men-
               tioned in the strategy, but there is no reference at all to security provided by the quality of jobs. The
               quality of jobs underpinned by minimum labour standards and collective agreements is a key compo-
               nent for higher productivity and creativity. A new EU Social Agenda with a number of concrete actions
               is needed as soon as possible.
            d. Europe has to be open to the world and remain non-protectionist internally as well. Excessive barriers
               for trade and for free movement of technology and knowledge would be detrimental to employment
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   in the EU. Free movement of people in the internal market is a right to which the European citizens are
   entitled, but the recognition of skills and competences has still to be developed and furthered. State
   subsidies distort fair competition and “export” unemployment from one State to another. On the other
   hand, fair and equal conditions are needed through minimum safety and other standards. Europe
   needs its own model for strong responsibility and management.
e. Europe must be the champion of global governance: foster stronger labour, financial, environmental
   and safety standards and multilateral institutions around the globe. A strong global economic, mon-
   etary and competition policy co-operation is also needed and the EU has to show leadership.
f. Greening of the economy is rightly a key priority in the draft strategy. It would be advisable to under-
   line also the necessary greening of the labour market. New jobs, restructuring  necessitated and
   brought about by climate change, smarter and eco-efficient ways of working, the higher level of skills
   needed by employees due to this green transformation and so on will thoroughly change the current
   labour markets. All the jobs have to become environmentally-friendly; Europe can be a winner in this
   transformation, if a progressive approach is chosen.
g. One of the biggest challenges is the demography in Europe and the possible lack of qualified work-
   force in the long run. This could call for activities that would make it attractive for workers to stay in
   the labour market longer instead of retirement e.g. changed working hours, improved payment to
   pensions if you stay longer and so on.

3. EUROCADRES would also like to draw attention to the following ideas and proposals

•	 The priorities of EU 2020 have to be reflected in the EU budget. The share of education, research and
   innovation funds has to be doubled from the beginning of the new budget period (2013 onwards).
•	 The second key driver «Empowering people in inclusive societies» should mention the social dialogue.
•	 The ideas of EU 2020 concerning universities and higher education can largely be supported. How-
   ever, the vocational education and the other higher education institutes (Polytechnics, Grandes écoles,
   Fachhochschulen, Yrkeshögskola etc.) should not be ignored. They are not at all mentioned.
•	 The  proposal of benchmarking European universities against the best universities in the world
   demands a system which is not based on a narrow set of simplistic indicators, but on a comprehensive
   view and understanding of the European educational system and its values. It is not so that only some
   few top-class educational performances are of importance, but also a high general level and a good
   quality of education.
•	 Greater mobility and “5th freedom” (free circulation of people, knowledge and technology)  can be
   supported. This requires a strong increase in the funding of relevant EU programmes.
•	 Regarding the statement (page 6) «In fact, new patterns are emerging where there are several entries
   in and exits from the labour market during a working life, instead of traditional sequence education,
   work and retirement», those patterns are may be more common and widespread than in the past, but
   definitely not a new phenomenon.
 
4. Consultation process and governance of EU 2020

EUROCADRES supports the idea that the European Council should fix  a  small number of headline
objectives. The few EMU criteria could serve as an efficient model. The employment rate, energy sav-
ing, the growth of the GNP together with qualitative aspects of life, work and environment are relevant
examples.

It is very positive that this kind of open consultation process is organised and the partnership approach
is a basis for EU 2020. Without clear commitments of all key players – including the social partners –, the
successful implementation of the strategy is not feasible or possible. Unfortunately, the draft document is
more positive than the beginning of the consultation process. There has been a very short time for replies
and in this way, it is difficult to organise any comprehensive national or European hearings and debates.
    ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



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            b) Commission proposal and European Council conclusions - EUROCADRES’
               comments on Europe 2020

            1. Further improvement of Europe 2020 essential

            There is a clear need for a common European development strategy which gives targets, common goals,
            indicators, comparisons, peer pressure and external evaluation for national reform measures. The Com-
            mission proposal on Europe 2020 was on the right track, but needed a further development.

            Unfortunately, the European Council decisions on 26 March did not really improve the Commission
            proposal. The strategy became mainly economic with only a few references to social or environmental
            matters. In addition, the European Summit could not agree on key targets concerning higher education,
            drop-outs and poverty.

            2. new European growth model needed

            Three main priorities of Europe 2020 in the Commission proposal smart, sustainable and inclusive growth
            were balanced contrary to the European Council conclusions. It is of importance that there is a balance
            between the economic, social and environmental pillar. EUROCADRES wants to underline that Europe has
            to be a social and environmentally-friendly market economy which is based on knowledge and competi-
            tiveness with a human face.

            It is also necessary to find a new growth model which is not only based on the Gross National Product.
            We need a broader concept for growth indicating the development of social and environmental aspects,
            values, well-being, energy-intensity, sustainable consumption and so on.
             
            3. Headline targets still too weak: R&D target up to 4 %

            The proposed small number of headline indicators, targets are worth supporting.

            EUROCADRES is not, however, happy with the decision of European Council to maintain the research and
            development target 3 % of the EU´s GDP; it should be 4 %. The slow progress of reaching research tar-
            gets is an unjustifiable reason to not to be ambitious. It is true that many Member States have not reached
            the 3 % target, but the competition with other global economic giants is only intensifying and Europe´s
            competitiveness and employment are mainly based on knowledge.

            Parallel, the Commission proposes (now with the support of the European Council) to develop an indi-
            cator which would reflect R&D and innovation intensity. The joint R&D is rightly not just a question of
            money input. EUROCADRES supports this proposal to follow also the output of the R&D investments. The
            effectiveness and impact of them is a vital part of efforts to create a knowledge based Europe. European
            Innovation Scoreboard measures also the outputs, but has a narrow view concentrating only on company
            behaviour and on direct economic effects, such as exports and sales. The social and human aspects of
            innovations are not covered, if the output is measured only in this way. 

            EUROCADRES recognizes the need for the headline indicator as far as higher education is concerned (Com-
            mission proposal ‘’at least 40 % of the younger generation should have a tertiary degree’’) and regrets the
            fact that the European Council could not reach any agreement on it. Nevertheless, EUROCADRES wants to
            point out that the quality of education is even more important than the quantity. As regards the higher
            education target, the needs and the demand of the labour market are crucial.

            The employment target of 75 % is ambitious enough. However, EUROCADRES finds it difficult to under-
            stand that the recommendation of the European Council to raise the employment level concerns only
            certain categories of workers. It should apply to all categories, including the P&MS groups. Alongside this
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quantitative target, it is of importance to remember the quality of jobs.
EUROCADRES does not propose new indicators, but wants to underline that the combating of unemploy-
ment – in particular youth unemployment – has to be a cornerstone of all strategies.
 
4. ESCO and benchmarking of universities need careful preparation 

The idea to introduce a ‘’European Skills, Competences and Occupations framework’’ ESCO requires fur-
ther consideration. It is not clear what would be the added-value of this kind of framework. What is the
relation between ESCO and ISCO-08 (International Standard Classification of Occupations).

What is most needed in this field is not a new administrative framework, but real reforms of education,
sufficient funding, further steps of Bologna process, carefully prepared classification system of universi-
ties, assessment of mutual recognition of qualifications directive and so on. They are of primary impor-
tance instead of administrative frameworks.

The Bologna process is a crucial part of European education policy. EUROCADRES supports the process
and finds it imperative that the matter of employability and the quality of jobs of the graduated are in
the hearth of this common European exercise. However, EUROCADRES is concerned that many difficult
reforms linked to the access to and financing of the university education are explained by the Bologna
process, even if it does not impose such reforms. The national implementation of the Bologna process is
not a great success in some countries. This is not the fault of the process, but the political decision-making
in these countries.

The proposal of benchmarking European universities against the best universities in the world demands
a system which is not based on a narrow set of simplistic indicators, but on a comprehensive view and
understanding of the European educational system and its values. One of the key criteria should be the
employability of graduated people. It is not so that only some few top-class educational performances are
of importance, but also a high general level and a good quality of education.

EUROCADRES demands that the Commission will issue a green paper or other corresponding consultation
document on the benchmarking of universities, before issuing the official proposal. A thorough discus-
sion on the matter is needed and the relevant stakeholders – such as P&MS groups which are often uni-
versity educated or working at universities – , have to be involved in this process.

EUROCADRES would like to remind that the polytechnics, universities of applied sciences (Fachhochs-
chule, les grandes ecoles) are part of European higher education structures, but their role in Europe 2020
is not clear due to the total lack of references to them.

5. greening of labour market forgotten?

The call for the greening of the economy is well integrated into the Commission proposal of Europe 2020,
but it crucial role was diminished in the conclusions of the European Council. In addition, the need for the
necessary greening process of the labour market is not at all mentioned. One of the main ways to increase
energy efficiency, create new green jobs etc is through the labour market and it should not be ignored
in Europe 2020. All the jobs should be environmentally-friendly or adapted to environment, not only the
‘’green’’ ones linked to recycling etc.

Research and innovations underpinning the transition to green labour market and economy deserve a
strong support. Europe should be number one in the world as far the number of patents in green technol-
ogy in concerned.
 
6. Recommendations on national budgets and taxes felicitous

EUROCADRES is fully content with the Commission recommendations with regard to the budgets: ´´´to
prioritize knowledge expenditure``, ´´quality of government expenditure matters: budgetary consolida-
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            tion programmes should prioritize qrowth-enchancing items such as education and skills, R&D and inno-
            vations...``. Knowledge based expenditures create competitiveness, long-term growth and improve the
            employability of workers.

            Also the Commission recommendation ´´raising taxes on labour should be avoided`` is the right one. In
            Europe, there has been a permanent trend of higher labour taxes, lower capital taxes and too low energy
            and environmental taxes. The higher productivity and employment rates cannot be reached through
            excessive labour taxes.
             
            7.  Strong Social Agenda indispensable

            EUROCADRES welcomes the rebirth of the EU strategy to promote corporate social responsibility CSR and
            finds it necessary to create a strong strategy with real content. EUROCADRES is not certain whether the
            right place of CSR is to be a part of Flagship initiative concerning industrial policy. CSR has to be very close
            to the activities of companies, but an independent CSR process is needed. CRS strategy has to involve
            all the stakeholders, such as companies, trade unions, NGOs, on an equal basis. EUROCADRES shares the
            view of the Commission 2020 proposal that CSR is “a key element in ensuring long term employee and
            consumer trust”.

            The second phase of the EU flexicurity agenda is needed, but is has to based on the principle that both
            flexibility and security are on an equal basis. The quality of jobs and the prevention of further downgrad-
            ing of social provisions have to be the core elements of flexicurity agenda.

            EU needs urgently a new Social Agenda, programme announcing the guidelines and practical proposals
            in the field of labour market, social affairs and equality. A sufficient number of new proposals are needed
            and those which are mentioned in the Commission proposal on Europe 2020 (working time, posting of
            workers, health and safety) are far from enough (no references to them in European Council conclusions).

            EUROCADRES is happy with the fact that the ‘’problem-solving potential of social dialogue at all levels’’ and
            vocational training are now mentioned which was not the case in the Commission consultation docu-
            ment issued last year. Life-long learning is also key element in Europe 2020.

            EUROCADRES supports the idea of promoting entrepreneurship through mobility programmes for young
            professionals, even if a separate programme is hardly necessary. A socially responsible entrepreneurship
            has to be a natural part of this kind of mobility exchange.
             
            8. Single market without taxation dimension?

            The promise to relaunch the single market and to tackle its bottlenecks is very useful. Also EUROCADRES is
            waiting with great interest the upcoming proposals of Mr Mario Monti how the Single Market should be
            developed. Europe 2020 offers some basis for the further development of the Single Market, but an highly
            important aspect is not at all mentioned: development of common tax policy with minimum levels and
            common tax bases. This is very necessary with a view of avoiding distortion of competition, abolition of
            tax heavens and creation of real single market. If the taxation aspect of the Single Market is not developed
            through the political decision of the EU institutions, the European Court of Justice will do it.
             
            9. Open and fair trade as a goal for external relations

            External policy plays an important role in Europe 2020 and EUROCADRES is mostly content with the pro-
            posals. Education as one of the main topics of the future high-level strategic dialogues, for instance, is a
            step forward. External dimension of the EU has to underline also the decent work. The European Council
            is promoting “open and fair trade” which is an appropriate principle. EU should create model legislation in
            several fields. The Reach regulation is an example of EU´s role as world-wide standard-setter. 
             
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10. Stronger follow-up and supervision

One of the weakest points of the Lisbon strategy was the supervision. Firstly, the success of Europe 2020
needs a middle-evaluation in 2015. Secondly, the recommendations procedure has to have more muscles.
The Commission and the European Parliament should have the right to issue both country-specific and
general EU level recommendations and warnings, without the consents of the Council. The Members States
have a tendency to water-down and politicize the recommendations and, thus, the whole process becomes
useless. Thirdly, the total transparency and ranking of the Member States performance is indispensable.


c) EUROCADRES’ comments to the Commission’s new initiative concerning
   Working time Directive

EUROCADRES welcomes the new commission’s initiative to restart the consultation phase with the aim to
renew the WTD, in particular the proposal to concentrate on the problematic impacts of the 2004-9 era
and underlining the European responsibility to act instead of accepting the status quo.

The commission’s call gives EUROCADRES the opportunity to precise, explain or modify its official com-
ments to the members of European parliament from October 2008 (Ref. 08-140) including the contribu-
tions to the mediation process with the European parliament, the commission and the council.
In particular, we answer to the questions on which the Commission proposes to consult the social partners:

(a) How could we develop balanced and innovative proposals regarding the organisation of working
    time that move beyond the unsuccessful debates of the last conciliation process? What is your
    long-term vision for the organisation of working time in a modern setting?
    EUROCADRES sticks to the main goal of the directive since its introduction, that is to guarantee Europe-
    wide protection for all workforce from unhealthy and unsafe working times and working time organi-
    sation, giving a framework which should under this overall goal allow the necessary flexibilities and
    security for adequate working time legislation and collective bargaining according to the needs of
    nations, branches, sectors, target-groups etc. As time is one of the most important and individually
    not renewable resources, working time and working time organisation must be part of responsible
    management and both collective and individual contracts under fair conditions of mutual trust, tak-
    ing into account that working time is always only part of life time, implicating a good balance with
    other categories of life time.

(b) What impact do you think that changes in working patterns and practices have had on the applica-
    tion of the Directive? Have any particular provisions become obsolete, or more difficult to apply?
    «Historically, time has been the measure, hourly or monthly, of P&MS achievement and wage. Labour
    market and work organization changed: more and more diversified, pushed by the transformation to
    the Knowledge Based Society and of course also by the technical developments.

   In such a situation to only use time as a measurement is not enough instrument for professionals’ efforts;
   therefore, for those ones categorized as ‘autonomous workers’ this directive needs to be complemented
   in order to allow such an adaptation (EUROCADRES’ letter to the European Parliament, 2008).

   This does not at all mean that working time protection and security are no more valid or unnecessary.
   EUROCADRES claims to develop adequate tools in order to measure and limit the workload and to
   guarantee really free time. Time as a resource will remain the basis even if not counted in hours and
   completed by additional indicators.

   Given the technical means, work may be performed anywhere any time, so that travelling time
   becomes working time, e.g. for preparation with laptop, driving time becomes working time for com-
   munication with mobile phones, even on-call time at home may turn into active working time imme-
   diately with tele-service tools.
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8


               Against this background, any time dedicated to the company must be categorised working time.

               Concerning counting, limits and rest-time the directive should define frames but delegate to the
               social partners (at European level, at national, sector or company levels) to find adequate and practi-
               cal solutions.

            (c) What is your experience to date on the overall functioning of the Working Time Directive? What
                has been your experience regarding the key issues identified in section 5 of this paper?
                EUROCADRES fully agrees with the first reaction of ETUC from March 24th which underlines the main
                goal of protection of health and safety of workers and also concerned clients. ETUC focused especially
                on the healthcare sector where doctors, nurses and other staff have huge responsibility not only for
                themselves but for other people they care for. EUROCADRES adds that this aspect of responsibility for
                others than directly concerned is relevant also for most high qualified professions and managerial
                positions: to guarantee full concentration at work and to reduce risks by too long working time needs
                a Europe-wide framework including almost all employed workers, professionals and middle manag-
                ers. This means, we stick to our position to cancel the general opt-out as well as to modify the unclear
                exception paragraph 17 of the WTD, supporting the position of the European parliament from 2005:
                proposing to reduce the exception to “chief executive officers (or persons in comparable positions),
                senior managers in the public or private sectors, directly subordinated to them and persons who are
                directly appointed by the board of directors”.

               We regard the actual exception in par. 17 as a sort of structural opt-out and cannot be accept it any longer.
               Furthermore, working outside of factories, shops or offices, as full-time work with clients or customers
               or travelling from time to time, is part of almost every professional work, in particular for professionals
               and managers. Therefore travelling time must be explicitly regarded as working time.

               EUROCADRES suggests 2 additional main items to the 5 already proposed by the commission: Reduc-
               ing exception of the WTD and introducing travelling time. EUROCADRES underlines that call-on time
               must be regarded working time as well, following the sentence of the European Court of Justice.

               Both the time spent in actual work tasks and the on-call time when no work is carried out (or other
               work related time) are to be counted as working time, because workers are then at the disposal of the
               employer, without being able to manage their time themselves. This must be regulated by the Direc-
               tive. A different practice may only be allowed through collective agreements so that sector-specific
               features is a prerequisite for determining the demand for on-call services and the key level of intensity
               and work strain experienced during on-call time.

               Doctors, IT specialists, engineers, social workers and other professional and managerial staff are often
               working on-call.

            (d) Do you agree with the analysis contained in this paper as regards the organisation and the regula-
                tion of working time in the EU? Are there any further issues which you consider should be added?
                The commission’s paper directly addresses EUROCADRES’ target group when mentioning that «for a
                growing number of ‘knowledge workers’, work may be assessed not only on the number of hours
                worked, but on the originality and quality of the product delivered. Such workers may enjoy extensive
                autonomy over the organisation and location of their work, raising questions about the application
                of normal working time rules. However, the new knowledge-based economy is also producing many
                jobs in routine production services (call centres, data treatment), entailing repetitive tasks under close
                supervision. In these cases, high levels of work intensity and stress can be found, which may require
                regulation in the interest of workers’ health and safety, just as in traditional activities.»

