Answers to the Questions in the Chapters

Document Sample
Answers to the Questions in the Chapters Powered By Docstoc
					Answers to the Questions in the Chapters
Chapter 2

Page 12: The production is counted as part of the Gross Domestic Product when the
         bread is bought at Vons by you.
         Your buying of the Ford is an example of consumption.
         General Motors buying the computer system is an example of business
             investment spending.
         Hondas sold in Japan are examples of exports.
         The Department of Defense buying the new jets is an example of
             government spending.

Page 13 The $50 million (100 million times $0.50) that is produced in Mexico is
         counted as GDP in Mexico. The other $39 million (100 million times $0.39) is
         part of the GDP in the United States.
         The rise in the divorce rate could cause the measure of Gross Domestic Product
         to rise even though people’s standard of living has not risen because divorced
         people will have two places to live, are more likely to eat in restaurants, are
         more likely to pay for child care, laundry, house cleaning, etc.
         “Nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP)” is the value of all final goods and
         services produced in the United States to be sold in a year.
        A “final good” is one used by a final user while an “intermediate good” is used
        as part of the production process.
        The four groups of final users are consumers, businesses, the government, and
        foreigners. “Consumption” is the buying of products to use them up. “Business
        investment spending” is the buying by private businesses of new capital goods.
        “Net exports” is exports minus imports.
        “Capital goods” are goods produced by people to be used as part of production,
        such as machines, tools, equipment, and so forth.
        The workweek of the average American worker is about 25 hours less than it
        was a century ago. People are enjoying more leisure time. Because leisure time
        is not counted as part of Gross Domestic Product, the Gross Domestic Product
        measure understates the increase in our actual standard of living.

Page 15: The Nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 1996 is equal to ($4 x 10) +
         ($12 x 20) + ($6 x 5) + ($25 x 10) = $560.
         The Nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2000 is equal to ($8 x 12) +
         ($36 x 15) + ($10 x 15) + ($30 x 12) = $1,146.
         The Real Gross Domestic Product (Real GDP) in 2000 is equal to ($4 x 12) +
         ($12 x 15) + ($6 x 15) + ($25 x 12) = $618.

Page 16: From 1996 to 2000, the Real GDP rose from $560 to $618. This is a change of
         $58. $58 as a percent of $618 is equal to 9.39%.
         At 2%, Real GDP per capita would double every 36 years. In 72 years, it
         would double twice. Therefore, it would be $40,000. At 3%, it would double
         every 245 years. Therefore, it would double 3 times and be $80,000.
         The Nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is not a good measure of the
         true standard of living of the people of a country because it does not consider
         leisure, because it does not consider goods and services produced but not sold,
         because it does not consider goods that have harmful effects, and because it
         misses the underground economy.
         The “underground economy” involves goods and services sold illegally or
         sold without reporting in order to avoid taxation.
         “Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP)” is the Gross Domestic Product adjusted
                                      Page 2

          to the prices of 1996.I t is a better measure of aggregate production than
         Nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP) because it removes the effects of price
         changes.
         “Real Gross Domestic Product Per Capita” measures production of all goods
         and services per person.
         The rate of growth of Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) from one year to
         the next year is calculated as the difference in the Real GDP divided by the
         original year’s Real GDP. The “Rule of 72” says that if something is growing
         at a certain percent per year, divide that into 72 to determine how long it will
         take to double.
         “National Income” is the sum of all incomes earned. It is equal to the Real GDP
         because people can only earn income by producing goods and services. The
         value earned is equal to the value produced.

Page 18: Technological improvements allow modem speeds to increase from 2400 to 56K
         are intensive growth.
         A higher percent of American workers have a college education today than
         before would be intensive growth.
         Immigration increases the American population would be extensive growth.
         Disease resistant seeds are developed which mean that fewer wheat plants will
         die before harvest would be intensive growth.
         Oil is discovered in Alaska would be extensive growth.

Page 19: If productivity is growing faster in other countries, their costs of production will
        grow slower. American exports will decline as they become relatively more
        expensive. American imports will rise as foreign products become relatively
        cheaper.

Page 23: "Productivity" is Real GDP per hour worked. Since we earn income only by
         producing goods and services, the greater our productivity, the greater our
         income.
         The "productivity problem" experienced by the United States is that
         productivity has been growing slower than in the past and also slower than our
         trade partner countries.
         The "productivity problem" has caused the American standard of living to grow
         very slowly. This has changed American life by causing more people to work,
         people to save less and go deeper in debt, a tax revolt, later marriage, and fewer
         children.
         Factors might be responsible for the slowdown in productivity growth include
         the low rates of business investment spending, the low rate of savings, too little
         spending on infrastructure and R&D, poor education, an adversarial relation
         between business and labor, poor management, and so forth.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 2       1. e 2. c 3. d 4. a 5. b 6. 6 7. d 8. c 9. d 10. a

Chapter 3

Page 25: When real GDP (production) is rising, there is an expansion. Real GDP stops rising at the peak.
         When real GDP is falling, there is a recession. If it falls greatly, there is a depression. When
         Real GDP stops falling, there is a trough. Then, Real GDP begins to rise in the recovery.

