SPORT-SCAN DAILY BRIEF

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                                                                  NHL 8/21/2011
         Anaheim Ducks
576792   Hiller's call is cool news in hot times

         Boston Bruins
576793   Arnold scores Boston Bruins ads

         Buffalo Sabres
576794   Pegula's not backing off his stated goal for Sabres

         Chicago Blackhawks
576795   Hawks taking shape already

         Detroit Red Wings
576796   National writer: Ex-Red Wing already making changes in
         new role with NHL
576797   Red Wings to continue affiliation with ECHL's Toledo
         Walleye

         Edmonton Oilers
576798   Outshoot to win? Not the Oilers!
576799   CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE: CAM BARKER

         Florida Panthers
576800   Florida Panthers fans upset by premium seating plan

         Montreal Canadiens
576801   One month to go

         NHL
576802   Hundreds attend funeral for NHLer Rick Rypien
576803   Report on NHL team relocation a moving violation 0

         St Louis Blues
576804   Hulsizer's roots in hockey could make him nice fit for Blues

         Toronto Maple Leafs
576805   Simmons: Why is it always the enforcers? 0
576806   Party time for MLSEL
576807   Deal has special ring for Peddie

         Vancouver Canucks
576808   Friends, family, NHLers pay tribute to former Canuck Rick
         Rypien

         Websites
576817   NBCSports.com / Accepting the role of violence in hockey
576818   NBCSports Nearly 1,000 people attend Rick Rypien’s funeral

         Winnipeg Jets
576809   'Rick’s tragedy won’t go in vain'
576810   Saying goodbye to Rypien
576811   Man in the Iron Maiden mask
576812   Winnipeg to host NHL launch
576813   Hiller on board, how 'bout Teemu?
576814   Panther fans see red over red section
576815   Rypien fondly remembered
576816   Jets strongly represented at Rypien funeral
SPORT-SCAN, INC. 941-284-4129
576792      Anaheim Ducks                                                            There remains a troubling element to this story, frightening in its mystery.
                                                                                     Doctors have been unable to determine the source of Hiller's condition,
                                                                                     meaning they also can't guarantee the symptoms are gone permanently.
Hiller's call is cool news in hot times                                              Who knows? A shot in a game, a bump in practice, an airplane ride. If
                                                                                     there's a trigger out there, Hiller doesn't know what it is and can't see it
                                                                                     coming.
By JEFF MILLER
                                                                                     "Sure, I wish I knew what caused it so I could avoid it in the future and I
2011-08-20 17:00:13                                                                  could give you guys a clear answer," he said. "But it's not going to change
                                                                                     how I feel right now, and I'm feeling good. That's what's important."
                                                                                     To be certain, the phone call from Switzerland last week was a positive one,
It flew nearly 6,000 miles to get here, coming from a foreign land nine hours        an optimistic one, a call the Ducks are glad they answered because of the
ahead of us.                                                                         bigger question Hiller answered.
But it arrived right on time, completely intact.                                     Asked if the vertigo symptoms are still on his mind, he said, "I've stopped
                                                                                     thinking too much about it."
Few things travel as well as optimism does.
                                                                                     Asked if he could play right now, he said, "Yeah, I think so."
"Another good day today," he said. "Beautiful weather here in Switzerland."
                                                                                     Asked when he thought he could resume performing like an All-Star, he
It was good to hear Jonas Hiller talk about the weather because it was good
                                                                                     said, "I hope the first game."
to hear Jonas Hiller talk about anything but Jonas Hiller.
                                                                                     Training camp is still a month away, but the Ducks' season feels a lot closer
For the first time in seven months, the Ducks goaltender could submit to
                                                                                     today. With Hiller recovered, it also feels at lot less uncertain.
idle conversation. Only with Hiller, the recent conversation wasn't so idle.
                                                                                     So, Teemu, how about clearing up the Ducks' outlook even more now?
"I'm where I used to be," Hiller explained over the phone, which is great
news for the Ducks seeing how he used to be an All-Star.                             Orange County Register: LOADED: 08.21.2011
The Ducks have made no bold-headline additions this offseason, but they
got better last week. By pronouncing himself free of vertigo symptoms,
Hiller greatly improved this team's prospects.
The Ducks aren't the Ducks and can't possibly be without Hiller. As good as
Ray Emery and Dan Ellis were in his absence last season, Hiller lifts this
team to a much more intriguing level.
This wasn't a big-time signing, but it was a big-time sighting.
Now, if Teemu Selanne can just talk his ligaments and tendons into one
more year, the Ducks could end up with one of the most productive
offseasons ever for a team that didn't really do much.
Should Selanne reach a decision in the next week and a half, the Ducks
certainly would finish with a much better late August than the one the
Angels are having.
"It's a lot of fun just to be back," Hiller said. "The fact that I'm excited to be
back should help me reach the level I was playing at before."
Having one star in limbo would be taxing enough on an organization's
psyche. But the Ducks have spent all summer with two stars tied behind
their backs.
Hiller and Selanne haven't been players of late, they've been questions.
They've been the Can he? and Will he? of the NHL. And no team in this
league was facing two larger, more impactful questions.
Hiller just brightened the horizon in Anaheim, and the way his words arrived
suggested things are sunnier these days in Switzerland, too. Good weather,
indeed.
Think about the season this guy endured. He carried the Ducks at the start
of 2010-11, emerged as an elite, world-class goalie and then, in mid-dream,
had the ice under his feet turn to oatmeal.
"I was pushing and pushing every day," Hiller said. "I didn't want to let the
team down. I didn't want to let my teammates down. It was tough for me to
mentally stay positive. You just wish you could be out there helping."
He was injured without technically being hurt. A cast on his wrist or crutches
under his arms would have been welcomed props for a man whose ailment
was out of sight, hidden from everyone but himself.
Then he had to watch as the Ducks made a mad, memorable scramble into
the playoffs behind the rented services of Emery and Ellis. All the while,
Hiller could do nothing more productive than deflect questions to which he
had no answers.
"If you're playing for last place it might not be that bad," he said. "But I saw
the potential, and the guys were playing well. There were a lot of
possibilities in the playoffs. It was tough to watch."
576793     Boston Bruins


Arnold scores Boston Bruins ads
Axed agency Mullen must bear it


By Thomas Grillo and Donna Goodison


The Boston Bruins have benched their advertising agency, but many fans
will be happy to hear that the big, bad bear who enforced the B’s “Hockey
Rules” in a series of silly TV commercials will stay in the game.
The Stanley Cup champion team said yesterday it tapped Arnold Worldwide
as its ad agency of record, replacing Mullen. Both firms have Hub offices.
“Everyone loves the bear. It’s an icon, and we’re looking to evolve the idea
and take the bear into new places,” said Peter Favat, Arnold’s chief creative
officer. “We have lots of great ideas and are gearing up to develop a social
media campaign that will get fans pumped for the new season.”
Mullen, the Bruins’ agency since 2008, debuted the bear ads in April 2009,
as the team entered the playoffs, and scored a million YouTube hits in two
weeks.
“The bear was an extremely popular campaign and we think it reignited the
fan’s passion for the teams and fueled their success,” said Mullen
spokesman David Swaebe. “We are proud of our work and the Bruins’
success, and now it’s another agency’s turn.”
In one spot shot at the Garden, a fan in a Bruins jersey gets a beer for his
girlfriend, who’s sporting a Montreal Canadiens jersey. The ashamed man
whispers, “But she’s so pretty” — and the glaring bear suddenly slaps the
beer out of his hand and pulls the B’s jersey over his head. The ad ends
with this rule: “Never date within the division.”
The campaign humanizes the team’s brand and gives it a sense of humor
for which team owner Jeremy Jacobs isn’t known, said Chris Cakebread, a
communications professor at Boston University.
“I like the campaign because it’s a little cheeky,” he said. “It’s certainly
distinctive to the category because it doesn’t have the typical flying hits and
close-ups of the players throwing their arms in the air when they score a
goal.”
Cakebread said it’s not unusual for an agency to inherit a brand’s
advertising. “In a marketing situation, the client owns the work,” he said.
“The question would be why did they replace one agency with the other.”
Bruins market chief Jen Compton said she’s happy to be able to extend the
hockey-loving grizzly’s life with Arnold Worldwide.
“We’re looking to revive the overall campaign, capitalize on the Stanley Cup
championship and take it to the next level,” she said. “Arnold is the leader in
town and worldwide, and we look forward to working with them — and that’s
nothing against Mullen.”
Boston Herald LOADED: 08.21.2011
576794     Buffalo Sabres                                                         Pegula on Regehr: "Buffalo is going to love him. He's a leader, just a class
                                                                                  act."
                                                                                  On Ehrhoff: "He was good enough to be voted defenseman of the year
Pegula's not backing off his stated goal for Sabres                               three years in a row on that team [in Vancouver]. We're really excited about
Staff Report                                                                      having him join us."

Two weeks ago, during a meeting with management, Sabres owner Terry               On Leino: "One of his coaches said he was the hardest-working player ever
Pegula took the floor to make something clear. He wasn't backing away             to come out of Finland. He's the kind of guy you have to have on your team
from his obsession to win the Stanley Cup by any means, but also he didn't        to win Stanley Cups."
want his people sweating over their futures if they flopped early in the          On all three: "One thing I like about these guys is that they all lost in a
season.                                                                           Game Seven of the Stanley Cup finals. That has to be pretty good
His message was only a slight deviation from one he had been delivering           motivation for them."
since he walked through the door -- or fell from the heavens -- and landed        Let's face it, Pegula is the gift that keeps on giving.
in the lap of a proud, championship-starved hockey town. He has been up
front and consistent about his aspiration to win it all. However, he didn't       He spent some $8 million on the dressing room alone, another $5 million or
want his desires to be confused with his demands.                                 so buying the Rochester Americans. They're adding scouts and tweaking
                                                                                  operations. One way to solve their salary-cap problems is having players in
In fact, he was in the midst of soothing his troops and explaining he had no      training camp duke it out for roster spots, making them that much stronger
demands about winning now when Sabres coach Lindy Ruff interrupted him            and deeper.
with a message of his own.
                                                                                  Every offseason move was made with the Cup in mind.
"Lindy cut me off," Pegula said with a laugh the other day by telephone. "He
said, 'No, Terry, we do have to win now. You know what? Winning now is            Pegula neither requires nor desires a place in the spotlight and has quietly
good. That's not bad, Terry, that's good. And we need to know that.'"             remained behind the scenes throughout the summer. He owns a private jet
                                                                                  but spoke last week while driving through a rainstorm along Interstate 83 in
Amen, Lindy.                                                                      Pennsylvania after watching his daughter, Jessica, play in a U.S. Open
Now, the focus is clear. The Sabres will be looking to take their place           tennis qualifier in Washington. He has mostly been away from the
among the mighty this season while understanding it could take time for           persistent buzz in Buffalo about hockey season.
their newcomers to get adjusted and their roster to snap into place. The          "I'm aware that there's some increased [excitement] for the Sabres, and it's
Sabres are over the salary cap and need to make decisions, so players can         even around the league," he said. "One of the things we wanted was some
expect a competitive atmosphere when training camp opens in a few                 respect. A lot of the other organizations are looking at us now and saying,
weeks.                                                                            'These guys mean business.'"
They want to have a good preseason and a strong start. The first two              The Sabres will have 12 games on national television. Boston and
months of last season were a mess for a talented Buffalo team that was            Philadelphia are the only two teams that will have more than Buffalo. The
going through the motions under a listless owner. Their biggest need wasn't       Bruins won the Stanley Cup. The Flyers have been among recent
a winger or a center or better defensemen. It was an attitude adjustment.         contenders.
Looking back, it was Pegula's first and greatest contribution. The shift in       Buffalo is evolving into a great story, and outsiders are paying attention. It
mind-set began when it became apparent that Pegula was purchasing the             means the Sabres will be playing on a bigger stage. With the attention
team. It continued when the Sabres learned he was committed to winning. It        comes greater expectations, more pressure and fewer excuses. Nobody
was confirmed when he stood before the masses and spoke with passion              understands this more than Pegula. And nobody, starting with Pegula, is
and conviction about his sole purpose as an owner.                                backing away.
It started at the top, and that's where the tone will be set again this season.   "It's obviously a good thing," Pegula said. "I said before I bought the
"If we come out of the chute 0-9 this year, everybody is going to be going        Sabres, to my wife and myself, that an owner in sports has one job, and
skitzoid," Pegula said. "But you gotta believe you're not an 0-9 team, and it     that's to be liked. That's the only job I have. There's only one way to be
will get better. You can't have the Sword of Damocles hanging over the            liked, and that's to win.
players, coaches and everybody's head. You have to stick with the team."          "I feel that we're going to have an interesting season this year. You know
The Sabres aren't going to start the season as the NHL's best team. They          what our goal is. We're going to try to achieve it."
don't have overwhelming talent, the most depth or even the top goaltender.        Buffalo News LOADED: 08.21.2011
Just know that they aren't far away, either. They will enter the season just
as capable of winning it all as any other team.
Hey, why not this year?
Rather than shying away from the goal, or fearing the goal, the Sabres are
following their leaders and embracing the goal. Pegula hasn't backed off an
inch. In fact, it's been the contrary. The Sabres are inching, if not leaping,
toward becoming one of the top teams in the league.
"I've heard some comments, 'It's time to put up or shut up. You say you
want to win and all this stuff,'" Pegula said. "Well, isn't that why every team
should exist? I don't think we're special. Everybody, and I don't care what
sport you're in, you're supposed to do your best to try to win."
Amen, Terry.
In a perfect sports world, winning championships would be the objective.
For the most part, it has been a foreign concept in Buffalo. The Bills for
years have been collecting ridiculous profits without making any real effort
to contend. The Sabres made half-baked attempts to win, so long as they
broke even on the balance sheet.
Well, times have changed.
The Sabres were aggressive in the offseason and added veteran
defensemen Robyn Regehr and Christian Ehrhoff and forward Ville Leino.
576795     Chicago Blackhawks                                                    training camp in mid-September after letting the players rest and recuperate
                                                                                 from the previous season.
                                                                                 "The offseason is the heightened state of training when they're going to put
Hawks taking shape already                                                       in the most time and they're going to put the most effort in terms of off-ice
That's because Goodman has strenuous workouts for them wherever they             stuff," Goodman said.
are                                                                              "You give them the tools for all aspects of the game, whether it's speed,
                                                                                 agility, strength or power. At certain points in any shift they're going to
                                                                                 engage in all of those things. My job is to allow them to have that huge
By Chris Kuc, Chicago Tribune reporter                                           toolbox that they can draw any of those skills from."