               As this analysis can be misinterpreted, EUROCADRES emphasized that protection of workers and work-
               ing time rules are regarded fully compatible with autonomy in knowledge-based work. On the other
               hand, highly regulated jobs may cover even top qualified professions, e.g. in healthcare, aircraft con-
               trol etc.
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   EUROCADRES clearly says that those groups of autonomously working professionals and managers
   must not be excluded from the protection of the WTD but need some additional solutions to be nego-
   tiated by the social partners, to guarantee good, healthy, creative, accurate and responsible work and
   to avoid extreme workload causing mistakes, lack of concentration, burn-out etc.

   Very long working time not only reduces the quality of work and raises various risks, but is also coun-
   ter-productive regarding the economic aspects, as long working time declines productivity and crea-
   tivity with bad impacts for the output.

   EUROCADRES repeats its 2008 proposals to frame the suggested social partners’ negotiations to meet
   the needs of professional and managerial staff:

   ”Compensatory rest time: Compensatory rest should be assured to professional and managerial staff
   in circumstances where normal rest periods cannot be taken. The determination of the compensatory
   rest length should be regulated by the social partner’s negotiation in the member states, taking into
   account the need to ensure the safety and health of the concerned individuals.

   In some cases, already foreseen in some countries, for P&MS it would be easier to count the working
   time in days per year, with a negotiated maximum number of days. EUROCADRES believes therefore
   that Art 17.2 should be amended granting equivalent periods of compensatory rest following periods
   of time spent on duty. The following articles shall be consequently adapted to fit this aim.” There could
   also be a compensation for necessary long working periods, for example through a right to extra vaca-
   tion, annual leave banks, working time accounts may be negotiated at company level by the social
   partners and the employees.

(e) Do you consider that the Commission should launch an initiative to amend the Directive? If so, do
    you agree with the objectives of a review as set out in this paper? What do you consider should be
    its scope?
    EUROCADRES welcomes the initiative and its scope only provided that the opt-out-paragraph 22 will
    be cancelled and the scope of the exclusion paragraph 17 reduced, as explained under answer c).

(f) Do you think that, apart from legislative measures, other action at European Union level would
    merit consideration? If so, what form of action should be taken, and on which issues?
    EUROCADRES fully supports and insists on the ETUC claim for publishing the WTD Implementation
    Report in order to provide the debate with a better fact basis.

(g) Do you wish to consider initiating a dialogue under Article 155 TFEU on any of the issues identified
    in this consultation? If so, on which ones?
    EUROCADRES does not claim for a 155 TFEU dialogue at the moment, but is available for such nego-
    tiations if there will be a realistic possibility to redefine paragraph 17 and find out concrete frame
    proposals for adequate working time organisation of professional and managerial staff, in particular
    in knowledge-based work. EUROCADRES would act in such a dialogue in close cooperation with ETUC.
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             d) EUROCADRES’ view on European Social Agenda in the field of labour market,
                social affairs and equality

             There are several trends which affect the EU policy in the field of social dimension. Globalisation, the
             strongly raising skill levels of employees, the intensification of structural changes in the labour market,
             the aging of the population in Europe and the request to “greening” of the economy linked, for instance,
             to the climate change are among the most important trends.

             The share and number of professional and managerial staff will continuously increase in Europe. This is a
             fact that cannot be neglected in the context of social dimension. The needs of professionals in the labour
             market have to be born in mind.

             EU has to be active also in the social field. Europe needs economic, but also social initiatives: Social Agenda.

             Against this background, EUROCADRES finds it important that the following ideas will be explored in the
             context of the European Social Dimension and the Social Agenda. This list is not exhaustive, but presents
             some key proposals.

             1. labour law and labour rights

             Inclusion of professional and managerial staff to the scope of the working time directive
             The revision of the WTD has to offer enough protection for all workers, including P&MS. The derogation
             for managers and other autonomous workers in the article 17.1 in the working time directive is very prob-
             lematic. The definition of these workers is too wide and a number of employees do not have sufficient
             working time protection. Derogations, such as opt-out, are not acceptable and on-call work has to be
             defined as work.

             Legal instrument on competition clauses
             Competition clauses have become too restrictive. In many cases, their conditions are disproportionate
             and they constitute an obstacle for free movement. The Social Partners’ document on «Key challenges
             facing European labour markets» in 2007 raised this matter in the recommendations: «Address non-com-
             petitive clauses and practices in order to promote voluntary mobility of workers». A legal instrument is
             needed to render these clauses more proportionate.

             Harmonisation of EU directives on workers’ information and consultation and evaluation of EWC directive
             Their content and procedures differ from each other. A process of harmonisation could be launched.
             Alongside a general harmonisation process, it is indispensable to develop further the EWC directive. It
             should be evaluated and later on revised.

             Legal initiative on economically dependent self-employed workers
             Many of economically dependent self-employed workers are in a vulnerable position. They are dependent
             on a single principal client-employer for their source of income. A better protection is needed and clear
             rules have to be established for these workers. The establishment of a general definition of employed
             persons at the EU level and a series of core common rights, among other things, are needed.

             Revision of posting of workers directive
             This directive and not only its implementation should be revised in order to strengthen the respect of fun-
             damental rights and to facilitate the free movement of workers. It must be clear that it is a question of
             minimum level (and not a maximum level) safety directive. Equal treatment for equal work is a key principle.

             Rules for transnational trade union rights (strike, to organise sympathy actions) and joint liability
             The rules for transnational trade union rights has to be created as a natural continuation of Viking case
             from the European Court of Justice, among the others. Joint liability has been a part of Employers’ Sanc-
             tion directive in immigration matters. A general European wide joint liability should be explored.
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Commission communication on Charter on Fundamental Rights and EU accession to European Convention
on Human Rights
A communication should be issued as regards the consequences of legally binding Charter on Funda-
mental Rights, how the Charter could be and should be used, what are the effects of opt-outs etc. In addi-
tion, the EUs accession to European Convention on Human Rights should take place as soon as possible
and without large reservations.

Directive on workers’ data protection
Workers’ data protection is not at the satisfactory level in many Member States and as a transnational issue
(for instance, delivery of health information) it is growing in importance. P&MS groups are knowledge and
data workers. Transfer of employees’ data between the EU and the third countries is also a relevant question.

Revision of transparency directive
The EU Transparency Directive plays an important role defining minimum standards for working con-
tracts. There is a need to fill the gaps and to guarantee more precise standards Europe-wide. It should
be reformed so that in all cases the description of the tasks and duties within the working contract must
make reference to the appropriate level of the European Qualification Framework. Secondly, the employer
should hand out a certificate indicating duration and level according EQF at termination of employment.

2. Equality

Directive or social partners’ legally binding agreement on paternal leave
Men should have equal possibilities of taking the leave for child care purposes. The stronger participation
of men in child care is also in the interest of women. In view of balancing the parents’ child care duties, this
initiative would be useful and could improve the equality of both sexes.

Revision of maternal leave, part-time & fixed-term work directives
These Social Partners’ agreements implemented through directive should be modified in the light of case
law and the experiences. The collectivisation of individual claims should be raised as well in this context.
An individual employee may not have the knowledge to proceed complaints, but the trade union has.

A strong roadmap for equality between men and women
The Commission´s roadmap for equality, its implementation report, evaluation and follow-up proposals has to
be strong enough to be able to improve the situation. Particular attention should be paid to equal pay questions.

Pioneer work in the area of men’s’ equality issues
Make men’s equality issues and problems a new priority area and prepare the EU’s first male equality pro-
gramme. Men, for instance, willing to take care of their children, are often discriminated at work.

3. Free movement

Fifth freedom of movement for all professional and managerial staff
The Commission has launched a number of specific sectoral initiatives to facilitate and to tackle the prob-
lems of the free movement of researches, the so called fifth freedom project. The fifth freedom should
apply to all PMS groups. The European Job Mobility Action Plan 2007-2010 has to be implemented as well.

Portability of supplementary pension rights
The proposal for a directive on supplementary pensions has to be adopted and carefully implemented.
P&MS groups, in particular, have supplementary pension rights. Even after the implementation it is impor-
tant to follow if the supplementary pensions are really portable.

Implementation of Directive on mutual recognition of professional qualifications and European qualifications
framework
The difficulties in mutual recognition of professional qualifications are still a great impediment for free
movement of workers and, in particular, for P&MS. The framework directive has to be implemented thor-
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12


             oughly and the new possibilities in this directive should be explored carefully (for instance article 15 on
             minimum requirements and recital on European cards). The European qualifications framework can also
             provide added-value.

             Agreement or directive of workers’ financial participation
             Financial participation systems – employee ownership of company for which they work through share
             distribution/grant of options/profit sharing in cash etc. – vary between the member states and employ-
             ers. Employees are faced with problems when they try to move from one Member State to another due to
             the fact that these systems are not mobile. The Social Partners should make an agreement on this matter
             or the Commission put forward a proposal.

             Service professions in WTO
             As a part of WTO service sector negotiation (where the EU is negotiator and has competence), the mobil-
             ity of certain professional groups are treated. Architects and their recognition of qualifications is an exam-
             ple. The EU should promote these negotiations and facilitate the movement of professionals also at the
             global level, bearing in mind the quality of services. However, the recognition of qualifications should be
             reciprocal and transparent.

             Intra-corporate transferees and Remunerated Trainees
             The directive on Intra-corporate transferees – common procedures in relation to temporary residence in
             the EU - is necessary only, if it can provide added-value. Most importantly, the conditions of employment
             must be governed by host country laws and collective agreements. The proposal on Remunerated Train-
             ees should ensure that they are treated along the same standards as similar trainees in the host country.

             Cross-border health care
             The European Court of Justice has issued a number of important decisions concerning cross-border
             health care. On the other side, people are seeking more and more health care in the other member states.
             Framework rules for mobile patients and health care is needed.

             4. Occupational health and safety

             Training of managers for occupational health and safety duties
             A number of managers (or even professionals) are responsible for occupational health and safety at their
             work. The employers should have an obligation to organise the training and updating of knowledge
             (awareness) for persons in charge of working environment questions. They should also have a strong
             mandate to improve and develop the working environment. The Commission has to issue a binding leg-
             islative proposal on this matter as a separate instrument or as part of some other directive.

             Directive on psychosocial factors at work
             The importance of psychosocial factors at work is growing. Stress, bullying and even violence are a nui-
             sance for too many P&MS employees and they lower considerable the productivity. The agreements of
             the Social Partners on stress at work and violence are an excellent basis for further actions. The Commis-
             sion should put forward a directive proposal on psychosocial factors at work.

             Right to be disconnected
             More and more professionals and managers are subjected to de facto on-call work by receiving emails,
             telephone calls etc 24 h a day. Nevertheless, also P&MS should have the right to enjoy undisturbed private
             life and privacy and a balance between work and family life. This would mean that every P&MS employee
             should be entitled to be disconnected from work-related electronic contacts during his/her rest time. The
             Commission should issue a binding proposal on this matter.

             Directive on muscular-skeletal diseases and improving of work ergonomics
             Muscular-skeletal diseases are a major problem in the working life also for the professional and manage-
             rial staff. Working with computers, for instance, is exhausting for body. Improving of work ergonomics is
             not only the matter of health of employees, but also a mean to increase the productivity.
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Directive on electromagnetic fields
The transposition of directive on electromagnetic fields was postponed until 2012 and some new stud-
ies on this item are expected. Even if the postponement might have been motivated, these kind of new
technology dangers of employees deserve particular attention.

REACH regulation and health and safety
This regulation will have a deep impact on chemicals and their use. Consequently, the health and safety
must follow this development. The existing directives have to be modified and the new ones issued, when
needed.

Legislation on nanotechnologies
Nanotechnology may offer a wide range of possibilities, but it is also a potential risk for health and safety.
Professionals are the key employee group developing the future nanotechnology “in good and in bad”.
It is not clear whether the EU legislation covers all the hazards. Basic ground rules and legal security for
society should be developed and adopted.

5. globalisation

Open and fair trade rules
Open (non protectionist) and fair trade is the best solution to create sustainable jobs. Fair trade rules
should be promoted at the EU level with an appropriate instrument. They should underline, in particular,
the core labour rights based on ILO conventions. Strengthening of ILO - WTO co-operation, labour aspects
in GSP and in bilateral trade agreements are also useful.

Strengthening the role of ILO
Ratification of relevant ILO conventions should be strengthened both within and outside the European
Union. Also the EUs contribution to the implementation of the decent work agenda should be ensured.

Social dimension of new EU external affairs administration
The new EU external affairs administration, common representations and actions should promote the
social dimension as one of the key issues. It is necessary that the social dimension is raised both in the
multilateral context (such as G 20) and in the bilateral relations (with China, Russia, Maghreb etc).

6. Employment and structural funds

Simplification of European Employment Strategy
The European Employment Strategy is useful, but it is too complicated and with too many objectives.
The EMU model with 5 goals would be better, like employment rate, unemployment rate, the share of
long-term unemployment, sectoral segregation between men and women plus one indicator describ-
ing flexicurity. Alongside the permanent targets, some changing annual subjects could be treated in the
context of this strategy.

Merger of Globalisation Fund into Social Fund
Restructuring due to the globalisation must be facilitated, but a separate fund is not needed. It creates
unnecessary and duplicating bureaucracy and links globalisation only to dismissals. We have already
the European Social Fund which covers the same measures as the Globalisation Fund. So the Globali-
sation Fund should be merged into Social Fund and, if necessary, the Social Fund regulation could be
modified.

7. Sustainable labour market

EU level guidelines for corporate social responsibility
EU must vigorously promote the CSR. EU strategy and actions in this field have to involve all relevant
stakeholders on an equal basis. CSR is a key element in ensuring long term employee and consumer
trust.
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             Commission Communication on «Green Jobs» and low carbon labour market
             Climate change including mitigation and adaptation to it will have a number of effects on the labour mar-
             ket. It should be explored what are the consequences and how the new jobs could be created in the low
             carbon labour market. The Communication should be followed by the action programme (white paper).

             Actions for services of general interests
             The new Lisbon Treaty includes a legal base and a declaration concerning services of general interests.
             The quality of services and the idea of services of general interest have to be part of future liberalisation
             directives and the framework regulation. Concrete actions are needed. In general, liberalisation may have
             both positive (lower prices) and negative effects (pressure on employment conditions), depending on the
             case. Attitude towards liberalisations should be practical, not ideological.

             8. Contractual and institutional labour market related co-operation

             Legal framework for transnational collective bargaining
             After the forthcoming informative document on transnational collective bargaining, the Commission
             should launch the Social Dialogue consultation process aiming at an agreement implemented through
             directive or at legislative instrument on this matter. The transnational collective bargaining is increasing,
             but the practices are varying and the responsibilities are unclear.

             Legal framework for bilateral autonomous Social Partners agreements
             The implementation of the Social Partners bilateral agreements (distance work, stress at work, and vio-
             lence at work) has been a confusing experience. The employers do not regard these agreements as bind-
             ing instruments, but consider them as non-binding resolutions. Thus, the effect of these agreements has
             been very limited. A number of questions linked to these agreements and their implementation remain
             open although they are a part of Community acquis.

             Co-operation between the Social Partners and the European institutions
             A deeper co-operation between the Social Partners and the European Institutions is needed:
             1. fully respecting the independence of the European Central Bank, the Macro-economic dialogue has to
                be strengthened,
             2. in the field of education and internal market, the Commission has to ensure a more systematic consul-
                tation of the Social Partners,
             3. periodic meetings between the Social Partners and the environment ministers plus competitiveness
                ministers would be useful,
             4. regular and early consultation of the Social Partners in relation to migration questions, including free
                movement of professionals in the context of WTO.


             e) EUROCADRES’ opinion Mario Monti Single Market Report

             1. general support for Monti report

             EUROCADRES strongly supports Mario Monti’s Single Market report. There are several reasons why the
             functioning of this market has to be developed. The full potential of the Single Market has not been used,
             its employment effects could be better and its qualitative aspects need to be improved.

             The approach of the Monti report is balanced. It understands that the Single Market does not exist only for
             the purposes of companies, but also for workers, consumers and for all citizens. The report offers a balanced
             approach to the Single Market which takes into account both economic, social and environmental aspects.

             The goal of the report to build a consensus around the Single Market is a very positive one.

             The report is also rich in practical proposals. It shows how much could and should be done in this field.
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2. EUROCADRES’ priority issues

The idea about the voluntary European Free Movement Card. The card would contain in a single docu-
ment all the information a European Citizen may require in another Member State in addition to identity
and nationality: work permit status, social status and entitlement to social security. EUROCADRES recom-
mends that the feasibility of this Card be explored immediately.

The report states that “Europe can reap the greatest benefits from mobility of highly skilled workers in
new and innovative sectors, through adapting to new dynamic types of mobility and by encouraging
forms of intra-EU circular mobility that compensates brain drains with brain gains”. EUROCADRES agrees
fully with this and this kind of European Card might be one way to encourage mobility. EUROCADRES is
not in favour of national mobility cards within the European labour market, because they may lead to
protectionism.

However, it is not clear what would be the relationship between this Free Movement Card and the exist-
ing European health card for mobile people and the possible professional cards. It is advisable that the
feasibility study clarifies the situation between different existing and projected mobility cards. The EU
cannot have a multitude of different mobility cards which would be confusing, in particular, for mobile
employees.

EUROCADRES would like to raise the complexity of international recognition of professional qualifications
as well. Automatic recognition of qualifications applies only to seven out of more than 800 professions. As
Mario Monti’s report advocates, the current Directive of Mutual Recognition of Qualifications should be
clarified and strengthened. The report proposes that the scope of this Directive should be expanded to
new sectors targeting in particular certain new highly skilled professions.

EUROCADRES warmly supports the suggestion that the scope and the content of the Mutual Recognition
Directive should be modernised and expanded. This development work should get under way imme-
diately. EUROCADRES also points out that the use of article 15 in the Directive of Mutual Recognition of
Qualifications has to be explored in this context. It gives a possibility for professional organisations to
propose minimum educational levels at the European level for the purposes of mutual recognition.

