Employability_skills_CPD_P - Excellence Gateway by yaofenjin

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									Skills for Life
Support Programme




  Developing employability
    provision that works
                                   Module 9
                                Participant Pack

                                         March 2010




The Skills for Life Support Programme     CfBT Education Trust   T: 0118 902 1920
is delivered on behalf of the Learning    60 Queens Road         F: 0845 838 1207
and Skills Improvement Service by         Reading                E: sflenquiries@cfbt.com
CfBT Education Trust and partners         RG1 4BS                W: www.excellencegateway.org.uk/sflsp
Skills for Life Support Programme


Contents
                                                                           Page

Handouts                                                                    3

HO1 Employability quiz                                                      3

HO2 Employability quiz answers                                              4

HO3 Reflection and action log                                               5

HO4 Employability skills definitions                                        6

HO5.1 Case study; Burleigh College                                          8

HO5.2 Case study: HMP Young Offenders Institution Hindley                   13

HO5.3 Case study: Exchange Group                                            16

HO5.4 Case study: Bedford Training Group (BTG)                              19

HO5.5 Case study: Strode College                                            22

HO5.6 Case study: City College Brighton & Hove                              26

HO5.7 Case study: Fareham College                                           32

HO6 Diamond nine grid                                                       36

HO6a Diamond nine prompt cards                                              37

HO7 Checklist for a whole organisation approach to employability            38

HO8: Action plan to develop employability provision                         40

HO9: Resources matrix                                                       42

HO10 Prompts and useful resources to support the optional workshops         47

Activity resources                                                          52

R1 Programme models that meet learner needs                                 52

R2 Programme models that meet learner needs                                 58




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Handout No. HO1
Employability quiz
1. What percentage of employers considers employability skills as being essential
   when recruiting graduates?
     48%
     58%
     68%
     78%


2. The top three employability skills as ranked by employers are literacy, numeracy
   and communication skills. Put them in order of preference, with the most
   important first.


3. What percentage of employers considers that they are involved with their
   further/local education college?
     23.3%
         33.3%
         43.3%
         53.3%


4. Of those adults who are unemployed for six months or more, what percentage
   has literacy and numeracy skills below functional levels?
    a.     10%
    b.     20%
    c.     25%
    d.     30%
    e.     40%


Answer True or False to the following statements:
5. Work experience/placements are vital for giving students employability skills.
6. Employers rate vocational skills higher than skills such as communication and
   problem solving.
7. Literacy, numeracy and communication skills are the only skills which define
   employability.
8. All your students and staff know what employability skills are and why they are
   important.


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Handout No. HO2
Employability quiz answers
1. What percentage of employers considers employability skills as being essential
   when recruiting graduates?
   Answer: 78%
    Source: Future fit: preparing graduates for the world of work, CBI 2009.
2. The top three employability skills as ranked by employers are literacy, numeracy
   and communication skills. Put them in order of preference, with the most
   important first.
    Communication skills
    Literacy skills
   Numeracy skills
   Source: Employability Skills Explored, LSN 2008
3. What percentage of employers considers that they are involved with their
   further/local education college?
   Answer: 23.3%
   Source: Employability Skills Explored, LSN 2008
4. Of those adults who are unemployed for six months or more, what percentage
   has literacy and numeracy skills below functional levels?
   Answer: 30%
   Source: A shared Evidence Base – The Role of Skills in the Labour Market, DfES and DWP 2007


Answer True or False to the following statements:
5. Work experience/placements are vital for giving students employability skills.
   Answer TRUE
   Source: Future fit: preparing graduates for the world of work, CBI 2009.
6. Employers rate vocational skills higher than skills such as communication and
   problem solving.
   Answer FALSE
    Source: Employability Skills Explored, LSN 2008
7. Literacy, numeracy and communication skills are the only skills which define
   employability.
   Answer FALSE
   Ask participants for their views. Say that definitions will be given in the next part
   of the session.
8. All your students and staff know what employability skills are and why they are
   important.
    Use this question as a discussion opportunity.




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Handout No. HO3
Reflection and action log
This log is a working document to record your thoughts, ideas and actions as you go
through the session.

Reflections and observations




Action 1




Action 2




Action 3




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Handout no. H04
Employability skills definitions
Most established definitions of employability skills emphasise the importance of
literacy, language, numeracy and IT skills in underpinning a person‟s work
readiness.

    UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), The Employability Challenge

         Self -                Thinking and            Working together           Understanding
      management             solving problems                and                   the business
                                                        communicating




             Using numbers                 Using language                  Using IT effectively
               effectively                   effectively




                                       Positive Approach



In The Employability Challenge, UKCES breaks down the above skills:
Positive approach: being ready to participate, make suggestions, accept new ideas
and constructive criticism, and take responsibility for outcomes
Using numbers effectively: measuring, recording measurements, calculating,
estimating quantities, relating numbers to the job
Using language effectively: writing clearly and in a way appropriate to the context,
ordering facts and concepts logically
Using IT effectively: operating a computer, using basic systems and also learning
other applications as necessary and using telephones and other technology to
communicate
Self-management: punctuality and time management, fitting dress and behaviour to
context, overcoming challenges and asking for help when necessary
Thinking and solving problems: creativity, reflecting on and learning from own
actions, prioritising
Working together and communicating: co-operating, being assertive, persuading,
being responsible to others, speaking clearly to individuals and groups and listening
for a response




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Understanding the business: understanding how the individual job fits into the
organisation as a whole, recognising the needs of stakeholders (customers and
service users, for example), judging risks, innovating, and contributing to the whole
organisation.

The two definitions below are also widely accepted.

Employability skills                               Employability skills are the abilities to
 Positive attitude                                 communicate
 Self-management                                   manage information
 Team working                                      use numbers
 Business and customer awareness                   think and solve problems
 Problem solving                                   demonstrate positive attitudes and
 Communication and literacy                         behaviours
 Application of numeracy                           be responsible
 Application of information technology.            be adaptable
                                                    learn continuously
CBI, Time well spent: Embedding
employability in work experience, March             work safely
2007                                                work with others
                                                    participate in projects and tasks.

                                                   The Conference Board of Canada,
                                                   Employability Skills 2000+, May 2000




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Handout no. HO5.1
Case study: Burleigh College
Developing supported employment pathways for parents with language
barriers

Burleigh College is a private training college, primarily offering business and English
language courses. As part of an LSC pilot running from April 2009 to March 2011,
the college has developed supported employment pathways for parents for whom
English language difficulties are a barrier to employment. To date 278 learners have
been recruited, all in receipt of one or more of Job Seekers Allowance (JSA),
Employment and Support Allowance (ESA), Income Support, Child Tax Credits,
Carers Allowance or as partners of a parent in receipt of such benefits or
allowances.

Learners are recruited:
 through outreach recruitment at Job Centre Plus
 from other programmes offered at the college or in children‟s centres
 through word of mouth
 from the previous client base
 through ALMOs ( Arms Length Management Organisations1)
 through leafleting and advertisement.

Funding is triggered by the number of learner starts, sustained job outcomes where
learners work for eight hours or more for at least 13 weeks, and by quarterly
evaluation reports.

The programme runs for 15 hours per week on a weekly roll-on roll-off basis.
Delivery is one to one and in small groups. While a defined scheme of work gives
structure to the programme and enables staff to accommodate new starters each
week, the programme is delivered flexibly to meet individual learner‟s needs.

Designing a programme that helps to overcome significant barriers to
employment
Manjula2 joined the programme in June 2009. She wants to work as a cleaner. The
particular barriers to employment of this learner group are highlighted by this extract
from her initial information, advice and guidance (IAG) session:

“Barriers to getting the job I want
1. Very limited spoken and written English
2. Health issues
3. Family issues make learning difficult
4. No work experience in this country
5. Lack of cleaning, health and safety and job search vocabulary
6. Very limited knowledge of how to apply for and seek work.”
1
    Responsible for council house management
2
    Not her real name


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The programme has been designed to address the following key employability skills
needs of learners like Manjula:
 language skills in the context of the working environment
 time-management skills: getting used to a structure of attendance and time
   keeping
 organisational skills: arranging family commitments around work and to support
   them to find work that fits in with their family commitments.

Manjula‟s individualised programme has the following goals:
1. Achieve entry level 1 in spoken English within 12 weeks* with particular emphasis
   on listening skills
2. Achieve entry level 1 in reading and writing within 16 weeks*
3. Develop language skills in the context of work with added vocabulary on cleaning
   and health and safety
4. Agree a flexible programme that it is monitored closely and kept to
5. Seek a work placement in the voluntary sector with a supportive employer (to be
   started within eight weeks)
6. Learn how to use other methods of looking for work such as cleaning agencies,
   newspapers or the internet.
*Duration dictated by the programme framework

To meet the needs of its learners, Burleigh‟s provision places a high priority on
partnership working and flexibility to ensure that it remains learner-centred.

Flexibility
The programme accommodates learners‟ parental responsibilities. Courses run
during school hours and where there are childcare problems, learners are not
expected to attend during school holidays. This flexibility means learners can come
back to the programme after holidays and other necessary absences (on other
programmes learners may have to be removed and restart). While reasonable and
achievable attendance requirements are agreed with learners, they are encouraged
to keep to this agreement within a culture of high expectations of attendance and
punctuality linked to employers‟ expectations.

Partnership working
The programme requires a high level of collaborative working between:
 the language teacher
 external IAG staff from Prospects, a provider of IAG in West London which is
   financed through a different funding stream. Staff see learners up to four times,
   about once every six weeks as an integral part of the programme. The outcomes
   of these sessions feed into the employability plan.