6:20 PM CDT, August 20, 2011                                                     One-timer: Single-game tickets for the Hawks' regular-season games go on
                                                                                 sale at 10 a.m. Monday and are available at ticketmaster.com or by calling
                                                                                 Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000.
Paul Goodman looks like he last missed a workout since some time in              Chicago Tribune LOADED: 08.21.2011
1998.
So it's no surprise the Blackhawks' strength and conditioning coach works
effortlessly alongside Patrick Sharp, Jonathan Toews, Dave Bolland and
other players when they break a sweat this summer in the team's expansive
workout room at the United Center.
What makes the lean and muscular Goodman's efforts to get the Hawks
into top physical shape during the offseason unique is that when Duncan
Keith, Marian Hossa, Niklas Hjalmarsson and others who are spread out
across North America and Europe hit the gym, Goodman in a sense is with
them too.
Through a combination of hands-on training, modern technology,
communication and a high-octane work ethic that features a do-as-I-do, not-
as-I-say attitude, there isn't a Hawks player preparing for this season who
doesn't have Goodman's know-how sitting on the weight bench next to him.
The 36-year-old Goodman has gone high-tech while developing training
regimens for the Hawks, creating and maintaining a Web site that allows
players to access individual programs with detailed instructions for five-day-
per-week workouts. The Hawks sign in to the site and can print a PDF file of
that day's plan and also can view videos of each exercise to provide the
proper technique to ensure maximum results without injuries.
"The ultimate goal is for them to play at their highest level," said Goodman,
who joined the Hawks organization in 2008. "We want to make sure they
stay away from anything that's going to infringe upon them not being able to
play at that level. We want to make everybody a better and safer athlete.
That's the priority (because) the better the athlete, the better the hockey
player."
Goodman spends hours each weekday at the United Center instructing and
training alongside players, maintaining the contents of the Web site and
phoning and texting Hawks who live outside the Chicago area during the
offseason. His efforts and techniques have made him a favorite of Hawks
players who swear by his programs, with Bolland and Sharp saying they're
in the best shapes of their careers after working with Goodman.
"Paul isn't just standing there telling us what to do" said Bolland, who
spends the bulk of his offseason in Chicago. "He actually does the training
with us to make it more fun and more intense.
"The Web site is great for guys who aren't in town. For me, it's nice that I
have the convenience here. But when I'm back home (in Toronto), I just
click on the site and the sheet prints out. I take it to the gym and work out.
It's nice, it's easy and it's convenient."
Goodman's passion for exercise began at an early age. While other
youngsters in East Brunswick, N.J., were glued in front of televisions, he
began a lifetime of training.
"My dad was always into fitness," Goodman said. "As a kid I saw him
training and I remember sneaking down into my basement and grabbing
bars. He had sand dumbbells and barbell set that I used it to lift weights
with. I was like 11 and 12 and I just took to it."
While attending Wisconsin as an undergrad and graduate student,
Goodman worked in the athletic department and helped train in the hockey
program, which included former Hawks Adam Burish and Rene Bourque.
After Wisconsin, a six-year stint as head strength and conditioning coach at
Vermont led to the Hawks hiring him. Now, he's a mainstay at the United
Center and on the road with the team during the season.
Goodman has implemented his most rigorous regimens during the
offseason, embarking on a 13-week training stint before the opening of
576796     Detroit Red Wings


National writer: Ex-Red Wing already making changes in new role with NHL


By KIRKLAND CRAWFORD


Brendan Shanahan, who won three Stanley Cups with the Red Wings, is
the NHL's new disciplinarian. He's just completed hosting the league's
Research Development and Orientation camp in Toronto where proposed
rules were tested by top prospects on the ice.
Yahoo!Sports hockey writer and former Free Press staffer Nicholas J.
Cotsonika spoke with Shanahan, who seems to be taking a totally different
approach to the job than his predecessor, Colin Campbell.
Shanahan said that everytime the NHL announces a suspension for an
illegal hit, the league will release a video of the play and break down what
they saw and how they came to the decision.
There's no doubt the former Red Wing is striving for a high level of
transparency.
“You might not agree with our decision, but you’re going to understand how
we got to that decision,” said Shanahan, the NHL’s vice president of player
safety and hockey operations. “This is not a black-and-white job. ⦠It’s not
completely predictive. But over a certain amount of time, I hope that they
sort of start to understand what the strike zone is.”
One of Shanahan's ex-teammate with Detroit, who's now another new face
in the NHL landscape, said the videos should help players better
understand what's permissible.
“My hope is that we can work together to make things as black and white as
possible,” said Mathieu Schneider, another former teammate of
Shanahan’s, now a special assistant to NHL Players’ Association executive
director Don Fehr. “I think in the past players have always seen a bit of a
gray area and not always had everything explained to them.
“I think it’s important as a player that you understand clearly what you can
and can’t do on the ice—what’s a legal, what’s an illegal hit. It’s going to
make the game better and more exciting, I think, and safer, more
importantly.” Cotsonika also uncovered that Shanahan tried to spice up the
video going out to players about the rule changes in boarding and illegal
checks to the head. How? By enlisting some help from Hollywood.
Detroit Free Press LOADED: 08.21.2011
576797     Detroit Red Wings


Red Wings to continue affiliation with ECHL's Toledo Walleye


FREE PRESS STAFF AND NEWS SERVICES


The Red Wings announced this week that the Toledo Walleye of the ECHL
will remain as the team's Double-A affiliate for the upcoming season.
The Walleye had been part of the Wings' organization since the team's first
season in 2009-10.
"Toledo's been a great partner for us over the years," Wings assistant
general manager Jim Nill said in a statement. "We look forward to watching
our prospects continue to develop in a city with a strong minor league
hockey tradition."
The affiliation wasn't the only good news for the Toledo club this week.
Toledo was ranked a top 15 minor-league market by Street & Smith's
Sports Business Journal; the city was No. 13 in the national rankings.
Toledo also is the home to the Detroit Tigers' Triple-A affiliate, the Mud
Hens. The Mud Hens play at Fifth Third Field and the Walleye at the
Huntington Center.
The rankings were based several factors, including total sports attendance,
percentage of seats filled and franchise tenure in the city.
According to the rankings, the Mud Hens and Walleye have attracted more
than 6 million fans to downtown Toledo since 2002.
Detroit Free Press LOADED: 08.21.2011
576798     Edmonton Oilers                                                         look at the Outshooting – Outshot differential of the Oilers compared to the
                                                                                   NHL as a whole:
                                                                                   Quite startling, isn’t it? The Oilers rank far below the league rate year after
Outshoot to win? Not the Oilers!                                                   year in terms of garnering any sort of advantage from outshooting their
                                                                                   opposition.

