AN INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND SOCIOLOGY

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					  AN INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND SOCIOLOGY
                            HSP3M
                Grade 11, University/College Preparation
                          TDSB, Martingrove C.I.
                         Revised : September 2009

Credit value:          1..0
Teacher:               Ms. Arban
Curriculum Leader:      Mr. Rakosy
Textbook:               Hawes, Reg, Hawkes, Charles, Holland, Dick, Gerrard, Dennis, and
                       Keirstead, Marc, Images of Society, Mc-Graw-Hill, 2001

The Ontario Curriculum, Grade 11 and 12, Social Sciences and Humanities, 2000


                         SECTION ONE - COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces the theories, questions, and issues that are the major concern of anthropology,
psychology, and sociology. Students develop an understanding of the way social scientists approach
the topics they study and the research methods they employ. Students are given opportunities to
explore theories from a variety of perspectives and to become familiar with current theories on a
range of issues researched by classical and contemporary social scientist in the three disciplines.


                              SECTION 2 - COURSE OVERVIEW

This course engages students in the study of humanity from the perspective of three of the social
sciences: anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students have the opportunity to reflect on their
own personal development, issues of mental health and well being, social influences on behaviour,
the impact of social institutions on their lives, and the challenges facing human cultures. This course
helps students find meaning in the world around them and to understand their own relationship to the
world. Through practical applications, discussions, debates, research, and reflection this course
helps students become self-motivated, creative, and critical problem-solvers.

This is a University/College Preparation course that has no prerequisites and includes content that is
relevant for both university and college programs and related careers. This course is designed to
equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for
specific university and college programs. Teaching and learning emphasize the development of both
independent research skills and independent learning skills. Social science courses give students
essential knowledge and transferable skills that are applicable in various areas of their lives, as well
as in their post secondary studies and in the workplace.
                                     SECTION 3 - STRANDS

The following are the three strands into which the course Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology,
and Sociology is organized:

               Self and Others               Social Structures and Institutions
               Social Organization           Research and Inquiry Skills

                               SECTION 4 - UNITS OF STUDY

       Unit I: Anthropology       Foundations of             Evaluation       Time
                                  anthropology                                Frame
                                  Human Evolution and        Group work,      September
                                  the Future of              debate, essay    to the
                                  Humanity; Genetic          and a test       end of
                                  Engineering                                 November
                                  The Birth of Language
                                  The Great Apes
                                  Cultural Anthropology      Presentation

       Unit II: Psychology        Foundations of             Minor            December
                                  Psychology                 assignments      to the end
                                                             & test           of
                                                                              February
                                  Nature vs. nurture
                                  Feral children and
                                  isolates
                                  Developmental
                                  psychology
                                  Infancy and childhood:
                                  physical, cognitive,
                                  moral and psycho-
                                  social development;
                                  what shapes human
                                  behavior?
                                  The Brain That             Debate and a
                                  Changes Itself             seminar
                                  (neuroplastic changes)
                                   Sigmund Freud
                                   Personality
                                   Mental health
                                   Abnormal psychology      Presentation
                                   (Mental Illnesses)       (or a project)
                                                            Assignments,
        Unit III: Sociology        Foundations of                            March to
                                                             and an
                                   sociology                                 the end of
                                                            interview at a   June
                                                            social agency
                                                            of your
                                                            choice,
                                                            leading to the
                                                            Summative
                                                            (explained
                                                            later)
                                   Social structures and
                                   institutions
                                   Family and family
                                   models
                                   School and educational
                                   reform
                                   Conflict and cohesion
                                   Delinquent behavior;
                                   violence and
                                   aggression
                                   Bullying
                                   Groups and Group
                                   behavior; conformity
                                   Social concerns and
                                   issues


                          SECTION 5: OVERALL EXPECTATIONS

By the end of this course, students will:

·      describe some differences and similarities in the approaches taken by anthropology,
       psychology, and sociology to the concept of self in relation to others;
·      demonstrate an understanding of the social forces that influence and shape behavior as
       described by anthropologists, psychologists, and sociologists;
·      identify and assess the major influences that contribute to an individual’s personal and social
       development;
·      identify social institutions common to many different cultures
·      demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of groups in Canadian society as
       identified by anthropology, psychology, and sociology;
·      demonstrate an ability to locate, select, and organize information from a variety of sources
·      demonstrate an ability to think creatively, manage time efficiently, and work effectively in
       independent and collaborative study