3. EUROCADRES also underlines

The portability of supplementary pensions, tax obstacles to cross-border work and health insurance
rights are a real problem area, as stated by the Report. In particular, highly mobile workers are suffering
and urgent measures are needed.

EUROCADRES notes with interest the proposal to develop Eures network with Public employment services
and the Social Partners. EUROCADRES may offer some added-value in this context thanks to its Mobil-net
network for mobile P&MS.

Alongside the proposed tax coordination, Europe needs tax harmonization by creating minimum levels
and common tax bases in the areas close to the Single Market. A pure tax coordination is not enough and
the European tax policy is more and more guided by the European Court of Justice, if the political deci-
sions are not taken.

The proposals concerning the reconciliation between economic freedoms and workers’ rights (linked to
the Viking, Laval, Balpa and other cases) is important. Fundamental rights lie at the core of European val-
ues and they cannot be broken.

The Report does not deal with the new legal basis for the Regulation concerning Services of General
Interest, introduced by the Lisbon Treaty. Why? It may be the part of the “balanced approach” to the Single
Market.
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16


             Cross-border health-care provision is needed urgently. The legal uncertainty concerning cross-border
             health services is great and the situation of patients, in particular patient safety, not clear. EUROCADRES
             underlines that free movement of patients, based on the principles laid down by the European Court of
             Justice, is a right for European citizens. It should not be hindered by unnecessary restrictions. The Council
             of Ministers’ decision on 7-8 June 2010 on this directive contains excessive impediments for free move-
             ment of patients.


             f) EUROCADRES’ view of the EU’s global Policy - More And Better globalisation

             1. introduction

             This document is the view of EUROCADRES with regard to the EU’s global policy. There are several reasons
             why EUROCADRES, representing millions of professional and managerial employees (P&MS groups) in
             Europe, has issued this statement.

             Primarily, members of EUROCADRES deal with global issues perhaps more than any other group of
             employees. Globalisation is affecting their daily work continuously and permanently.

             EUROCADRES’ view of globalisation is naturally European. These EUROCADRES’ global guidelines address
             what to include in the EU global policy and what measures are required.

             The EU is gradually becoming a forum that provides more and more global guidelines. The European
             Union is currently implementing the new European External Action Service. In the future, the EU and its
             member states will have joint delegations and operations around the world.

             In addition, the Treaty of Lisbon has come into force, providing further external action decision-making
             power in worldwide matters to the EU.

             This is a ground-breaking project for EUROCADRES, and partly in the European trade union movement
             in general. Consequently, this document includes discussion of the definition and background of glo-
             balisation, an assessment of its current state and an opinion on the advantages and disadvantages of
             globalisation.

             Because this is a highly future-oriented document, development trends also need to be assessed. They
             are an essential background for the recommendations concerning practical measures, material on which
             constitutes the main body of this document. There is a separate annex on possible future trends. They do
             not constitute a position of EUROCADRES, but one possible scenario.

             2. globalisation – definition and background

             Globalisation is a worldwide social, environmental, cultural and economic integration process. Interaction
             and interrelation are growing stronger on all levels. This is the result of an increase in trade and movement
             of capital; mobility of people and visions; developments in data, skills, and technology; and a deregula-
             tion. Alongside globalisation, increasing connexions, the world is simultaneously characterized by dis-
             integration, reintegration and recomposition. These types of changes most often affect the professional
             and managerial staff and they are highly involved in these “processes”.

             Globalisation as a word was not widely adopted until the 1980’s, although the phenomenon itself came
             into being centuries ago. In its current form, globalisation therefore is not a new phenomenon, but it is
             continuously gaining strength and accelerating, and it also is transformed by, for example, media and
             information technology.
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3. the current state of globalisation

One indicator of the acceleration of globalisation is the number of multinational corporations. In 1988,
the number of multinational corporations was 18,500, at the turn of the millennium it was 63,000, and
today the number of multinational corporations is estimated at more than one hundred thousand. A
substantial number of workers in EU countries are exposed to global phenomena, connections, eco-
nomic concerns, and other global issues every day. In particular, this applies to the professional and
managerial staff.

In the last few decades, from the globalisation perspective in particular, the world has changed more
rapidly than perhaps ever before. Additionally, globalisation nowadays affects all mankind. Individual
countries in the knowledge society and larger territories such as the European Union with their extensive
trade connections have particularly strong links to globalisation.

Globalisation has contributed to enabling hundreds of millions of citizens of developing countries to rise
from poverty and has enabled several industrialised countries, including most of the EU member states,
to maintain high standards of living. It has created jobs and new sources of income. The availability and
transparency of information have increased significantly. Also, the state of both democracy and of basic
human rights has become stronger because of new global networks. The P&MS groups have both con-
tributed to and taken advantage of this development.

On the other hand, globalisation has made competition tougher, which increasingly affects the profes-
sional and managerial staff as well. For instance, in the service industry with high skill demands and in
the field of research this world-wide competition is harder and harder. Not all people feel that they are
benefiting from globalisation. As it stands, globalisation seems to be based on unsustainable consump-
tion and production instead of sustainable development.

Especially in recent years, the entire global system has gone through some difficult times. Shortly before
the global economic crisis, there was the world food price crisis, and the energy market has also been unsta-
ble. WTO negotiations have come to a halt, and the climate change negotiations are at boiling point.

Despite the accelerated globalisation and its obvious friction points, fundamentally the structure and
methods of operation of the global system are in many ways similar to those of the post-World-War-II era.
Then again, in some areas the market economy is the most effective one (for example, in the trade sector).
However, even these industries require strong enough frameworks and basic rules for their operations, as
demonstrated by the recent fate of the financial market. Overall, the so-called globalisation governance
seems largely insufficient.

4. Advantages and disadvantages of globalisation, and the need for changes

The current state of global development is challenging, and it is likely to become even more so in the
future. yet the advantages of globalisation outweigh its disadvantages. Secluded societies are not more
affluent, financially successful, democratic, or environmentally friendly. It is also good to remember that
many global concerns (including overpopulation) are not directly caused by globalisation.

On the other hand, so-called globalisation governance and various areas of policy related to it remain,
for the most part, undeveloped. There are plenty of problems with issues related to financial, social, and
sustainable development. Many of the problems are most likely to get worse in the future.

Needless to say, these problems will not be solved by turning back development hundreds of years and
removing connections between people and countries (i.e., anti-globalisation). On the contrary, what is
needed is more cross-border connections and co-operation.

Also, both international decision-making systems and governance of globalisation should be strength-
ened significantly. Development in various cross-border policy areas is required, along with a strong han-
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             dle on various problems, and needs to be in place as soon as possible. For these reasons, a comprehensive
             package of measures is required to enable an even better model of globalisation.

             5. Recommended measures

             In short, what is required is more but better globalisation. These proposals aim at creating this better
             globalisation. It would be even more useful and more sustainable.

             •	 Working life
             The EU should make efforts worldwide to guarantee all workers the right to a minimum level of labour stand-
             ards and collective bargaining, and the right to organise. The basic rights of workers are included among the
             fundamental human rights, and denying them may also distort competition.
             The right to association and to strike are basic rights which the P&MS employees also need to have world-
             wide.

             Equal treatment and decent work conditions should be the starting points for mobility and migration
             between the EU member states and developing countries. Additionally, the focus should be on how to
             successfully combine international career opportunities with private and family life.
             Based on the ILO decent work agenda, the EU should develop a Decent Work Strategy to promote the
             workers’ rights at the global level. The Strategy should commit the EU to increase the efforts to:
             •	 Promote the strengthening of the ILO: improvement of its advisory capacity with the WTO, and con-
                sideration of trade blockades in cases of blatant violation of basic human rights; enhancement to
                ratification and implementation of ILO conventions; and the drafting or processing of ILO conventions
                on, for example, the supranational right to strike and standards concerning working time.
             •	 Apply the directive on workers’ right to information and consultation with the European Work Coun-
                cils to all global companies, and Global Work Councils created. The role of P&MS is important for the
                implementation of GWCs.
             •	 Initiate an adaptation of an ILO convention on psychosocial factors at work, such as stress, which is a
                priority issue for P&MS.

             The concept of a living wage (i.e., wages at a level sufficient to meet the basic needs of an average-sized
             family) should be included in the EU Decent Work Strategy. A living wage should be included among the
             basic economic rights. In addition, increase of wages in proportion to national income is necessary.

             Establishment of International Framework Agreements (global trade unions and multinational compa-
             nies agreeing on respect for basic human rights) should also be included in the EU Decent Work Strategy.

             •	 Knowledge and skills
             Having knowledge and skills is one of the preconditions for development, employment, and competitiveness in
             several fields, also on a global scale. It holds a key position in solving a variety of problems as well as promoting
             the status of individual workers and citizens.

             The EU should promote in the ILO global skills strategy investments in education, recognition of qualifica-
             tions with a view to facilitating mobility and the key role of higher education.

             Global ranking lists and classification systems used by institutions of higher education should be revised
             on the basis of the OECD work, and, if necessary, UNESCO should also be included in this development
             process.

             Worldwide recognition of professional qualifications should be facilitated as part of the mobility of work-
             ers between the EU and developing countries, but this should not result in the lowering of qualification
             requirements.

             The ILO convention on the certification of the skills system should be developed on the basis of an EU
             initiative.
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The EU should contribute to the revision of the WTO’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual
Property Rights (TRIPS) through a review of the industries it covers and an update of its minimum standards.

Worldwide mobility of students, teachers, and researchers between the EU member states and other
countries, and its prospects, should be significantly improved. The education targets of the EU Europe
2020 strategy need to be examined also from the globalisation perspective.

Policies related to mobility outside the EU should aim for a shift from ‘brain drain’ to ‘brain exchanges’. Europe
is not yet an open and inclusive society with global responsibility. Mobility should be beneficial for both the
source and the target country, and especially for the workers, from the perspective of their skills.

•	 Economy and economic development policy
The EU should contribute strongly to giving impetus to new type of sustainable economic growth. Common
global rules should be created for economic activities enabling undistorted competition and conditions.

The EU should strive to eliminate tax havens and automatic taxation data exchange should cover all coun-
tries. Global tax coordination, cooperation and elimination of unhealthy tax competition are necessary.
A global tax on financial transactions should be applied to, for example, speculative currency trading in
accordance with the European Parliament guidelines. The funds generated should be directed to employ-
ment, green jobs and educational purposes.

The EU should support a global levy on banks, for example, in view of future financial crisis. Sufficient
stability of financial markets is accomplishable by increasing transparency, limiting speculative activities,
providing sufficient resources and equipment for monitoring, and limiting the reward system for exces-
sive risk-taking.

Fixing of exchange rates for additional competitiveness at the expense of other countries needs to be regulated,
and, for these purposes, a monitoring system needs to be created and supervised by the IMF and the WTO.

Subsidies that distort competition and transfer unemployment from country to country have to be abol-
ished, and a Global Competition Authority dealing with cross-border competition issues needs to be
formed with rights equal to those enjoyed by the European Commission.
The EU should insist on putting in place regulations for free economic zones to ensure adherence to and
compliance with basic human rights and to prevent distortion of competition, for example, for taxation
purposes.

•	 Trade policy
The foundation for the EU trade policy should be free and fair trade based on a multilateral system. Trading is
an integral resource of welfare.

International trade should be made more open including the areas of higher knowledge. Production and
export subsidies should be abolished.

Fair trade systems need to be developed further, and ILO standards should be better incorporated into
the systems. The regulations of the WTO and the EU should enable the implementation of fair trade crite-
ria, for example, in public procurement.

Basic human rights and sustainable development should be included in an appropriate and legally valid
manner in the EU trade and investment agreements, and the system for monitoring these agreements
should be ratified.

EU decision-making processes for the Generalised System of Preferences need to be more transparent; the
ILO should have a stronger role in the assessment of GSP agreements; trade union organisations need to
have a right of appeal in requirement breach cases and compliance with the human rights treaties related
to the system needs to be properly monitored – to enable genuine progress of the participating countries.
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



20


             Public services may be included in the WTO agreements if the advantages of the arrangement are appar-
             ent and it will not present any significant disadvantages in provision of these services. The application of
             EU definition for services, i.e. provided for remuneration, should be assessed as a model for WTO defini-
             tion for services.

             •	 Environment and climate
             The state and biodiversity of the environment are important values for their own sake, but the living environ-
             ment of human beings, and working environment issues are highly relevant in this context. Adherence to envi-
             ronmental standards or their neglect will also have a significant impact on the competition between the EU
             and other territories around the world.

             The sole aim of the global environmental policy of the EU should not only be to increase the number of
             jobs related to the environment; instead, it must contribute to making all jobs eco-friendly. The ecological
             footprints of production and consumption in the working life (carbon, water, pollutions etc.) need to be
             as small as possible.

             The basis for the EU climate change policy should include emission reduction targets that enable keeping
             warming below 2 °C (85% reduction by 2050). Industrialised countries produce most of the emissions, but
             the growth is most rapid in developing countries.

             International climate agreements need to be strengthened in order to allow carbon taxes on the products
             of countries that breach or have not signed the agreements. The EU should consider this type of taxation
             as a last resort if response to climate change issues does not progress otherwise.

             The EU’s development aid should be directed to support countries that adhere to the international envi-
             ronmental agreements. Pollution and loss of biodiversity are global threats.

             The EU needs to support the idea of an International World Environmental Organisation, affiliated to the
             UN, which will receive similar authority to the WTO in its field of operations.

             •	 Social responsibility
             Social responsibility and ethical conduct should be regarded as a natural part of the worldwide operations
             of the EU, employers, and societies. International regulations on social responsibility should be revised and
             strengthened.

             The EU needs to recognise the key role of P&MS in the promotion of social responsibility and underline
             the Responsible European Management. The rights of P&MS to reinforce social responsibility have to be
             strengthened.

             The EU should contribute to the revision of OECD corporate social responsibility guidelines. Issues that
             require attention include, for example, supplier and delivery chains, living wages, inadequate legislation
             where in conflict with international standards and ethical traceability of products and services.

             The ILO declaration on fundamental principles and rights at work and the social justice declaration
             should be adhered to by all employers. One vital element here is the compatibility of ILO declarations
             with OECD guidelines. These pursuits should be included in the EU contribution to the decent work
             policy.

             The UN Global Compact strategic policy promoting social responsibility and the UN Principles for Respon-
             sible Investment (UNPRI) need to become as comprehensive and powerful as possible, and support is
             required also from the EU.

             Trade union and comparable representative organisation access to information needs to be improved,
             and third-party monitoring of adherence to social responsibility is required.
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There are numerous declarations and initiatives related to social responsibility and it is important to
establish worldwide understanding of their fundamental guidelines, for example, with innovative sup-
port from the EU.

•	 Governance of globalisation
The EU should aim to strengthen the governance of globalisation with the following targets: 1) creating inter-
national standards in fields lacking them; 2) establishing new international organisations with strong deci-
sion-making capacity; 3) enhancing the capabilities of influence related to civic activities and democratically
elected institutions, including the influence and right to access of trade unions; and 4) by increasing the trans-
parency of international institutions.

For example, a permanent trade union advisory committee resembling the OECD-affiliated one (TUAC)
should be established in affiliation with the WTO and the Group of Twenty.

Organisations based on free civic activities, including trade union organisations, should be supported
worldwide, for example, through co-operation related to EU development policy.

The possibility of strengthening the UN to form a system that resembles a worldwide European Union – a
global union (GU) – should be explored. The UN-GU should be given more decision-making capacity, and
its decisions should become more binding. The memberships of individual EU member states in the UN
should be integrated into collective EU membership.

The G-20 nations should be brought together to form a UN Economic Council, which should include also
smaller countries, in a rotation system, and the EU, with collective membership.

The EU needs to form a unified external action service that will emphasise promotion of a more functional
globalisation model as one of its main priorities. The EU should have only one voice in international and
global context and institutions.

•	 Other proposals
The EU countries need to increase their development aid to 1 per cent of the GDP. The EU development
aid needs to be closely linked with basic labour rights, the environment, and anti-corruption work. Decent
work and education, including the education of women, should be among the main priorities of develop-
ment co-operation.

The world population needs to be lowered worldwide through the use of schooling and sex education, to
avoid restrictions, as a last resort, on the curbing of birth rates.

Efforts should be made to reach better coherence between the decisions taken in different international
institutions, such as the WTO, ILO, IMF and the World Bank.