Page 26: 1 Expansion. 2 Peak. 3. Recession 4. Trough          5. Recovery 6. Expansion          7. Peak
                                     Page 3

Page 27: 10 million are unemployed. The labor force is 100 million. The unemployment rate is 10%.
         William is employed. Jose is not in the labor force. Jane is unemployed. Mary is not in the labor
         force (a discouraged worker)

Page 28: The official unemployment rate may be understated because discouraged workers are not counted
         as unemployed and because those working part-time involuntarily are counted as fully employed.
         It may be overstated because those working in the underground economy may be counted as
         unemployed.
         When the economy is getting worse, the unemployed may give up looking for a job that they sure
         does not exist. When they give up looking, they are no longer officially unemployed and the
         official unemployment rate falls.

Page 29: Robert --- structural. Mary --- frictional.   Maria --- cyclical.

Page 31: The administration of President Kennedy defined full employment as occurring when there is no
         cyclical unemployment. In order words, full-employment exists if the economy creates a job for
         every worker who wants one. The “natural rate of unemployment” was defined as the lowest
         rate of unemployment that could occur before inflation accelerates.

          Potential Real GDP is the amount of production needed to have full-employment. The difference
          between the actual Real GDP and the Potential Real GDP is called the GDP Gap. If the actual
          Real GDP is less (greater) than the Potential Real GDP, the difference is called a recessionary
          (inflationary) gap.

Page 32: 1. Unemployment insurance may have raised the natural rate of unemployment by making it
         possible for people to search for jobs for longer periods of time.
         2. People in their 20s tend to go from job to job, becoming unemployed several times in a year.
         If there are fewer of such people, the natural rate of unemployment will be lower.
         3. 6.9% – 4% = 2.9%. 2.9% x 2 = 5.8%. 5.8% of $7,054 = $409.1 billion. Using this estimate,
         had production been $409.1 billion greater, unemployment would have been 4%.

Page 33: When people’s incomes decline, their demand for certain durable goods declines greatly. This
         occurs because people can postpone buying a new car, house, etc. Those who work to produce
         these products are the most likely to lose their jobs. These are likely to be blue-collar workers
         (factory or construction workers). On the other hand, the demand for services produced by
         white-collar workers does not decline as much in a recession.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 3      1. c 2. b 3. c 4. b 5. d 6. b 7. a 8. b

Chapter 4

Page 36: Take (10) ($3) + (5) ($4) + (20) ($10) = $250 and divide by (10) ($1) + (5) ($3) + (20) ($5)
         = $125. $250 divided by $125 = 2. 2 times 100 = 200.
         $30,000 in 2000 would buy the same as $15,000 in 1982.
         82.4 – 72.6 = 9.8. 9.8 divided by 72.6 = 13.5%.

Page 38: The CPI overstated the actual rise in the cost of living because it did not consider that people
         substitute cheaper goods for more expensive ones as prices rise, because it did not consider that
         people shop in cheaper stores as prices rise, and because it did not adequately consider the quality
         changes of products. The overstatement is important because so many people have COLAs.

Page 39: (15) ($3) + (10) ($6) + (20) ($15) = $405 and divide by (15) ($1) + (10) ($2) + (20) ($5) = $135.
         $405 divided by $135 = 3. 3 times 100 equals 300.
                                      Page 4

          The CPI and the GDP Deflator will show difference results because (1) they have different base
          years, (2) they measure the prices of different goods and services, and (3) the CPI uses the fixed
          quantities of the base year while the GDP Deflator uses the fixed quantities of the current year.

Page 40: 9% – 13.5% = - 4.5%. The bank was paying me to lend money to me!

Page 42: Joe expected 17% - 10% = 7%. Joe paid 17% - 3% = 14%.
         1. People who already own homes are better off
         2. People who want to buy homes are worse off
         3. People on fixed incomes are worse off
         4. People with large credit card debt are better off
         5. People with a considerable amount of money in a savings account are worse off
         6. The federal government is better off
         If you believed that a high rate of inflation were coming soon,
         1. The amount you would save in a bank would decrease
         2. The amount of debt you would want to be in would increase
         3. The number of homes you would want to own would increase

Page 44: Inflation increases consumer debt, reduced overall saving, mischannels savings into inflation
         hedges, and decreases business investment spending by increasing uncertainty.
         With $100,000 to save, the best places to save during times of high inflation are the inflation
         hedges --- real estate, gold, silver, jewelry, antiques, art, and other collectibles.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 4      1. c 2. b 3. b 4. d 5. b 6. c 7. d 8. c 9. d 10. d

Chapter 5

Page 49 Other factors affecting your demand for college courses include your income, the prices at
        substitutes, such as CSU or UC, the prices of complements, such as books, your tastes for
        education, and your expectations of future prices.