Bruce McCurdy                                                                      On the micro scale, it would seem that the shot clock has little bearing on
                                                                                   the results of any individual Oiler game, with such relationship as exists a
                                                                                   clearly negative correlation. The macro scale, on the other hand, says
                                                                                   something else entirely. We’ll address that in Part Two tomorrow; in the
How much does outshooting the opposition contribute to winning in the              meantime I’ll titillate the curious reader with the revelation that there is an
NHL? When we looked at this question a while back we found that the                elephant in the room, a great big one which is in plain view in the above
relationship might be changing, perhaps due to score effects having an             stats. Stay tuned.
ever-increasing influence on the modern game. Historically the outshooting
teams have had a modest edge, winning about 53% of the available points,           Edmonton Journal: LOADED: 08.21.2011
but the last two seasons teams that have been outshot have actually won
more than their share.
But for certain teams, notably the Edmonton Oilers, this seeming paradox is
pretty much status quo. The relationship between shot clock and
scoreboard has been ambiguous at best, whether the Oilers are a great
squad or a lousy one.
Consider that in the dynasty years 1983-90, the Oilers were credited with
fewer shots than they allowed each and every year, at least during the
regular season. Yet they routinely finished at or very near the top of the
standings, outscoring their opponents by an average of 80 goals a year
throughout that span. Shots? Who cares?
In more recent times (since 1997), the NHL has tracked results of
outshooting teams on the micro scale, cross-referencing game outcomes to
shots on goal. The Oilers have been an outlier pretty much since that time,
consistently posting better W-L records when being outshot. Let’s start our
look in 1999, when the first version of the Bettman Point was introduced to
the NHL:
Throughout this time the Little Team That Could performed better in games
they were outshot in four years out of five; while the margin was razor-thin
either way in the middle three years, it was fairly substantial in the first and
the last, with a net difference of 35 percentage points over the half-decade
leading up to the lockout. This contrasts fairly sharply with the NHL as a
whole; during those same five years, outshooting teams had a points
percentage of .558, while teams on the short end of the shot clock were just
.495. The Oilers of K-Lowe and MacT were slightly below average in the
former but well above in the latter category, and overall were a slightly
above-average team, about 30 points better than the NHL mean
percentage of .526 during the half-decade of Bettman Point Ver 1.0.
Flash forward past the lockout, when the introduction of the shootout saw
average points percentages elevate again to a new level that oscillates
somewhere around .558. The Oilers of course had one splendid season
which I will present here as a standalone.
The Oilers were a different group during the Year of Pronger, outshooting
their opposition in many more games, and faring reasonably well in those
games. Even here, however, it’s worth noting the NHL as a whole had a 90-
point differential in favour of outshooting teams, with percentages of .603
and .513 respectively; once again the Oilers of Craig MacTavish performed
better than expected in games in which they were outshot.
(As with every season under study, the number of games doesn’t quite add
up to 82 due to a couple of games where shots were dead even. I have
omitted the results of such games as unnecessary noise.)
The Oilers continue to show this odd trend right through the present day, in
fact the effect is growing stronger:
Strange, isn’t it? Even as the Oilers have descended to the depths of the
league, they have maintained this odd tendency to do better when being
outshot. I suppose that’s a good thing, given that it happens so often
nowadays. Still, the fact the Oilers won just four of the 22 games in which
they outshot the other guys in 2010-11 doesn’t sit well with this fan. Nor
does the larger picture view that the Oil outshot and outscored their
opponents exactly four times in 82 games, for pete’s sake.
Expressing the eleven seasons under review as a graph shows how strong
is Oilers’ tendency to perform better than expected when outshot – or if
your glass is half empty, worse than expected when they are the
outshooters.
This persistent tendency is especially stark when compared to a league
where outshooting has, for the most part, been a good idea. Let’s have a
576799     Edmonton Oilers                                                       Barker? He hasn't proven he can consistently play anything more than third-
                                                                                 pairing minutes at even strength. But he does possess the tool Smith didn't
                                                                                 -- the potential to produce offence and, the Oilers hope, to be a secondary
CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE: CAM BARKER                                              option to Ryan Whitney on the power play. Barker had 40 points in just 68
                                                                                 games with Chicago in 2008-09.
                                                                                 Of course, Barker has produced next-to-nothing over the last two seasons
Robin Brownlee                                                                   with Chicago and Minnesota -- just 6-20-26 in 122 games. Can Barker
                                                                                 regain his confidence and contribute offensively? Fair question. Will Barker
August 20 2011 07:29PM                                                           make a career-defining stand here in Edmonton the way Smith did?
                                                                                 I don't know the answer to that last question, but with a one-year contract at
                                                                                 a palatable salary, Barker looks to me to be a gamble worth taking. What's
The Edmonton Oilers rolled the dice on a reclamation project with Jason
                                                                                 the worst possible outcome? He gets cut loose after one year. Best-case?
Smith back in 1999 and came up winners. Is there a chance Cam Barker
                                                                                 Hmm.
could provide the Oilers the same kind of payoff?
                                                                                 Listen to Robin Brownlee Wednesdays and Thursdays from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
While Edmonton GM Steven Tambellini, who grabbed Barker off the scrap
                                                                                 on the Jason Gregor Show on TEAM 1260.
heap July 1 after he had his contract bought out by the Minnesota Wild, and
fans won't have an answer right away, the circumstances of Barker's arrival      Edmonton Journal: LOADED: 08.21.2011
are strikingly similar to Smith's a dozen years earlier.
That doesn't for a second mean that Barker and Smith stack up as
comparable players in substance or style, but it struck me as I was doing
research on Barker in preparation before an interview with him on Nation
Radio how much he has in common with Smith.


Suffice to say, Tambellini and fans would be thrilled if Barker has the same
tenure here as Smith, who ended up playing 542 regular season games
with the Oilers, plus 45 more in the playoffs, and captaining the team before
being dealt to Philadelphia in July 2007.
Different time? Sure. Different players? Yes. But anybody who suggests
Barker is nothing more than a failed first-rounder and a longshot who is
unlikely to amount to much, might be forgetting that Smith arrived here
tagged much the same way.
THE RESUMES
-- Both Smith and Barker were drafted in the first round out of the WHL.
Smith was selected 18th overall from the Regina Pats in 1992.
Barker has even better pedigree. He was taken third overall, behind only
Alex Ovechkin and Evgeni Malkin, in 2004 from the Medicine Hat Tigers by
the Chicago Blackhawks.
-- Significant injuries have played a part in both their careers. Smith's time
with New Jersey got sidetracked in November of 1994 when a knee injury
suffered in practice limited him to two games in 1994-95.
After being dealt to Minnesota by Chicago, Barker never did find his stride
with the Wild and played just 52 games in 2010-11 after, among other
things, hurting his back against the Oilers in a game Feb. 22.
-- Both came cheap. Dealt to the Toronto Maple Leafs by the Devils during
the 1996-97 season, Smith didn't fit into coach Pat Quinn's plans and
Edmonton GM Glen Sather got him for a fourth-round pick in 1999 and a
second-rounder in 2000. Pretty cheap for a future captain.
Deemed expendable in the Windy City, Barker struggled so mightily in
Minnesota the Wild bought him out and the Oilers inked him to a one-year
deal for $2,25 million.
-- Both arrived in Edmonton at the age of 25 as young veterans entering
what should be the physical prime of their NHL careers after stints with two
previous teams.
Smith had played in 326 regular season games with New Jersey and
Toronto. Barker checks in for camp with the Oilers with 271 games in the
books with Chicago and Minnesota.
NOW OR NEVER?
Smith was seen by many as nothing more than a depth defenseman, a guy
who could play third-pairing minutes and provide a physical element. He
wasn't expected to add any offence. He didn't.
But Smith became more than that in terms of impact on the team, carving
out a niche with a level of punishing play few expected, playing through
injuries with the pain threshold of a cadaver and by providing quiet but
unquestionable leadership in the dressing room.
576800     Florida Panthers


Florida Panthers fans upset by premium seating plan
Seats could cost more than $20,000 if three prime sections are converted to
high-end Club Red


By Craig Davis, Sun Sentinel
7:49 PM EDT, August 20, 2011


Allyn White is among a group of fans seeing red over the Florida Panthers'
latest red-themed initiative unveiled this summer.
Season-ticket holders in three prime sections at BankAtlantic Center
received a letter more than a week ago advising them of tentative plans to
convert part of the lower bowl into an "ultra-premium, all-inclusive" area to
be known as Club Red beginning in July 2012. They were given first right of
refusal or the option of choosing comparable seats at a 50 percent discount
for the 2012-13 season.


The price to join the exclusive club rocked White like a blindside check. He
said he was told his seats would cost $22,500 apiece, which would cover
other events at BAC in addition to Panthers games. He said he paid about
$5,000 for two seats at center ice in row 15 for the upcoming hockey
season.
"I've been a season-ticket holder since Day 1 in Miami. I've never missed a
game. You're telling me too bad, your $5,000 tickets are now going to be
$45,000?" said White, who runs a travel agency in Fort Lauderdale. "I don't
want to sit in the corners. I don't want to sit in row 3. I sit in … prime seats,
which I've earned. I've got the best seats in the house."
The sections that would become Club Red — 134, 101 and 102 — straddle
center ice behind the team benches. The Panthers' parent company,
Sunrise Sports & Entertainment, is aiming to boost the revenue potential
from those prime seats. Members would have access to a plush bar and
lounge area with high-end food and beverage options.
"Obviously, it's going to be a significant revenue generator for the
organization. We also think it's going to create a very unique experience for
those people that become members," said Michael Yormark, president and
COO of the Panthers and SSE. "We did do focus groups, we talked to our
season-seat holders. This was not something that was done in haste."
Yormark said a decision hasn't been made to go ahead with Club Red but
could come by the end of the month. There would be 672 seats in the area.
The change would affect about 180 current account holders who occupy
about 360 seats in the area, according to the Panthers.
Pricing has not been set. A job posting on the Panthers' site for a sales
director for Club Red said tickets would start at $20,000 per year.
Mickey Kay, of Coconut Creek, said he won't renew his two season tickets
and that friends who have six seats feel similarly. White said he has been in
contact with holders of 52 other season tickets in section 134 who are upset
about having to give up seats they have occupied for years.
"I don't know who they got feedback from because it wasn't me, it wasn't
the 50 people I polled in my section," White said. "We've been sitting
together the whole time in the arena. We've become good friends. We meet
once a month in and out of season to get together."
Yormark said he understands the emotional response and that efforts are
being made to find acceptable seats in other sections for those who want to
move.
"We've come up with attractive options that in many cases would actually
save these seat-holders money moving forward if they choose to take
advantage," Yormark said. "I am a firm believer that we'll satisfy every
single one of our season-seat holders, and that ultimately we're not going to
lose anybody."
Sun Sentinel LOADED: 08.21.2011
576801    Montreal Canadiens


One month to go


Posted by Mike Boone


RDS will telecast the Canadiens exhibition opener – against the Dallas
Stars at the Bell Centre – on Sept. 20.
Fans will be able to watch seven of the team’s eight pre-season games on
RDS.
The only omission is the Sept. 23 game in Ottawa.
Maybe they’re worried about Pierre Houde’s vocal cords. The game at
Scotiabank Place is the Canadiens’ third in four nights.
Montreal Gazette LOADED: 08.21.2011
576802     NHL                                                                     pounds, he played a hard game and was a favourite among teammates
                                                                                   who admired his tenacity.
                                                                                   Toronto Globe And Mail LOADED: 08.21.2011
Hundreds attend funeral for NHLer Rick Rypien


By ALLAN MAKI


The Little Guy Who Could: Family, friends, teammates and fans remember
the life of NHL forward
Near the make-shift altar hung a framed Vancouver Canucks' jersey - No.
37 and autographed - next to a Regina Pats poster that read Pure Hockey.
Beneath the caption was a photo of Rick Rypien, corralling a loose puck.
That image of Rypien in action, full of life and hope, served as the backdrop
for Saturday's memorial service in the Alberta Stella Arena where he had
played his minor hockey. Described as the little guy who could, Rypien had
worked his way into the National Hockey League and become a hero here
in the Crowsnest Pass only to lose the one fight he couldn't win.
On a sun-kissed Saturday afternoon, roughly 1,000 people sat inside a
hockey rink to remember a young man whose life ended far too soon.
Earlier this week in his home in nearby Coleman, Rypien was found dead at
the age of 27. Police said it wasn't suspicious. It has since been confirmed
Rypien took his own life after battling depression. Twice, the NHL spark
plug performer and on-ice fighter had taken a leave of absence from the
Canucks for what team officials dubbed personal reasons.
At his emotionally-charged memorial service, Rypien's dark brown casket
was wheeled down the aisle by several pall bearers, including former
Canuck and Manitoba Moose teammate Kevin Bieksa. He was one of
several Canucks in attendance as was Rypien's cousin, former NFL
quarterback and Super Bowl champion Mark Rypien.
"Why?" Allan Rypien, Rick's uncle, asked in his eulogy. "He had a good
family, good friends. He fought this disease with everything he had. It was
much like a hockey game - sometimes you win, sometimes our opposition
wins. The disease won the battle ... We have to be thankful for the time we
had him in our lives."
Mike Gillis, the Vancouver Canucks' general manager, spoke to the media
after the nearly two-hour service and said mental health issues need to be
addressed in a more public manner.
"I don't think we can be afraid to talk of the issues he went through.
I know he wanted that to make sure we can do more for someone else,"
Gillis said. "Rick suffered from depression. When he was in an environment
that he could control, he was fine, he was great. When he got into an
environment he couldn't control then he had great difficulty. We challenged
it every step of the way."
Recently, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman commented on the deaths of
Rypien and Derek Boogaard, who died in May after a deadly mix of alcohol
and painkillers. Bettman said the league and NHL Players' Association
would look into their substance abuse and behavioural issue programs to
see what more could be done.
Gillis insisted virtually everything was done for Rypien.
"The league had all the resources we could use. At the end of the day it
wasn't enough. We have access to the best doctors, the best programs. We
had the opportunity to try our hardest to do the right thing," Gillis explained.
"I don't think there's an easy answer to this."
Craig Heisinger, whose Winnipeg Jets had just signed Rypien for the
coming NHL season, was equally emphatic in saying Rypien was far from
neglected.
"The system didn't fail him," noted the Jets' assistant GM. "Everybody in
today's society faces a different challenge. Rick fought them like everyone
else. The demon depression won out.
"He's at peace, we should all be."
Asked what the NHL was going to better combat mental health matters,
Heisinger replied, "Not sure, but we're going to work at it."
Rypien played parts of six seasons with the Canucks. He also played for
the American Hockey League's Moose. Although only 5-foot-11, 194
576803     NHL                                                                    6. Providence, RI
                                                                                  7. Austin, Texas
Report on NHL team relocation a moving violation 0                                8. Hartford, Conn.
Suggestions of moving struggling clubs to Houston, L.A. suburbs over              9. Sacramento, Calif.
Quebec City asinine
                                                                                  10. Richmond, Va.
                                                                                  Here's our list of five North American cities in which we'd like to see an NHL
By Steve MacFarlane                                                               team:
                                                                                  1. Quebec City
Pardon my French, but after checking out a list of The Business Journals’         2. Hamilton, Ont.
list of the best candidates for NHL expansion or relocation, my instant
reaction was: “Quoi?!?”                                                           3. Seattle, Wash.