Additional methods, or alternative ones to GDP, as a standard yardstick for prosperity are required, along
with their comprehensive use also in global organisations. The GDP should be complemented in par-
ticular with assessment of people’s well-being and the state of the environment, and various social and
ecological footprint indicators introduced by the EU Beyond GDP initiative.
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



22


             Annex : Possible global future prospects

             Making predictions about global development today is just as difficult as ever. The only absolute cer-
             tainty is that none of the predictions are likely to be entirely true. However, it is of utmost importance
             in the global context that some predictions are made to create a basis for policy proposals. In addition,
             despite all the uncertainty, it is possible to detect some changes or factors that might be achieved at
             least to some extent. Assessments made by EUROCADRES along with various international surveys point
             to the following future developments occurring in the next two to three decades as one possible future
             scenario:

             a)  Prices of raw materials, food, energy, etc., increase substantially because of, for example, the world
                 population reaching more than 10 billion people, and the increased consumption in the developing
                 countries. This will result in large-scale adaptation processes related to production, everyday life situ-
                 ations, etc.
             b)  There is an extensive global increase in the level of education. Higher education has become a com-
                 petitive edge almost everywhere, and therefore applying it as a standard recipe for success alone is
                 not enough. Emphasis is on the ability to process information and specialisation. This change affects
                 professional and managerial staff everywhere.
             c)  Increasing employment, seasonal employment, the informal economy, working time, psycho-social
                 working life factors and several other “old” issues related to working life remain significant. On the one
                 hand, multinational corporations consolidate their cross-border staff-related issues, but, at the same
                 time, company-based wage agreements are also common. Significant new issues related to working
                 life emerge, such as the health effects of nanotechnology. Protecting the privacy of every citizen and
                 employee becomes a top priority.
             d) The decline in the number of members in the trade European union movement stops at some stage,
                 if it succeeds in modernising itself and the development at the global level is mixed. The trade union
                 movement diversifies its strategy more and more toward service-provider for its members and towards
                 those of non-governmental organisations. It wants to become an opinion leader, a lobbyist, a street
                 activist, a network leader, etc. Workers’ awareness of their rights increases in the developing countries.
                 There have been efforts on cross-border mergers of trade union organisations, but a closely-linked
                 network of co-operation has proved to be a better solution.
             e) More and more employers are international and multicultural (an example is the emergence of Chi-
                 nese and Indian employers in Europe and the US), and the role of individual nation-states in their future
                 visions becomes smaller all the time. International delocalisations will further increase. It becomes
                 more and more common that in the welfare service industry also the employer’s headquarters are in
                 another country or even on another continent.
             f ) Welfare services gain ground in some parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, but the publicly funded
                 welfare services in the Western countries of today face cutbacks because of debt repayment, demog-
                 raphy, and slow economic growth.
             g) The overall security situation improves with the increase of interdependency between countries.
                 On the other hand, migration causes tension on the local level and in the workplace. Multicultural
                 workplaces become the norm, but the EU will remain as an internal labour market. Secularisation
                 progresses, and people’s ideologies become more varied.
             h)  Because of insufficient action, climate change and environmental problems are not under control
                 (for instance, the carbon emission reduction requirement is over 80%). In the 2030’s, the concerns
                 become serious: for example, radical emission reduction measures have to be taken. This has a signifi-
                 cant impact on working life as well as everyday life.
             i)  Various fields of technology, including information technology, genetics, and biotechnology, move
                 forward in great strides (for example, connecting a human brain to a computer) and aid in develop-
                 ment of work methods and equipment. Professional and managerial staff are the forerunners in this
                 development.
             j) Asian, African, and Latin American citizens move toward a European-American model of consumption
                 but can never reach the level of today, because of both the lack of raw materials and environmental
                 problems. In the US and Europe, consumption (and, along with it, working life) undergoes significant
                 changes. In addition to decreasing, it also becomes, for example, low-carbon and resource-efficient.
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k) The era of constant economic growth based on excessive consumption is over in the Western coun-
    tries of today, and the repayment of debts partly brought on by the recession that began in 2008
    will continue to affect households for decades. There is a shift from a mass consumption economy to
    ‘green’ and ‘smart’ economic strategies. The gross domestic product (GDP) loses its central position as a
    standard measurement value, because the world population and the CO2 concentration in the Earth’s
    atmosphere fundamentally determine the prerequisites for the survival of mankind.
l)  Mobility accelerates, and there is large-scale urbanisation because of population growth and overall
    internationalisation, as well as a mix of populations. For instance, large communities of people from
    Asia, Africa and Latin America emerge all over the world. People with a higher education have almost
    unlimited global migration opportunities.
m) The importance of basic human rights is emphasised, as are social responsibility and ethics. Women
    experience a breakthrough in a variety of fields of society, including in the Arab countries, and the
    equality of men too is regarded as important. Democracy is putting down stronger roots and spread-
    ing, China included, although opinions vary about its content.
n) The multipolar world develops: The significance of the United States, the EU, and Japan declines in
    proportion to the growing significance of, for example, Latin America and India. China could become
    the most prominent country in the world in the 2030’s. Europe may have a weaker global position,
    because of the contradictory development in Russia and in some member states of the EU. The ‘free’
    market economy is joined by the successful ‘planned’ market economy. The traditional Western coun-
    tries move from being the beneficiaries of globalisation and the definers of the ground rules to being
    the ones that are challenged.
o) Regional and continental integration between countries increases, but the free trade system and the
    global financial market survive. The membership of the Western Balkan countries, Ukraine, and (in par-
    ticular) Turkey has made the EU more diverse. On the other hand, it has taken additional steps towards
    deep integration and partly harmonised the policy of Member States in some significant fields (such
    as foreign policy, energy and economic policy).


g) EUROCADRES’ key messages concerning EU’s trade policy

The foundation for the EU’s trade policy should be free and fair trade based on a multilateral system. Trading
is an integral resource of welfare and has created a huge number of jobs also for Professional and Managerial
Staff.

International trade should be made more open including the areas of higher knowledge which is of par-
ticular importance for Professional and Managerial Staff (P&MS). Production and export subsidies should
be abolished.

Fair trade systems need to be developed further, and ILO standards should be better incorporated into
the systems. The regulations of the WTO and the EU should enable the implementation of fair trade crite-
ria, for example, in public procurement.

Basic human rights and sustainable development should be included in an appropriate and legally valid
manner in the EU trade and investment agreements, and the system for monitoring these agreements
should be ratified. Also many P&MS do not have the basic rights on the labour market.

EU decision-making processes for the Generalised System of Preferences need to be more transparent;
the ILO should have a stronger role in the assessment of GSP agreements; trade union organisations need
to have a right of appeal in requirement breach cases and compliance with the human rights treaties
related to the system needs to be properly monitored – to enable genuine progress of the participating
countries.

Public services may be included in the WTO agreements, if the advantages of the arrangement are appar-
ent and it will not present any significant disadvantages in provision of these services. The application of
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



24


             EU definition for services, i.e. provided for remuneration, should be assessed as a model for WTO defini-
             tion for services1.

             Coherence between different policy areas is of fundamental importance. Trade policy must be coherent
             not only with the EU’s external policies but also with all the internal policy areas including development
             policies, agricultural policies, energy policies, environmental and climate policies and development of
             global financial governance. EU trade policy should contribute to the promotion of decent work, also for
             Professional and Managerial Staff.

             Bilateral trade negotiations should always be a second option and a push for concluding multilateral
             negotiations should remain. FTA negotiations should be launched with the most important economies
             with certain qualifications.

             Adherence to environmental standards or their neglect will also have a significant impact on the com-
             petition between the EU and other territories around the world. International climate agreements need
             to be strengthened in order to allow carbon taxes on the products of countries that breach or have not
             signed the agreements. The EU should consider this type of taxation as a last resort if response to climate
             change issues does not progress otherwise. Research and development in view of adapting the industrial
             structures to the necessary global greening has to be supported.

             Having knowledge and skills is one of the preconditions for development, employment, and competitive-
             ness in several fields, also on a global scale. It holds a key position in solving a variety of problems as well
             as promoting the status of individual workers and citizens. Worldwide recognition of professional qualifi-
             cations should be facilitated as part of the mobility of workers between the EU and developing countries,
             but this should not result in the lowering of qualification requirements. This issue is of great importance
             for Professional and Managerial Staff.

             Policies related to mobility outside the EU should aim for a shift from ‘brain drain’ to ‘brain exchanges’.
             Europe is not yet an open and inclusive society with global responsibility. Mobility should be beneficial
             for both the source and the target country, and especially for the workers, from the perspective of their
             skills. Also this is a key issues from the point view of Professional and Managerial Staff.

             The EU should contribute to the revision of the WTO’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual
             Property Rights (TRIPS) through a review of the industries it covers and an update of its minimum stand-
             ards. A number of P&MS are in touch with TRIPS.


             h) EUROCADRES´ reply to the Commission consultation on future trade policy,

             1. now that the new lisbon treaty has entered into force, how can we best ensure that our
                future trade policy is coherent with the EU’s external action as a whole and notably in
                relation to the EU’s neighbouring countries?

             Coherence between different policy areas is of fundamental importance. Trade policy must be coherent
             not only with the EU’s external policies but also with all the internal policy areas including development
             policies, agricultural policies, energy policies, environmental and climate policies and development of
             global financial governance. EU trade policy should contribute to the promotion of decent work, also for



             1. The absence of remuneration between the provider and the recipient of a service suggests that this kind of service does not constitute
                a service according to the EU definition (see, for instance, the ECJ cases Belgium v. Humbel and Wirth v. Landeshaupstadt Hannover). In
                other words, a social, educational, cultural or medical service essentially financed out of public funds is not an economic service in the
                EU context. The similar use of remuneration concept in the WTO context may phase out essentially publicly funded social, educational,
                cultural and medical services from GATS agreements.
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Professional and Managerial Staff. EU should create a coherent global strategy that promotes socially,
environmentally and economically sustainable development. The strategy must integrate internal and
external dimensions.

The EU need to form a unified external action service that will emphasise promotion of a more functional
globalisation model as one of its main priorities. The EU should have only one voice in international and
global context and institutions.

Efforts should be made to reach better coherence between the decisions taken in different international
institutions, such as the WTO, ILO, IMF and the World Bank.

2. given the importance of boosting growth, creating more jobs and ensuring a more
   resource efficient and greener economy, how can EU trade policy help? What should
   the new trade priorities be in the light of the Europe 2020 Strategy?

The foundation for the EU trade policy should be free and fair trade based on a multilateral system. Trading
is an integral resource of welfare and has created a huge number of jobs also for Professional and Managerial
Staff P&MS. International trade should be made more open including the areas of higher knowledge which
is of particular importance for P&MS. Production and export subsidies should be abolished.

Basic human rights and sustainable development should be included in an appropriate and legally valid
manner in the EU trade and investment agreements and the system for monitoring these agreements
should be ratified.

The EU should aim to strengthen the governance of globalisation with the following targets: 1) creating
international standards in fields lacking them; 2) establishing new organisations with strong decision-
making capacity; 3) enhancing the capabilities of influence related to civic activities and democratically
elected institutions, including the influence and right to access of trade unions; and 4) by increasing the
transparency of international institutions.

Fair trade systems need to be developed further, and ILO standards should be better incorporated into
the systems. The regulations of the WTO and the EU should enable the implementation of fair trade crite-
ria, for example, in public procurement.

The Article 21 of the Lisbon Treaty which states that the Union’s action on the international scene shall
be guided by the principles which have inspired its own creation, development and enlargement, and
which it seeks to advance in the wider world: democracy, the rule of law, the universality and indivisibility
of human rights and fundamental freedoms, respect for human dignity, the principles of equality and
solidarity, and respect for the principles of the United Nations Charter and international law. The EU trade
policy should reflect these high ideals.

3. in addition to continuing to push for a successful conclusion to the Doha Round, how
   can the EU best pursue overall EU trade policy objectives in the WtO?

Multilateral system must always be a priority for the EU. As said above, efforts should be made to reach
better coherence between the decisions taken in different international institutions, such as the WTO, ILO,
IMF and the World Bank.

The conclusion of the Doha Round with an appropriate social clause would be ideal. As stated above,
basic human rights and sustainable development should be included in an appropriate and legally valid
manner in the EU trade and investment agreements and the system for monitoring these agreements
should be ratified.

Fixing of exchange rates for additional competitiveness at the expense of other countries needs to be
regulated, and, for these purposes, a monitoring system needs to be created and supervised by the IMF
and the WTO.
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



26


             Fair trade systems need to be developed further, and ILO standards should be better incorporated into
             the systems. The regulations of the WTO and the EU should enable the implementation of fair trade crite-
             ria, for example, in public procurement.

             The EU must aim at increasing the transparency of international institutions. The EU should also enhance
             the capabilities of influence related to civic activities and democratically elected institutions, including
             the influence and right to access of trade unions. A permanent trade union advisory committee resem-
             bling the OECD affiliated one (TUAC) should be established in affiliation with the WTO.

             4. Do our current FtA negotiations provide the right geographic and substantive focus
                for our bilateral trade relationships in the context of the Europe 2020 strategy?

             Bilateral trade negotiations should always be a second option and a push for concluding multilateral
             negotiations should remain. FTA negotiations should be launched with the most important economies
             with certain qualifications.

             It is of utmost importance that basic human rights and sustainable development are included in an
             appropriate and legally valid manner in the EU trade and investment agreements and the system for
             monitoring these agreements should be ratified. Breaching basic human rights or sustainable develop-
             ment must not be used as competitive advantage. Also many P&MS do not have the basic rights on the
             labour market, such as right to association or right to strike.

             The EU should absolutely not sign FTAs with countries, such as Colombia, that widely breach basic human
             rights. In Colombia a total of 49 trade unionists were assassinated in 2009, of whom 16 were trade union
             leaders. Attacks, disappearances and death threats continue.

             The EU should not engage in FTA negotiations with least developed countries. Other instruments such
             the Generalised System of Preferences should be used with these countries due to asymmetric trade rela-
             tions.

             5. Should the EU now try for closer economic integration and cooperation with such part-
                ners? What is the best way to further facilitate trade and investment, overcoming regu-
                latory differences that may have the effect of barriers to trade and deepening our trade
                relationships with these important economies?

             The markets of these important economies (the US, Japan, China, Russia) provide great opportunities.
             Reciprocity should be the guiding principle with major strategic trading partners. Russia and other coun-
             tries should be encouraged to finally join the WTO to guarantee a level playing field and reciprocity in the
             opening of markets.

             6. How can the EU improve the effectiveness of regulatory dialogues? How can the EU
                promote the establishment of and greater recourse to international standards without
                compromising legitimate public policy choices?

             Keeping up social and environmental standards as well as the level of quality in services is in the interest
             of the EU. As said, basic human rights and sustainable development should be included in an appropriate
             and legally valid manner in the EU trade and investment agreements and the system for monitoring these
             agreements should be ratified.

             Public services may be included in the WTO agreements if the advantages of the arrangement are appar-
             ent and it will not present any significant disadvantages in provision of these services. The application of
             EU definition for services, i.e. provided for remuneration, should be assessed as a model for WTO defini-
             tion for services.
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                                                                                                                27


7. How can the EU, and in particular trade policy, help to secure a reliable and sustainable
   supply of raw materials by third countries?

The principle of open and fair trade should be applied also in this context. Fair raw material trade is as
basis for sustainability, survival and industrial development.

8. Should the EU aim for more trade in services, and if so, how? Multilateral and bilat-
   eral negotiations have only partially succeeded in opening trade in services so far, so
   would a renewed focus on trade in services among key trading partners (plurilateral
   approach) offer a useful alternative avenue?

yes, services are increasingly important for the EU in terms of job creation and economic value. Reciproc-
ity should be the guiding principle. Keeping the level of quality must also be possible including the level
of qualifications. Worldwide recognition of professional qualifications should be facilitated as part of
the mobility of workers between the EU and third countries, but this should not result in the lowering of
qualification requirements.

As stated above, public services may be included in the WTO agreements if the advantages of the arrange-
ment are apparent and it will not present any significant disadvantages in provision of these services. The
application of EU definition for services, i.e. provided for remuneration, should be assessed as a model for
WTO definition for services.

9. given that the lisbon treaty gives the EU greater competences in international invest-
   ment policy, how should we contribute to facilitating cross-border direct investment
   (both outward and inward)? What are the key issues to be addressed in agreements
   governing investment?

The EU should ensure coherence between investment policy and policies for decent work and sustainable
development.

This far, typically, the interests of investors have been given exclusive access in the process of prepara-
tion, negotiation and implementation of BITs to the exclusion of other stake holders. In the case of dis-
putes arising on the implementation of BITs, only investors have been allowed to complain against the
states concerned, while trade unions in particular have not been given the opportunity to file complaints
against investors violating workers’ rights. Indeed, those rights, as well as environmental protection, have
often been considered as barriers to freedom to invest, and there have been cases of a lowering of stand-
ards to attract investment, in contravention of ILO and OECD requirements in particular.

The shift in the economic balance worldwide also means that Foreign Direct Investment is no longer a
one-way issue, with investors from Northern countries using the BITs to protect their investment in
poor countries of the South. The EU now has to deal with a new dimension involving investment from
Asian, Latin American and African investors into Europe, and the need to maintain the highest Euro-
pean standards.

10. How can trade policy best support green and inclusive growth around the globe
    including through Sustainability impact Assessments?

Even here it is of outmost importance that basic human rights and sustainable development are included
in an appropriate and legally valid manner in the EU trade and investment agreements and the system for
monitoring these agreements should be ratified. Breaching basic human rights or sustainable develop-
ment must not be used as competitive advantage.

Adherence to environmental standards or their neglect will also have a significant impact on the competi-
tion between the EU and other territories around the world. International climate agreements need to be
strengthened in order to allow carbon taxes on the products of countries that breach or have not signed
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



28


             the agreements. The EU should consider this type of taxation as a last resort if response to climate change
             issues does not progress otherwise.

             The EU’s development aid should be directed to support countries that adhere to the international envi-
             ronmental agreements. Pollution and loss of biodiversity are global threats. The EU needs to support the
             idea of an International World Environmental Organisation, affiliated to the UN, which will receive similar
             authority to the WTO in its field of operations.

             With regard to Sustainability Impact Assessments, the impression of EUROCADRES is that in these proc-
             esses the fundamental rights of workers or effects on jobs are not very widely taken into account. Here,
             the quality of jobs is as important as quantity of jobs. The definition of decent work must come from the
             ILO. Dialogue with different stakeholders should be improved. The role and true impact of Sustainability
             Impact Assessments on negotiations and subsequent FTAs must be evaluated.

             Research and development has to be supported n view of adapting the industrial structures to greening
             economy. This process is a huge challenge, in particular, for P&MS.

             11. given the forthcoming revision of the Common Agricultural Policy and the continuing
                 need to foster a sustainable agricultural sector in Europe, how should EU trade policy
                 develop in this area consistently with the overall objectives of the lisbon treaty?

             Production and export subsidies should be abolished. Subsidies that distort competition and transfer
             unemployment from country to country have to be abolished, and a Global Competition Authority deal-
             ing with cross-border competition issues needs to be formed with rights equal to those enjoyed by the
             European Commission.

             12. How can EU trade policy ensure that the benefits of global value chains are shared by
                 European producers, consumers and jobholders?

             Common global rules should be created for economic activities enabling undistorted competition and con-
             ditions. The EU should strive to eliminate tax havens and automatic taxation data exchange should cover all
             countries. Global tax coordination, cooperation and elimination of unhealthy tax competition are necessary.

             Social responsibility and ethical conduct should be regarded as a natural part of the worldwide oper-
             ations of the EU, employers, and societies. International regulations on social responsibility should be
             revised and strengthened. There are numerous declarations and initiatives related to social responsibility
             and it is important to establish worldwide understanding of their fundamental guidelines, for example,
             with innovative support from the EU.