Page 53 1.   decrease ----- move along           2. increase ----- shift right
        3.   increase ----- shift right          4. increase ----- shift right
        5.   increase ----- shift right          6. decrease ----- shift left
        7.   increase ----- shift right

Practice Quiz for Chapter 5      1. a 2. c 3. a 4. b 5. c 6. b 7. b              8. b

Chapter 6

Page 58 1. shift to the left   2. shift to the right   3. shift to the left   4. move along   5. shift to the left

Page 60 The equilibrium price is $1,500 and the equilibrium quantity is 300. At a price of $2,000, there is
        a surplus of 400 computers.

Page 64 When the price of gasoline rises, the demand for automobiles (a complement) falls. This is a shift
        to the left. When the new equilibrium is reached, the price of automobiles will have fallen and
        the quantity of automobiles sold will also have fallen.

Page 65 When the price of water rises, the supply of oranges decreases. This is a shift in supply to the
        left. When the new equilibrium is reached, the price of oranges will have risen and the quantity
        of oranges sold will have fallen.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 6       1. a 2. a 3. c 4. b 5. c 6. c 7. c 8. b 9. a 10. c
                                      Page 5
Chapter 7

Page 71 Demand falls and Supply rises
        Demand rises and Supply falls
        Demand rises and Supply is not affected
        Demand falls and Supply rises
        Demand is not affected; Supply rises
        Demand falls and Supply rises

Page 74 Demand rises and Supply falls. The price of the foreign money rises. The dollar depreciates.
        Demand falls and Supply rises. The price of the foreign money falls. The dollar appreciates.
        Demand falls and Supply rises. The price of the foreign money falls. The dollar appreciates.
        Demand rises. The price of the foreign money rises. The dollar depreciates.
        Demand rises and Supply falls. The price of the foreign money rises. The dollar depreciates.

Page 77 Savings        Low       Low Low          High
        CD             Low       Low Low          High
        MMF            Low       Low Low           High
        T-Bill         Low       Low Low          High
        T-Bond         Higher Higher Low           Lower
        Corp. Bond Higher Higher Low               Lower
        Stock           Higher Higher Low          Lower
        In this answer, these are in order by expected return, lowest to highest. They are also in order by
        risk, lowest to highest, and by liquidity, highest to lowest. None of these assets have any
        significant tax advantages.

          People will buy the asset with the highest return, T-Bills. This will increase the price of the T-
          Bill. As the return rises, the interest rate on the T-Bill falls. This will continue until the return on
          the T-Bill is also 5%.

          On average, stocks have earned a greater return because they carry greater risk and because they
          are less liquid.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 7       1. b 2. b 3. c 4. b 5. a 6. c 7. a 8. b 9. a 10. a

Chapter 8

Page 84 1. Any time there are price ceilings there will be shortages. The shortages have shown up as
            rolling black outs or brown outs. The companies may have to choose between customers,
            cutting off some but not others. The price ceiling reduces any incentive there might be to
            conserve.
        2. Eliminating inflation by wage and price controls creates shortages. There were shortages of
           workers and shortages of many goods. The rationing was commonly done through long lines
           as well as seller choice of buyer. The were black and gray markets for many goods.
        3. At the price of zero, the demand to enter the U.S. well exceeds the number of immigrants
           allowed. There are long lists of people wanting to migrate, with a wait of many years. The
           government resolves the shortage by choosing who will enter. Those with family members
           already in the U.S. gain first priority. In other countries, those with certain skills are given
           priority. The black market is shown by the large number of undocumented migrants.
                                      Page 6

Page 87 1. The minimum wage is a price floor. At this price fewer people will be hired. In reality, the
           reduction in employment because of the minimum wage is very small. More people will desire
           to work at the higher wage. There will be a surplus of workers --- unemployment. Today, the
           minimum wage is so low that the number of unemployed is small.
        2. The reduced demand for workers should lead to lower wages. But the union creates a wage
           floor. Since wages do not fall, the number of workers hired is smaller and the number desiring
           to work is larger. There is a surplus of workers --- unemployment. The persistence of
           unemployment requires both a decrease in demand and a wage floor.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 8       1. a 2. d 3. b     4. b 5. b 6. a 7. b 8. e 9. d 10. c

Chapter 9

Page 91      1.   The Federal Reserve Decreases the Money Supply --- Shift Left
             2.   Workers Receive Higher Wages --- Shift Right
             3.   The American Dollar Depreciates --- Shift Right
             4.   Taxes on Personal Incomes are Decreased --- Shift Right
             5.   Taxes on Businesses are Increased --- Shift Left
             6.   Government Purchases Decrease --- Shift Left
             7.   Foreign Incomes Increase --- Shift Right
             8.   The GDP Deflator Rises --- Move Along