(Translation for even less fluent fellow Canadians: “What?!?”)                    4. Hartford, Conn.

In a clear case of nerdy number-crunching gone horribly wrong, the                5. Saskatoon, Sask.
outrageous report shows what happens when you take common sense,                  Toronto Sun LOADED: 08.21.2011
history and rational human though out of a ‘study’ and leave it to the brains
of a computer, or mathematically minded human being posing as one.
Quebec City — easily the most logical destination for the next NHL team to
call home, either because the league believes it needs to grow or because
one of its already flailing franchises needs to be transplanted — was way
down that list.
Ranked No. 31 of 58 North American cities on the list that ranks them from
“sufficient” to “borderline” and finally “insufficient,” the former home of the
Nordiques falls in the middle category.
Hamilton was down there, too, ranked 33rd behind places like Honolulu,
Hawaii, Orlando, Fla., and Tulsa, Okla.
Meanwhile, Atlanta — land of a pair of former NHL franchises that now call
Calgary and Winnipeg home — was just outside of the top 10 in 11th spot
thanks to what the study estimates as a US$51.8-billion available income
base — the amount earned by all of its residents in 2010.
As entertaining as random studies like this one can sometimes be, anyone
who takes the results seriously is as nutty as the person who decided to put
it together, or maybe even the guy who decided to write about it.
Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif., ranks first, with Houston a close second.
Las Vegas, Virginia Beach, and Providence are also in the top 10.
Based on disposable income, there’s no way the Jets would be back in
Manitoba. Yet they sold out their season tickets in a matter of minutes (17
of them), and without even debuting their new jersey, the team’s gear is the
league’s most popular sales item at the moment.
It’s easy to imagine a similar scene when the Nordiques — or whatever
name the new Quebec franchise may be given — eventually make their
long-awaited return to Canada.
One thing the Business Journals study gets right is a brief sentence near
the bottom of the writeup, where it says other factors would be considered,
such as an area’s passion for hockey.
Indeed, Canadian cities have that in abundance.
You may argue both Winnipeg and Quebec have already lost franchises of
their own. But it wasn’t because of a lack of passion from the fans. The
business of hockey was broken, and the salary cap era has fixed the model.
If financial numbers like those in this study were the sole basis for the
NHL’s future plans, we may never see another team north of the border.
Well, until places like Atlanta prove money isn’t all that matters when it
comes to the feasibility of a hockey franchise.
The Business Journals' Top 10 markets for NHL expansion/relocation:
1. Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif.
2. Houston, Texas
3. Bridgeport-Stamford, Conn.
4. Las Vegas, Nev.
5. Virginia Beach-Norfolk, Va.
576804     St Louis Blues                                                         Before his departure from the desert, however, Hulsizer had become a
                                                                                  fixture at games in Phoenix. While indicating that he would be a "hands-off"
                                                                                  owner if the deal went through, Hulsizer regularly wore his Coyotes' jersey
Hulsizer's roots in hockey could make him nice fit for Blues                      and sat among the crowd.
                                                                                  "They haven't had a great product and I think we can turn it around,"
                                                                                  Hulsizer told reporters, despite reports that the team was losing $30 million-
By JEREMY RUTHERFORD • jrutherford@post-dispatch.com > 314-444-                   plus per season in recent years. "We are going to have to earn the fans
7135 | Posted: Sunday, August 21, 2011 12:00 am                                   back. ... We are going to have to earn back their faith and show that by
                                                                                  putting out a good product."
                                                                                  Perhaps because of his heavy public exposure in the ill-fated venture,
Matthew Hulsizer, one of the candidates to be the next owner of the Blues,        Hulsizer is keeping a much lower profile in his bid for the Blues, a
"had a big personality and presence" during a four-year career as a               development that more closely fits his profile. It was once noted that after
defenseman at Amherst College.                                                    starting PEAK6 with his wife, co-founder Jennifer Just, the company burned
                                                                                  the cardboard boxes in which the firm's equipment was shipped, so that its
"I know back then, hockey was very important to him," Amherst coach Jack
                                                                                  competitors couldn't learn of the technology being used.
Arena said. "He worked hard at the game, and he just loved to play. And he
wasn't a wallflower. He was always very much in the middle of the locker          PEAK6's website says that its recipe for success has been "relentless
room scene."                                                                      innovation with flawless execution."
Soon, Hulsizer could be bringing that presence - in a more prominent role -       Now, Hulsizer is hopeful to bring that recipe to the Blues.
to the Blues. Monday is the deadline for groups to submit their offers to
purchase the team, and it's expected that Hulsizer, along with current Blues      Asked if he ever thought that his former defenseman had a future in
minority owner Tom Stillman, will be among those putting bids on the table.       hockey, Arena said: "Certainly not like this. So many of our former players
The next step, once an offer is accepted, would be signing a purchase             stay involved in some way, but normally it's helping coach youth teams or
agreement and then taking the deal to the National Hockey League for              something like that.
approval.
                                                                                  "The success Matt has had in the business world has certainly been
"Any former player or coach would love to own an NHL team," Hulsizer,             phenomenal. So knowing him, even as much as he loves hockey, he's not
who did not respond to a request to be interviewed for this story, told the       going into any deal with blinders on due to his love for hockey. He's a very,
                                                                                  very sharp business guy. If I were a Blues fan - and I might become one if
Chicago Tribune last year. "I'm a hockey fan, a hockey coach and a hockey         he gets the team - I'd be excited about someone like him owning the
player and I would like to join the club."                                        franchise."
Hulsizer, who is a registered USA Hockey coach in Winnetka, Ill., was             St Louis Post Dispatch LOADED: 08.21.2011
Amherst's top defenseman in the late 1980s and early '90s, according to
Arena. Hulsizer totaled 23 goals and 57 points in four years at the Division
III school, and as a senior he was elected team captain and earned a spot
on the all-conference team.
"Kids at schools like Amherst,'' Arena said, "they're pretty highly
accomplished kids and for them to be so academically oriented and take
that much time out to do something like hockey, you have to love it and he
certainly did."
Hulsizer, now 41, did not go from college defenseman to potential NHL
owner overnight. Amherst, a liberal arts college founded in 1821 in western
Massachusetts, is better known for its academics than athletics. The
school's alumni list includes Calvin Coolidge, the 30th president of the
United States, along with 10 governors, four Nobel Prize winners and three
astronauts.
A 1991 graduate, Hulsizer started his professional career with O'Connor &
Associates, working on the floor of the American Stock Exchange in New
York. In 1992, O'Connor was bought by Swiss Bank, and the New Jersey
native was relocated to Chicago. In 1997, facing another relocation,
Hulsizer co-founded PEAK6 Investments, a financial services firm. Fourteen
years after its launch, PEAK6, based in Chicago, manages an estimated $1
billion in assets.
Hulsizer, however, never lost his love for hockey, and two months after
pulling out of a complicated deal to buy the Phoenix Coyotes, he could be
joining "the club" in St. Louis.
A relative unknown in NHL circles two years ago, Hulsizer would be a slam-
dunk to gain NHL approval. In December 2010, the league's 10-member
Board of Governors' executive committee unanimously approved his
application to buy the Coyotes.
Deputy commissioner Bill Daly labeled the group's conversations with
Hulsizer as "a very good interview."
The NHL had bought Phoenix out of bankruptcy in 2009 and planned to sell
the Coyotes to Hulsizer. But part of deal included the city of Glendale, Ariz.,
paying Hulsizer $197 million over a five-year span, a total that was to be
funded by $100 million in bond sales.
That plan hit a snag when the Goldwater Institute, a watchdog group in
Arizona, scoffed at the bond proposal and threatened legal action. That
scared away investors. Amid the wrangling, Hulsizer backed out of the deal,
not wishing to engage in several more months of negotiations.
576805     Toronto Maple Leafs                                                    I worry that Adam van Koeverden winning the K-1 1,000 metres at the world
                                                                                  championship puts him in a favoured position for the London Olympics.
                                                                                  Four years ago, the pressure of being a heavy favourite and the Canadian
Simmons: Why is it always the enforcers? 0                                        flag-holder in Beijing, ate up the impressive Canadian athlete ... The
                                                                                  lobbying has started early. There are no signs the NHL will allow its players
                                                                                  in the 2014 Winter Olympics, but Pittsburgh’s Dan Bylsma is already
                                                                                  lobbying for the head coaching job of Team USA ... It’s nice the NHL runs a
By Steve Simmons ,Toronto Sun                                                     research and development dog and pony show every summer. But I’d be
                                                                                  more impressed if years after Colin Campbell, Don Cherry and others
                                                                                  publicly identified the problem of weapon-like equipment, something could
A psychologist told me straight up years ago: Don’t try and understand            be finally done about that. Maybe Doug Gilmour should bring his old
mental illness. Just be aware that it’s almost everywhere.                        shoulder pads to his Hall of Fame induction just to show what he played
                                                                                  with. ... Another thing I don’t understand: Why haven’t the goalie gloves
That message, both complex and simple, comes to mind with the recent              shrunk in size? Time was, you had to catch the puck. Now, the glove is so
death of hockey player Rick Rypien. Neither his life, nor his death, can be       large the puck just hits it half the time ... Anyone who has been around
easily quantified or explained.                                                   minor hockey long enough has witnessed tournament games with 4-on-4
                                                                                  and 3-on-3 in overtime. Even 2-on-2. Funny to see the big boys stealing
He suffered from a form of depression — as so many of us do — and
                                                                                  ideas from the little guys.
eventually succumbed to it. He did so with a life all too public and a hockey
role that that had proven to be challenging and destructive on so many            AND ANOTHER THING
levels for so many players.
                                                                                  Let’s see if we have this straight: The only reason the Ponzi creep created
It can be no coincidence that deaths among young hockey players — some            the University of Miami football scandal is he was feeling hurt and dismayed
drug-related, some depression-related, some alcohol-related — have come           in prison that none of the boys he bought lap dances for bothered to call or
from those who are employed to be the tough guy in today’s game. In each          visit after he was incarcerated. Is that about right? ... The forever-injured
of the deaths of Rypien at 27, Derek Boogaard at 28, and before that Bob          Canadian pitcher Rich Harden has been unimpressive this season, except
Probert at 45 and John Kordic at 27 — all men gone well before their time,        in two starts against the Blue Jays ... The new National Basketball League
all fought on the ice and fought personal demons off it — there is an inate       is a wonderful idea that has no chance of success or survival. I say that with
correlation between job description and personal problems.                        the knowledge that I made exactly the same prediction when Toronto FC
                                                                                  came to town. And I was only half right with my prediction. They have had
There is nothing else like this in hockey. There is no list of young goalies
                                                                                  no chance of success ... For those counting at the knockdowns, the boxing
gone, or young forwards of talent. But this is something both the National        great, Floyd Mayweather Jr., is being sued for failing to pay bills, not
Hockey League and the NHL Players’ Association must look at with a new-           making car payments, not paying rent for his office, having his staff beat up
found vigilance.
                                                                                  fans, for allegedly beating up a security guard who asked to see his ID, and
What should happen first in hockey? The elimination of fighting or the            all that has nothing to do with criminal charges he faces for grand larceny
elimination of designated fighters? That, and finding better ways to deal         and lobbery. Said Floyd: “Everything is allegations.” ... Born this date: Toe
with mental illness inside the game, is the next real-life challenge inside the   Blake and Billy Reay. And a happy birthday to Jim McMahon (52), Archie
game.                                                                             Griffin (57), Josee Chouinard (41, really, how is that possible?), Craig
                                                                                  Counsell (41) and Clarence Williams III (72) ... And hey, whatever became
THIS AND THAT                                                                     of Ernie DiGregorio?
After a horrible 2-for-20 start with the Blue Jays, Colby Rasmus has              LONG WAIT, SHORT STINT
demonstrated why Alex Anthopoulos was willing to give up nine
organizational parts to get the centre fielder. Not only is he solid in the       Greg Marshall waited 17 years and all those second-place finishes in
outfield, but Rasmus has hit .395 with 10 runs scored and 10 RBIs in 43 at-       interviews before getting his first head-coaching job in the Canadian
bats since settling in as a Blue Jay ... I fully understand the Jays wanting to   Football League — a job that ended up lasting all of eight games.
lock up GM Anthopoulos long-term. The question is, knowing Anthopoulos,           Maybe Marshall, the long-time defensive coordinator, was passed over all
will he want a long-term deal? He is family man first, baseball man second.
                                                                                  those years for a reason. Whatever the reason was, the situation for him in
The way he talks, and knowing he’s a workaholic, he’s not likely to be a          Saskatchewan couldn’t have been worse this season and it seemed as
baseball lifer ... The way Adeiny Hechavarria is hitting in Las Vegas, he has     though he did little to aid the failing team.
to be a September callup with the Jays. Doesn’t he? It won’t be long before
the Jays infield will consist of 21-year-old Brett Lawrie, 22-year-old            His eight-game span as a head coach — career record 1-7 — will rank as
Hechavarria and now the aging shortstop, Yunel Escobar, all of 28. All three      one of the shortest in league history.
acquired in different ways by Anthopoulos over the past two years ... Oh, to
be at Sports Day at Maple Leaf Square on Saturday, just to get a shot at          Will he ever get another head-coaching opportunity? Unlikely. But as Ron
Richard Peddie in the dunk tank ... So, I have second pick in my fantasy          Lancaster once proved after starting his coaching career at 4-28, there can
football draft and am having trouble deciding between Adrian Peterson,            be hope. Lancaster coached 14 more seasons after being fired in
Chris Johnson (assuming he reports) and this year’s flavour du jour, Arian        Saskatchewan, although it did take him 11 years to get his second
Foster.                                                                           opportunity.