             Trade union and comparable representative organisation access to information needs to be improved,
             and third-party monitoring of adherence to social responsibility is required.

             Basic human rights and sustainable development should be included in an appropriate and legally valid
             manner in the EU trade and investment agreements, and the system for monitoring these agreements
             should be ratified. Breaching human rights or sustainable development commitments must not be used
             for competitive advantage.

             13. Are existing ‘flanking’ policies sufficient to ensure that the benefits of trade are shared
                 among different people and across different regions and markets in the EU? And how
                 can the EU best ensure, where necessary, that trade and other policies play their part
                 in helping people, sectors and communities adjust?

             Subsidies that distort competition and transfer unemployment from country to country have to be abol-
             ished, and a Global Competition Authority dealing with cross-border competition issues needs to be
             formed with rights equal to those enjoyed by the European Commission.
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Violating workers’ rights or lowering of standards in contravention of ILO and OECD requirements cannot
be option for the EU to pursue. The basic rights of workers are included among the fundamental human
rights, and denying them may also distort competition. Therefore ensuring adherence to these rights
both inside and outside EU is fundamental.

A global tax on financial transactions should be applied to, for example, speculative currency trading in
accordance with the European Parliament guidelines. The funds generated should be directed to employ-
ment, green jobs and educational purposes.

The directive on workers’ right to information and consultation with the European Work Councils should
be applied to all global companies, and Global Work Councils created. The role of P&MS is important for
the implementation of GWCs.

14. How can the EU best strengthen the issue of trade and development in its trade policy?
    Should the EU pursue a more differentiated approach in its trade relations to reflect
    the level of development of particular partners? How should the EU approach the
    issue of trade preferences in relation to the generally low level of EU Most Favoured
    nation (MFn) tariffs, which will further be eroded following the possible conclusion of
    the Doha Round?

The EU should make efforts worldwide to guarantee all workers the right to a minimum level of labour
standards and collective bargaining, and the right to organise. The basic rights of workers are included
among the fundamental human rights, and denying them may also distort competition. Based on the ILO
decent work agenda, the EU should develop a Decent Work Strategy to promote the workers’ rights at the
global level. The concept of a living wage should be included in the EU Decent Work Strategy.

As stated above, basic human rights and sustainable development should be included in an appropriate
and legally valid manner in the EU trade and investment agreements and the system for monitoring these
agreements should be ratified for the the EU to credible in global political arena. The EU should not sign
FTAs with countries, such as Colombia, that widely breach basic human rights. In Colombia, a total of 49
trade unionists were assassinated in 2009, of whom 16 were trade union leaders. Attacks, disappearances
and death threats continue. China is also a problematic country.

The EU should not engage in FTA negotiations with least developed countries. Other instruments such
the Generalised System of Preferences should be used with these countries due to asymmetric trade rela-
tions. EU decision-making processes for the Generalised System of Preferences need to be more transpar-
ent; the ILO should have a stronger role in the assessment of GSP agreements; trade union organisations
need to have a right of appeal in requirement breach cases and compliance with the human rights trea-
ties related to the system needs to be properly monitored – to enable genuine progress of the participat-
ing countries.

15. What initiatives could the EU take and which EU trade policy instruments could we
    mobilise to complement and reinforce the ‘smart’ dimension of the Europe 2020 strat-
    egy and facilitate trade in high-tech goods and services?

Having knowledge and skills is one of the preconditions for development, employment, and competitive-
ness in several fields, also on a global scale. It holds a key position in solving a variety of problems as well
as promoting the status of individual workers and citizens.

The EU should promote in the ILO global skills strategy investments in education, recognition of qualifica-
tions with a view to facilitating mobility and the key role of higher education.

Global ranking lists and classification systems used by institutions of higher education should be revised
on the basis of the OECD work, and, if necessary, UNESCO should also be included in this development
process.
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30


             Worldwide recognition of professional qualifications should be facilitated as part of the mobility of work-
             ers between the EU and developing countries, but this should not result in the lowering of qualification
             requirements. This issue is of great importance for Professional and Managerial Staff.

             The ILO convention on the certification of the skills system should be developed on the basis of an EU
             initiative.

             Worldwide mobility of students, teachers, and researchers between the EU member states and other
             countries, and its prospects, should be significantly improved. Future professionals and managers need
             proper training and experience for international duties. The education targets of the EU Europe 2020
             strategy need to be examined also from the globalisation perspective.

             Policies related to mobility outside the EU should aim for a shift from ‘brain drain’ to ‘brain exchanges’.
             Europe is not yet an open and inclusive society with global responsibility. Mobility should be beneficial
             for both the source and the target country, and especially for the workers, from the perspective of their
             skills. Also this is a key issues from the point view of Professional and Managerial Staff.

             16. How can the EU best safeguard its firms or interests against trading partners who do
                 not play by the rules? Are the existing tools and priorities sufficient to address unfair
                 competition from third countries?

             The EU should contribute to the revision of the WTO’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellec-
             tual Property Rights (TRIPS) through a review of the industries it covers and an update of its minimum
             standards.

             The EU should strive to eliminate tax havens and automatic taxation data exchange should cover all coun-
             tries. Global tax coordination, cooperation and elimination of unhealthy tax competition are necessary.
             A global tax on financial transactions should be applied to, for example, speculative currency trading in
             accordance with the European Parliament guidelines. The funds generated should be directed to employ-
             ment, green jobs and educational purposes.

             The EU should support a global levy on banks, for example, in view of future financial crisis. Sufficient
             stability of financial markets is possible to accomplish by increasing transparency, limiting speculative
             activities, providing sufficient resources and equipment for monitoring, and limiting the reward system
             for excessive risk-taking.

             Fixing of exchange rates for additional competitiveness at the expense of other countries needs to be
             regulated, and, for these purposes, a monitoring system needs to be created and supervised by the IMF
             and the WTO.

             Subsidies that distort competition and transfer unemployment from country to country have to be abol-
             ished, and a Global Competition Authority dealing with cross-border competition issues needs to be
             formed with rights equal to those enjoyed by the European Commission.

             It is in the interest of the EU to ensure adherence to and compliance with basic human rights and sustain-
             able development goals. Therefore, they must be included in a legally valid manner in EU agreements
             and their monitoring must be ratified. The EU should also insist on putting in place regulations for free
             economic zones to ensure adherence to and compliance with basic human rights.

             17. How can the EU best safeguard its firms or interests against major trading partners
                 who maintain an asymmetric level of openness and resort to protectionist measures?
                 Are the existing tools and priorities sufficient to address practices such as keeping
                 EU suppliers out of government procurement markets, market access restrictions,
                 restricted and insecure access to energy and raw materials?
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Concluding the Doha Round and FTAs have the potential of contributing to more symmetric openness.

18. What else can EU trade policy do to further improve the protection of iPR in key markets?

The EU should contribute to the revision of the WTO’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual
Property Rights (TRIPS) through a review of the industries it covers and an update of its minimum stand-
ards. A number of P&MS are in touch with TRIPS.

19. What more should the Commission do to ensure that trade policy becomes more trans-
    parent and to ensure that a wide variety of views and opinions is heard in the policy-
    making process? 

Foster regular consultations with major stakeholders, increase transparency of negotiation processes and
decision-making of international institutions and enhance the capabilities of influence related to civic
activities and democratically elected institutions. Trade union and comparable representative organisa-
tion access to information needs to be improved.

20. Are there additional priorities in relation to trade policy that the Commission should
    pursue?

In general, the EU should aim to strengthen the governance of globalisation and to increase the transpar-
ency of international institutions. As said, efforts should be made to reach better coherence between the
decisions taken in different international institutions, such as the WTO, ILO, IMF and the World Bank.


i) EUROCADRES’ opinion of the Proposal for a directive on conditions of entry
   and residence of third-country nationals in the framework of an intra-corporate
   transfer [COM(2010) 378 final]
 
The proposal is one of five legislative proposals on labour immigration that were planned to be adopted
between 2007 and 2009. It is meant for “movements of managerial and technical employees of branches
and subsidiaries of multinational corporations, temporarily relocated for short assignments to other
units of the company.” The aim is to set binding minimum standards. There is a high degree of flexibility
for Member States in implementation. The transfers should be for more than three months to a maxi-
mum of three years for managers and specialists, and one year for graduate trainees.
 
The directive does not apply to third-country nationals that are researchers or third country nationals
posted by undertakings established in a Member State in the framework of a provision of services. Per-
sons entering a Member State under commitments made in an international agreement facilitating the
entry and temporary stay of certain categories of trade- and investment-related natural persons are also
excluded. These categories are also excluded from the scope of EU Blue Card directive.
 
Competence requirements and categories

According to the proposal, the transferee must possess the professional qualifications needed in the
Member State and fulfil the conditions of regulated professions laid down under national legislation.
Competence requirements for the three categories are the same as under GATS commitments of EU-25
including:
•	 managers: senior position, directs the host entity, supervised by the board of directors or equivalent;
•	 specialists: possessing uncommon knowledge essential and specific to the host entity, taking account
    not only of knowledge specific to the host entity, but also of whether the person has a high level of
    qualification referring to a type of work or trade requiring specific technical knowledge;
•	 graduate trainee: higher education qualification and transferred to broaden his/her knowledge of and
    experience in a company in preparation for a managerial position within the company;
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32


             •	 ‘higher education qualification’ means a formal qualification of the successful completion of a post-
                secondary higher education programme of at least three years.
              
             The difference is that the scope of the directive includes all above-mentioned groups, not just the services
             sector and the context of provision of services.
              
             Criteria for admission

             Evidence of employment within the same company for at least 12 months immediately preceding the
             date of the intra-corporate transfer may only be required if the requirement is in the legislation of the
             Member States. However, evidence is required that the transferee will be able to transfer back to an entity
             belonging to that group of undertakings and established in a third country at the end of the assign-
             ment. The proposal only requires that laws, regulations, provisions or universally applicable collective
             agreements applicable to posted workers are met with regard to remuneration. If the transfer from first
             Member State to a second Member State is for more than 12 months, the second Member State has the
             possibility of requiring a new application for the transfer.
              
             Other rules

             The proposal requires applications to be refused for instance if the employer has been sanctioned for
             illegal employment. Host company may be penalized in case of failure to comply with the conditions
             of admission. Member States must decide whether an application is to be made by the company or
             by the transferee. Simplified procedures may be granted for three years for companies on the basis of
             specified information. The applications must be handled in 30 days or in complicated cases in 60 days.
             The handling of applications for family reunification in the first State of residence must be within two
             months.
              
             EUROCADRES’ opinion

             EUROCADRES supports the mobility of knowledge and skills yet at the same time equal treatment must
             be guaranteed. EUROCADRES also supports the stated aims of laying down minimum standards for intra-
             corporate transfers, simplifying the rules across Member States, and quickening the procedure are good
             in principle. In practice however, the labour immigration legislation at the EU level is becoming so com-
             plicated that it is more and more difficult even for experts to manage. The legislation encompasses the
             general framework directive, several sectoral proposals, the directives on posted workers and researchers,
             and commitments under international agreements, among others. As simplification of rules remains a
             declared goal of the Commission, EUROCADRES would like the Commission to seriously consider whether
             the sectoral proposals are heading towards the right direction.
              
             The proposal on intra-corporate transfers has potentially an enormous impact on labour markets in the
             EU and Member States, especially for the professional and managerial staff. However, the labour market
             parties were not properly consulted during the preparation process of the proposal. The consultation was
             organised at a very general level on the Green Paper on an EU approach to managing economic migration
             in 2005, which is simply not enough. A proper directive-specific consultation with labour market parties
             should have followed. EUROCADRES strongly recommends the Commission to engage in consultations
             with the European social partners without further delay.
              
             The proposal allows for transferees to work for a considerable time (up to 3 yrs) with different terms of
             employment and remuneration than those applicable to the host country workers. The period of three
             years is much longer than currently allowed in many Member States. The conditions of employment
             including remuneration would not be governed by host country laws and collective agreements appli-
             cable to host country workers but instead of those applicable to posted works. EUROCADRES demands a
             detailed discussion in why this approach should be chosen and what would be the consequences for the
             labour markets and for the position of professional and managerial staff in the EU and Member States.
              
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According to the proposal, the added-value for Member States is to make the movement of intra-corpo-
rate transfers easier from one Member State to another. The added value must be specified. Third-country
nationals who have been granted an intra-corporate transferee permit in a first Member State shall be
allowed to work in any other entity established in another Member State of the duration of this transfer
does not exceed twelve months. It is not specified which terms of employment would apply in these
cases. Would the proposal allow companies to shop for the cheapest option in terms of remuneration
and other terms of employment? EUROCADRES is of the opinion that same terms of employment and
remuneration must apply than in the host country.
 
EUROCADRES supports the requirement for graduate trainees to present a training agreement and pro-
gramme to ensure the proper use of the system. However, EUROCADRES finds it very problematic in
terms of equal treatment that there is no requirement for graduate trainees to be treated along the
same standards as similar trainees in the host country with regard to conditions of employment and
remuneration.
 
EUROCADRES is of the view that in the absence of a system for declaring collective agreements to be of
universal application, Member States should always base themselves on collective agreements which are
generally applicable to all similar undertakings in the geographical area and in the profession or indus-
try concerned, and/or collective agreements which have been concluded by the most representative
employers’ and labour organisations at national level and which are applied throughout national terri-
tory. No “opt-out” for Member States with regard to their application should be allowed as in the current
proposal. Trade unions must also be allowed to negotiate the rights of the intra-corporate transfers.
 
The proposal does not allow for labour market tests, but Member States may refuse an application on
the grounds of volumes of admission of third-country nationals so the proposal does not give a right for
admission. EUROCADRES would like to know how this relates to the commitments the EU and Member
States have made in GATS and bilateral free trade agreements. Is there a real possibility for Member States
to determine the volume of admissions?
 
From EUROCADRES point of view, the persons entering under the category of specialists should fulfil the
requirement of having at least a high level of qualification mostly acquired through a post-secondary
higher education. Competences corresponding to higher education skills, acquired through certified sys-
tems of life-long learning, could be considered in presence of a recognized certificates.

The current definition for the category of specialists in the proposal is too vague. Similarly, the persons
entering under the category of managers must be better defined as the stated aim is to target managers
working in senior positions. The current definition of a manager as “directing the host entity or a depart-
ment or sub-division of the host Entity, supervising and controlling the work of other supervisory, profes-
sional or managerial employees” could be applied to every manager. EUROCADRES is of the opinion that
the definition is too general and must be reduced to senior managers that “will direct the host entity”. 
 
As the directive concerns transnational companies, EUROCADRES considers it necessary that the Euro-
pean Works Councils get informed and consulted.
 
 
j) Ongoing Bologna - Experiences, challenges, outlook
   (Gerald Musger – Vice President EUROCADRES)

The long-term perspectives of the issue, the complexity regarding structures, contents and stakeholders and
the actual under-representation of social partners’ involvement need analysis, clear decisions and strict focus
on the needs and interests of professional and managerial staff.

Bologna has become a good example of our understanding of an open and integrative Europe: as a syno-
nym for a long way to standardise and harmonise the higher education system, to restructure the aca-
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



34


             demic qualification in a three-steps-system with more or less deep reforms of the university systems, not
             only for the European Union but for a wider Europe with even close relations to other continents. And it
             has become the headline for a new system of credit points in order to get qualification elements through-
             out Europe recognised and to facilitate students’ mobility. Bologna is not only a term for a process but a
             centre-term linked to a bundle of other activities and initiatives, such as the announcement for the “Euro-
             pean Research Area” (DG Research), the European Qualification Framework (EQF) the Lifelong Learning
             initiative, the efforts to establish an EU university ranking system etc.

             EUROCADRES’ involvement in the Bologna process

             Although we were confronted with the fact that “Bologna” is not part of the social dialogue EUROCADRES
             has participated in several meetings of the Bologna (and Copenhagen) process underlining the special
             interests of professional and managerial staff, in particular the impacts on all the reforms on the labour
             market, the recognition of diplomas and informal lifelong learning, the mobility, the research and devel-
             opment areas etc. For details see the Report to the EUROCADRES congress 2009: http://www.EUROCAD-
             RES.org/spip.php?rubrique163.

             In April 2009, during the Conference of European Ministers Responsible for Higher convened to take stock
             of the achievements of the Bologna Process and to establish the priorities for the European Higher Educa-
             tion Area (EHEA) for the next decade. On 12 March 2010, the ministers of the actual 47 countries partici-
             pating in the Bologna Process adopted the Budapest-Vienna Declaration, closed the so-called Bologna
             process 1999-2010 and officially launched the European Higher Education Area:
             •	 http://www.ond.vlaanderen.be/hogeronderwijs/bologna/2010_conference/documents/Budapest-
                Vienna_Declaration.pdf.

             For more information on the Bologna and the Copenhagen processes, important details and follow-up
             visit the following websites:
             •	 http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/highereducation/EHEA2010/BolognaPedestrians_en.asp (Bologna web site);
             •	 http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-policy/doc1134_en.htm (European Quality Assur-
                ance Reference framework for Vocational Education and Training EQARF);
             •	 http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-policy/doc50_en.htm (European Credit system for
                Vocational Education and Training ECVET, an attempt to facilitate the recognition of knowledge, skills
                and competences gained by individuals in different learning environments or through periods of voca-
                tional education and training abroad).

             The Malaga conference organised by the Spanish EU presidency in May 2010 underlined the social dimen-
             sion and responsibility of universities and dealt with the questions of widening access to higher educa-
             tion for underrepresented groups (including lifelong learners and developing flexible learning paths) to
             ensure equity, efficiency and quality in higher education and to explore the ways universities may interact
             with societal demands and community engagement.

             the European Qualification Framework needs integration into labour relations

             ”The European Qualifications Framework (EQF) acts as a translation device to make national qualifications
             more readable across Europe, promoting workers’ and learners’ mobility between countries and facilitat-
             ing their lifelong learning”.

             We must be aware that EQF is not a binding standard, therefore the implications are limited. For the
             national transformations see http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-policy/doc44_en.htm.