Page 93      1. The Productivity of American Workers Increases at a More Rapid Rate -- Shift Right
             2. Workers Receive Higher Wages – Shift Left
             3. An Increase in the Price of Oil, Used in the Production of Most Products – Shift Left
             4. A Government Subsidy to Business to Buy More Capital Goods – Shift Right
             5. Government Regulations Which Raise Costs of Production to Businesses – Shift Left
             6. A Depreciation of the Dollar (Which Affects the Prices of Imported Parts and Materials
                Used in Production) – Shift Left
             7. An Increase in the GDP Deflator --- Move Along

Page 98      a. The three changes all would decrease aggregate demand (shift it to the left). Both Real
                GDP and the GDP Deflator would decrease.
             b. The depreciation of the peso would shift aggregate demand to the right and shift aggregate
                supply to the left (by raising costs of imported materials). Both shifts cause the GDP
                Deflator to rise. If the shift in supply is larger, the Real GDP falls.
             c. Reduced wages would shift aggregate demand to the left and shift aggregate supply to the
                right (by lowering costs of production). Both shifts would lower the GDP Deflator. If the
                shift in aggregate demand is larger, the Real GDP will fall.
             d. No statement can be made for sure concerning the GDP Deflator. But it is certain that the
                Real GDP will fall. Mexico had a recession (actually a severe depression).

Practice Quiz for Chapter 9 1. c 2. d 3. d 4. b 5. b 6. a 7. b 8. c 9. d 10. c

Chapter 10

Page 106          This economy will experience recession. The total spending (aggregate demand) of $9,000
                  --- $8,000 of consumption and $1,000 of business investment spending --- is not enough to
                  buy the Potential Real GDP of $10,000. Either production will fall (recession) or prices
                  will fall (deflation).
                                     Page 7

Page 109        In the first case, total spending would equal $95,000. This is “too low” and would cause a
                recession. In the second case, total spending would equal $115,000. This is “too high” and
                would cause inflation. The government should spend $15,000 to bring the total spending up
                to $100,000. This would give the government a budget deficit of $5,000 ($15,000 –
                $10,000). The budget deficit is paid for by borrowing $5,000 from the savers.

Page 110      A large budget surplus at a time of impending recession would tend to make the recession
             worse. The government needs to add to total spending, not subtract from it. To reduce the
             budget surpluses, the government could lower taxes, stimulating consumer or business
             investment spending. It could increase its own purchases. Or it could pay off the national
             debt, adding to the pool of savings.

Page 112   With the government, total spending (aggregate demand) equal $106,000 ($85,000 - $5,000 +
           $10,000 + $6,000 + $10,000). This would cause inflation, as total spending exceeds Potential
           Real GDP. To avoid the inflation, the government should spend only $4,000. This would make
           the four categories of spending add up to $100,000. The government would then have a surplus
           of $6,000 ($4,000 - $40,000) which it would add to the savings to pay for the additional desired
           business investment spending and for the $1,000 extra on imports.
           The amount of national income that households do not spend on goods and services produced
           in the United States must be made up by the other spenders – businesses, government, and
           foreigners. This means that Savings + Taxes + Imports must equal Investment Spending
           +Government Purchases + Exports. If Savings are nearly equal to Business Investment
           Spending, then if government purchases exceed tax revenues, the imports must exceed the
           exports to make the two sides balance.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 10      1. c 2. a 3. b 4. a 5. a 6. c 7. b 8. c 9. a 10. a

Chapter 11

Page 128    If interest rates fall, consumer spending will rise because it is less rewarding to save and
           cheaper to borrow. Business investment spending will rise because it is cheaper to borrow. Net
           exports will rise because the dollar will appreciate.
           If there is an inflationary gap. Prices will rise, reducing aggregate demand, wages will rise
           increasing costs of production and shifting aggregate supply to the left, and real interest rates
           will rise shifting aggregate demand to the left. The gap will be eliminated.

Page 130     Aggregate supply is vertical because the Real GDP will always be the same (equal to the
             Potential Real GDP). Except temporarily, it will not vary from that amount.
             An increase in the money supply will shift aggregate demand to the right. The result is
             That prices will rise --- inflation.

Page 132     A recession in the United States would reduce the demand for foreign money. The exchange
             rate would fall. This would create a profitable opportunity. Someone would buy gold in other
             countries, ship it to the United States, convert it to dollars in the United States, and sell the
             dollars on the foreign exchange market for a profit. The money supply would rise in the
             United States, reducing the recession. The money supply would fall in other countries,
              spreading the recession to them. Selling the dollars on the foreign exchange market would
              bring the exchange rate back to its original fixed level.