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   the employability mentor or „Routeway broker‟
    “Routeway brokers or employability mentors are seen by the LSC as linking
    provision and addressing the „revolving door‟ syndrome. They support the
    learner‟s pathway to employment both on the course and thereafter through the
    progression modules which are planned on the employability plan. They are
    members of the college staff and are typically the pastoral staff/employment staff.
    They are funded within the programme which, because of the long-term
    commitment, has meant shifting some focus of funding from course delivery to
    aftercare. Our Routeway brokers are combining their work with working towards
    an NVQ Level 3 qualification in IAG.”
    Davis Stevenson, Manager, Burleigh College

Following initial assessment to confirm eligibility for the programme, learners‟
language, numeracy and employability and soft skills are diagnostically assessed to
inform the combined individual employment plan and individual learning plan, which
is agreed by the language teacher, the employability mentor and the IAG staff.
Although numeracy teaching is not a funded part of the programme, numeracy
needs identified are met and learners have the opportunity to achieve a numeracy
qualification to enhance their employment prospects.

The employability mentor‟s role is to support the learner to achieve the goals laid out
in the individual employment plan. During her initial IAG session, Manjula records:
“This is how I want my mentor to be involved with me throughout this plan:
 Encourage me throughout this plan
 Help me work out any problems that might come up
 Provide on-going guidance and counselling
 Agree a flexible programme with me and monitor how well I keep to what I have
   agreed
 Check with my language tutor that I am learning the vocabulary for cleaning
   work.”

Language goals are contextualised to the workplace. On the next page is an extract
from Manjula‟s individual learning plan.

Burleigh has found the following teaching and learning resources effective for this
learner group:
 citizenship materials
 games, hot potato etc
 sector-specific learning materials
 E2E learning materials.

Progress is reviewed every three weeks by the language teacher and the
employability mentor. A trained support worker is on hand to provide pastoral and
other support learners may need. There is an exit review which leads to the next
intervention supported and facilitated by the mentor. This process is repeated for
each intervention until the learner finds employment or funding ceases.




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  Learning Goals                                         Activities
 Learn five new           Obtain list of words and meanings from teacher each day
 words a day              Write these words and their meanings in a vocabulary book
 relating to cleaning     Learn the five words a day
 or jobsearch
                          Teacher will test daily on the previous day‟s words and weekly
                          on the week‟s words
                          Use these words where you are able in classroom activities
                          (speaking and listening and writing)
 Talk about yourself      Prepare a two-minute talk about yourself and work as a
 to the class using       cleaner
 new vocabulary           Use some of the new words you have learnt
 particularly in          Practise your talk with your teacher and listen to her
 relation to the          suggestions
 cleaning job you
 want                     Practise parts of your talk that your teacher says could be
                          improved
                          Give your talk to the class and answer questions from them

Meeting local employment needs
There are local employment opportunities in childcare, school support work, retail,
hospitality, food manufacturing and care. Programmes are delivered and designed
with this in mind. Care agencies and school support agencies inform the programme
by providing details of client personal and professional skills required, which are
delivered on the programme. CRB checks are carried out at an early stage of the
programme so that learners can quickly take up employment in workplaces where
this is a requirement. Links with employment agencies help the college to source the
part-time jobs that fit in with their learners‟ childcare responsibilities. Programme
funding allows for uniforms to be purchased for learners accessing work.

Work placements
Learners undertake supervised work placements in adult and child care, retail,
school meals, schools escort services and administration. One of the goals on

Manjula‟s employability plan is to:
 “Undertake a work placement and keep to attendance and time keeping agreed for
that placement. Obtain a reference. Try to communicate in English on placement
wherever possible. This placement can be for 1 or 2 days a week and I will attend
College on the other days.”

Learners typically undertake 10 hours placement work per week for four hours. The
college emphasises the value of work placement as a means of practising the
English skills acquired in college. Work placements are effective where:
 there is a match between the learner‟s employment goal and their placement
 the client is well prepared and supported during the placement
 employers are prepared to spend time investing in the learner


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   employers give placement workers responsibility and treat them as permanent
    members of staff.

Measuring the success of the programme
The programme has a retention rate of 82%: 21% of learners progress into
employment, against a target of 20% (10% full-time and 10% part-time); 60% of
learners achieve a Skills for life qualification against a target of 50%; and 45% of the
learners go on to further study on completing the course.

Challenges
The main challenges arise from Burleigh‟s aim to be flexible and learner-centred to
accommodate individual‟s circumstances, whilst ensuring that individuals attend to
an agreed schedule and develop the time-management and organisational skills
needed to be employable. There are also the challenges of co-ordinating the vital
role played by external IAG staff at Prospects and training the Routeway brokers to
look beyond short-term employment outcomes to developing long-term employment
pathways for the learners beyond the end of the programme.

Burleigh‟s top tips for effective employability skills provision
   Recognise that employability skills can be delivered as part of an ESOL provision
    in generic and sector-specific contexts
   Make the learning fun and interactive
   Include a work-placement element
   Make sure learning goals identified through assessment are expressed and
    developed in an employability context (sector-specific where appropriate)
   Make sure your employability teachers have:
     empathy with unemployed learners
     motivational skills
     the ability to break down a lengthy pathway into manageable chunks to
       motivate learners to achieve.




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Handout no. HO5.2
Case study: HMP and Young Offender Institution Hindley
Developing employability skills through active learning
HMP and Young Offender Institution Hindley is a prison for young people based in
the North West. Most of the young people are only there for an average of 48 days
which means that courses have to be roll-on roll-off and delivered in such a way as
to provide learners with some recognition of their learning. Provision is currently
funded by the Learning and Skills Council. Skills for Life Manager, Amina Bodhania,
has been working on the employability project.

An employability skills pilot project has been developed with learners in the staff
canteen. The learners, who are working towards an NVQ Level 2 in catering, work in
the canteen for five days a week, six hours a day. The canteen is a working kitchen
serving meals and snacks to staff and visitors. Training delivery is spearheaded by
the vocational trainers and experienced chefs Morgan and Scott. One day a week,
Kiera, a Learning Support Practitioner, helps learners to develop their employability
skills. There are plans to develop the model into other vocational contexts.

Specific criteria are applied to the learners who participate on this course.
 They must be on a longer than average sentence.
 They need to have a literacy and numeracy assessment using the PLUS initial
  assessment tool.
 They are interviewed and observed over time to identity their employability skills.
 They have to have a basic food hygiene qualification
 They need to be well-behaved learners with security clearance because they are
  working in a public-facing kitchen mess.

The programme design covers most of the skills identified in the Asset Skills
Employability Matrix (see next page).

At the end of the course the learners get:
 An Employability qualification
 Literacy and numeracy qualifications at the appropriate level
 NVQ L2 in catering

Staff continue to monitor learners‟ NVQ achievements and employment on release
from prison.

What makes Hindley‟s practice effective?
The programme covers all aspects of the Asset Skills Employability Matrix; all
activities are cross-referenced to the development of fundamental, personal
management or team work skills. Although employers are not directly involved in the
design and delivery of the course, the chef (vocational tutor), who has led on the
development of the course and the design of the activities, has extensive
occupational experience including running his own restaurant and working in large


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hotel kitchens, so thus has the right kind of knowledge to identify employability skills
in context. He is supported to deliver the course by a technician and a learning
support practitioner. Hindley already has strong links with employers in other
vocational areas which will be expanded to the staff canteen in the future.

The Asset Skills Employability Matrix
A. Fundamental Skills: The skills needed as a base for further development:
Communication; use numbers; manage information
B. Personal Management Skills: The personal skills, qualities, attributes, attitudes and
behaviours that drives one‟s potential for growth: Demonstrate Positive Attitudes and
Behaviours, Be Responsible, Be Adaptable, Learn Continuously, Work Safely
C. Teamwork Skills: The skills and attributes needed to contribute effectively: The Working
Environment, Work with Others, Think and Solve Problems, Participate in Projects and
Tasks, Customer Care

http://www.assetskills.org/CrossSectorSkills/EmployabilityKeyDocuments.asp


In order to teach employability skills effectively, the staff have identified the following
critical factors:
 Active learning approaches are extremely effective at helping learners develop
     personal management, behaviour management, problem solving and teamwork
     skills as well as building their confidence. The learners do not want to do formal
     learning or to be in a classroom. There is a learning pod attached to the mess
     and, when they are not busy, learners take part in games and activities; an
     element of problem solving and competition keep the learners engaged and
     motivated. Learners‟ feedback indicates that they recognise the value of these
     activities. Said one: “I think the games were fine and a more interesting way of
     learning”
 Time to develop good resources and an active learning approach really pays off
     and needs to be built in to create good quality provision
 Training for staff in active learning approaches3
 Language, literacy and numeracy and employability skills development needs to
     be embedded into a real working context such as the mess, rather than be
     delivered as stand-alone skills
 Partnership working between vocational staff, the head chef and the learning
     support staff both in the development and delivery of the programme
 Wider partnership working, for example with IAG staff, resettlement staff and
     local employers when arranging work experience through ROTL [Release on
     Temporary Licence]

Supported by their Skills for Life Support Programme Development Adviser, the
team at Hindley has developed a problem solving game. „Build your Empire‟ is set in
a catering context and is mapped to the Asset Skills Employability Matrix.