                               SECTION 6 - LEARNING SKILLS

Student learning skills will be monitored and evaluated throughout the year. Factors such as
academic integrity, good attendance, completion of homework, and submission of assignments on
time are critical in achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success. The report card
provides a record of the learning skills demonstrated by the students in the five following categories:

                                        Works Independently
                                            Teamwork
                                           Organization
                                           Work Habits
                                             Initiative

     These learning skills are evaluated using a four point scale: E(excellent), (G) good, (S)
                            satisfactory, and (N) needs improvement.


                      SECTION 7 - ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

Throughout this course, students will be provided with numerous and varied opportunities to
demonstrate the full extent of their achievement of the curriculum expectations, across all four
categories of knowledge and skills.

70% of the grade will be based on evaluations conducted throughout the course, with special
consideration given to more recent evidence of achievement.
30% of the grade will be based on the summative evaluation of the final culminating activity.

All below outlined tasks may have elements that overlap and/or parts that will be included under
different categories (i.e. partly under Knowledge/Understanding, partly under Thinking/Inquiry,
partly under Communication or Application).


The following mark distribution will be applied:
Knowledge/Understand Thinking/Inquiry               Communication            Application
      25%                 25%                           25%                     25%

Knowledge/Understanding:

Test #1 Anthropology
Test #2 Developmental Psychology
Quizzes

Thinking/Inquiry:

Inquiry Method
Social Darwinism
The Whale Rider
The Perfect School
The Cycle of Violence
Minor Assignments

Communication:

Essay: Genetic research
Presentation: World Cultures
The Brain That Changes Itself (seminar)

Application:

Genetic Research (newspaper article/debate)
Isolates (nature vs. nurture)
Psychology Profiles
Who Am I?
Mental Illnesses
Debates

                              SUMMATIVE ASSIGNMENT: 30%
 Students will choose and visit a social agency of their choice
 Students will identify the target group their agency serves (elderly, youth at risk, teenage
 pregnancies, homeless people etc.)
 Students will research the topic relevant to their agency and interview a representative of that
 agency
 Students will analyze the results, present their findings in class and write a report addressing
 the social issue they have researched
                     SECTION 8 - RESPONSIBILITIES FOR CREDIT

1. Each student must prepare for each class by reading and answering the homework questions
    assigned by the teacher.

2. Share information from specifically assigned readings or research with the other members of
   the group or class.

3. Come to class prepared (pen, pencil, notebook and studying materials).

4. To meet the course expectations, each student must
·      write unit tests on the dates scheduled
·      complete all major projects, assignments and the essay
·      attend all classes unless there is a legitimate reason for absence
·      define, organize, research, submit and present a topic of independent study (final
       summative evaluation).


SECTION 9 - ATTENDANCE POLICY, CLASS ROUTINES AND PROCEDURES

Regular daily attendance and punctuality is a must. Students are responsible for catching up on
missed homework and assignments. If you miss a class, you can find all work sheets on the shelf
next to the office door.
Participation in class activities is an important component in learning how to develop the skills
and work habits essential to succeed.
Lateness for school is not a legitimate reason for a missed test.
Students ill on day of a test must provide a properly dated note by a doctor, parent or guardian.
No food or drinks (except water) are permitted in the classroom.
All assignments (except those completed in class) must be typed. I will not accept any
assignment written in pencil.


                                 SECTION 10 - HOMEWORK

Homework will be on the side board for the majority of classes. Make sure that as soon as you
come to class, you write the homework into your Student Handbook. You are expected to do
your homework and to make notes or answer questions on the reading assigned. The taking of
notes is a major part of the learning process as you will learn how to condense and summarize
information and to put source material into your own words.

Homework will be assigned and checked on a regular basis at the beginning of class.
If a student is absent at time of checking, it is up to the student to submit homework to the
teacher at the beginning of the next class.
                                SECTION 11 - EXTRA HELP

I can be found for extra help in history office, room 265A or 267 before classes or by
appointments only at lunch.

				
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