Page 133      The equation of exchange is M x V = P x Q. If V is constant and M does not grow because
              there are no findings of gold, then aggregate demand will not change. If Q is growing, P must
              fall. This is deflation. It was the main experience from 1876 to 1896.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 11      1. d 2. b 3. a 4. b 5. d 6. c 7. b 8. d 9. a 10. c
                                     Page 8

Chapter 12

Page 141     1. 1929 5.85%                      1934 1.02 – 2.6 = -1.58% 1938 .81 + 2.4 = 3.21%
                1930 3.59 + 3 = 6.59%           1935 .75 – 2.5 = -1.75% 1939 .59 + 1.2 = 1.79%
                1931 2.64 + 8.2 = 10.84% 1936 .75-1.25 = - .50% 1940 .56 – 1.2 = - 0.64%
                1932 2.73 + 10.1 = 12.83% 1937 .94 – 3.7 = -2.66% 1941 .53 – 4.6 = - 4.07%
                1933 1.73 + 5 = 6.73%
                Real interest rates rose and were very high from 1929 to 1933. Through must of the rest of
                the decade, they were negative, which should have increased consumer and business
                spending.
             2. M fell 26.5%. P fell about 24%. Q fell about 28.9%. To keep the equation of exchange in
                balance, V must have fallen about 26%. V was not a constant, as predicted by the Classical
                economic view.

Page 143   1. A horizontal short-run aggregate supply means that, if aggregate demand increases for some
              reason, production (Real Gross Domestic Product) will rise but prices will stay the same. In
              a period of severe recession, companies would not have to raise their prices. When they
              increase production, they need more workers. But in a period of severe recession, they can
              hire more workers without having to pay higher wages. In a normal period, to hire some
              workers as they increase production, companies would indeed have to raise wages. This
              would force them to raise prices (yielding the upward-sloping aggregate supply curve we
              used earlier).
           2. In the 1990 recession, Keynes would advice that the government take action. Failing to act
              will only cause the recession to go on and on. The action could be an increase in
              government spending or a decrease in taxes (or both)

Page 144 The New Deal programs may have reduced the economic problem somewhat. They may have
         also made the problem easier. But a look at the data for Real Gross Domestic Product,
         unemployment, and wages shows that the Great Depression was far from over in 1941, eight
         years after the New Deal began.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 12      1. b 2-5. a,b,e,g 6. c 7. b 8. c 9. c 10. a

Chapter 13

Page 148 (1) Fill in the following consumption function:

  Disposable Income           Consumption        Savings
          0                      1000            -1000
       1000                      1900             - 900
       2000                      2800             - 800
       3000                      3700             - 700
       4000                      4600             - 600
       5000                      5500             - 500
       6000                      6400             - 400
       7000                      7300             - 300
       8000                      7200             - 200
       9000                      9100             - 100
     10,000                    10,000                 0
     11,000                    10,900               100
     12,000                    11,800              200
     13,000                    12,700              300
     14,000                    13,600              400
     15,000                    14,500              500
                                        Page 9

      16,000                       15,400              600
      17,000                       16,300              700
      18,000                       17,200              800
      19,000                       18,100              900
      20,000                       19,000             1000
      21,000                       19,900             1100
      22,000                       20,800             1200
      23,000                       21,700             1300
      24,000                       22,600             1400
      25,000                       23,500             1500

(2) Calculate the marginal propensity to consume. _____9/10___________

    Calculate the marginal propensity to save. _______1/10______________

(3) If disposable income is 10,000, what is the average propensity to consume?
    __________1_______
    If disposable income is 20,000, what is the average propensity to consume?
    _________0.95________
    Therefore, as disposable income rises from 10,000 to 20,000, consumption __rises_____
    And the average propensity to consume ____falls_________ (answer “rises” or “falls”).

Page 150 (1)
                            National Income ($7,000)




Households
  Business Savings                                               Loans                         Businesses
                        ($4,000)                             ($4,000)
                                              Financial
                                              Institutions




                                 Consumption ($6,600)

(2) Equilibrium Real GDP is equal to 12,000, where aggregate demand (C+I) is equal to National Income. If income
were 1000 (25,000), consumption plus investment spending equal 2100 (23,700). There would be shortages of 1100
(surpluses of 1700). This is a change in unintended inventory investment. Orders from manufacturers would rise (fall).
As a result, production (real GDP) would rise (fall).
                                        Page 10

Page 152 1. If income were 2000 (16,000), consumption plus investment spending plus government spending equal
3100 (15,700). There would be shortages of 1100 (surpluses of 300). This is a change in unintended inventory
investment. Orders from manufacturers would rise (fall). As a result, production (real GDP) would rise (fall).
           2.