HEAR AND THERE                                                                    UFC, FOX TAKE AIM AT BOXING

Eric Tillman stopped being a football genius the minute Fred Stamps went          Quick: Name the UFC heavyweight champion. If you’re like me, and had to
down with an injury ... Another strange aspect of Tim Connolly centring Phil      look up the name of Cain Velasquez, and then wonder who he is, you’ll
Kessel: Connolly and Kessel both shoot right. If healthy, Matthew Lombardi,       understand why it was necessary for UFC to get itself on mainstream
a left-handed shot, might be a better fit for Kessel. And Lombardi would be       television in North America. The seven-year deal it signed with FOX-TV is
one of the few Leafs with Kessel-type speed ... If the American League            the kind of arrangement that can help grow the hugely successful niche
season ended today, I’d have to vote for Curtis Granderson as the MVP.            sport into more than merely niche.
He’s just a home run behind Jose Bautista, but leading the league in RBIs,
                                                                                  What UFC currently lacks is a crossover star — a Hulk Hogan, Muhammad
runs scored, has 23 stolen bases, 10 triples and plays a mean centre field
                                                                                  Ali, Wayne Gretzky — a face that everyone knows (and please don’t tell me
... No genius, that Clinton Portis. He got a chance to work out for the New
                                                                                  that’s the extraordinarily dull Georges St. Pierre.) Clearly, with its first free
England Patriots, who love reclamation projects, and showed up out of
                                                                                  television card, UFC and FOX have targeted boxing fans.
shape ... When you see Prince Fielder, you know he’s Cecil Fielder’s son.
But I still can’t get over the fact that big John Mayberry’s son, John            The Nov. 12 show happens to be on the same night the largest name in
Mayberry Jr., plays centre field. Doesn’t seem right ... So, if Chris Getzlaf     boxing, Manny Pacquaio, takes on Juan Manuel Marquez on pay per view.
makes the circus catch late Thursday night against the Argos, is Greg             The numbers will make a statement.
Marshall still coaching the Roughriders and would Jim Barker have
replaced himself, or been forced to, in Toronto?                                  ARGOS IN-FIGHTING INCIDENT IGNORED

SCENE AND HEARD
Just how the fight on the sidelines between Cory Boyd and assistant coach
Mike O’Shea near the end of the Argos’ second win of the season was
covered says much about the place the CFL holds in Canada’s largest city.
Were the names and teams different, say it were a shoving match between
Luke Schenn and a Maple Leafs assistant coach, how prevalent would it be
in the news? How much time would that event take up on talk radio? How
much newspaper space would be afforded the inner battle?
Instead, there was little coverage and almost no reaction to a fight between
the Argos’ best player and best-known assistant coach. For O’Shea,
fighting in games is nothing new. He had more than a few of those in his
career. But as a coach, his responsibilities change.
Speaking just for myself, I’d care a whole lot more about the Argos if they
were covered with same energy and enthusiasm that the Leafs are.
Toronto Sun LOADED: 08.21.2011
576806        Toronto Maple Leafs                                                  Down from the trailer was a tent where fans where able to have their picture
                                                                                   taken with the coveted Voyageurs Cup. I’m not sure what the Voyageurs
                                                                                   Cup is, but I think the Toronto Sun fastball team won it back ’91, when
Party time for MLSEL                                                               hockey writer Lance Hornby was the manager.
                                                                                   As I headed toward the exit, I spotted Cody Franson being whisked away
                                                                                   by some security guys. He appeared to be in a daze, no doubt because he
By Steve Buffery ,Toronto Sun                                                      had just been asked by hundreds of fans for an autograph. That doesn’t
                                                                                   happen in Nashville.
                                                                                   Then former Raptors favourite Muggsy Bogues sat down in the autograph
TORONTO -                                                                          booth. You have to get Muggsy credit. He chatted with pretty well every fan,
                                                                                   including one dimwit who asked him to sign his Muggsy Bogues jersey.
Okay, let’s get this out of the way: Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment
Ltd. President Richard Peddie guarantees that the Leafs will make the              “I got it half-price,” the guy said.
playoffs this season.
                                                                                   Muggsy didn’t look impressed.
“Absolutely,” Peddie said, when asked if he was certain about his
prediction. “But I guess Burkie’s going to kill me now.”                           Toronto Sun LOADED: 08.21.2011