3
 Training module 5a, Promoting active learning in embedded literacy, language and numeracy, developed
through the Skills for Life Support Programme


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In addition to developing their own active-learning activities and resources, staff have
found the following materials useful:
 LSIS Teaching and Learning Programme resources (formerly Standards Unit) 4
 Thinking through mathematics materials5
 LLU+OLASS numeracy packs6.

Staff at Hindley have faced the following challenges in the design and delivery of
their provision:
 The short length of sentences given to the learners which makes it difficult for
   learners to achieve qualifications. Currently, they target learners who have longer
   sentences
 Finding funding to allow the learning support and Skills for Life tutors to work in
   the mess. To overcome this, they encourage a team approach to delivery with all
   members of staff getting involved
 Funding externally accredited qualifications. They are therefore recognising small
   step achievements using the RARPA7 framework.

Moving forward, staff plan to:
 use the model of partnership working developed with the support of the Skills for
  Life Support Programme for future developments.
 transfer the catering/employability qualification model to other vocational areas
 continue to develop employability-related learning activities
 develop an employability-related credit framework linked to a new individual
  learning plan so that learners can be encouraged to identify and record the
  employability skills they have developed

Contact
Amina Bodhania
Skills for Life Manager
Amina.Bodhania@hmps.gsi.gov.uk




4
  http://tlp.excellencegateway.org.uk/tlp/subject-resources.html
5
  http://www.ncetm.org.uk/resources/8848
6
  http://www1.lsbu.ac.uk/lluplus/
7
  http://www.rarpatoolkit.com/en/rarpa.asp


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Handout No. HO5.3

Case study: Exchange Group
Exchange Group is a large, grade two, national skills and employability provider.
The organisation has a network of training centres and e-learning services for
businesses and individuals. The company runs Learndirect centres in libraries. It
offers Train to Gain, apprenticeships, National Vocational Qualifications and literacy,
language and numeracy programmes as well as a recruitment service and tailored
training. Emma Warren is their Head of Employability.
The company runs its own innovative campaign for learning called „Skill Bill‟,
designed to engage adults in learning.




Response to Redundancy
Response to Redundancy is Exchange Group‟s employability programme, offered to
people who have been made redundant. LSC-funded, the roll-on roll-off, blended
learning programme offers 900 learners a menu of short courses covering:
 business administration
 customer service
 IT entry levels and levels 1 and 2
 management
 personal development including: how to learn, self-development, interpersonal
   skills, managing stress and time-management
 retail
 Skills for Life (literacy, language and numeracy)
 team leading.

Meeting the needs of learners
“Our offer is a mix of vocationally specific and generic courses that can be used
across sectors, covering, for example,. customer service and management. We also
offer training in the personal skills of time-management, team working and IT. Many
of the courses are for as little as three to six hours, which attract busy and also
reluctant learners to give it a try. Nearly half our learners will go on to do more than
45 guided learning hours once they have built their confidence.”
Emma Warren, Head of Employability.

Learners have one-to-one tutor support or group sessions and use e-learning
packages as well. Interactive and customised materials engage learners in a
personalised programme which suits their level, e.g. Interviews - body language


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cards. The in-house employability questionnaire identifies learners‟ personal
development areas at the outset.
Working with employers
Employers have been involved in the design of the Response to Redundancy programme
defining what the skills gaps were in their workforce and what the skills needs were for the
future. Partnership work with employers has identified an opportunity for care sector
training in Leicester. Effective employer partnerships are established through careful
listening to match employers‟ needs with a tailored offer.

Using local labour market information
“We look for significant indicators about business sectors. Our Wolverhampton
centre has just introduced call centre pre-employment courses. Labour market
information shows this is an expanding sector with real job vacancies in the West
Midlands.”
Emma Warren

Embedding Skills for Life
Skills for Life are made meaningful by putting them into context so that learners see how
they are vital to getting and keeping a job. The company‟s Skills for Life co-ordinator has
designed a series of literacy and numeracy level 1 and level 2 workbooks as part of
Exchange Group‟s involvement in the LSIS Skills for Life Support Programme this year.
These have Skills for Life embedded into employability activities.

Evidence of success
The model is effective because it promotes learner choice. The building blocks of
short courses can be combined to create longer programmes once learners gain
confidence. The offer includes e-learning but has face to face support to keep
learners on track.
Figures show that 80% of learners achieve and 30% of these go into further learning.
There is an 80% retention rate with 27% of learners goinhg into jobs (out of a target
of 35%).
Challenges
The three key challenges identified by the Head of Employability are:
 identifying learners needs and personalising their learning
 being selective in identifying the right learning content for the course
 selecting the right courses to include to match local skills‟ needs

These challenges are met through:
 listening to learners
   extensive research to find and adapt teaching and learning materials
   identifying industries where people have aspirations of working and also
    providing generic options, e.g. for customer service.




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Lessons learnt
Emma Warren‟s top tips for other providers focus on tailoring the employability offer
very carefully to clients‟ needs. She says: “Make the offer flexible and short; link it to
real jobs and local industries.”




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Handout No. HO5.4
Case study 2 – Bedford Training Group Ltd
A taste of learning, a chance of work




Bedford Training Group Ltd (BTG) is a work-based learning provider with charitable
status. Emerging from Group Training Association (GTA) in 1982, it has always
provided apprenticeships and vocational training to meet the needs of industry. By
recruiting teaching, assessing and management staff from industry backgrounds, it
has helped to keep its profile as an employer-focused organisation that has great
credibility when offering employability programmes.
Based in Bedford, BTG provides E2E opportunities, off-the-job training and
unemployed apprenticeships. The Chief Executive, Alan Gildersleve, himself an
engineer, leads on employability work because he feels it is a key part of his remit to
encourage young people into industry and to show a pride in passing on the skills of
his trade.

The model
The LSC funds BTG‟s E2E provision for 97 learners in the Bedfordshire and Milton
Keynes area. BTG has three centres across the area which were chosen to reflect
the skills needed locally in motor vehicle, construction and engineering manufacture.
This is supported by a holistic model of delivery that takes an unemployed learner
through training and qualifications to work placements and/or apprenticeships. Part
of the success of this model is that it offers unemployed learners „tasters‟ so that
they can try out a range of skills.

BTG also places key skills in Communications (level 1) at the heart of the learning as
this is seen as fundamental to the success of learners both on the E2E programme
and in work. By emphasising key skills early in the vocational learning experience for
all learners, BTG has achieved a 96% success rate; many unemployed learners will
be looking at employment opportunities in very small businesses such as
independent local garages where they will be required to do everything from
answering the phone to filling in MOT records.

Learners are offered tasters in all subject areas, initially for a couple of days for each
area, and then choose the one that interests them most. As an important part of the
model, it helps the learners to see the range of trades available and gives them a
wider understanding of the industry, especially helpful for learners who don‟t really
know what they want to do. Also it helps to keep them engaged and motivated rather
than defensive. Throughout their programme, learners have an E2E mentor to


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Skills for Life Support Programme

support their vocational and literacy, language and numeracy learning as well as
giving them opportunities to talk about external issues which might be affecting their
ability to gain work.


The BTG Model for E2E

                                      Initially assessed for vocational competence
                                       and literacy, language and numeracy skills.
                                                 Introduced to their mentor


   Literacy, language and numeracy


                                        Try out a range of „tasters‟ for 2–3 weeks
                                            in a workshop environment (role
                                             modelling and work simulation)


Literacy, language and numeracy


                                        Mentor support to choose one subject as
                                           their „Skills Builder‟ for 20 weeks
                                              Complete level 1 key skills in
                                                  Communications


Literacy, language and numeracy


                                      Depending on progress, offered unemployed
                                      apprenticeship, work experience or bursary
                                        and given support to prepare for these
                                                     opportunities



What works well?
As well as offering a delivery model that engages the learners in a subject of their
choice, BTG places great importance on a practical approach that embeds
theoretical learning. This integrated method is much more effective than separating
out skills and knowledge since it helps to motivate learners who have had negative
learning experiences and who have expressed a preference to work with their hands.
It also means that opportunities to deliver language, literacy and numeracy occur
naturally as well as providing opportunities to teach employment-focused elements
such as timekeeping, attitude, record-keeping, health and safety and working with
others.




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Skills for Life Support Programme

BTG identifies several factors fundamental to its success:
 The expertise of their staff who have worked in the industry and can offer positive
  role models to unemployed learners
 Their relationship with employers which is built on an understanding of the
  technical and employability needs of the industry
 Flexibility of delivery models and approaches which meets the needs of both the
  learners and prospective employers
 A combination of a skills‟ assessment to test vocational aptitude combined with
  an initial assessment of literacy, language and numeracy needs to ensure
  learners are on the right course with the right support
 The expectation that all E2E learners and unemployed apprentices will gain a
  minimum of level 1 key skills in Communications
 The Board of Governors are all employers who have links with small, medium
  and large employers to ensure that BTG stays up to date with industry needs and
  there are positive links with potential employers
 Choice of geographical location: the delivery centres are within easy reach of
  public transport and BTG offers a free minibus pick-up for learners who are
  outside this transport network.

BTG places great emphasis on being credible with both learners and prospective
employers based on its knowledge of what it is like to work industry – from
establishing a learning environment in their workshops which replicates the daily
routine of work through to tailoring the delivery of learning to address changes in
industry standards. An approach that is employment-focused means that trainers act
as role models for unemployed learners so that they can „learn‟ how to be employed
and can answer questions about work from a position of having “been there, seen it,
got the overalls”.