                                Transfers           Taxes
                                 ($0)             ($1,000)
Disposable Income                                                   National Income ($14,000)
   ($13,000)




                                            Government
                                            ($1,000 Net Taxes)                Purchases
                                                                              ($1,000)

Households
     Business               Savings                                             Loans          Businesses
                            ($200)                                              ($200)
                                              Financial
                                              Institutions




                                 Consumption ($11,800)
                              (7,000 Widgets @ a Price of $20 Each)


            3. Equilibrium Real GDP is equal to 13,000, where aggregate demand (C+I+G) is equal to
National Income.

Page 153 1. If income were 2000 (16,000), consumption plus investment spending plus government spending plus
exports minus imports equal 3100 (15,700). There would be shortages of 1100 (surpluses of 300). This is a change in
unintended inventory investment. Orders from manufacturers would rise (fall). As a result, production (real GDP)
would rise (fall).
                                        Page 11

            2.
                                  Transfers         Taxes
                                   (0)            ($1,000)
Disposable Income                                             National Income ($14,000)
   ($13,000)




                                              Government
                                              ($1,000 Net Taxes)      Purchases(G)
                                                           ($40         (1,000)

Households
  Bu   siness             Savings                                     Loans(I)       Businesses
                          ($200)                                      ($200)
                                               Financial
                                               Institutions

                                   Consumption ($11,800)
                              (

                                                                 Imports(M) Exports(X)
                                                                 ($1,000)     ($1,000)

                                                                                 Foreign
                                                                                 Countries


           3. Equilibrium Real GDP is equal to 13,000, where aggregate demand (C+I+G +Exports -
Imports) is equal to National Income.

Page 154. There is an inflationary gap of $3000 ($13,000 - $10,000)

Page 157. 5      3   10   1

Page 157. Decrease in government purchases of 500 times the government purchases multiplier of 10
equals a decrease in equilibrium real GDP of 5000. Since it was 13,000, it is now 8000. There is now a
recessionary gap of 2000 (8000 – 10,000). The multiplier is 1 divided by 1 – 9/10 = 10. 9/10 is the
marginal propensity to consume.
           To eliminate all gaps, government purchases should have been reduced by 300 (to 700). 300
times 10 equals 3000. Starting from 13,000, the decrease of 3000 would bring equilibrium real GDP down
to 10,000 (equal to Potential Real GDP).

Practice Quiz for Chapter 13. 1. d        2. a 3. c 4. e 5. c 6. a 7. b 8. b 9. b 10. d
                                     Page 12

Chapter 14

Page 163. Japanese workers treat their semi-annual bonuses as transitory income. Therefore, they save
most of them. They live on their regular monthly income.

Page 164. Since Japanese people are more likely than American people to work in family owned
businesses, their incomes are less certain from year to year. With less certain incomes, they are more likely
to save.

Page 166. Raising taxes on the rich to lower taxes for the middle class would increase consumer spending.
The rich people would be more likely to save while the middle class people would be more likely to spend.

          Since 1980, the distribution of income in the United States has become more unequal. This
should have decreased consumer spending and increased saving because the richer people are more likely
to save.

Page 168. The average price would likely be close to $300,000 today. This is a large increase in wealth,
which would increase consumer spending.

Page 169. The rise in per capita income, the fall in interest rates, the slowing of the rise if prices
(disinflation), the rise in consumer confidence, and the rise in stock prices all point to an increase in
consumer spending. The rise is debt is the only statistic pointing to a decline in consumer spending.
Unless its effect is very large, one would expect consumer spending to rise in 1998. Indeed, that is what
happened.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 14. 1. B 2. D 3. A 4. A 5. A 6. A 7. B 8. B 9. A 10. B

Chapter 15

Page 174 Depreciation rose from about 75% of business investment spending to about 85%. In some
years, it was over 90%. Thus, it rose, although not in every year.
            The recession years were those years in which net investment spending as a percent of GDP fell.
Years such as 1974-75, 1982-83, 1990-92, and so forth. Other years where this ration fell were not
recession years.
           Examine the table for the net investment spending as a percent of GDP. Years in which this
number was close to 2 ½% or more are years of good performance. Years below this, and especially below
2% are poor performance. But you must also look at the trend of this number --- is it improving or falling.
           Just about half of the rise in gross investment spending can be attributed to information
equipment and software.

Page 176   What trend there is suggests that the percent of corporate profits paid as taxes fell.
           What trend there is suggests that the percent of corporate profits after taxes paid as dividends to
the owners has risen.
            For the most part, retained after-tax profits were high in the years that business investment
spending was high and vice versa.
           For the most part, stock prices were high and rising in the years that business investment
spending was high and vice versa.
           Personal savings rates do not correlate well with business investment spending. This results
because businesses use corporate profits to finance business investment spending.

Page 178 Although the trend is not continuous, generally depreciation did become a higher percent of
gross private investment spending. And it did so especially in the years during which business investment
spending was low. This could indicate that the expected lifetime of capital goods is becoming shorter.
                                         Page 13

Page 179 Generally, capacity utilization was below 80% in recession years and above 80% in other
years. However, in some of the years with poor investment performance, capacity utilization was above
80%.