             The 3-column-matrix within the EQF allows integrating the social and managerial competences which
             normally are not part of the qualification curricula at school or university but are part of the lifelong
             learning on the job. EUROCADRES underlines the importance of these elements of the EQF which are
             rather underestimated in the more formal approach of the national transformation procedures which are
             looking more or less only at the curricula and diplomas. They can be an important link between qualifica-
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                                                                                                                  35


tion curricula and collective agreement schemes, with the possibility of trans-national transparency, as
shown in the project “Dobrodošli” 2009, with good proposals to improve the actual Transparency Direc-
tive 91/533EEC. For more details see http://www.gpa-djp.at/dobrodosli.

The new EU initiative called “ESCO – European Skills, Competences and Occupations taxonomy” not only
sounds similar to the EQF matrix but also has the aim to link the education and qualification systems
closer to the needs of the labour market. The first stakeholders’ conference in March 2010 unfortunately
again did not include the social partners who could have told the requests from the companies’ and
branches’ side as well as from the trade unions’ side bargaining collective agreements with job descrip-
tions. A test version of website is announced to be available by the end of 2010. Details: http://ec.europa.
eu/social/main.jsp?catId=88&langId=en&eventsId=242&furtherEvents=yes.

A prospective European ranking model for universities

The idea of a “Brussels” ranking index has long been in the air amongst European countries, quite con-
cerned about the underachieving performances of European universities in the world’s two major rank-
ings – the Shanghai Jiao Tong (SJTU) and the Times Higher Education Supplement (THES).

Responding to an invitation by the French Presidency of the EU, the Commission launched in Decem-
ber 2008 a call for tenders to generate its own ranking system for universities. It was won in June 2009
by CHERPA, the Consortium for Higher Education and Research Performance Assessment. Building on
previous EU-funded work on mapping the different strengths and missions of European universities, the
project consists of two stages, a design phase and a testing phase, with final results expected for May
2011.

There is a complex bundle of stakeholders interested in a European ranking system, with various interests
partly controversial. The actual crisis made evident that the aim of developing the research budgets along
the 3% Lisbon Aim will not be reached in every country. Even worse, budgets for universities and higher
education will be frozen or even reduced, with bad social impacts in that area.

EUROCADRES as a social partner underlines the requests and interests of the professional and manage-
rial staff within the universities, the needs of the students as prospective professionals and the needs of
managers who work together with universities as partners in projects or joint ventures.

Therefore EUROCADRES pledges for a multi-dimensional and stakeholder-oriented approach and for the
shift of a “ranking” towards a system of an informative guide and tool for prospective students, graduates
entering the labour market, employers and policy-makers, a benchmark with a clear stress on quality
assurance. Not only the universities but also other academic institutes as Fachhochschulen should be
covered. For status details of the ranking process see http://www.u-map.eu/about.doc/.

For the Berlin model which EUROCADRES supports see http://www.che-concept.de/cms/?getObject=302&
getLang=en.

EURAXESS

EURAXESS - Researchers in Motion - is a one-stop shop for researchers seeking to advance their careers
and personal development by moving to other countries. The EURAXESS web-site (http://ec.europa.eu/
euraxess/index.cfm/general/index) is composed to cover the specific initiatives of mobile researchers.
Researchers can find a wealth of constantly updated information on job vacancies, funding opportuni-
ties and fellowships throughout Europe. Posting their CV will allow recruiters to find them. Companies or
research institutes can post vacancies free of charge and search for the CVs of international top research-
ers. Users can also directly access the national Jobs portals of the 35 partner countries which contain infor-
mation on research job and funding opportunities, as well as on personalised services in each country.
The information and services of EURAXESS can be used as an excellent and steadily updated background
for EUROCADRES Mobil-net activities and advice for our members.
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



36


             Joint university programmes

             make quite clear the actual status, the obstacles, the needs and perspectives of the European integration
             and harmonisation process within the field of higher education, touching a lot of questions from contents
             till certificates and supervision/evaluation. For detailed contents, presentations and results of the confer-
             ence “Too many Cooks in the Kitchen” run in Graz in June 2010 see the conference site:
             http://www.ecaconsortium.net/main/events/documents/joint-programmes:-too-many-cooks-in-the-kitchen/4.

             In particular, the conference announced the launch of a new website interlinking detailed information
             from national or trans-national university programmes covering all Bologna partner countries. This web-
             site is under construction and will provide very good information for students, for researchers or for busi-
             ness partners of universities interested in joint programmes: http://www.qrossroads.eu.

             the try of an outlook: ongoing Bologna, new challenges

             The Meeting of the Bologna follow-up group on 24-25th of August 2010 in Alden Biesen mirrored the
             complexity of the process as well as the problems of the jungles of national, trans-national, European,
             international, private and public authorities. Therefore the group needs a lot of energy to manage proce-
             dures, membership, reports etc accepted by every partner.

             The agenda of the meeting was full of exchange of reports and other information (“taking note of…”).
             Concerning concrete objects of action proposed, some of the items sound quite interesting:
             •	 questionnaire on student and staff mobility;
             •	 setting up a Network of Experts in Recognition of Prior Learning and approve the terms of reference;
             •	 exchange ideas on possible additional working methods and other measures to facilitate the full
                and proper implementation of Bologna principles and action lines across the EHEA, especially at the
                national and institutional levels;
             •	 information provided by the European Commission on the ECTS and Diploma Supplement implemen-
                tation and discuss possible ways forward;
             •	 EUROCADRES will be involved in the follow-up group of Bologna.

             EUROCADRES’ priorities in our efforts to influence Bologna

             EUROCADRES Executive Committee discussed in the October 2010 meeting the actual situation and the
             challenges an decided in debate the following priorities to be followed:

             •	 Cooperation with European trade unions of staff in higher education in order to lobby for improved
                working conditions, contracts and working environment – this aspect seems underestimated
             •	 Lobbying for the interests of professional and managerial staff as consumers, project or business part-
                ners of universities in order to develop the higher education area more suitable to economic and social
                needs, in particular to integrate life-long learning
             •	 Raising our voice as European social partner to underline the needs of European solutions for the lots
                of problems and to prevent falling back into mere national short-term ways out of crisis
             •	 Lobbying for a higher education area with excellent working conditions both for staff and students as
                attraction point for European research in excellence and to prevent brain drain from Europe.
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                                                                                                                                  37


k) Agreement with CEPliS




  AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE EUROPEAN COUNCIL OF THE LIBERAL PROFESSIONS
  (CEPLlS) AND THE COUNCIL OF EUROPEAN PROFESSIONAL AND MANAGERIAL STAFF
  (EUROCADRES) ON THE REPRESENTATION OF THE PROFESSIONS AND PROFESSIO-
  NALS IN THE EUROPEAN SOCIAL DIALOGUE

  PREAMBLE

  Engaged in a mutually enriching collaboration since their joint adoption of a Memorandum of Understanding in 2007,
  the Council of European Professional and Managerial Staff (EUROCADRES) and the European Council of the Liberal
  Professions (CEPLlS), share a common vision of a European Union based on the values enshrined in the EU Charter of
  Fundamental Rights and in the democratic principles included in all the Treaties of the European Communities/European
  Union, and especially in the Lisbon Treaty.
  The two organizations share a common view of the importance of professionalism and of professionals in the building of
  a Single Market based on high-quality of services and respect for ethical and professional standards. In that context, they
  are strongly committed to work energetically to assist towards the achievement of the objectives of the Lisbon Agenda
  aiming at making the Union the most dynamic and competitive knowledge-based economy in the world. Both organiza-
  tions recognize the importance of the European Social Dialogue as a key tool for the realization of this goal.
  In order to deepen and render more efficient their collaboration EUROCADRES AND CEPLlS have agreed the fol-
  lowing:
  1-        EUROCADRES shall inform CEPLIS about all developments and issues related to European Social Dialogue
  topics and especially those with implication for the professions and professionals.
  2-        CEPLIS shall provide EUROCADRES with informed submissions based on expert knowledge to be used in
  the framework of its participation in consultations, negotiations and Opinion-drafting relating to the European Social
  Dialogue. In that context, representations of the two organizations shall meet at least four times a year in order to examine
  Social Dialogue related issues.
  3-        EUROCADRES is committed to represent the positions of CEPLIS at the table of the European Social Dia-
  logue. In case of a difference of opinion on an issue discussed in the framework of the European Social Dialogue, the
  two organizations are committed to discuss in order to reach a common position. In the unlikely possibility of a radical
  difference of opinion, EUROCADRES is committed to communicate the position of CEPLIS to the European Social
  Partners.

  Signed in Brussels, the 22/07/10.

  ForCEPLlS,                                                                                           For EUROCADRES
  Mr. Jacques Reignault, President                                                               Mr. Carlo Parietti, President
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



38


             2. pRoject AnD netwoRks




             2.1. new project processes

             At the Executive Committee meeting on 8 April in Madrid following procedure was adopted to improve
             the selection, planning of applications for EU funds and the visibility of projects.
             1. In order to improve our planning of projects, the yearly EUROCADRES calendar gets fixed items dedi-
                 cated to projects:
                 •	 Call for ideas and proposals for projects of next year at June Executive Committee meeting (this
                    call comprises EUROCADRES projects as well as projects from our affiliated organization in which
                    EUROCADRES should have an active role (resources and/or money);
                 •	 To be sent till September to the presidium at the latest, to give the presidium the possibility to
                    prepare the debate along the criteria “Priority, visibility, timing: Does the idea fit into working pro-
                    gram? What about resources and responsibilities? Target groups for participation? Transfer of out-
                    come? Visible benefit for members?” and under aspects of Resolution B;
                 •	 Orientation on number and subjects of projects for the next year in the October Executive Com-
                    mittee, with clear responsibilities and deadlines for any project, to be worked out according to
                    EU budget call deadlines in spring (3) and summer (2) by our project manager together with the
                    responsible presidium and/or core group members;
                 •	 Debate on transfer of any project result to national and European social dialogue in the Executive
                    Committee; all participating affiliates and the presidium reporting about transfer activities.
             2. Improving the possibilities of electronic feedback loops to the draft applications before finalizing by
                 the president and the project manager.
             3. Short-term decisions on partnership in projects of other applicators should be taken by the presi-
                 dent, after electronic consultation of the Presidium, in particular in case of requested resources. Such
                 projects are part of the actual status report to the Executive Committee. In case a project partnership
                 could cause content problems the executive committee must be asked before for a mandate.
             4. Improving the visibility of any project on the website:
                 •	 Content: responsible Presidium member / project core group;
                 •	 Technical: secretariat;
                 •	 Actual status of all projects on the internal website: project manager.
             5. yearly evaluation of our project activities, processes and transfers including the financial aspects by
                 the presidium with report to and debate in the Executive Committee.


             2.2. StartPro

             In a remarkably short time, the globalisation process has changed the world’s economic order, bringing
             with it new challenges and opportunities. Europe cannot compete in this new environment unless it
             becomes more innovative and responds more effectively to consumers’ needs and preferences. In con-
             trast, the prevalent feeling among StartPro members is mainly that highly-qualified young people are
             tired of knocking on doors, not being given the chance and having to say sorry most of the time. The
             fact that the younger generation is able to think outside the box should be seen as an asset. At the end
             of the day, it is a win-win situation for everyone: reward fresh thinking and initiatives while allowing
             young professionals to gain skills and experience, transform workplaces into learning sites and inspire
                                                                                                    ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



                                                                                                                                     39


young professionals to pursue new ideas that can actually benefit the company, the organization or the
community as a whole.

The conference of StartPro on “Intrapreneurship: Young professionals starting innovation” in Brussels
from 28 to 29 September 2009 and an in-depth seminar on the same issue in Brussels on 24 Febru-
ary 2010 presented innovative work organisation and employee driven innovation as opportunities for
young P&MS and graduates. The concept of intrapreneurship, i.e. enterprising within a given company or
organisation, might just make employees feel more at ease, empowered to unleash their creative poten-
tial but it also clearly a good recipe to attract and retain talent. And from a trade union perspective, it is an
interesting step towards a more egalitarian, participative and decisively innovative workplace. However,
precondition for the creation of an innovative work organization is the involvement of trade unions. They
need to take part in the development and the monitoring of the evolvement of such new work places. It
is their role to give protection to employees and especially to young professionals who start to face their
entrance into a job.

Following outcomes were identified1:
1. Workplaces will keep on changing in the future labour market. The competitive advantage of creative
   initiatives of employees will be one of the elements in distinguishing companies that survive in the
   future. Facilitating intrapreneurship is a strategy to keep the company alive and growing, and will be a
   strategy to save the jobs of all employees.
2. Trade unions have to support intrapreneurship not only for the mere reason that they can save the
   jobs of the employees in the company, they will also make these employees better and give them a
   stronger position within the company and on the labour market. Developing intrapreneurship within
   companies should imply a process of creating better jobs on the work floor, and is the best protection
   for vulnerable workers in the company. Trade unions should actively promote an integral approach of
   intrapreneurship within the company. As investments in lifelong learning activities should be open
   for employees at all levels, intrapreneurship strategies should be focusing on employees in the entire
   company.
3. Creative employees need decent wages and working conditions conducive to creativity. Of course,
   trade unions should be aware that new forms of work organisation do respect the regulations on
   wages and working time. But, trade unions should also try to broaden the scope of social dialogue at
   company level to the development of a creative work environment. In discussing the features of this
   innovative work organisation trade unions can guarantee that all workers will have the opportunity
   to be creative on the one hand and to guarantee that all creative workers are protected on the other.
4. Creativity is not the privilege of a small group of individual professional workers within a company. Best
   practices of intrapreneurship frequently indicated the assets of a collective approach of intrapreneurship
   policies. A collective approach not only means inviting all employees to the innovative action, it presup-
   poses inviting all employees, regardless of their duties, to work together on innovation. Multidisciplinary
   teams could become the building blocks of the future organisations. Professional and managerial staff
   working together with blue and white collar workers in multifunctional teams will facilitate mutual learn-
   ing and motivate employees to be willing, daring and to grasp and undertake initiatives.
5. Trade unions are needed to implement new forms of work organisation. Intrapreneurial policies work
   better when trade unions are involved. Trade union support helps to guarantee the active involvement
   and commitment of all employees in the company, and -of course- has beneficial effects on the posi-
   tive climate in the organisation. Trade unions can use this key position to guarantee that all employees
   are involved in the intrapreneurial plans of the organisation. This will be a lever to make not only the
   members of the R&D department, but all employees better.

A project application was prepared titled “Young professional and managerial staff facing changes in the
work place” and submitted to the Commission in summer 2010. On the day of the writing of this annual
report the project was still pending. However, some of the project background should be presented here:



1. Final brochure of project “Intrapreneurship – A trade union strategy for innovation in European companies” (2010)
   (http://www.eurocadres.org/spip.php?article3649)
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



40


             In the current economic environment change is a constant. Businesses are closing, opening and restruc-
             turing at a pace never experienced before. young employees are often among the most affected by these
             changes because they are the last arrived in the work place and therefore the ones who suffer more
             negative effects and consequences. This project should offer to trade unions officers and employees rep-
             resentatives as well as employer representatives an arena of discussion, to improve their knowledge and
             expertise on the situation of young P&MS during economic changes and restructuring processes and
             to enable them to develop common guidelines for action before, during and after restructuring and
             economic changes. For this reason it is crucial for the project to involve employer as well as employees
             representatives of companies which are in the process of planning company changes as well as those
             which have finished the process of restructuring. Those who have finished their restructuring process can
             give information about what they have learned and what have been good or bad experiences during the
             process of change. Those who are planning their restructuring process or have started will be sensibilized
             through this project to include in their strategy aspects of young P&MS. Thus, the present project wishes
             to focus on following main objectives:
             •	 to raise awareness among trade unions and employer organisations on the consequences of young
                P&MS in restructuring;
             •	 to exchange experiences and to identify the different ways and approaches used by national trade
                unions to tackle the issue of young P&MS in restructuring processes;
             •	 to show potentials of young P&MS during and after restructuring and propose possible solutions on
                how to use these potentials in order to be beneficial for young P&MS and the company;
             •	 to anticipate changes in public and private companies and how this might affect young P&MS;
             •	 to develop guidelines on how to improve and take into account the situation of young P&MS;
             •	 to support the establishment of partnerships especially on national level between social partners;
             •	 to present existing EU initiatives and tools.


             2.3. mobil-net

             EUROCADRES mobility advisers discussed in the seminar “Work migration as brain gain chance for Eu-
             rope” in Brussels on 18 and 19 May 2010. When dealing with mobility of high qualified employees trade
             unions tend to search for the negative effect of mobility and to find solutions for them, e.g. no recognition
             of qualifications and diplomas, unequal working and living conditions for foreign employees, disadvan-
             tages when coming back to the former workplace, transfer of social security rights, etc. However, P&MS
             can produce “brain gain” effects for companies and societies and foremost for themselves if mobility is
             managed in an effective way. One of the main aspects of brain gain is the fact that high qualified people
             will positively contribute to the development of their country of origin through personal and professional
             networks which continue to exist, knowledge will be transferred and new cooperation established.

             Following aspects of mobility trade unions need to deal with have been identified:
             •	 In addition to the classic forms of mobility (job, geographic, career) “project mobility” and “virtual mo-
                bility” are emerging, especially in research professions
             •	 Trade unions should encourage hesitating professionals to realise their chances by providing members
                with good advice and information
             •	 Statistic data about mobility are rare, incomplete and insufficient
             •	 Offering a test period in the new job and country to employees before they make a final decision to
                stay in the new company abroad
             •	 Time supplement for those who want to commute; this would give mobile employees the possibility
                to stay attached to their social surrounding and networks
             •	 Guarantee for getting back into the previous job when returning to country of origin (in cases of mobil-
                ity within a company);
             •	 Tele-working: working from home (or elsewhere) for a company which has its offices abroad.
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                                                                                                                41


2.4.    innovation

EUROCADRES was very active in 2010 on the issue of innovation. Besides the StartPro project on intrapre-
neurship and innovative work organization (see section 2.2.) two additional projects were conduced on
the issue of innovation.

a) “Professional and Managerial Staff taking the responsibility to develop competences
    and attitudes for innovation”

P&MS are the driving force of innovation. Thus, the main objective of the project was to introduce innova-
tion as field of action for trade union representatives and to rise awareness among trade unions that they
have to support their members – P&MS – to develop competences for innovation. P&MS are faced with
the twofold challenge - on the one hand, to fulfil tasks and targets set by the company owners, and on the
other hand, to motivate their subordinates to cooperate. If innovation strategies should be successful, the
executing actors need to be assured that they are taught the proper leadership skills.