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Skills for Life Support Programme

Handout No. HO5.5
Case study: Strode College
Supporting prisoners to find employment on release
Strode College in Street, Somerset, has been a provider of education to prisons for
more than 25 years. Currently, the college has 300 staff delivering literacy,
numeracy, ICT and vocational skills to 10 prisons in the South-West: Bristol,
Channings Wood, Dartmoor, Eastwood Park, Erlestoke, Exeter, Guys March, Leyhill,
Portland and The Verne.

Introduction
In 2008, the College was awarded a grant to develop an employability skills pilot first
run at HMP Erlestoke. The pilot was devised by Jane Snedden, Group Manager for
Offender Learning and Skills, as an attempt to give prisoners recognition for the skills
they demonstrated while at work in prison industry workshops where there were no
accreditation opportunities. The end result for prisoners involved would be twofold:
reinforcement of the employability skills they need on the outside to get and keep a
job; and a real reference that could be used in job applications.
Currently seven of Strode‟s prisons offer the 12-week employability programme, four
per year with about 10 roll-on, roll-off learners in each group. The only entry
requirement is that offenders are working in the prison industry workshops – for
example in lighting, construction, potpourri packaging, furniture assembly, print
shops and clothing stores. This group rarely access the education provision and it is
hoped that involvement in the employability skills programme will encourage greater
take up. The prison industry supervisors/and instructors‟ involvement was extremely
important when developing the programme; it encouraged their awareness of the
importance of good employability skills in reducing re-offending.
The programme is advertised and actively promoted by the college tutor, workshop
supervisors, and information, advice and guidance staff

Developing the employability skills programme
Jane and her team began by identifying the key employability skills valued by
employers and therefore needed by their learners. These have since been revised
following feedback from the workshop supervisors/instructors and comprise:
 punctuality
   motivation and concentration
   manner and language
   work independently
   interaction with others
   attention to health and safety in the workplace
   quality of work.




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Delivery model
Because of the key role played by the workshop supervisor/instructor, learners‟
employability skills are assessed during every work session. The employability tutor
meets with the supervisor/instructor each week to discuss learner progress. The
tutor also meets with each learner for 15 minutes every week. At these sessions, the
learner is encouraged to reflect on the skills listed above and discuss with the tutor
their performance on each skill that week. They consider what went well, aspects of
their work that were not up to standard and areas for improvement.
At the start of the programme, learners carry out an employability skills initial
assessment. At the end of the first week, they are expected to re-assess their skills
and to compare their assessment with that of their workshop supervisor/instructor,
identifying areas of strength and areas for improvement (Review of initial
assessment week). There are high expectations of the learners; they are required to
achieve an 80% success rate in each of the target skills every week in order to gain
a reference at the end of the programme.

There are weekly sessions to review progress (Employability skills progress sheet).
The employability tutor uses these sessions to focus on supporting the learner to
develop their weaker skills. They also provide the opportunity to refer the learner to
appropriate education provision, for example to literacy, language or numeracy
provision, one-to-one or classroom-based, or to courses leading to employability
skills qualifications, such as Ready, Steady Work (OCR)
http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/type/vrq/rsw/index.html or NCFE Employability
Skills http://www.ncfe.org.uk/Default.aspx?id=18343

At the end of the course, learners receive a detailed reference.

Learners value the regular opportunities to reflect on and review their progress one-
to-one. They were asked what sort of learning activities helped most to develop their
skills:
“Talking through my work with the tutor.”
“By thinking about what I do rather than just doing it, I can see ways to improve.”
(Learners at HMP Erlestoke)
“Reviewing the working week enabled me to think more about how to handle
situations better.”
(Learner at HMP The Verne)



What makes the model effective?
The course waiting lists, positive feedback from the workshop supervisors/instructors
and the growth of the provision across Strode‟s prisons are all evidence of success.
For example, 15 learners at HMP Erlestoke were asked to rate how useful the
programme has been in increasing their chances of finding and keeping a job on a
scale of 1–5 with 1 being no use at all and 5 being extremely useful. Of these 13
gave a rating of 5.




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Jane and her team feel that the following aspects of the model make it particularly
effective:
 The learner takes responsibility for the initial and ongoing assessment of their
    employability skills
   The skills are relevant to the needs of offenders: “I understand what an employer
    wants from me.” And, “I am more aware of what it takes to be a good employee.”
   It draws offenders who wouldn‟t otherwise access education into learning
   It links together the Education and Employment staff and fits around the existing
    prison regime, making it easy to implement
   The workshop supervisor/instructor plays a key role in the continuous
    assessment of the employability skills
   The employability tutor has a weekly one-to-one with the learner and workshop
    supervisor/instructor to review targets and discuss any issues
   Offenders value the opportunity to leave the programme with a detailed, factual
    reference that will help them to secure employment on release or within the
    prison.

 “I have discovered through comments from learners that the reference is well
received by the various review boards (i.e. parole and D category, etc) so this is a
further incentive to get learners involved.”
Employability tutor at HMP Erlestoke
“People are using the reference not just with a view to getting a job, but also for
character reference (those wishing to be self-employed) and for „political‟ reasons,
e.g. to count for immigration/Offender Assessment System (OASys), etc.
Employability tutor at HMP The Verne


Challenges
The main challenge was to convince the workshop supervisors/instructors of the
value of the initiative. By taking time to explain the purpose of the project and
listening to their suggestions for improvement, the supervisors/instructors are now
fully on board. Ensuring consistency in the way the initiative is being implemented
across the prisons has been a further challenge, requiring rigorous and time-
consuming internal verification processes.


Strode‟s top tips for effective employability skills provision
 Encourage everyone to be involved in planning the programmes and to have their
   say
   Ensure learners are clear about their employability skills‟ targets and their role in
    meeting them
   Embed the literacy and numeracy skills development in activities learners enjoy




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Skills for Life Support Programme

   Ensure your employability tutors have had experiences in business or of
    employing their own staff so that they can draw real-life examples from their own
    experience.

Contact information
Jane Snedden can be contacted at Strode College:
Tel: 07990 685454
Email: jsnedden@strode-college.ac.uk




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Skills for Life Support Programme

Handout HO5.6
Case study: City College Brighton & Hove




“SHINE”: How courses were selected
„SHINE‟ is a project intended to support the longer-term unemployed.
In consultation with JobCentre Plus (JCP), City College Brighton & Hove discovered
that at the time of developing the project Brighton and Hove had 6,881 people
claiming Job Seeker‟s Allowance (JSA) of whom 27% (1,857) had been claiming
JSA for six months or more. An analysis of information, again provided by JCP,
showed that of the 27% most had previously been employed in the construction and
retail sectors or as casual workers in the pubs and clubs in the City. The majority
were believed to have qualifications below level 2, many with literacy, numeracy and
ESOL needs.
Having established the scale of the potential audience for „SHINE‟, the College was
able to access current labour market information (LMI) to help inform their
personalised employment programme (PEP). Working with JCP and the Brighton
and Hove Economic Partnership, the College, identified the sectors that had current
local job opportunities, as well as critically determining the projected labour market
demand. Internal knowledge from the College‟s own skills advisors also proved
invaluable in identifying sectors which presented opportunities for up-skilling. These
included hospitality, the need for legislative training for door supervisors and food
handling training for catering staff. Infection control qualifications were also
identified.

“Shine was based on actual labour market opportunity in Brighton and Hove. We
sought the views of employers, JCP and the economic forum in order to develop it.
Because it is a strong offer which focuses on giving people qualifications to get into
work, it is an expensive offer to deliver; it mostly requires us to hire in specialist
trainers. There are also certificate/registration/ exam fees, specialist student
materials, etc; but it will have an impact and make a difference”.
Vernice Halligan, Head of Employer Engagement City College Brighton and Hove


The College was also mindful of the need to work closely with other local providers in
the area to ensure that the provision they were proposing was not duplicating
existing offers in the City:

“We visited the College and spent time with Donna Keenan to understand their offer
and to explain ours. This gave us all a fuller appreciation of the wider PEP provision
for Brighton & Hove jobseekers, and avoided duplication between our two
organisations”.
Beverley Foard, Centre Manager, Skills South East, Working Links


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Using this information, the College was able to craft a specific proposal informed by
LMI and local knowledge, and set about designing courses that would up-skill and or
re-skill the long-term unemployed in the following sectors: Hospitality (specifically
local hotels – catering/kitchen), Care (including Public Sector), and Call Centres. A
public sector section has also been designed, again generated by demand and
includes training for: Administration, Teaching, and Classroom Assistants.
Key attributes for success
Buy-in
City College Brighton & Hove work in conjunction with the Brighton & Hove City
Employment & Skills Plan (CESP), a plan led by the City Council which is at the very
heart of economic growth for the City.
The plan has four core priorities which are to:
 support the creation, retention and development of local business and enterprise,
 increase the employment rate in the City
 develop and improve Skills for Work
 develop the infrastructure and intelligence to support the delivery of the actions in
    the CESP.

The College plays an active role in the CESP and shares a similar ethos, evidenced
through their mission statement which informs the steer of their work:
“City College will work in partnership to deliver high quality education and training for
today‟s and tomorrow‟s workforce”.

With employer- led provision at the heart of the College‟s strategic focus the „SHINE‟
provision was a natural development in response to the economic turndown.