I don’t get it. Everyone seems to cower around Leafs GM Brian Burke these
days. Sure, he growls and barks and snarls. But so does the dog next door.
Then again, the dog next door is closer to winning a Stanley Cup than
Burkie is.
Right track
Hey, I’m just kidding. Burkie has the Leafs on the right track. They’ve got
two great, young goalies, a solid core on defence and a gifted goal scorer
up front. All they need is 11 more quality forwards and the parade is on.
I caught up with Peddie at Maple Leaf Square on Saturday, where MLSEL
was throwing a street party in celebration of ... well, I’m not sure what they
were celebrating. They haven’t won anything. The cynic in me figures the
party was a ruse to sell condos.
“This is a way for the organization to thank our loyal fans,” one of the
MLSEL media guys said.
I suggested that winning a few games might be a good way to thank your
fans. But, hey, what do I know about selling condos.
But you’ve to give Peddie credit. The MLSEL poobah was a good enough
sport to take his turn in the dunk tank, though he was able to do only one
session because he hurt his back falling into the water. I kid you not. The
man was in pain.
I asked Peddie who was next in the tank.
“Well, Burkie was supposed to be here,” he said. “But he’s out shooting
something. I think it’s caribou this time.”
I guess if Burkie isn’t signing big, dumb animals, he’s hunting them.
The MLSEL media boys had a tough time finding guys for the dunk tank
after Peddie bailed. One guy they threw in was Chris Hebb, the VP of
Broadcasting. But who the hell wants to dunk Chris Hebb? No offence to
Hebb. I’m sure he’s a nice guy and everything. But the whole idea of
dunking someone is to get back at them, so to speak.
I can see fans being sour with Peddie or Burkie or Raptors GM Bryan
Colangelo, and wanting to dunk them. But Chris Hebb?
I couldn’t take the excitement of the dunk tank any longer, so I decided to
wander around a little. I noticed a referee on stilts, confirming my belief that
all referees are clowns.
Then I wandered over to the autograph booth and saw that there was huge
lineup to get Cody Franson’s autograph. The line almost went right to Lake
Shore Blvd. You know this town is Leafs crazy when 100 people line up to
get Cody Franson’s autograph. Again, nothing against Cody Franson, who
could be a nice fit on the Leafs blue line this season. But he’s no Aki Berg.
I noticed that most of the people at the party were wearing Leafs or Raptors
shirt, and there weren’t many wearing TFC sweaters. Then again, the event
started at 10 a.m., and most TFC fans are drunk by then.
Authentic
Another one of the event’s attractions was a trailer set up inside to look like
the Leafs dressing room. And boy was it authentic. It looked exactly like the
real Leafs dressing room right after a game.
That is, there wasn’t a player to be found anywhere.
576807     Toronto Maple Leafs                                                    “I got Richard on my third pitch and (executive vice-president) Tom Anselmi
                                                                                  on my second,” a pleased Massey said. “It’s good the brass is doing this to
                                                                                  show they’re good sports. I’m a life-long Leaf fan and hopefully this will be
Deal has special ring for Peddie                                                  the year we actually do something. They have a nice, young team right now
                                                                                  and the goaltending situation is looking great.”
                                                                                  Dubbed the Sports Day In Maple Leaf Square, the interactive event for the
By Lance Hornby ,Toronto Sun                                                      MLSEL Team Up Foundation let fans meet Cody Franson and other figures
                                                                                  from the MLSEL sports stable — while unloading a little frustration at the
                                                                                  dunk tank.
Richard Peddie regrets he won’t go out a winner on the ice, but is confident      Leads voting
his fingerprints will soon be on a future Stanley Cup for the Maple Leafs.
                                                                                  “I was ready for someone to throw at my head,” quipped Peddie. “We
In fact, his retirement deal calls for him to receive a coveted Cup ring          started talking about a dunk tank for our employees for the event and then
should the hockey team suddenly surge to the top in the next few seasons.         they said: ‘Can we put you in?’ ”
Peddie is stepping down Dec. 31 after almost 14 years as president and
CEO of Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment Ltd. He oversaw a company              Fans voting via Twitter named Peddie as the one they most wanted to soak.
that was successful everywhere but on the playing surface of its two hockey       With three balls for $5 and unlimited chances for $20 in a two-minute
teams, the basketball Raptors and soccer’s TFC.                                   barrage, Massey was the third contestant, behind a kid in a Sidney Crosby
                                                                                  jersey. Anselmi got into the spirit by wearing his business suit.
“My retirement agreement is that I get a ring if we do it in the next three
years,” Peddie said on Saturday, adding with a laugh “the next guy is going       “We want people to come down and use the Square as a great gathering
to get all the credit and get his name on the Cup. Which is cool, because I       place,” Anselmi said. “And the sooner we can use it for playoffs, the better.”
think hockey is the only sport where the suits get their name on the trophy.
                                                                                  A crowd of 4,000 gathered there in June to watch Game 7 of the Boston-
“I’m down to 17 weeks to go, but who’s counting? It has been a lot of fun         Vancouver series on the giant outdoor screen and four movies have been
and we’ve done a lot of good things, even though we haven’t won. I feel           shown at night.
really good about our four teams, Aron (Winter’s) makevover of TFC and I
love what Dallas Eakins is doing with the Marlies. Brian Burke (Leafs) and        “This will be an outstanding place for the playoffs and so will Real Sports
Bryan Colangelo (Raptors) have some good quality players. I just wish they        (the adjacent bar that seats 1,000),” Peddie said. “We want people to know
would have won while I was here. But I’m sure our fans are going to see           there’s always something going on here.”
some winners.”                                                                    Franson gets big T.O. welcome
The search for Peddie’s successor has been on hold since MLSEL’s                  Just think what the reaction will be when Cody Franson actually plays a
majority shareholders, the Ontario Teachers Pension Plan, put its 66%             game as a Maple Leaf.
control up for bidding. That move has not yet met a price the Teachers seek
to cash in.                                                                       The new defenceman arrived in town Friday night, strolled Yorkville with his
                                                                                  girlfriend and on Saturday morning, a long row of fans was queued for his
Meanwhile, the corporate head-hunting firm of Korn/Ferry International was        autograph at Maple Leaf Square.
hired to conduct a search for Peddie’s replacement last December.
                                                                                  “I’ve been in Toronto one day and there’s a lineup around the corner,”
Korn/Ferry pared down a long list and though it has looked as far away as         Franson said after his half-hour signing session at MLSEL’s charity event.
the U.S., it has identified one internal MLSEL candidate, executive vice-         “It doesn’t get any better than that.”
president Tom Anselmi.
                                                                                  Popular
“Things are playing out,” a coy Anselmi said. “Once we know what the
score is with the sale, they’ll get back into the search.”                        Franson, acquired from the Nashville Predators with centre Matthew
                                                                                  Lombardi, knows all about the Leafs’ generational popularity despite 44
The 64-year-old Peddie brought a strong business acumen to a company              years without a Cup. Franson was wearing a little Wendel Clark sweater in
that’s now valued at more than a billion dollars, but he was heavily criticized   his first baby picture, taken in Salmon Arm, B.C., in 1987.
for meddling in hockey matters. There were some difficulties surrounding
Pat Quinn’s exit as general manager and a flawed choice in Peddie naming          Now, the 6-foot-5 Franson joins a Leaf defence that should be one of the
newcomer John Ferguson to the post. But Peddie bowed to the fans’                 biggest in the NHL.
wishes in 2008 by getting a proven, Cup-winning personality in Burke and
then stepping back to the boardroom.                                              ”It’s good that we’re covered in that (size) aspect,” Franson said. “We
                                                                                  should have a good, young team going forward. I had a quick chat with
Burke has yet to get the Leafs in the playoffs and his success or failure in      (general manager) Brian Burke and we talked about how excited we are
the next couple of years will reflect on Peddie’s legacy.                         and which direction the team is going.
“I was absolutely convinced he was the right guy,” Peddie said. “We did a         “I spoke to (captain) Dion Phaneuf after things quieted down from the trade
very thorough search and analysis of the track record of almost all the GMs.      and Luke Schenn has been working outwith me in Kelowna. Other than
Brian was under contract and we could not approach him for fear of                that, I don’t know anybody. I’ve walked on to a blank canvas, but that’s part
tampering. So we waited (almost a year).                                          of the excitement of a new team.”
“When you are the general manager of the Leafs, it’s more than what you           Toronto Sun LOADED: 08.21.2011
do on the ice. You’re a spokesman for hockey and the NHL. It takes a very
special person to be captain of the Leafs and to be the GM.”
Peddie has said he will not be taking any high-profile jobs connected to
sports once he leaves. He has spoken of spending more time in an
environmentally friendly house that he and wife Colleen built on Bob-Lo
Island in the Detroit River, near his Windsor roots.
Richard takes a bath
Gary Massey’s perfect fastball strike fulfilled the fantasy of many
disgruntled Toronto sports fans.
Wearing a Maple Leafs’ ap, the 33-year-old employee of a local moving
company became the first to send MLSEL president Richard Peddie into an
ice-cold dunk tank during Saturday’s charity event outside the Air Canada
Centre. The prize was Peddie’s own tickets to the Leafs’
Sept. 19 pre-season opener against Ottawa.
576808     Vancouver Canucks                                                    Rypien bounced between the Canucks and their farm team, the Manitoba
                                                                                Moose, where his general manager was Heisinger, now the assistant
                                                                                general manager for the Winnipeg Jets.
Friends, family, NHLers pay tribute to former Canuck Rick Rypien                “At the end of the day, he’s a fantastic person,” said Heisinger, fighting back
                                                                                tears behind his sunglasses following the service.

By Bryce Forbes,                                                                “We are not going to let this tragedy go in vain, we are going to learn more
                                                                                about it,” said Heisinger, who brought Rypien into the Jets’ fold in July as a
                                                                                free agent.

BLAIRMORE — Family and friends paid their respects Saturday to the NHL          “Rick’s message so much at the end was that he wanted to get better and
player affectionately known as “Ripper.”                                        help other people. So I think the message is left with us to make sure it gets
                                                                                out there,” said Heisinger.
About 1,000 people came to Blairmore, Alta., about 220 kilometres south of
Calgary, to mourn Rick Rypien who died on Monday.                               “At the end of the day, if Rick’s happier where he is today, we should all be
                                                                                happy for him.”
“On days like this, it is extremely challenging for everybody who knows
someone like Rick,” said a clearly distraught Mike Gillis, general manager of   Born and raised in Coleman, Rypien finished his career with nine goals and
the Vancouver Canucks, after the memorial service at the Albert Stella          16 points in 119 NHL games, to go along with 226 penalty minutes. He
Memorial Arena where Rypien once played.                                        added 39 points in 116 games at the AHL level.

Rypien, 27, who had battled depression for a number of years, died              Vancouver Sun: LOADED: 08.21.2011
suddenly in his home nearby in Coleman, Alta. RCMP have called it non-
suspicious.
There were a number of representatives from the Canucks, Manitoba
Moose, Jets and Regina Pats, his former teams, at the funeral.
Representatives from the Canucks included Kevin Bieksa, Alex Burrows,
Aaron Rome, Darcy Hordichuk, Mason Raymond, Manny Malhotra and a
variety of staff. Joining them were several members of the Jets staff,
including True North Sports and Entertainment chairman Mark Chipman,
general manager Kevin Cheveldayoff, and assistant general manager Craig
Heisinger.
His uncle, former NFL quarterback and Super Bowl winner Mark Rypien,
was also in attendance.
Shortly after noon, Rypien’s dark brown casket was wheeled through the
converted lacrosse rink, with his former teammate Bieksa one of the
pallbearers.
At the front of the rink sat Rypien’s No. 11 Pats jersey, one he wore proudly
as the captain of the Western Hockey League team. His No. 37 Canucks
jersey was at the entrance.
Tears flowed openly from many in the crowd.
While Rypien had a tough guy reputation, his uncle Allan Rypien said he
also had a big heart. He recalled how he would visit classes at a Crowsnest
Pass area school and make sure everyone had an autograph or photo
before he left.
Rypien’s struggles with depression were also addressed.
“I don’t think we can be afraid to talk about the issues Rick went through,”
said Gillis. “I know he wanted that.”
Rypien took a leave of absence from the Canucks twice in his career, the
latest in November. He never returned, instead finishing the season with the
Moose of the American Hockey League.
“When he was in an environment he can control, he was fine, he was
great,” said Gillis. “When he got into an environment he couldn’t control, he
had great difficulty.”
Gillis said the Canucks did everything they could to help Rypien.
“We tried a lot of different things and were there for him every step of the
way,” he said. “We challenged it every step of the way, but things occurred
that he just couldn’t seem to overcome.
“I guess Rick at the end of the day couldn’t overcome the illness that he
had.”
Rypien joined the Canucks in 2005, fighting his way to a spot on the team
as an undrafted free agent from junior. He scored his first NHL goal on his
first NHL shot.
“When you look back at his career, he did virtually everything to get to the
highest level,” said Gillis.
However, he was a man more known for his golden gloves than a golden
stick, playing more of an enforcer role with the Canucks.
576809     Winnipeg Jets


'Rick’s tragedy won’t go in vain'