Trade union strategies for innovation were discussed in two national seminars – Hungary (14 June 2010)
and Germany (15 September 2010) – and in a seminar involving participants from all Scandinavian coun-
tries (17 May 2010). Following main outcomes of the seminars have been:
•	 Individuals are reluctant to adapt to change because innovation normally leads to a new work organi-
    sation which has an impact on the working conditions of employees. Moreover, the current wave of
    global uncertainty is presenting leaders, organisations and governments with complex challenges,
    which require new ways of thinking in order to overcome the complexities around;
•	 The involvement of the social partners at national and European level is crucial for a successful imple-
    mentation of innovation and creativity;
•	 The implementation of innovation and creativity need to be done in the frame of the European Model
    of Responsible Management. This model is based on a broad range of values, on long-term thinking,
    stakeholder engagement, social accountability and professional development. This means bringing
    companies’ interests and activities in line with employees’ interests and long-term interests of our
    societies. This means offering products and services that contribute to the economic, social and envi-
    ronmental sustainability.

A final conference “innovative Europe to overcome the crisis” will be held on the day of EUROCADRES´
General Assembly on 29 and 30 november 2010.

The project activities were conducted in partnership with ANSE – the Association of National Organisa-
tions for Supervision in Europe.

b) Qualification for “innovation Manager”

The project was conduced under project leadership of Impetus Innovation Management GmbH (consult-
ant company from Germany) and in partnership with Solution4 (consultant company from Hungary), the
Institute of Leadership and Management (training institute from the UK), and EUROCADRES. The main
objective was the development of a qualification module called “Innovation Manager”. Any person se-
lected to manage innovation will require an additional qualification to work efficiently and effectively.
The qualification module is an appropriate instrument to gain knowledge and competences which are
needed to understand innovation processes and their mechanisms of action. The objective is to develop
systematic innovation management which will enable companies to enhance their ability to innovate
significantly. The project succeeded in developing such qualification module with was tested in the pilot
training course “Ready, set, go – make innovation happen – introductory training course for innova-
tion managers” in Brussels on 11 and 12 May 2010.
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



42


             2.5. Restructuring in the public sector

             CEEP worked together with ETUC, EUROCADRES and the sectoral social partner organisations (sectors:
             education, electricity, healthcare, postal services, public transport, railways and public administration)
             to improve expertise in anticipation, preparation and social support during restructuring of Services of
             General Interest (SGIs) in the frame of the project “Anticipation of change in the public services”. The
             aim was to provide a forum where the social partners in SGIs could discuss these themes in depth. On the
             employers’ side the partners included CEMR, CER, EFEE, Eurelectric, HOSPEEM, PostEurop and UITP and on
             the Trade Unions side, EPSU, ETF, ETUCE, Uni-Europa.

             Now more than ever, Public Services are under strong pressure due to the economic and financial crisis
             on the one hand and increased expectations from citizens on the other. The fact that substantial change
             will happen is not questioned. The extent to which the social partners can contribute to the better man-
             agement of change in the interests of those who pay for public services, those who receive them and the
             workers who deliver them will be shaped by how social dialogue develops in the near future. It is also evi-
             dent that in many countries there are increasing tensions in the social dialogue environment associated
             with new financial challenges and their impact on Public Services’ terms of employment and working
             conditions. Increasing service delivery flexibility against a background of reduced income or security is a
             substantial demand to place on workers and poses a significant challenge to those involved in securing
             employee commitment to, and engagement in, the change process.

             Many enterprises and SGIs had to adapt to new challenges. There are numerous reasons for these chang-
             es and among others :
             •	 to improve the competitiveness of enterprises on the world stage;
             •	 to achieve greater customer orientation;
             •	 to respond to new needs;
             •	 to improve the scope and the quality of service;
             •	 to offer best value for citizens’ money;
             •	 to cope with the lower availability of public finance;
             •	 to adapt to technological change;
             •	 liberalisation, privatisation and increasing competition;
             •	 the current economic situation and environmental issues.

             In this overall context, the project findings suggest two practical ways to improve the quality of social
             dialogue and outline two major challenges. Initiatives to improve social dialogue are suggested in the
             following areas2:
               •	 Public services social partners need to influence more the shape and content of EU social policy which
                  takes its reference point today from the medium and large sized private sector companies that gener-
                  ate much of Europe’s wealth, but employ less than 20% of its workers. The social partners participating in
                  the project shared the view that they currently fail to exercise the influence that they might on the shape
                  and content of the cross-sectoral social dialogue at the European level when the economic importance
                  of public services and the size and distinctive nature of the workforces they employ are considered.
                  Whilst this view was shared by both social partners, trade unions believed that better use of existing
                  structures could facilitate solutions. Employers’ organizations however concluded that they needed to
                  establish a new Public Services Employers’ Forum in order to increase leverage at the European level;
               •	 Whilst the challenges faced by the sectors participating in the project and the agendas and work
                  plans of the European level sectoral social dialogue committees in them were essentially similar, ex-
                  changes of information and best practice between them remain very limited. Both sides of the social
                  partnership believed that the creation of a Knowledge Exchange facility with an orientation toward
                  anticipating change and managing it better would help to deepen the sectoral social dialogue. This
                  was particularly the case in those sectors where social dialogue is still in its infancy.



             2. Final final expert report: “Anticipation of Change in the Public Services – Diverse backgrounds …. Common Challenges” (2010) (http://
                www.ceep.eu/images/stories/pdf/AOC/CEEP_finalexpertreport.pdf )
                                                                               ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



                                                                                                                43


Important challenges facing the social partners include:
 •	 The social dialogue at the European level in the participating sectors today does not focus on some
    of the issues that are already of considerable significance, and that are likely to become more funda-
    mentally important over a one to five year time horizon. These include the management of job losses,
    outsourcing and increasing productivity;
 •	 The outcomes of today’s social dialogue in the participating sectors are more oriented toward joint
    advocacy statements aimed toward external stakeholders than they are toward developing a shared
    vision and diagnosis of future challenges and the development of practical tools to help deal with
    them. Whilst advocacy will remain important in a rapidly changing environment, the development of
    a shared vision and development of action oriented solutions will become even more important to
    success.


2.6. new project proposals for 2011-2012

The Executive Committee in October 2010 agreed on following project proposals which will be submitted
in 2011:

a) Excellence in research working conditions in Europe

The initiative of this project should enable trade unions and works council representatives in research in-
stitutes to promote the advantage of European mobility by gathering professional experience throughout
Europe within a contractual framework which will support the career and save rights and thus make for
employees European mobility a real added value for their professional and private life. Thus, the project
will focus on the working conditions within the research and innovation sectors, public and private, aca-
demic and industrial, fundamental and applied. Given a broad variety of individual contracts and collec-
tive agreements at different levels, based on national developments, cultures and legislations, it will be
an enormous challenge for trade unions and their workplace representatives to take a European initiative.
Objectives:
•	 identify common patterns and elements within the contractual diversity
•	 identify the most important elements of contracts which are worth starting a process of harmonizing
    through social dialogue at European level
•	 exchanging experiences in collective agreements in the research sector including all types and levels
    of staff at national level
•	 developing a socio-economic model to compare and assess various and different contractual ele-
    ments
•	 using this socio-economic model to identify best practice and lines of development of agreements
    and contracts
•	 drafting a “European collective agreement declaration of excellence” attractive both for research insti-
    tutes and their employees as an offer for social dialogue with a win-win-perspective.


b) Data protection and privacy in the working life, especially for professional and mana-
   gerial staff

Workers’ data protections and privacy in the working life is one of the emerging key questions in the
world of work. Employers’ right to supervise the email exchange of employees, control them with elec-
tronic equipments such as cameras, use of facebook and access to and distribution of personal health
information and other information concerning private life are examples of topical questions in this field.
There is an ever increasing conflict between the workers’ right to privacy and the employers’ wish to dis-
close and get information about employees’ private life. Data protection and privacy is strongly a P&MS
matter, because they use intensively new data and information equipments and are highly connected
through data networks. Professional and managerial staff have frequently access to information which
is regarded as crucial for business and for other corresponding activities. EUROCADRES adopted a Social
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



44


             Agenda in the March 2010 Executive Committee meeting with an objective concerning workers’ data
             protection. http://www.EUROCADRES.org/spip.php?article377

             Objectives:
             The project would shed light on the national and European situation concerning workers’ data protection:
             what are the problems, national and European legislation, how these questions are tackled at the work-
             place level. The expected results are more information about this topical question, cross-border exchange
             of information, networking of trade union experts in this field, presentation of practical measures to solve
             the problems, identification of (legal) framework and common principles which would be needed at the
             European level.

             Activities:
              •	 Comparative study on workers’ data protection legislation in European countries,
              •	 analysis of practical cases at the work place level,
              •	 expert seminar for EUROCADRES member organisations and the European Commission,
              •	 publication including comparative study, presentation of practical cases and seminar results,
              •	 drafting of outline for EU directive on Data Protection and Privacy in the Working Life.


             c) P&MS and European Works Councils (EWC)

             EWCs have developed very positively in the past years: their number is increasing and some of them
             succeeded in gaining strong information and consultation rights. EUROCADRES considers it as very im-
             portant that P&MS are sufficiently represented in those bodies, taking into consideration the growing
             number of P&MS within the workforce. Further, EUROCADRES considers that P&MS can contribute with
             their competences of management, leadership and languages to the functioning of EWCs. However, on
             European level there is a lack of information about the involvement of P&MS in EWCs: how many of them
             represent P&MS (or employees in general), how many of them are male or female, in which sectors are
             they well/insufficiently represented; which issues related to P&MS are on the agenda of EWCs; etc.

             Objectives:
             •	 to strengthen representation of P&MS in EWC´s
             •	 to strengthen capacities of P&MS in EWC´s
             •	 to develop a database on P&MS


             d) Observatory on P&MS

             There is no European strategy to support mobility, professional and educational development specifically
             of P&MS. This leads to the fact that despite their growing number in Europe and their changing working
             and living conditions there are not sufficient studies and data available in the context of European in-
             dustrial relations. EUROCADRES has observed crucial changes in work organisation and leadership styles.
             Some changes lead to working time flexibility and increased stress at work. Different types of work con-
             tract emerge which are tailor-made to the new work organisation (e.g. project based contracts, bonus
             systems, etc.). Further, the demographic change does not allow any more to neglect women in decision-
             making positions. Formal obstacles for getting into those positions for women are decreasing but male
             networks and the difficulties to balance personal life and work make it difficult for women to stay in
             leadership positions. Finally, all these changes affect the membership of P&MS in trade unions. Some
             examples in Europe show that P&MS do not feel fully represented by traditional trade unions.

             EUROCADRES suggests to create a European observatory monitoring employment, working, training,
             education and living conditions of P&MS with the aim to obtain comparable data about this group of
             employees. All observatories on European level in frame of industrial relations and employment (e.g.
             EIRO, EMCC, EWCO, LMO, EEO) do not monitor and analyse in particular the issue of P&MS. Thus, it is not
             surprising that a European strategy is missing. The observatory should aim primarily to serve the needs
                                                                                ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



                                                                                                                 45


of national and European level organisations of the social partners, governmental organisations and EU
institutions so that they are able to develop legislation, policies and strategies improving the working,
living and mobility conditions of P&MS.

The overall objective of the project is to determine the cornerstones for an observatory. Thus, the objec-
tives of the project itself have a constitutional character for this observatory which are:
•	 to raise awareness of the current working and living conditions of P&MS and to deduce some future
    trends
•	 to demonstrate the important role of P&MS in the industrial relations
•	 to develop the main cornerstones of the methodology and the structure of the observatory
•	 to set up a network of researchers

Such an observatory would mirror the experience of APEC (Association Pour l’Emploi des Cadres) in
France.

Since the aim is to establish an observatory for all P&MS (regardless of their affiliation to trade unions or
not) we plan to work in partnership with CEC.

A specific activity on P&MS could be established within the framework of Eurofound (“Dublin Foundation”).


2.7. FEMAnEt core group members


 Organization             Country                                      name of the candidate

 GPA-djp                  Austria                                      Andrea KAMPELMÜHLER
 LBC-NVK                  Belgium                                      Myriam SCHEVERNELS
 CITUB/KNSB               Bulgaria                                     Chavdar IVANOV
 Akava & STTK             Finland                                      Paula ILVESKIVI
 UGICT CGT                France                                       Christine GUINAND
 CFDT Cadres              France                                       Monique BOUTRAND
 Agenquadri-CGIL          Italy                                        Maura LIBERATORI
 Solidarnosc              Poland                                       Agnieszka LENARTOWICZ-LySIK
 UGT-P                    Portugal                                     Ricardina BRUM CONCECA MACH-
                                                                       ADO JANEIRINHO-GUERREIRO
 CC.OO.                   Spain                                        Ana HERRANZ SAEZ-EZQUERRA
 UGT                      Spain                                        Pilar NIEVA DE LA PAZ
 SACO                     Sweden                                       Charlotta KRAFT
 TCO                      Sweden                                       Kia REGNER
 PCS                      UK                                           to be nominated
 EUROCADRES                                                            Marianne HEIDE
 EUROCADRES                                                            Carlo PARIETTI

Approved on the EUROCADRES Executive Committee on 17 June 2010
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



46


             3. finAnciAl situAtion




             tREASURER’S REPORt On FinAnCiAl MAnAgEMEnt


             EUROCADRES finances are managed under the responsibility of the Executive Committee who has access
             to all necessary documents. Treasurer Patricia Blancard was elected in November 2009.

             Financial year 2009 is a period of transition, since the budget was presented by the treasurer of the previ-
             ous term of office while the results are presented by the treasurer of the new term.

             The Executive Committee on18 June 2010 adopted the closing of the accounts for the year 2009

              EUROCADRES has a system for keeping and auditing:
             •	 the accounting was in 2009 is provided by Jurgen Van Den Wijngaert
             •	 The external audit was carried out by the RSM Interaudit Society.
             •	 Internal audit was made by Harry Van Herpen and Brigitte de Chateau-Thierry elected by Congress

             Among the resources of EUROCADRES, the “Support Program” plays a specific role. The third support pro-
             gram for the period 2006/2009 has provided funding up to of € 424 788,26 including € 100 752,34 re-
             ceived in 2009. The average amount was € 106 197.



                                               3rd support Programme 2006/2009
              years                                         2006           2007            2008           2009
              Number of contributing countries              14             12              13             15
              Amount                                        92 637,55      78 572,54       152 825,83     100 752,34



             This amount is important, however not sufficient to sustain all the EUROCADRES related needs. It is note-
             worthy that some countries have not contributed, unlike EUROCADRES has welcomed contributions of
             some organisations beyond the support programme.

             Moreover, while for the European Industry Federations, for instance, payment is due before March 31 of
             the related year, EUROCADRES receives payments often late. Thus among €100 752.34 corresponding to
             the year 2009 of the support programme, only € 73 289.84 were actually received in 2009. The remainder
             being the balance of 2008, which itself was important because an important part corresponded to the
             year 2007.

             But beyond the financial commitments of members, essential to EUROCADRES performance, EUROCAD-
             RES work is sustained by non financial supports from member organisations.
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                                                                                                              47


Finally, another part of the balance sheet (revenues and expenses) and of our activity is related to the
projects accepted by the European Commission. The project budget is balanced on 2 or 3 years (including
our own contribution), the final repayment balancing the budget.

To sustain the EUROCADRES needs, the Executive Committee in October 2010, has confirmed the support
programme 2010–2013 (decided in January), and has therefore established a working group, which will
make further proposals to improve the membership fee system, to strengthen a balanced budget, to
make more stable, thanks to its members commitment, to sustain the EUROCADRES needs and activities.

The external audit confirms EUROCADRES presented true and fair view of the association’s assets, liabili-
ties. Financial accounts are honest and transparent.

The report of the internal auditors is reproduced below:



Auditor’s report

for the financial year 2009


On 30th September 2010 the undersigned auditors examined the accounts of EUROCADRES at its regis-
tered office, located at Boulevard du Roi Albert II, 5, Brussels.

During their examination, the auditors had access to the income and expenditure accounts for the finan-
cial year 20092, the balance sheets for the years ending 31 December 2008 and 31 December 20092 as
well as the corresponding accounting documents.

They had access to the financial report submitted to the Executive Committee for financial year 2009 and
the budget adopted by the Executive Committee for the financial year 2009.

They also had access to the report on the external audit carried out by RSM International, a company
based in Antwerp (Belgium), dated 31 May 2010.

The relevant explanations were provided by Carlo Parietti (President), Patricia Blancard (Treasurer) and
Jurgen van der Wungaert (Accountant).

The accounting documents and accounts were spot-checked. The auditors declared that the accounts
have been kept properly and are up to date.

Brussels, 30th September 2010



Auditors:


Harry Van Herpen                                                           Brigitte de Chateau-Thierry
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



48


             4. upDAteD list of executive
                committee membeRs,
                pResiDium membeRs AnD
                membeRs of the secRetARiAt

             Executive Committee – List of Members & Substitutes
             elected by the 2009 Congress, with the changes that were required by member organisations after the Congress.