Strong internal and external partnerships
The success of the programme has been dependent on its strong internal
partnerships. These have included curriculum heads, the Employer Engagement
Department and Planning. Significant partnerships and relationships have also been
built externally enabling purposeful referrals and the capacity to keep up to date with
the ever-changing labour market information:

“Partnership working will be central to the delivery of this programme and we will
actively enhance our relationships with JobCentre Plus, Working Links, the LSC,
Nextstep Advisors and Tourism Futures. We will utilise these relationships alongside
our own well-established employer network to market and recruit to the programme
and to identify viable job opportunities for learners. Through partnership working we
will also be able to ensure that the ongoing programme of training opportunities
meets, and continues to meet, the needs of the local labour market and thus offer
the maximum benefits for the learners engaged on the programmes”.
Vernice Halligan

In developing strong partnerships with local services both strategically and
operationally, the college is mirroring the desired approach for providers working
towards an Integrated Employment and Skills (IES) model:


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“With the launch of the Adult Advancement and Careers Service on April 23rd in
Brighton and Hove, this is a timely opportunity to work with partner organisations to
identify the skills needs of adults who face redundancy or who have recently been
made redundant. The intention is to work, and to continue to work, in partnership
with other agencies, including the Adult Learning Group, Job Centre Plus and the
City Council and to create tailor-made programmes in response to this need”.
Steve Lewis, Head of Higher Education and Adult Learning, City College

WorkSkills
The Edexcel suite of WorkSkills qualifications has been central to the College‟s
„SHINE‟ offer. WorkSkills is a new, suite of BTEC qualifications that has been
designed with flexibility to allow for roll-on roll-off provision. The qualifications are
suitable for learners of all ages and at all stages of their working lives, and aim to
build the „ABC‟ of employability – Attitude, Behaviour and Communication. There are
four skills pathways within the WorkSkills framework: Personal Life Skills,
Sustainable Employability Skills, Work Placement Skills and Skills for Business.
Learners are able to combine units from across these pathways to build
qualifications of different sizes and at different levels.
„SHINE‟ integrates core units of the WorkSkills suite into its offer. These include the
three level 2 units of Applying for a Job, Preparing for an Interview and Searching for
a Job. Those wishing to learn more about running their own business or being self-
employed are sign-posted to three level 2 core enterprise units within the suite,
namely Planning an Enterprise and Running an Enterprise.
The Industry Pathway courses (relating to the sectors identified by LMI) complete the
„SHINE‟ set of courses with suitable progression routes highlighted. The current
offer, qualifications, guided learning hours (GLH) and progression routes are shown
in the table on the next page.
A „SHINE‟ learner typically receives approximately 50 guided learning hours,
although this is dependent on each learner‟s needs and their individual learning
plans. The College considers that the offer has been very well received by those
wishing to re-train with a view to accessing employment in a previously unfamiliar
sector:
“The Edexcel suite of WorkSkills qualifications is particularly flexible and responsive
to a whole range of employment skills needs at a range of different levels. The
College is now a registered centre for these qualifications. It is also an opportunity to
explore more pre-access provision for those learners who might see the current
climate as an opportunity to up-skill and retrain at a higher level with a view to
moving into higher education.”
Steve Lewis




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Industry          Course                      Qualification    GLH         Progression options
sector
Hospitality       Door Supervisor             BIIAB            30          VRQ Level 2 National
                                              National                     Certificate in Door
                                              Certificate                  Supervision
                                                                           VRQ Level 2 Certificate
                                                                           for Security Guards
                                                                           VRQ Level 2 Providing
                                                                           Security
                                                                           VRQ Level 2 Spectator
                                                                           Safety

                  First Aid Appointed         Cambridge        7           Full First Aider Certificate
                  Person                      First Aid                    (HSE Approved)
                                              Certificate
                  Conflict Management         NCFE             40          Door Supervisor BIIAB
                                              Certification                National Certificate
                                                                           VRQ Level 2
                                                                           Certificate in Conflict
                                                                           Management
                  Food Safety in              CIEH Level 2     7           Food Safety in Catering
                  Catering                    Award                        Level 3
                  Food Safety in              CIEH Level 3     21          Food Service NVQ Level
                  Catering Level 3            Award                        2 or Level 3
                                                                           Food Processing NVQ
                                                                           Level 2 or Level 3
                                                                           Professional Cookery
                                                                           NVQ Level 2 or Level 3
Care              Infection Control           EDI Level 2      20          NVQ Level 2 Health &
                                              Award in         + 50        Social Care
                                              Infection        hrs.
                                              Control          Self
                                                               Study
Call Centres      Call Centre Training        TBC              9           Call Centre Operations
                  (Sales/ Telemarketing)                                   NVQ Level 2, 3 or 4




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Organisational challenges and solutions
As with any new development there have been a few teething problems at an
operational level which have needed attention to keep the project moving. Working
across agencies has raised issues around procedures and paperwork and, more
specifically, the need to streamline processes between organisations where possible
to further speed up the service:
“Access to frontline [JCP] advisers is critical and they have been very constructive in
feeding back to us what they think works and what doesn't. We expect them to be
instrumental in developing our offer further. We have to continue to break down the
bureaucracy and be flexible enough to make our systems work together and we are
working on this.
Vernice Halligan

The College has a range of cluster meetings planned with all parties to agree the
best way forward in addressing these challenges and plans to play a central role in
helping to make improvements in this area.

Early into the launch clarification was also needed about the use of single units and
how best to record the information. There was confusion about how single units
might be interpreted by the LSC and how this type of accreditation should be
recorded so to avoid funding errors. Both points were clarified by dialogue between
the LSC and Edexcel, with the LSC reporting that:
“It is, however, perfectly possible to both register for, and achieve, a single
WorkSkills unit. The achievement of a single unit also does not affect a provider‟s
success rates as single units of this type are exempt from that measure. If a learner
has achieved two units out of the three required for the full qualification, then the
third unit should be registered on the ILR as the whole qualification and not the
single unit.
The other two units will then contribute towards the achievement of the full
qualification through the Accreditation of Prior Learning. However, in order to draw
down the correct amount of funding (i.e. not be double funded) field A51a on the ILR
need to be completed. This will indicate the proportion of funding which remains to
be drawn down for the full qualification. Guidance on the completion of the field can
be found in our Funding Guidance. Completion of the full qualification will also
contribute to a provider‟s success rates.
Val Koffman, Kent & Sussex LSC

Capacity has also been an issue to address. „SHINE‟ attracted over 300 referrals
from JCP in the first three weeks of its launch, which led to the College having to
recruit an additional full-time frontline advice and guidance member of staff to work
exclusively on the project. This has taken time and needed managing skilfully to
avoid long waiting lists of those wishing to be seen.

Impact to date
By working through the inevitable challenges encountered as a result of developing a
new offer in a short time frame, the „SHINE‟ project is getting results. In the first three
weeks of the programme the College received 304 referrals from JCP, of whom 258
people have been interviewed, 46 are awaiting interview, 128 have attended


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courses, and a further 130 jobseekers are enrolled on courses. The more popular
courses are: Door Supervisor, Food Safety 2 and 3, Health & Safety and First Aid
Appointed Persons.
In addition, City College recently received a visit from the Director General of the
Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), Adam Sharples, giving the College the
opportunity to showcase their work and approach. The results so far, coupled with
the interest at both national and regional levels, have given the College greater
impetus to roll the „SHINE‟ model out across East Sussex.




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Handout HO5.7
Case study: Fareham College




                     PROSPECTS
„PROSPECTS‟: How courses were selected
In order to respond quickly enough to the „call/invitation‟ from the LSC and
JobCentre Plus (JCP) for support of the long-term unemployed pre-employment and
employment enhancement initiative, the Vice Principal, Nigel Duncan, based the
development of „PROSPECTS‟ on the input of JCP which advised on the
programme content and strategies for engagement.
The development for „PROSPECTS‟ has been based on two main drivers:
 The local market intelligence sourced from the Office of National Statistics
   (NOMIS), supplying official labour market statistics www.nomisweb.co.uk and
   JCP provided information on local job data

     NOMIS provided the intelligence about the number of local people that have
      been unemployed for more than six months

     JCP Job advertisements gave an indication of what local companies were
      looking for, which could be interpreted as an indication of employment
      opportunities

   The capacity, skills and expertise that the College had to offer to match these
    particular needs.


This activity produced a „mix and match‟ draft programme which was then sent to the
LSC and JCP for their comments, whilst simultaneously being shared with
colleagues in the College to secure their buy-in. All such activity was time limited, but
using the LMI in this way produced a very specific offer and one which the College
knows will need refreshing to reflect shifting local need and labour market conditions
as the programme progresses and is evaluated.

The initial personalised employment programme (PEP) offer from Fareham College
has thus been selective, making „PROSPECTS‟ a small yet targeted programme:



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“Better to limit your offer to match the need than to look good with a huge offer, most
of which will not be needed and probably will not run.”
Nigel Duncan, Vice Principal, Fareham College.


Key features for success
The Vice Principal has suggested the following planning tips to ensure delivery of a
successful PEP offer:
 Make sure the expectations of the client group and their support agencies are
   fully understood to prevent there being a mismatch between the programme and
   the needs of the target client group. For this Fareham consulted with those who
   make the referrals to the programme – JCP

   Maintain close working relationships with the referral agencies and establish a
    single link person to manage the relationship. It is very easy to think you know
    what the client group needs, only to find out after very few referrals that it isn‟t
    responsive enough, or doesn‟t have the right courses to offer, etc

   Ensure that there is buy-in across the organisation at all levels and that roles and
    involvement are clearly understood

   Don‟t bite off more than the organisation can chew! A few carefully chosen and
    targeted courses are better than loads that rarely run due to lack of demand

   Expect to have to modify the programme to fit the feedback you will receive from
    the referral agencies that you will be working with.