By: Gary Lawless


BLAIRMORE, Alta. -- Roughly 1,000 people filled an arena for the funeral of
Winnipeg Jets forward Rick Rypien Saturday afternoon.
Among the attendees were Jets owner Mark Chipman, GM Kevin
Cheveldayoff, asst. GM Craig Heisinger, Vancouver Canucks GM Mike
Gillis, and a number of Rypien's former Canucks teammates. Canucks
defenceman Kevin Bieksa was a pallbearer.
Rypien was found dead in his home earlier this week. His death is not
considered suspicious.
"Rick’s tragedy won’t go in vain," said asst. GM Craig Heisinger, speaking
to the Free Press outside the arena. "I don’t know what we’re going to do
yet, but we’ll do something. We’re going to learn more about this disease.
We’re going to talk about it and find ways to fight it."
Rypien, who struggled with depression, had signed with the Winnipeg Jets
this off-season after six years with the Vancouver Canucks.
"I don’t think we can be afraid to talk about the issues that Rick went
through. I know he wanted that. It’s up to us now to continue the legacy of a
great young man and help those that go through the same issues as Rick,"
said Canucks GM Mike Gillis.
"Rick suffered from depression and it was an ongoing illness. When he was
in an environment that he could control, he was fine and he was great.
When he got into an environment he couldn’t control, he had great difficulty.
"We tried a lot of things and were there for him every step of the way, and
challenged him every step of the way. But there are thing that occur that
you can’t overcome. I guess at the end of the day, Rick couldn’t overcome
the illness he had. For everything he had accomplished in life, it’s
remarkable that that’s how powerful his illness was."
The 27-year-old's death came as a surprise to many who knew him and
thought he had turned a corner. They said he was looking forward to
playing for the newly relocated Jets.
"My overwhelming question is why? How could this happen,"? said his
uncle, Allan Rypien Jr.
"He had a great family, great friends and a great job."
Rypien said his nephew was battling a disease not unlike cancer.
"He fought this disease with everything he had in him," he said. "If you knew
Rick he fought with everything he had in him. Unfortunately the disease
won the battle."
"Be thankful the battle he faced is over."
A number of minor hockey players, wearing Crowsnest Pass Thunder
hockey jerseys were among those in attendance.
An autographed #37 jersey from Rypien's time with the Vancouver Canucks
and a poster from his days with the WHL's Regina Pats were part of only a
few momentos scattered amongst the bunches of flowers.
Rypien grew up in the scenic Crowsnest Pass, played much of his early
hockey there and considered the area his home.
- with files from The Canadian Press
Winnipeg Free Press LOADED 08.21.2011
576810     Winnipeg Jets                                                          Heisinger and Gillis addressed a group of media, the two hockey bosses
                                                                                  standing side by side, reaching out to grab one another's shoulder from
                                                                                  time to time as they both attempted to keep their emotions in check.
Saying goodbye to Rypien                                                          "The system didn't fail Rick. Everybody did as much as they possibly could
Family, friends gather at funeral in Alberta                                      for him. He did as much as he could for himself," said Heisinger. "Nothing
                                                                                  could be done. At the end of the day if Rick is happier where he is today,
                                                                                  we should all be happier for him. Everybody in today's society faces
                                                                                  different challenges. Rick was no different and he fought them like anybody
By: Gary Lawless                                                                  else. Just, in the end, the demon that is depression won out."
                                                                                  Heisinger said there's no plan in place to honour or learn from Rypien's life
                                                                                  and death, but that will change in time.
BLAIRMORE, Alta. -- It's hard to imagine a more beautiful setting for a
moment of such sadness.                                                           "Rick was a fantastic person. It's unfortunate the way it came to an end. But
                                                                                  I'd go through this with Rick again in a heartbeat because he'd do the same
Rick Rypien was laid to rest Saturday in southwest Alberta's Crowsnest
                                                                                  for us. Rick was worth everything we did. Absolutely. I can't tell you I know
Pass, wreathed by the Rocky Mountains, just eight miles from the B.C.
                                                                                  a lot about depression, but I can tell you I have a lot more to learn and were
border.
                                                                                  not going to let Rick's tragedy go in vain," said Heisinger.
The 27-year-old Rypien was found dead in his home in Coleman, Alta., last
                                                                                  "We will learn more about this. Rick's message at the end was so much
Monday after a 10-year battle with depression.
                                                                                  about other people and being able to help them. That message is left to us
Close to 1,000 people came to the Albert Stella Memorial Arena in                 now and we're going to work on it and get it out there."
Blairmore for an emotional service on a sun-kissed afternoon in a valley cut
                                                                                  Gillis said the NHL's behavioural program, the Canucks and the Moose all
out of the Rockies and bisected by the Crowsnest River.
                                                                                  worked to help the player.
Rypien played his minor hockey in the barn-style arena that was filled with
                                                                                  "I'm proud to have known him. Proud to have thought of him as a friend, to
family, friends and teammates he gained growing up in Crowsnest Pass
                                                                                  have worked with him and shared some success with him," said Gillis. "We
and playing hockey with the Regina Pats, Manitoba Moose and Vancouver
                                                                                  had access to the best doctors, the best programs. We had the ability to
Canucks.
                                                                                  intervene. We had opportunity to try our hardest to do the best thing. I don't
The memorial program featured a picture of a smiling Rypien in a Canucks          think there's an easy answer to any of this. I think it's going to be
jersey on the cover and a black and white photo of a more pensive Rypien          unfortunate for Rick's situation to get lumped into other situations because I
inside.                                                                           don't think it's similar at all. I hope we can become more aware and become
                                                                                  better... We were all hopeful and at different times thought we were making
"My overwhelming question is why?" said his uncle, Allan Rypien, in one of        progress and then it would happen again. At the end of the day, we were
three eulogies to Rypien. "How could this happen? He had a great family,          confident he was getting and feeling better. We felt he was doing well."
great friends and a great job... He fought this disease with everything he
had in him. If you knew Rick he fought with everything he had in him.             The Canucks and Jets have repeatedly stressed Rypien did not suffer from
Unfortunately the disease won the battle. Be thankful the battle he faced is      addiction. This past season Rypien left the Canucks to enter the NHL's
over."                                                                            behavioural program and was loaned to the Moose for the post-season.

Hockey feuds and macho personas were parked for the afternoon as men              The Jets made him one of their first free agent signings this summer and he
like Canucks GM Mike Gillis and Winnipeg Jets assistant GM Craig                  was expected to arrive in Winnipeg last Sunday.
Heisinger reached out to embrace and console each other.
                                                                                  Winnipeg Free Press LOADED 08.21.2011
NHL players came from across North America to say goodbye to their
friend.
"I don't think we can be afraid to talk about the issues that Rick went
through. I know he wanted that. It's up to us now to continue the legacy of a
great young man and help those that go through the same issues as Rick,"
said Gillis. "Rick suffered from depression and it was an ongoing illness.
When he was in an environment that he could control, he was fine and he
was great. When he got into an environment he couldn't control he had
great difficulty. We tried a lot of things and were there for him every step of
the way and challenged it every step of the way, but there are things that
occur that you can't overcome.
"I guess at the end of the day Rick couldn't overcome the illness he had.
For everything he had accomplished in his life, it's remarkable that that's
how powerful his illness was."
Jets owner Mark Chipman, GM Kevin Cheveldayoff, director of
communications Scott Brown, athletic therapist Rob Milette, assistant
equipment manager Mark Grehan and winger Jason Jaffray were in
attendance.
Former teammate Mike Keane and friend Kevin Kaiser as well as former
Moose coaches Scott Arniel and Brad Berry were in the congregation.
Rypien was the strong, silent type on the surface but was sensitive and
caring to those who saw him as more than a hockey player.
Rypien's former Canucks teammate Kevin Bieksa was a pallbearer and
Canucks Alex Burrows, Mason Raymond, Manny Malholtra and Aaron
Rome attended the service.
Other NHL notables included Ryan Walter, Kris Versteeg, Darcy Hordichuk,
Garth Murray and NHLPA executive Mathieu Schneider.
Rypien's depression has been linked back to the death of a girlfriend during
his time in junior hockey. Twice during his time with the Canucks he took
personal leaves to deal with his illness.
576811     Winnipeg Jets


Man in the Iron Maiden mask
Mason paying tribute to metal masters


By: Ed Tait


Chris Mason will be rocking a new mask when he skates into the crease for
the first time as a Winnipeg Jet.
Mason, the veteran netminder, told InGoal Magazine this week he'll be
wearing a mask painted by Steve Nash of Eyecandyair that features the
Jets' new logo and a tribute to heavy-metal masters Iron Maiden.
"We went back and forth, lots of phone calls, and I sent Steve some
sketches and he did some art and we mulled over a bunch of different
ideas," Mason said in an interview with InGoal. "Then he came up with the
Iron Maiden Eddie (the band's mascot) in the old fighter jet and I thought it
was perfect. I loved the image and thought that was really appropriate for
the Jets.
"I'm a fan of a few songs. 'Aces High' is one song I really like, so it's kind of
perfect."
Iron Maiden's Eddie first appeared on the Aces High album cover and was
originally created by one of Nash's favourite artists, Derek Riggs.
The chin on Mason's mask will feature the Jets' logo and include his
number, 50, with the wings extending from the front along the sides of the
headgear.
"I think it looks awesome with the maple leaf behind the jet," Mason said.
"I'm a big fan of the logo, and I just love having the maple leaf on my mask,
so I'm really excited about that."
The back plate features an eagle with the family name spelled out on the
wings and is a tribute to his family. Mason is expecting his second daughter
in October.
"Steve came up with an eagle family done in native art style," said Mason.
"It's a mother eagle protecting her two young children with sky in
background. I think it just looks awesome."
Interestingly, Mason -- a product of Red Deer -- said one of his favourite
goalies when he was growing up was former Jet Bob Essensa. And he's got
a few ideas if the franchise trots out their old colours over the next few
years, although that apparently isn't in the plans for 2011-12.
"I was definitely Bob Essensa on the driveway a lot," said Mason. "So if
they do a third jersey with something like that I would have definitely one
something like his or close to his because I loved his masks."
Mason has been pro-Winnipeg since the franchise relocation from Atlanta
became official in late May, stating several times to a number of news
outlets the return to a Canadian market is exciting. It's a message he
repeated in this latest interview.
"It's home, or close to home, and any athlete would jump at the opportunity
to play close to home, especially getting later in a career, having a couple
young children, and being so accessible to our family," he said. "I'm so
excited to get to Winnipeg. I've always wanted to play in Canada. I know it
might not be the most popular answer for people in Atlanta but that's how I
feel.
"It was tough in Atlanta because in my opinion it just wasn't an optimal
hockey market. The fans there were awesome but there just wasn't a broad
range of support, so it was tough some nights to have that feeling it didn't
matter so much and hockey wasn't the most important thing. Going to
Winnipeg, you're not going to have that feeling at all. It's going to be
everywhere, it's going to be the opposite spectrum."
ed.tait@freepress.mb.ca
Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition August 21, 2011
B2
Winnipeg Free Press LOADED 08.21.2011
576812      Winnipeg Jets


Winnipeg to host NHL launch


By: Gary Lawless and Ed Tait


The National Hockey League’s 2011-12 regular season will see the curtain
raised with a major launch centred right here in Winnipeg Oct. 6.
Sources have told the Free Press the season debut – dubbed ‘NHL Face-
Off’ -- will include a live network broadcast component from The Forks on
opening night as the campaign begins with the Habs in Toronto to face the
Maple Leafs (6 p.m.) and the Pittsburgh Penguins in Vancouver to meet the
Canucks (9 p.m.)
Both those games are on CBC with lone other game, featuring the
Philadelphia Flyers travelling to Boston to face the Stanley-Cup champion
Bruins, to be televised on Versus.
The festivities will all be part of a four-day build-up to the Jets’ first contest
at MTS Centre against the Montreal Canadiens on Sunday, Oct. 9,
televised nationally on CBC with the puck dropping at 4 p.m.
Word is the party in Winnipeg will include a ‘major Canadian concert act,’
with one of the bands rumoured to be Nickelback.
The NHL ran a similar campaign in past seasons with last year’s ‘NHL
Face-Off’ including an entertainment festival in Toronto that featured live
musical performances, interactive hockey-skills games, giveaways,
appearances by former NHL players, merchandise tents and live game
broadcasts on giant video screens.
As well, the season opens with four NHL teams – the Anaheim Ducks,
Buffalo Sabres, Los Angeles Kings and New York Rangers – making their
2011-12 debuts in Europe. On Oct. 7 the Kings and Rangers meet in
Stockholm with the Sabres and Ducks in Helsinki. On Saturday, the Ducks
face the Rangers in Berlin, marking the first NHL game ever in Germany.
Winnipeg Free Press LOADED 08.21.2011
576813      Winnipeg Jets                                                            Who knows? A shot in a game, a bump in practice, an airplane ride. If
                                                                                     there's a trigger out there, Hiller doesn't know what it is and can't see it
                                                                                     coming.
Hiller on board, how 'bout Teemu?                                                    "Sure, I wish I knew what caused it so I could avoid it in the future and I
                                                                                     could give you guys a clear answer," he said. "But it's not going to change
                                                                                     how I feel right now, and I'm feeling good. That's what's important."
By: Jeff Miller
                                                                                     To be certain, the phone call from Switzerland last week was a positive one,
                                                                                     an optimistic one, a call the Ducks are glad they answered because of the
                                                                                     bigger question Hiller answered.
ANAHEIM -- It flew nearly 6,000 miles to get here, coming from a foreign
land nine hours ahead of us.                                                         Asked if the vertigo symptoms are still on his mind, he said, "I've stopped
                                                                                     thinking too much about it."
But it arrived right on time, completely intact.
                                                                                     Asked if he could play right now, he said, "Yeah, I think so."
Few things travel as well as optimism does.
                                                                                     Asked when he thought he could resume performing like an all-star, he
"Another good day today," he said. "Beautiful weather here in Switzerland."          said, "I hope the first game."
It was good to hear Jonas Hiller talk about the weather because it was good          Training camp is still a month away, but the Ducks' season feels a lot closer
to hear Jonas Hiller talk about anything but Jonas Hiller.                           today. With Hiller recovered, it also feels at lot less uncertain.
For the first time in seven months, the Ducks' goaltender could submit to            So, Teemu, how about clearing up the Ducks' outlook even more now?
idle conversation. Only with Hiller, the recent conversation wasn't so idle.
                                                                                     -- McClatchy news service
"I'm where I used to be," Hiller explained over the phone, which is great
news for the Ducks seeing how he used to be an all-star.                             Winnipeg Free Press LOADED 08.21.2011