              Country/ Federation      Member                                       Substitute

              Austria                  Gerald Musger (ÖGB-GPA-djp)                  Andrea Kampelmühler
                                       Vice-President                               (ÖGB-GPA-djp)
              Belgium                  Jan De Paepe (LBC-NVK)                       Myriam Delmée (BBTK-SETCa)
              Czech Republic           Eva Janáčková                                Pavel Konečný (ČMKOS OS
                                       (ČMKOS OS – PROJEKT)                         pracovníků vědy a výzkumu -
                                                                                    Science and Research)
              Denmark                  Marianne Heide (FTF), Vice-President         Käthe Munk Ryom (AC)
              Estonia                  Kaido Kaasik (TALO)
              Finland                  Markus Penttinen (AKAVA),                    Pirkko Nikula (STTK)
                                       Vice-President                               Juri Aaltonen (STTK)
                                       Kati Hallikainen (AKAVA/UIL)
              France                   William Lis (UGICT-CGT)                      Virginie Dedenys (FO Cadres)
                                       Patricia Blancard (CFDT Cadres),
                                       Treasurer
              Germany                  Inge Kaufmann (DGB)                          Rolf Schmidt (Ver.di)
              Greece                   Aristotelis Lakkas (INE/OTOE)
              Hungary                  Gábor Szabó (ÉSZT)                           Erzsébet Búzás Putz (ÉSZT)
              Italy                    Carlo Parietti (AgenQuadri CGIL),
                                       President
                                       Federica Cochi (APQ-CISL)
              Ireland                  Peter Nolan (IMPACT)
              Luxembourg               Joël Jung (OGBL)                             Angelo Zanon (OGBL)
              Malta                    Martin Camilleri (GWU)
              Netherlands              Bart Willems (MHP)                           Wolter W. Muller (MHP)
              Norway                   Frode Sandberg (yS)                          Nina Henriksen (FLT)
                                       Åshild Olaussen (UNIO)
              Poland                   Marian Krzaklewski (NSZZ Solidarność),       Agnieszka Lenartowicz (NSZZ
                                       Vice-President                               Solidarność)
              Portugal                 José João Nóbrega Ascenso (UGT)              Mario David Soares (CGTP-IN)
                                                                        ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



                                                                                                         49


Romania               Radu Minea (FSLCRP)
Spain                 Paula Ruiz Torres (UTC-UGT)               Francisco José Garcia Utrilla
                                                                (cc.oo)

Sweden                Britt-Marie Häggström (SACO)              Carin Neanro (SKTF)
                      Kia Regnér (TCO)
United Kingdom        Mike Clancy (Prospect)                    Ian Albert (PCS)
EFFAT                 Dario Campeotto
EFBWW                 Juska Kivioja
EMCEF                 Ari Åberg
EMF                   To be nominated
EPSU                  Maria Helena Rodrigues                    Carola Fischbach-Pyttel
ETF                   Michel Patard, Vice-President             Zdenka Vužić
ETUF.TCL              Patrick Itschert                          Valeria Fedeli
UNI Europa            - Christer Forslund, Vice-President       - Bernadette Ségol
                      - Maria Teresa Seabra                     - Gerhard Rohde

AUDitORS
AUDITORS                     Harry Van Herpen                   De Unie (Netherlands)
                             Tel : +31345851044
                             Email : Harry.van.Herpen@unie.nl
                             Brigitte de Chateau-Thierry        UGICA-CFTC (France)
                             Tel. : +336 47 20 98 73
                             Email : bchateau@capgemini.fr

PRESiDiUM
President                    Carlo Parietti                     carlo.parietti@EUROCADRES.org
Vice-Presidents              Christer Forslund                  christer.forslund@unionen.se
                             Marianne Heide                     Marianne.Heide@ftf.dk
                             Marian Krzaklewski                 mkrzak@solidarnosc.org.pl
                             Gerald Musger                      gerald.musger@gpa-djp.at
                             Michel Patard                      m.patard@ugict.cgt.fr
                             Markus Penttinen                   markus.penttinen@akava.fi
                             Maria Helena Rodrigues             ste@mail.telepac.pt
Treasurer                    Patricia Blancard                  patricia.blancard@cadres.cfdt.fr
Executive Officer            Thomas Janson                      thomas.janson@EUROCADRES.org


WORKing gROUPS
                                                                Responsible
 Working group on gender equality                               Marianne Heide
 Working group on membership fee system                         Gerald Musger
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



50


             BRUSSElS SECREtARiAt


              Carlo Parietti          President                  Phone: +32 2 2240734
                                                                 EMail: carlo.parietti@EUROCADRES.org
              Thomas Janson           Executive Officer          Phone: +32 2 2240732
                                                                 Email : Thomas.janson@EUROCADRES.org
              Slavica Uzelac          Project Manager            Phone: +32 2 224 07 31
                                                                 EMail: slavica.uzelac@EUROCADRES.org
              Fabienne Gandwerg       Administrative Assistant   Phone: +32 2 224 07 30
                                                                 EMail: secretariat@EUROCADRES.org
                                                                                  ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



                                                                                                                   51


5. consiDeRAtions AnD issues:
   A view foRwARD foR euRocADRes




This 2010 Annual Report must first of all be accountable for the implementation of the 2009 Congress
decisions.

As you can read in this report our Executive Committee took decisions on EUROCADRES internal affairs;
sent the EU Commission and the European Parliament opinions in the framework of social partners con-
sultations; started to present projects more consistent with our political aims and to plan for the projects
in 2011; finally, strengthened our representative capacity by signing an important agreement with CEPLIS
on closer cooperation and on representation of the liberal professions in the European social dialogue.

All that work was done meanwhile the EUROCADRES’ secretariat was suffering the lack of an Executive
Officer. For many years EUROCADRES has received an indirect but very important extra contribution from
the Belgian CSC, which allowed us to employ an Executive Officer. We hope that this support will be also
confirmed in future. Just few days ago, thanks to the Swedish TCO, it was finally possible to appoint a new
Executive Officer, Thomas Janson, already well known and regarded with high esteem in the European
trade unionism of white collars and professionals. TCO provides us with a part time engagement of Tho-
mas for several months, during which we will arrange the conditions to employ him full time. This goal
is not only internal: it is actually crucial to allow EUROCADRES to implement its duties in political and
cultural contents.

Also for this reason, and more generally to sustain EUROCADRES, the Executive Committee in October
2010, confirming the Support Programme 2010–2013 (decided in January 2010), has established a work-
ing group, which will make further proposals to improve the membership fee system in order to strength-
en a balanced budget and to make EUROCADRES more stable,

2010 is also the third year of the ongoing economic, social and financial crisis. The global crisis is now at
its third phase, and this time the crisis is mainly burning in Europe. It opened up the political crisis of the
European Monetary Union. The credit market is the new crucial field of the global competition. The glo-
bal financial market forces have now the power to dictate the strategies of the domestic public finances.
It could dramatically weaken the European social model. Domestic deficits are mainly national debts to
foreign investors who are no more the traditional national savers, but the overall financial market forces;
and often those investors are «sovereign funds», owned by authoritarian states, which make profit on our
debts. In the same time the states of the Euro zone have began to compete with each other, based on
debt interests. This kind of financial competition between European states could lead to the turn away
from the perspective towards a more competitive Europe in the global economy.

A progressive harmonisation of the fiscal conditions, social protection and of the policies on education,
research and innovation is the basis also for a sustainable European Monetary Union. Furthermore, the
idea to establish a supplementary pension fund at European level could be quite positive.

It is correct and necessary to say “no austerity”. Nonetheless we have to know that the deficit spending
policies do not mean automatically social provisions and protection. The trade unionism too must have
proposals on where to save, where to find and where to invest money. It would be interesting to think
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



52


             about a EU taxation on the capital gains, rather than about domestic taxes on the financial operations.
             A EU taxation on capital gains would allow the EU budget to invest directly into education and training,
             research and innovation.

             In this spirit we named our annual conference “Innovative Europe to overcome the crisis” and take part in
             the preparation of the 2011 ETUC Congress. No opposition between “no austerity” and “yes innovation”;
             on the contrary: innovation is the condition for avoiding that the market forces force a harsh austerity.

             The implementation of innovation and creativity needs to be granted to any person, and in the first place
             to P&MS, as an opportunity and not as pressure. It needs an involvement of social dialogue and social
             partners in the innovation strategies. Innovation has to become the main issue in the national and Euro-
             pean social dialogue frameworks.

             We could synthesize the overall message of many of our opinions and projects that to defend and to
             improve the social Europe more European society is needed, going beyond the domestic civil societies.
             This is in particular the case regarding the recognition of professional qualifications and more generally
             all the issues concerning mobility; further, the Managerial Social Responsibility as P&MS’ contribution to
             implement Corporate Social Responsibility; a larger involvement of young professionals and of the youth
             in an ageing Europe; and finally gender equality as pivot and generally defining the level of advancement
             of a society and of the EU 2020 strategy.

             The EU 2020 needs social protagonists in order to be a strategy and not just a list of goals. In this respect
             the role of P&MS could be crucial. Europe knows very little about the P&MS’ working conditions, their
             organizational and cultural changes and their needs for education and training. For this reason we will go
             on with the project of the European Observatory on P&MS.

             Professions and professionals have established the first concept of a European model of economy and
             society, contemporaneously or even before the birth of those nation states which now form the European
             Union.

             We think that professions and professionals, with their Responsible European Model of Management, can
             contribute today to the recognition of the European society as a basis for building the political and social
             European Union.
                                                                      ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



                                                                                                       53


6. cAlenDAR of Activities


EUROCADRES´ projects´ events

 Date                   Activity                           Who                  Where
 24 February 2010       StartPro seminar: “young profes-   StartPro             Brussels
                        sionals starting innovation”
 18 March 2010          National seminar in France         EUROCADRES´          Paris
                        “Implementing Cards for the        members
                        recognition of European profes-
                        sional qualifications – A multi-
                        stakeholder approach”
 7 April 2010           National seminar in Spain          EUROCADRES´          Madrid
                        “Implementing Cards for the        members
                        recognition of European profes-
                        sional qualifications – A multi-
                        stakeholder approach”
 13 April 2010          National seminar in Croatia        EUROCADRES´          Zagreb
                        “Implementing Cards for the        members
                        recognition of European profes-
                        sional qualifications – A multi-
                        stakeholder approach”
 15 April 2010          National seminar in Belgium        EUROCADRES´          Brussels
                        “Implementing Cards for the        members
                        recognition of European profes-
                        sional qualifications – A multi-
                        stakeholder approach”
 17 May 2010            Regional seminar in Scandinavia    EUROCADRES´          Stockholm
                        “Responsible management for        members
                        innovation – P&MS taking respon-
                        sibility to develop competences
                        and attitudes for innovation”
 18-19 May 2010         Seminar “Work migration as brain   mobilnet             Brussels
                        gain chance for Europe”
 14 June 2010           National seminar in Bulgaria       EUROCADRES´          Budapest
                        “Responsible management for        members
                        innovation – P&MS taking respon-
                        sibility to develop competences
                        and attitudes for innovation”
 15 September 2010      National seminar in Germany        EUROCADRES´          Mainz
                        “Responsible management for in-    members
                        novation – P&MS taking respon-
                        sibility to develop competences
                        and attitudes for innovation”
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



54


             Events of partner´s projects and other external conferences/meetings

              Date                     Activity                              Who                  Where
              23-26 November 2009      Congress UNSA                         Carlo Parietti       Pau
              1-2 December 2009        ETUC Executive Committee              Carlo Parietti       Brussels
                                       meeting
              4-5 December 2009        OGBL Congress                         Carlo Parietti       Luxembourg
              16-17 December 2009      Swedish EU Presidency - Final         Christer Forslund,   Stockholm
                                       Conference of the European year       Carlo Parietti
                                       of Innovation and Creativity
              12-13 January 2010       CEEP seminar - “Anticipation of       Michel Patard        Brussels
                                       change in public services sectoral
                                       seminar public transport/railways”
              21-22 January 2010       ETUC conference - “Joint study on     Dirk Ameel           Brussels
                                       restructuring in the EU”
              16-18 February 2010      ETUI Education training seminar       Carlo Parietti,      Hamburg
                                       “Goodbye Working Time?                Gerald Musger
                                       How to assess P&MS’ performance
                                       (Monitoring changes in working
                                       conditions for P&MS)”
              22-23 February 2010      CEEP seminar - “Anticipation of       Marja Kaarina        Brussels
                                       change in public services- sectoral   Koskinen
                                       seminar on education and health”
              25 February 2010         European Social Dialogue              Carlo Parietti       Brussels
                                       Committee - Outline of DG EMPL
                                       current and forthcoming work
                                       preparation of the Europe 2020
                                       Strategy
              1-3 March 2010           ETUC Economic Employment              Carlo Parietti       Madrid
                                       Committee - “Facing the crisis:
                                       Is European employment policy
                                       up to the challenge?”
              9-10 March 2010          ETUC Executive committee              Carlo Parietti       Brussels
                                       meeting
              16 March 2010            EU-OSHA European Partnership          Sarah Jane Mellor    Brussels
                                       Meeting
              25 March 2010            Tripartite Social Summit              Carlo Parietti       Brussels
              25-26 March 2010         Spanish EU Presidency - CSR,          Sarah Jane Mellor    Palma de
                                       Conference on the Institutionali-                          Mallorca
                                       zation of the social responsibility
                                       of the enterprises as a result of
                                       the permanent and multilateral
                                       dialogue and its influence on the
                                       improvement of the competitive-
                                       ness of the enterprises
              9 April 2010             Meeting with Spanish EU               Marianne Heide,      Madrid
                                       Presidency on education               Gerald Musger,
                                                                             Carlo Parietti
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                                                                                                              55




15 April 2010          ETUC meeting - European Industry        Carlo Parietti          Brussels
                       Federations and the European
                       social dialogue
29 - 30 April 2010     National Congress AgenQuadri - Cgil     Carlo Parietti          Genoa
5-8 May 2010           Cgil Congress                           Carlo Parietti          Rimini
11-12 May 2010         Impetus Innovation/Solution4/           Dirk Ameel,             Brussels
                       ILM, EUROCADRES´ training course        William Lis,
                       - “Ready, set, go – make innova-        Rolf Schmidt
                       tion happen”
27-28 May 2010         Spanish EU Presidency´                  Carlo Parietti          Málaga
                       “The Social dimension and
                       responsibility of universities”
1-2 June 2010          ETUC Executive Committee                Carlo Parietti          Brussels
8-9 June 2010          ITC ILO seminar - “27 National          Carlo Parietti          Brussels
                       Seminars anticipating and
                       managing restructuring - National
                       Seminar - Belgium”
10-11 June 2010        European Accreditation Network          Gerald Musger           Graz
                       conference - Joint university
                       programmes
16 June 2010           Social Dialogue Committee -             Carlo Parietti          Brussels
                       Social partners’ contribution to
                       the EU2020 Strategy; Social part-
                       ners’ joint work on climate change
                       and flexicurity; Third joint table on
                       the implementation of the Harass-
                       ment and Violence agreement
29 June 2010           DG Employment/seminar of the            Chiara Parisi           Brussels
                       Mutual Learing Programme
                       “The Way Forward - Exit strategies
                       for crisis-related measures with re-
                       gards to the Europe 2020 Strategy”
30 June 2010           CEEP conference - “Anticipation of      Michel Patard           Brussels
                       change in public services”
30 June 2010           Réalités du Dialogue Social             Carlo Parietti          Paris
                       “Les acteurs européens face à la
                       question sociale”
20-28 August 2010      BEST (Board of European Students        William Lis             Sofia
                       of Technology) seminar
                       “University is not enough?
                       Cross the bridge to real world”
2-3 September 2010     ETUC conference - “For a trade          Carlo Parietti          Brussels
                       union version of the New Skills
                       New Jobs initiative”
15-17 September 2010   PERC conference - “20 years of          Gerald Musger           Vienna
                       transition, what now”, Vienna
     ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITy 2010



56

              27-28 September 2010    ETUC conference - “Workplace         Gerald Musger        Brussels
                                      Europe - Trade Unions supporting
                                      mobile and migrant workers”
              4 October 2010          EURAXES - “Where knowledge has       Carlo Parietti       Brussels
                                      no borders”
              4 October 2010          Eurofound - Posted workers:          Slavica Uzelac       Brussels
                                      challenges for Europe
              13-14 October 2010      ETUC – Executive Committee           Carlo Parietti       Brussels
                                      meeting
              16 October 2010         Committee on Employment and          Carlo Parietti       Brussels
                                      Social Affairs of the European
                                      Parliament - Hearing on Green
                                      Paper on Pensions
              19 October 2010         ETUC Congress Preparatory Com-       Carlo Parietti       Brussels
                                      mittee
              25-26 October 2010      ENAEE / EUR-ACE SPREAD final         Carlo Parietti,      Brussels
                                      conference - “European accredita-    Slavica Uzelac,
                                      tion for engineering education –     Pierre Compte
                                      Present and future: which assets?
                                      any liability?”
              27 October 2010         ETUC Migration and Inclusion         Paola Cammilli       Brussels
                                      Working Group meeting
              27 October 2010         European Parliament´s committee      Paola Cammilli       Brussels
                                      on Women´s Rights and Gender
                                      Equality public hearing - “Women
                                      and Business leadership - the last
                                      glass ceiling”
              29 October 2010         Commissioner Andor conference -      Christer Forslund,   Brussels
                                      “Green Paper on pensions”            Carlo Parietti
              29 October 2010         DG Internal Market conference        Slavica Uzelac       Brussels
                                      with professional organisations
                                      – Evaluation of the professional
                                      qualifications directive
              8-9 November 2010       DG Employment thematic review        Slavica Uzelac       Brussels
                                      seminar - “Promoting entrepre-
                                      neurship and self employment
                                      across Europe”
              9-10 November 2010      Belgian EU Presidency - “Careers     Carlo Parietti       Brussels
                                      and mobility of the researchers”
              16 November 2010        European Job Mobility                Paola Cammilli       Brussels
                                      Partnership – “European job
                                      mobility day”
              17-19 November 2010     EURES Working Party meeting          Slavica Uzelac       Antwerp
                                                                           Paola Cammilli
              19 November 2010        AgenQuadri - Cgil Conference:        Carlo Parietti       Rome
                                      Representative capacity without
                                      borders
              29-30 November 2010     Multi-stakeholder Forum on           Michel Patard        Brussels
                                      CSR - Plenary meeting
COUNCIL OF EUROPEAN PROFESSIONAL AND MANAGERIAL STAFF
RAT DER EUROPÄISCHEN FACH- UND FÜHRUNGSKRÄFTE
CONSEIL DES CADRES EUROPÉENS

Boulevard du Roi Albert II, 5 B - 1210 Bruxelles
Tel : +32 2 224 07 30 Fax : +32 2 224 07 33
Web : www.eurocadres.eu
E.mail : secretariat@eurocadres.eu