“It is very early in our delivery of this programme to measure or even predict its
success. Needless to say, we hope that it will meet the needs of the local long-term
unemployed in the area and that we are very open to change the offer to meet the
need”.
Nigel Duncan

Organisational challenges and solutions
For Fareham College there have been two key challenges in developing and
delivering the „PROSPECTS‟ programme. The first has been to adapt the current
college systems to ensure they are sympathetic to the „PROSPECTS‟ offer and
associated clients:
“The single biggest challenge in developing and delivering a programme such as
„Prospects‟ is developing an organisational infrastructure that is responsive and
flexible enough to meet the expectations of the client group and the associated
referral agencies. The planning for this is something that has to be compatible with
other areas of the College‟s provision if the range of provision for all learners is to be
developed in line with their needs”.
Nigel Duncan




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In order to ensure this level of responsiveness the College specially designed their
product, „PROSPECTS‟, and produced a delivery plan to guide activity. Key to this
was the appointment of a project manager who could liaise with key groups, such as
JCP, as well as acting as a named point of contact for learners. The College believes
that good communication has been vital to developing this offer, and maintaining
open dialogue between JCP and the college has helped to grow an effective working
relationship which is yielding genuine referrals. Without this dialogue initial referrals
from JCP were too broad, but now, with greater understanding between both parties,
referrals have became more purposeful:

“At first the enquiries were very general and the Job Seekers Allowance (JSA) clients
didn‟t know what courses we were offering. After visiting the JCPs and giving them a
copy of the courses we were able to offer, we found that the JSA claimants had a
better idea of the courses we were able to offer, so this speeded up the referral
process. I also discussed other opportunities with the JCP staff including work
placements and apprenticeship schemes, which we may be able to help with”.
Claire Middleton, Business Development Manager, Fareham College

College enrolment processes have been amended to ensure a seamless process for
clients. The College has set up a referral procedure to ensure that referrals are
directed to the correct department and that enquiries are dealt with within 24 hours.
A tracking system is being developed to capture learners‟ journeys but critically
linking them with existing college services to assist learners returning to learning:
“My role at the college involves managing and distributing „Discretionary Learning
Support Funding‟ which enables students to enrol on courses if they are facing
financial difficulties, especially those in receipt of benefits. The first hurdle usually
faced by JSA claimants is having to fund exam and registration fees for courses
which are not automatically remitted – these students can apply to our Discretionary
Learner Support Funds to assist with those fees and in most cases do not have to
pay for the fees themselves.
Students can also apply to the fund for help with additional costs such as course
materials, textbooks, protective clothing and childcare costs. Probably the most
significant of these is childcare as many students would not be able to attend college
at all without this ongoing assistance; daily childcare costs can be huge and many
people would not even consider developing their employability skills through
education and training if funding assistance was not available to them.”
Debbie Goodall, Student Welfare Officer, Fareham College

The second significant consideration for the College, which is still on-going, is
providing all year round access to the programme. While the College does work
across the entire calendar year to provide a responsive course offer outside of the
traditional academic year, careful planning is needed to prevent „drift‟ in the costing
model. Initial solutions have been creative and the College is using on-line learning
facilities as appropriate to support learners:
“It is the summer term and therefore most courses are ending. We have been able to
set up some clients with online training over the summer and they could join a formal
course in September”.
Theresa Kemp, Head of Development, Professional Studies



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Skills for Life Support Programme

Impact to date
Even though it‟s still early days there have been areas of real impact as a result of
the provision offer and associated new ways of working. The partnership between
JCP and the College has strengthened, the dialogue between the two organisations
is effective and protocols of working have been established.
Chris Moxam from Gosport JCP has commented that Fareham College responded
quickly and efficiently to enquiries, and stated that her clients have been impressed
by the range of courses Fareham College could offer under the PEP scheme.
The College has reviewed its own systems to ensure customers get an appropriate
response within 24 hours. The tracking system is proving essential in ensuring
learners are helped and guided through the College system and to provide evidence
for job outcomes.
There have been 40 JCP referrals so far, of which three have completed a four-hour
pre-employment course on CV writing and have booked to do another pre-
employment training course. Three have started a short ICT course; six have
completed a short course (of between seven and nine hours) in food hygiene, basic
ICT or first aid; 11 others are booked to complete similar short courses; and 6 other
learners have enrolled on Skills for Life literacy courses.
Work placements, offered as part of the programme, are having a real impact by
offering unemployed people the chance to keep their skills up to date. The College
includes itself in the mix of employers and is currently hosting a learner, Michelle
Parr, who is gaining invaluable experience by helping the college to review its risk
assessments and health and safety policies. Estates Manager Sally Boffee has been
impressed with Michelle‟s attitude to work and hopes that her experience at the
college will enable her to secure a job in this field




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack            35
Skills for Life
Support Programme
Handout HO6 Activity task sheet
Diamond Nine grid
Write the resource you think is most important, when planning for responsive employability
provision, at the top of the diamond, and the least important at the bottom. Now add the
other factors in. Use the cards to help you.


Most important




Least important




The Skills for Life Support Programme    CfBT Education Trust   T: 0118 902 1920
is delivered on behalf of the Learning   60 Queens Road         F: 0845 838 1207
and Skills Improvement Service by        Reading                E: sflenquiries@cfbt.com
CfBT Education Trust and partners        RG1 4BS                W: www.excellencegateway.org.uk/sflsp
Skills for Life Support Programme

Handout HO6a Activity resource
Diamond Nine prompt cards
Staff with the right skills and knowledge          Labour market information


Links with employers to secure credible            Qualifications and accreditation
work placements                                    opportunities


Funding                                            Employability training resources that
                                                   promote active learning

Collaborative partnerships with agencies           Initial assessments for employability,
such as JCP, third-sector groups, local            literacy, language and numeracy
authorities and other providers

Embedding employability into policy and            Systems that track and monitor learners‟
procedures across the organisation                 progress and achievement

Support for learners, for example IAG,             Partnership working across the
tutorials, regular reviews, pastoral               organisation. For example, ensuring
support                                            strong links with the Skills for Life team,
                                                   vocational tutors, marketing and
                                                   business development




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack                     37
Skills for Life Support Programme

Handout HO7
Checklist for a whole organisation approach to employability

Give each statement a grade from 1–5 using the following scale:
1. This aspect is fully developed
2. This aspect is partially developed
3. We have just begun to develop this aspect
4. Development activity has been identified but not begun
5. No development has been identified for this aspect.


1. A clear vision of what employability means in your organisation and what
   you hope to achieve by making it core business
2. A strategy for developing a whole organisation approach to employability
3. The use of local labour market information on employers, jobs and
   employment opportunities to inform strategy and curriculum design
4. A marketing strategy that ensures access to unemployed people and
   other target audiences for employability skills provision
5. A clear plan for moving forward with SMART targets and specified roles
   and responsibilities
6. Employability embedded in strategies, policies and plans, where
   appropriate
7. Buy in, through a shared vision of employability, of:
       senior management team and governing body
       employers
       middle managers
       teachers/trainers/assessors
       learners
8. Identification of the resource implications of making employability a core
   business and of appropriate funds, e.g. Adult Learner-Responsive funding
   and adult support funds
9. Accurate data on the skills profile of your learners
10. Enhanced initial and diagnostic assessment processes that identify the
    specific employability skills needs of learners alongside any language,
    literacy and numeracy needs




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack        38
Skills for Life Support Programme


11. Staff with access to and the skills to use information from initial and
    diagnostic assessment to differentiate learning relating to language,
    literacy and numeracy and employability skills development
12. Partnership working between senior managers, managers and teaching
    staff, and employers
13. Partnership working with local employers to inform curriculum design and
    delivery
14. Partnership working with Jobcentre Plus in order, for example, to gain
    labour market information, increase referrals and improve progression
    opportunities
15. Flexible and sustainable models of delivery that take into account
    organisational structures, staff skills and experience
16. Management information systems that record learning and progression,
    including job outcomes
17. Programmes that focus on workplace skills, attitudes and behaviours
18. Progression pathways from employability courses to further learning,
    employment and other opportunities
19. Timetabling that allows for collaborative planning and working across
    teams
20. A programme of CPD that supports staff to develop the skills to manage,
    support, plan, teach and evaluate employability programmes
21. Quality assurance processes that include a focus on employability




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack       39
Skills for Life Support Programme

Handout HO8: Action plan to develop employability provision
                                                Action plan to develop employability provision
 Development actions         Time-       Who?        Progress                  Outcomes
                                                                                                 Impact
 Audit reference no.         scale                                                               (quantifiable)




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack                                          40
Skills for Life Support Programme




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack   41
Skills for Life Support Programme

Handout HO9: Resources matrix
                               Resource                                                                                       Job roles & topics
                                                                                   Employer                            Adviser                       Employ. Tutor                             L&N Tutor




                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                              Problem




                                                                                                                                                                  Problem




                                                                                                                                                                                                      Problem
                                                                                                    Org self




                                                                                                                                        Org self




                                                                                                                                                                            Org self




                                                                                                                                                                                                                Org self
                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                       Comm




                                                                                                                                                           Comm




                                                                                                                                                                                               Comm
                                                                                                                                                                                       Maths
                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                               Maths