The Ducks have made no bold-headline additions this offseason, but they
got better last week. By pronouncing himself free of vertigo symptoms,
Hiller greatly improved this team's prospects.
The Ducks aren't the Ducks and can't possibly be without Hiller. As good as
Ray Emery and Dan Ellis were in his absence last season, Hiller lifts this
team to a much more intriguing level.
This wasn't a big-time signing, but it was a big-time sighting.
Now, if Teemu Selanne can just talk his ligaments and tendons into one
more year, the Ducks could end up with one of the most productive off-
seasons ever for a team that didn't really do much.
Should Selanne reach a decision in the next week and a half, the Ducks
certainly would finish with a much better late August than the one the
Angels are having.
"It's a lot of fun just to be back," Hiller said. "The fact that I'm excited to be
back should help me reach the level I was playing at before."
Having one star in limbo would be taxing enough on an organization's
psyche. But the Ducks have spent all summer with two stars tied behind
their backs.
Hiller and Selanne haven't been players of late, they've been questions.
They've been the Can he? and Will he? of the NHL. And no team in this
league was facing two larger, more impactful questions.
Hiller just brightened the horizon in Anaheim, and the way his words arrived
suggested things are sunnier these days in Switzerland, too. Good weather,
indeed.
Think about the season this guy endured. He carried the Ducks at the start
of 2010-11, emerged as an elite, world-class goalie and then, in mid-dream,
had the ice under his feet turn to oatmeal.
"I was pushing and pushing every day," Hiller said. "I didn't want to let the
team down. I didn't want to let my teammates down. It was tough for me to
mentally stay positive. You just wish you could be out there helping."
He was injured without technically being hurt. A cast on his wrist or crutches
under his arms would have been welcomed props for a man whose ailment
was out of sight, hidden from everyone but himself.
Then he had to watch as the Ducks made a mad, memorable scramble into
the playoffs behind the rented services of Emery and Ellis. All the while,
Hiller could do nothing more productive than deflect questions to which he
had no answers.
"If you're playing for last place it might not be that bad," he said. "But I saw
the potential, and the guys were playing well. There were a lot of
possibilities in the playoffs. It was tough to watch."
There remains a troubling element to this story, frightening in its mystery.
Doctors have been unable to determine the source of Hiller's condition,
meaning they also can't guarantee the symptoms are gone permanently.
576814      Winnipeg Jets


Panther fans see red over red section


By: Staff Writer


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Allyn White is among a group of fans seeing
red over the Florida Panthers' latest red-themed initiative unveiled this
summer.
Season-ticket holders in three prime sections at BankAtlantic Center
received a letter more than a week ago advising them of tentative plans to
convert part of the lower bowl into an "ultra-premium, all-inclusive" area to
be known as Club Red beginning in July 2012. They were given first right of
refusal or the option of choosing comparable seats at a 50 percent discount
for the 2012-13 season.
The price to join the exclusive club rocked White like a blindside check. He
said he was told his seats would cost $22,500 apiece, which would cover
other events at BAC in addition to Panthers games. He said he paid about
$5,000 for two seats at center ice in row 15 for the upcoming hockey
season.
"I've been a season-ticket holder since Day 1 in Miami. I've never missed a
game. You're telling me too bad, your $5,000 tickets are now going to be
$45,000?" said White, who runs a travel agency in Fort Lauderdale. "I don't
want to sit in the corners. I don't want to sit in row 3. I sit in ... prime seats,
which I've earned. I've got the best seats in the house."
The sections that would become Club Red -- 134, 101 and 102 -- straddle
centre ice behind the team benches.
Members would have access to a plush bar and lounge area with high-end
food and beverage options.
"Obviously, it's going to be a significant revenue generator for the
organization. We also think it's going to create a very unique experience for
those people that become members," said Michael Yormark, president and
COO of the Panthers. "We did do focus groups, we talked to our season-
seat holders. This was not something that was done in haste."
-- McClatchy news service
Winnipeg Free Press LOADED 08.21.2011
576815     Winnipeg Jets                                                        "It's been so busy the last few days we haven't really had time to stop,"
                                                                                Heisinger said. "Now you're going to have to sit down and think about it. It
                                                                                could be a couple challenging days. At the end of it, though, we were lucky
Rypien fondly remembered                                                        to have him."
                                                                                -- With files from Kirk Penton

By Kevin Rushworth, QMI Agency                                                  Winnipeg Sun LOADED 08.21.2011



BLAIRMORE, Alta. -- Rick Rypien was remembered Saturday as a kind-
hearted, hometown hockey hero who waged a valiant battle against
depression.
And though he ultimately lost that fight, his legacy is one of hope and
education to help those in need.
Hundreds of family and friends gathered at the Albert Stella Memorial Arena
for the funeral service of the former Vancouver Canuck and would-be
Winnipeg Jet. The hockey arena is in Blairmore, a hub of the tight-knit
Crowsnest Pass community in the southwest corner of Alberta.
"It was a fantastic tribute to a fantastic kid," Jets assistant GM Craig
Heisinger said.
Many attending the ceremony filed into the arena wearing their Crowsnest
Pass Thunder minor hockey league jerseys in memory of the man who
grew up playing hockey in Coleman and hosted the annual Rocky Mountain
Ice Hockey School.
Several of Rypien's teammates and coaches were also in attendance. Jets
owner Mark Chipman, Heisinger, GM Kevin Cheveldayoff and forward
Jason Jaffray were there, as were Canucks GM Mike Gillis, defenceman
Kevin Bieksa, who was a pall bearer, Alexandre Burrows, Aaron Rome,
Manny Malhotra and Mason Raymond.
Former members of the Manitoba Moose also came out to pay their
respects. Scott Arniel, now the head coach in Columbus, and Brad Berry,
Arniel's assistant with the Blue Jackets, were there, as was St. John's
IceCaps coach Keith McCambridge and former Moose captain Mike Keane.
Rypien's cousin, former NFL quarterback Mark Rypien, was also in
attendance.
As the ceremony began, hymns could be heard rising from within the arena.
Rypien's family requested no media presence inside the arena.
When speaking with the media after the ceremony, both Gillis and
Heisinger were visibly emotional. Gillis said he was proud to have thought
of Rypien as a friend and to have worked with him.
"We send our deepest condolences," Gillis said. "I don't think we can be
afraid to talk about the issues Rick went through.
"I know he wanted that, and I think it is up to us now to continue the legacy
of a great young man and to talk about the things that have occurred."
Gillis expanded on the illness Rypien battled.
"Rick suffered from depression, which was an ongoing illness," Gillis said.
"When he was in an environment he could control, he was fine, he was
great. When he got into an environment that he couldn't control, he had
great difficulty."
Gillis said the NHL tried many different steps and was there for Rypien
every step of the way. He suggested Rypien simply couldn't overcome his
illness.
"We had all the resources we could use," he said. "At the end of the day it
wasn't enough. We had access to the best doctors, the best programs. We
had the ability to intervene. We had opportunity to try our hardest and do
the best thing."
When asked what he knew about depression, Heisinger -- the man who got
Rypien his first tryout and contract with the Canucks -- said he had a lot to
learn about the condition, but that he was willing to learn as much as he
could.
"We're not going to let this tragedy go in vain and we are going to learn
more about it," he said.
Heisinger said the next few days could be the toughest for those who were
close Rypien
576816    Winnipeg Jets


Jets strongly represented at Rypien funeral


By KIRK PENTON, QMI Agency


WINNIPEG - Several members of the Winnipeg Jets front office will be in
Blairmore, Alta., on Saturday for Rick Rypien’s funeral.
True North Sports and Entertainment chairman Mark Chipman, Jets general
manager Kevin Cheveldayoff, assistant GM Craig Heisinger, head athletic
therapist Rob Milette and director of corporate communications Scott Brown
are all planning to attend the public service.
Former Manitoba Moose captain Mike Keane is also expected to be at the
funeral, which will be held at the arena in Blairmore.
Rypien, who signed with the Jets last month, died on Monday at his
Coleman, Alta., home. RCMP ruled his death sudden but not suspicious. It
was revealed after his death that Rypien had battled depression for a
decade.
ICINGS: The Jets open training camp four weeks from Saturday …
According to reports, prime minister Stephen Harper is interested in
attending Winnipeg’s season-opener on Oct. 9 against the Montreal
Canadiens. The Jets refused comment on the matter Friday … The Jets
confirmed Friday that Swiss goaltender David Aebischer is coming to
training camp on a tryout basis. Aebischer, who appeared in 214 NHL
games for Colorado, Montreal and Phoenix, spent the last four years
playing in his native country.
Winnipeg Sun LOADED 08.21.2011
576817     Websites


NBCSports.com / Accepting the role of violence in hockey


James O'Brien


There are plenty of people who simply don’t care about the welfare of
professional athletes, but I’d like to think that most of us care – at least a
little bit – about the health of NHL players. That’s why it makes sense that
the league is looking into different ways to make hockey a safer sport.
Yet at some point, one must acknowledge that violence is an inherent part
of the game. When a hockey player signs a contract, he’s basically making
a pact to put his body on the line – it’s one of the drawbacks to the fame,
glory and money that comes with playing the sport at its highest level.
The Ottawa Citizen’s Ken Gray wrote a provocative (and quick) piece about
head shots in the NHL, revolving around the fear that Sidney Crosby‘s
struggles with concussions might mean that we’ve already seen the star
center’s best days. Gray makes a wider point about how the league needs
to investigate head injuries, but does he ask for a little too much?
But if Bettman were really brave, his league would be aggressively
investigating the recent indications that shots to the head and fighting can
lead to brain injuries and some forms of mental illness. But that could mean
taking head shots, fighting and maybe even body contact out of the NHL.
And while that might be good for players’ health, it wouldn’t be good for
owners’ pocketbooks. The NHL believes violence sells. There is little
evidence to suggest otherwise … unfortunately.
Honestly, I could see a future NHL in which head shots will be made illegal
across the board. Maybe fighting will be removed from the game within our
lifetimes (or at least our children/grancdhildren’s lives, depending on your
age). But the thought of removing body contact out of the sport is as wrong
as changing the NFL to a flag football league.
Perhaps there’s a gladiatorial element to some fans’ interest in the sport,
but body contact is an essential element of any NHL game. Physicality
makes an impact just about everywhere on the ice; it’s tough to picture
defensemen trying to contain explosive forwards with stick work and
positioning alone.
Sure, it’s possible to play the game in such a manner, but abolishing body
contact would be an extreme measure that would remove much of the thrill
and intrigue from the sport.
Now that you’ve heard my reaction to the piece, where do you stand on
measures to protect players? Should the NHL make all hits to the head
illegal, ban fighting or even body contact altogether, as Gray suggests? Let
us know in the comments.
NBCSports.com / LOADED: 08.21.2011
576818     Websites


NBCSports Nearly 1,000 people attend Rick Rypien’s funeral


James O'Brien


The funeral procession included a scattering of different items from his
playing career, including an autographed No. 37 jersey from his time with
the Canucks, the only NHL team he suited up for. (The Winnipeg Jets
signed him to a one-year, $700K deal in June, a promising development
that made his death that much more shocking to many.) The program
reportedly featured a photo of Rypien in a blue Canucks jersey with the
phrase: “Until we all meet again.”
Rick Rypien’s uncle Allan spoke of his nephew’s struggles with depression.
Rypien said his nephew was battling a disease not unlike cancer.
“He fought this disease with everything he had in him,” he said. “If you knew
Rick he fought with everything he had in him. Unfortunately the disease
won the battle.”
“Be thankful the battle he faced is over.”.com /
NBCSports.com / LOADED: 08.21.2011

				
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