Page 181     Raw materials and labor costs rose greatly in the 1970s, when the investment performance was
poor. Since the early 1980s, these costs rose very slowly (except for raw materials prices in 2000). This
helped in the years when investment performance was good but did not cause the other years of poor
investment performance since 1980.

Page 182 This relies on your summary of the above information. In different years, the poor investment
performance was caused by different factors. The Internet assignment is left for you.

Page 185     This one is left for you.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 15       1. D 2. B        3. B   4. B   5. A 6. A 7. A         8. B    9. B    10. D

Chapter 16

Page 188-189 Internet assignments are left for you. The answer will be different each year.

Page 190        Internet assignments are left for you. The answer will be different each year.

Page 192        Social Security and Medicare spending have risen because the proportion of the population
over age 65 has been rising. People are living longer. In addition, health care costs have risen due to
technology. And the COLA for Social Security is based on the CPI, which overstates the rise in the cost of
living.
                Calculate the real government spending by taking the actual government spending and
dividing by the GDP Deflator, expressed as a fraction. So, for example, in 1980 take $590.9 and divided
by .5704 and you get $1035.94. If you take the percentage change from 1980 to 1988 and again from 1989
to 1992 and compare your numbers with the percentage change from 1993 to 2000, you should see a slight
slowing of the growth rate.

Page 193        Internet assignments are left for you. The answer will be different each year.

Page 197       Social Security has probably led to earlier retirement by providing people income so that
they could afford to retire.
                Social Security may have reduced savings, since people now need to save less for
retirement (a major reason for saving). However, it is possible that, if people are retiring earlier, they will
need to save even more in their working years.
                The Internet question is left for you.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 16       1. A      2. B   3. A   4. C   5. D    6. A    7. D   8. A    9. B    10. D

Chapter 17

Page 202      The Internet question is left for you. You will find that taxes as a percent of GDP are lower
in the United States than in most other countries.

Page 203       $0.14    $154.16

Page 204        4.5%

Page 204        34%     49%     68%
                                       Page 14

Page 205     regressive; regressive;    proportional;   regressive

Page 206 In both cases, poorer people devote a higher percent of their incomes to the item (gasoline or
cigarettes). Since more of their income is subject to the tax, these taxes are regressive. Even if a poor
person does not own a car, that person will pay the gasoline tax in bus fare.

Page 207     Average Tax Rate     Marginal Tax Rate
                     5%                5%
                   10%                15%
                   15%                25%
                   20%                35%
                   25%                45%

             The Internet Assignments are left for you.

Page 208     Tax is $1,389.20. The savings equal $453.80.

Page 209 1. All $10,000 of the capital gain is now taxable income. In addition, eliminate the deduction
for sales taxes paid and for consumer debt interest. The new adjusted gross income is now $20,000. This
puts the person in the 15% marginal tax rate. 15% of $20,000 equals $3,000. The person’s tax increased
by $1,610.80 because of the higher income taxed and the loss of two deductions. In this calculation, it is
assumed that the taxpayer can still take the business loss and the medical deduction. Such may not be the
case.
             2. In 1980, you would have paid 70% of $4,000, or $2,800. In 1986, you would have paid
28% of $10,000, or $2,800. In 1992, you would have paid 31% of $10,000, or $3,100.

Page 210 1. The adjusted gross income would still be $20,000. So, the tax due would still be 15% of
$20,000, or $3,000.
            2. Today, you would pay 20% of $10,000, or $2,000.


Practice Quiz for Chapter 17 1. A 2. C 3. A 4. C 5. A 6. B              7. C 8. A 9. C 10. A

Chapter 18

Page 217     4   2   10

Page 217     1. Government spending should increase by $8000.
                Taxes should decrease by $10,000.
                Transfers should increase by $10,000.
             2. Equilibrium Real GDP is now $9,000.
                There is a recessionary gap of $1,000.
             3. Equilibrium Real GDP would be $10,000 with no gap.

Page 220     Because there are fewer tax brackets and because the rates became less progressive, the
             Tax system came to have less of a stabilizing effect.
                                 Page 15
Page 222