                                                                                                                                                   Maths
                                                                                                    Team




                                                                                                                                        Team




                                                                                                                                                                            Team




                                                                                                                                                                                                                Team
                                                                                                    work




                                                                                                                                        work




                                                                                                                                                                            work




                                                                                                                                                                                                                work
Skills for Business Master Employability Framework                                                                           
http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/VLSP-23098

A Skills Toolkit for Employers (Asset Skills)                                                                                                                                                                  
http://www.assetskills.org/nmsruntime/saveasdialog.asp?lID=494&sI
D=687
BBC Skillswise Website                                                                                                                           
http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/
Contextualised Skills for Life resources from the Key Skills Support                                                                                                                        
Programme
http://www.ngfl-cymru.org.uk/vtc-home/vtc-key_skills-home/vtc-
keyskills-in-vocational-areas
JobcentrePlus: Job Kit                                                                                                                                                       
http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/jcp/stellent/groups/jcp/documents/sit
estudio/dev_015519.pdf
KeySkills4u.com                                                                    
http://www.keyskills4u.com/
Get on at work contextualised materials                                                                                                                                                                     
GOAW contextualised materials




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack                                                                                                                                         42
Skills for Life Support Programme

                               Resource                                                                                                   Job roles & topics
                                                                                   Employer                                         Adviser                                   Employ. Tutor                                        L&N Tutor




                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Team work
                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Problem
                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Org self
                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Comm
                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Maths
Jobcoach                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
http://backtowork.direct.gov.uk/index.html
BBC raw skills for everyday life                                                                                                                                                 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/raw/
Skills for Life Materials for Embedded Learning – e2e Entry to                                                                                                                                                                                              
Employment
http://rwp.qia.oxi.net/embeddedlearning/search.cfm
Supporting improving own learning and performance guide to good                                                 
practice
http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=224070
Initial assessment toolkit – Learning for Work, Key Skills Support                                                                                                                                                                                
Programme
http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/media/KSSP/ia_toolkit_lo_res.
pdf
NCETM Workplace mathematics video clips                                                                                                                                   

https://www.ncetm.org.uk/resources/13735
Move On Learner Route                                                                                                      

http://www.move-on.org.uk/ilr_php/numeracy/welcome.php
Tools Library                                                                                                                                                             

http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/toolslibrary




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack                                                                                                                                                                                  43
Skills for Life Support Programme


                               Resource                                                                                                   Job roles & topics
                                                                                   Employer                                         Adviser                                   Employ. Tutor                                        L&N Tutor




                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Team work
                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Problem
                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Org self
                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Comm
                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Maths
iRoute                                                                                                                             

http://www.move-on.org.uk/intermed_flash.asp
Get on at Work                                                                                                                     

Generic workplace Skills for Life checklist
Improving practice in foundation learning: Could I do that job?                                                                                                                          

http://ntlcp.qia.org.uk/flt/screens/flt_01_02_02_00/page.html
The 14-19 Workforce Support (formerly the Diploma Support                                                                                                                                                                                         
Programme) : Inside work
http://www.diploma-support.org/resourcesandtools/insidework/
Improving practice in foundation learning: Meet the experts                                                                                                                                        

http://ntlcp.qia.org.uk/flt/screens/flt_07_01_00_00/page.html
Vocational learning support programme: The recruitment game                                                                                                                                                                                                   

http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/VLSP29/index.htm
Move On Teacher Route ESOL resources                                                                                                                                                                           

ESOL resources




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack                                                                                                                                                                                  44
Skills for Life Support Programme


                                Resource                                                                                                      Job roles & topics
                                                                                   Employer                                          Adviser                                       Employ. Tutor                                     L&N Tutor




                                                                                                                                                                                                      Team work
                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Team work
                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                                                                            Problem




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Problem
                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Org self




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Org self
                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                                                                     Comm




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Comm
                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Maths
The Teaching and Learning Programme                                                                                                                                                                                                       

http://tlp.excellencegateway.org.uk/teachingandlearning/downloads/i
ndex_lsis.html#
Teaching speaking and listening, a toolkit for practitioners – Learning                                                                                                                                                             
for Work, Key Skills Support Programme
http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=224140
Brain Games http://www.braingames.org.uk/                                                                                                                                           

Skills for Life Materials for Embedded Learning – Family Life                                                                                                                                                     

http://rwp.excellencegateway.org.uk/embeddedlearning/searchresult
s.cfm?setting=Family%20life:_focus%20on%20parenting&sett_title=
Family%20life:_focus%20on%20parenting
Teaching and learning programme - Learning mathematics in context                                                                                                                                                            

http://tlp.excellencegateway.org.uk/tlp/xcurricula/lmic/
Improving learning in mathematics                                                                                                                                                                                            

http://tlp.excellencegateway.org.uk/teachingandlearning/downloads/d
efault.aspx#math
Skills for Working - for staff working with adult post-16 learners with                                                                                                                                                                                         
learning difficulties or disabilities
http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=SFW
Teaching & Learning Programme Employability website                                                                                                                                                           
http://tlp.excellencegateway.org.uk/tlp/xcurricula/employability



Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack                                                                                                                                                                                    45
Skills for Life Support Programme


                               Resource                                                                                                   Job roles & topics
                                                                                   Employer                                         Adviser                                   Employ. Tutor                                        L&N Tutor




                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                                                                    Team work




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Team work
                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                                                                          Problem




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Problem
                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                                                                Org self




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Org self
                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                                                                   Comm




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Comm
                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                                                                           Maths




                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Maths
Teaching and learning functional mathematics                                                                                                                                                                               

http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=201311
Move On Teacher Route - The teacher route stop 2 CPD Summary                                                                                                                                                               
of resources and teaching approaches to supporting numeracy
http://www.move-
on.org.uk/downloadsFile/downloads1733/MOWCS_supporting_num
_in_lifelong_learning_Sep08.pdf
Move On The teacher route stop 4 teaching and learning Learning                                                                                                                                                                    
chunks and guidance
http://www.move-on.org.uk/mu_route.asp?stop=4
Teaching and learning – Key Skills Support Programme                                                                                                                                                                                      

http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=195640
Supporting problem solving – Guide to good practice                                                                                                                                                                                       

http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=224076
Supporting working with others – Guide to good practice                                                                                                                                                                                             

http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=224079
Move On Learner Route                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
http://www.move-on.org.uk/ilr_php/literacy/welcome.php




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack                                                                                                                                                                                  46
Skills for Life Support Programme
Handout HO10
Prompts and useful resources to support the optional
workshops
1. Designing employability skills assessment
See section 2.2.2 in Becoming work ready: a practical guide to developing
employability skills provision and the case studies for Burleigh College and
Strode College.

Points to consider when designing the assessment
   Will your assessment be paper-based, online or both?
   At what stage will learners or employees complete the assessment: at
    interview; induction; first visit to the company; subsequent visit?
   Who will support the learner to complete employability skills assessment:
    adviser; employer engagement staff; information, advice and guidance
    workers; assessor; teacher; or employer? Perhaps the learner will complete
    the assessment online and unaided?
   What supporting guidance notes might the learner or person assisting them to
    complete the assessment needs?
   Which employability skills will be included in your assessment?
   From which existing checklists (see the suggested resources below) can you
    draw your ideas?
   How will the results of the employability skills assessment be recorded;
    compiled; fed back to the learner; shared with other professionals or the
    employer and acted upon?
   How will the assessment influence the design of a personalised learning plan
    and training programme?
   Will the assessment be reviewed or repeated at any stage? If so, when?

Selection of useful resources
   Skills for Business Master Employability Framework
    http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/VLSP-23098
   A Skills Toolkit for Employers (Asset Skills)
    http://www.assetskills.org/nmsruntime/saveasdialog.asp?lID=494&sID=687
   Initial assessment toolkit – Learning for Work, Key Skills Support Programme
    http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/media/KSSP/ia_toolkit_lo_res.pdf
   JobcentrePlus: Job Kit
    http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/jcp/stellent/groups/jcp/documents/sitestudio/
    dev_015519.pdf
   Teaching & Learning Programme Employability website
    http://tlp.excellencegateway.org.uk/tlp/xcurricula/employability

   Jobcoach http://backtowork.direct.gov.uk/index.html

Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack         47
Skills for Life Support Programme

   Tools Library http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/toolslibrary
   Get on at Work Generic workplace Skills for Life checklist




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack   48
Skills for Life Support Programme
2. Creating employability promotional materials: Points to consider when
designing promotional materials
   What promotional materials do you already have and how will these fit with
    them? Will they belong to a „family‟ of materials or be stand alone?
   Will you be using e-marketing?
   Will they be professionally designed and printed or produced in-house?
   How can you introduce colour, visuals and photographs into the materials?
   Will there be any permissions required or copyright issues?
   Are there any logos which must be used from your own organisation, funding
    bodies or partners?
   Who will you need to consult in your organisation to agree the content?
   What references to literacy, language and numeracy will you make?
   Will the materials be tailored for different sectors or companies?
   How will you use local labour market information to inform your content?
   Who is the audience for the materials and what level of language, including
    technical words or phrases, will they understand?
   Will the materials address both employers and workers or will there be
    separate materials for these groups?
   How will you sell the features and benefits of your offer?
   What matters to the readers?

Selection of useful resources
   iRoute http://www.move-on.org.uk/intermed_flash.asp
   Get on at Work training pack
    http://www.move-on.org.uk/downloadsresults.asp?id=103
   Get on at Work intermediary training
    http://www.move-on.org.uk/goaw.php?scid=193&pid=185
   Get on at Work Promotion and engagement tools
    http://www.move-on.org.uk/goaw.php?scid=185
   Making it work, a practical guide to effective delivery of Skills for Life in
    workplace learning, LSIS
    www.excellencegateway.org.uk/255255
   Working with employers toolkit, Learning for Work, Key Skills Support
    Programme
    http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=224156




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack            49
Skills for Life Support Programme

3. Planning work experience
See section 1.3.3 in Becoming work ready: a practical guide to developing
employability skills provision, in particular the key factors for successful work
placements and the case studies for Lufton College and BCHA
Points to consider when planning work experience
   What is the purpose of the work experience: is it a taster; a longer term
    experience; likely to lead to a job; or part of an overall training programme?
   What arrangements can you make for internal work experience if learners are
    unable to secure work experience with external employers?
   What are the expectations and aspirations of the individuals involved –
    learner; employer; supervisor; adviser; trainer or assessor?
   How will the experience be recorded, monitored, reviewed and assessed?
   When will any monitoring or reviews take place?
   Who will be responsible for reviewing or monitoring the work experience?
   What relationship does the work experience have to other elements of the
    learner‟s course or programme?
   Will the employer be expected to take part in any formal assessment
    activities?
   What preparation do the learner and employer require and what resources
    might they need as part of this?
   What contingency plans can you make if the work experience is not
    completed for some reason?
   How will you make sure all parties are clear about their roles and
    responsibilities?
   What formal documentation might you need for the work experience:
    agreement, contract, learning plan, review forms, assessment forms or
    checklists?

Selection of useful resources
   NCETM Workplace mathematics video clips
    https://www.ncetm.org.uk/resources/13735
   Improving practice in foundation learning: Could I do that job?
    http://ntlcp.qia.org.uk/flt/screens/flt_01_02_02_00/page.html
   The 14-19 Workforce Support (formerly the Diploma Support Programme) :
    Inside work
    http://www.diploma-support.org/resourcesandtools/insidework/
   Improving practice in foundation learning: Meet the experts
    http://ntlcp.qia.org.uk/flt/screens/flt_07_01_00_00/page.html
   Vocational learning support programme: The recruitment game
    http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/VLSP29/index.htm


Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack             50
Skills for Life Support Programme

   Making it work, a practical guide to effective delivery of Skills for Life in
    workplace learning, LSIS
    www.excellencegateway.org.uk/255255
   Working with employers toolkit, Learning for Work, Key Skills Support
    Programme
    http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/page.aspx?o=224156
   Teaching & Learning Programme Employability website
    http://tlp.excellencegateway.org.uk/tlp/xcurricula/employability




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack            51
Skills for Life Support Programme

Activity resource R1
Programme models that meet learner needs
1. Acorn Training, Derbyshire
Learners can spend two hours per day, two days a week working in a range of
jobs roles in the virtual shop, Steady Shop. This is preparation for a social
enterprise, Zebra Zone, which is an online retail business. Off-site activities
include:
 market research
 observations of real customer environments
 leaflet drops.

Training is in groups, one to one and e-learning. Activities include:
 role play
 interview practice
 acting as manager of the shop
 listening to real business experience
 work placements.

One day per week is devoted to improving literacy, numeracy, ICT and personal
development skills. Teaching and learning activities are contextualised to retail
and customer service. Learners contribute to local charity events, e.g., by
participating in a market survey.

Learners
Those participating:
 are not in employment, education or training (NEET)
 respond well to activities in the community which build self-esteem,
   confidence and team-working skills
 have literacy and numeracy skills needs at level 1
 are ready for vocational training and are motivated by activities that simulate
   the workplace
 are referred by Connexions.




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack          52
Skills for Life Support Programme
2. Bournemouth Church Housing Association
The 13 or 26 week programme offers:
 12 hours work experience per week
 housing advice and support to deal with debt or health issues
 online learning to improve Skills for Life, using Move On and BBC Skillswise
 literacy and numeracy embedded into job search
 one SfL qualification can be achieved with further qualifications on offer if
   funded by client or employer.

Labour market information such as the region‟s Labour Market Bulletin is used to
inform trends and job vacancies.
Employers take clients on a 13 weeks „try before you buy‟ trial. They are
supported in the recruitment process and see applicants after an initial interview
with the training provider.

Learners
Those participating:
 are referred by Jobcentre Plus
 are aged 18+
 have been unemployed for six months
 are receiving Job Seekers Allowance
 have already attended a number of training programmes as part of the
   „revolving door‟ syndrome
 have barriers to training such as housing, debt or health issues




Developing employability provision that works: Module 9 Participant Pack        53
Skills for Life Support Programme
3. Exchange Group
Response to Redundancy is an employability programme, offered to people who
have been made redundant. LSC funded, the roll-on roll-off, blended learning
programme offers 900 learners a menu of short courses covering:
 business administration
 customer service
 IT entry levels and levels 1 and 2
 management
 personal development, including how to learn, self development,
   interpersonal skills, managing stress and time management
 retail
 Skills for Life from entry level 3 to level 2
 team leading.

Learners have one-to-one tutor support or group sessions, using e-learning
packages. Interactive and customised materials engage learners in a
personalised programme which suits their level. Skills for Life are embedded into
literacy and numeracy workbooks.

Courses can be short – from three to six hours – or learners can choose to
extend their learning for 45 or more hours.

Significant indicators about business sectors inform the design of courses. For
instance, a call centre pre-employment course has been designed for the West
Midlands where this is an expanding sector.

Learners
Those participating:
 have been recently employed
 are referred by Jobcentre Plus or self-referred by Learndirect
 have diverse skills gaps and skills levels
 have the skills and confidence to access and benefit from online learning
 have a range of employability skills needs, including SfL, time management
   and team work
 want vocational skills to get a job.




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Skills for Life Support Programme
4. Croydon College
This is a flexible programme leading to the City & Guilds Award or Certificate in
Employability and Personal Development through a blended and active learning
approach. Learners can also complete vocational qualifications in hair, beauty,
construction and food and drink, alongside adult literacy and numeracy
qualifications.
The six-month programme finds innovative ways of teaching:
 personal development for learning and work
   career planning and job searching
   rights and responsibilities in life and work.

Interactive and motivational activities see learners setting up their own
recruitment agency, running discussions and learning problem solving. Learners
are offered a mix of group work, one-to-one sessions, a breakfast club and self
study with a workbook. All the activities are set in the context of skills for
employability – literacy, numeracy and team working skills – as well as „soft skills‟
like independent thinking.
There is a strong holistic, person-centred approach with double staffing, a daily
breakfast club, small groups and one-to-one support.
The vocational courses have a realistic work environment in the College‟s own
hair and beauty salon and restaurant and bar. These are used by members of
the public who pay for the services.
Skills for Life are embedded in materials that teachers use in the vocational
areas as well as in the employability activities.
Learners
   are aged 16-18+
   are not in employment, education or training (NEET)
   have multiple, complex needs including previous exclusion from school,
    alcohol and drug abuse
   have poor prior learning experiences
   respond well to interactive learning activities
   are referred by Connexions.




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Skills for Life Support Programme
5. Bedford Training Group Ltd
The group run three centres across its area that reflect the skills needed locally
in motor vehicle, construction and engineering manufacture. This is supported by
a holistic model of delivery which takes unemployed learners through training
and qualifications to work placements and/or apprenticeships. Part of the
success of this model is that it offers unemployed learners „tasters‟ so that they
can try out a range of skills. It also places key skills in communications (level 1)
at the heart of the learning.
Learners are offered tasters of all subject areas and then choose which one they
are interested in. Throughout their programme, learners have a mentor to
support their vocational and Skills for Life learning as well as offering a place to
talk about external issues which might be affecting their ability to gain work.
As well as a delivery model that engages the learners in a subject of their choice,
there is an emphasis on a practical approach that embeds theoretical sessions.

This integrated method helps to motivate learners who have had negative
learning experiences and who have expressed a preference to work with their
hands. It also means that language, literacy and numeracy are occur alongside
opportunities to teach employment-focused elements such as timekeeping,
attitude, record keeping, health and safety, and working with others.

Learners
Those participating:
 are aged 16–19
 are not in employment, education or training (NEET)
 are referred by Connexions
 have literacy needs at Level 1
 are undecided about a vocational route to take
 respond well to practical, on the job training.




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Skills for Life Support Programme


6. HMP & YOI Low Newton
This is a roll-on roll-off programme leading to a BTEC in Work Skills and Key
Skills, Improving Own Learning and Performance. Course content includes:
 search for a job
 applying for a job
 preparing for an interview, including Home Office interviews
 interview skills.

These topics have been selected as they enable the learners to gain transferable
skills and are linked to their targets on their ILPs.

Interactive sessions involve differentiated activities and tasks. There are
opportunities for choice and creativity with the development of a personal
progress file. Learners can improve ICT skills. Learners are supportive of each
other and there is a buddy system with ambassadors for the course.

There are some good links with Business in the Community and employers from
national service-sector companies come into the prison to talk about the skills
required for work and also participate in mock interviews.

Learners:
Those participating:
   need transferable skills
   need roll on, roll off provision
   have skills gaps include social skills, problem solving and job searching
   need a focus on interview preparation
   respond well to programmes that are interactive and allow an element of
    learner choice.




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Skills for Life Support Programme

Activity resource R2
Programme models that meet learner needs

Learner profile




Delivery model




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