Year (Fiscal) Deficit (Billions) Unemployment Rate Structural Budget Deficit
 1960           - 0.3                     5.5%              - 45.3
 1961             3.3                    6.7%               -77.7
 1962             7.1                    5.5%               -37.9
 1963             4.8                    5.7%               -46.2
 1964             5.9                    5.2%               -30.1
 1965             1.4                    4.5%               -13.6
 1966             3.7                    3.8%                  9.7
 1967             8.6                    3.8%                14.6
 1968           25.2                     3.6%                37.2
 1969           –3.2                     3.5%                11.8
 1970             2.8                    4.9%              -24.2
 1971           23.0                     5.9%              -34
 1972           23.4                     5.6%              -24.6
 1973           14.9                     4.9%              -12.1
 1974             6.1                    5.6%              -11.9
 1975           53.2                     8.5%              -81.8
 1976           73.7                     7.7%              -37.3
 1977           53.7                     7.1%              -39.3
 1978           59.2                     6.1%              - 3.8
 1979           40.7                     5.8%              -13.3
 1980           73.8                     7.1%              -19.2
 1981           79.0                     7.6%              -29
 1982          128.0                     9.7%              -43
 1983          207.8                     9.6%               39.8
 1984          185.4                     7.5%               80.4
 1985          212.3                     7.2%              116.3
 1986          221.2                     7.0%              111.2
 1987          149.8                     6.2%                83.8
 1988          155.2                     5.5%              110.2
 1989          152.5                     5.3%              113.5
                  - = surplus          rate taken in December
Examine the data. The correspondence between rising structural deficits and falling
unemployment (or vice versa) is a very weak one. Obviously, other factors have a stronger effect
on unemployment.

2. Fiscal Year       Official Budget Deficit (billions)   Unemployment Rate
     1992                  $290                               7.5%                 $185
     1993                  $255                               6.9%                   168
     1994                  $203                               6.1%                   140
     1995                  $164                               5.6%                   116
     1996                  $107                               5.4%                    65
     1997                  $ 22                               4.9%                  - 5
     1998                  -$ 69 (Surplus)                    4.5%                  - 84
     1999                  -$125 (Surplus)                    4.2%                 -131
     2000                  -$236 (Surplus)                    4.0%                 -236
     2001                  -$127 (Surplus)                    4.8%                 -151
                                           Page 16

Fiscal policy was contractionary from 1992 to 2000? More of the $417 billion decline of the deficit (290
billion to minus $127 billion) is due to the actions of the government ($336 billion) than due to the
automatic stabilizers ($81 billion).
3. In 2001, the surplus was $127 billion. The unemployment rate was 4.8%. Therefore, using our
“ballpark” figure, 0.8 times $30 billion (=$24 billion) is due to the automatic stabilizers. (The CBO
estimate of this is $20 billion. So, our “ballpark” estimate is close.) The remaining $103 billion would be
the structural surplus. ($107 billion according to the CBO estimate.) In 2002, the projected deficit is $157
billion. The projected unemployment rate is 5.9%. So using our “ballpark” figure, 1.9 times $30 billion
(equals $57 billion) is due to the automatic stabilizers. The remaining $100 billion would be the structural
deficit. (The CBO estimate is that $40 billion is due to the automatic stabilizers and that the structural
deficit is $117 billion.) So the structural deficit went from a $103 billion surplus to a $100 billion deficit --
- a change of $203 billion in one year. (The CBO estimate is that the change was $224 billion.) Of the
actual change in the deficit of $284 billion ($127 billion plus $157 billion), $203 billion was caused by
government policies ($224 billion according to the CBO). Only $81 billion ($60 billion according to the
CBO) was caused by the worsening economy. According to the CBO estimate, of the change in the
structural deficit, about 39% was due to the tax reduction of 2001, another 28% was due to the Job Creation
and Worker Assistance Act, and another 21% was due to the increases in defense and related spending
following September 11, 2001. In 2003, the budget deficit is projected to drop to $145 billion. Since the
unemployment rate is projected to remain unchanged, none of this drop would be due to an improving
economy. The structural deficit for 2003 would be $145 billion minus $57 billion (1.9 times $30 billion),
which equals $88 billion. The structural deficit would drop from $100 billion to $88 billion due to the end
of some temporary changes that were made in 2001 (the shifting of the timing of some government
spending and some unusually large tax refunds due to excessive withholding in 2001 and to reduced capital
gains as the stock market plummeted.

Page 225 true; true; false; false; false; false

Page 228 85% percent of the total federal (national) debt has occurred since 1980?
    Year          Total         Held by the Federal Government
    1946          $270.9              $29.1
    1970           380.9               97.7
    1980           909.1              197.1
    Most Recent
     Year(2002)   6137.1            2,659.6

Page 230 The main advantage to paying off the national debt is that doing so would add to the pool of
savings. More savings would lower interest rates. Lower interest rates would encourage business
investment spending. More business investment spending on capital goods would increase Real GDP.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 18 1. C 2. C 3. D 4. B 5. A 6. D 7. B 8. D 9. B 10. A

Chapter 19

 Page 235 If there is a recession in the United States, the demand for yen would fall. The price of the yen
would fall. The dollar would appreciate and the yen would depreciate. This would lower American
exports and increase American imports.
             Under the Gold Standard, gold would leave Japan and enter the United States. Gold entering
the United States would increase spending here, helping to end the recession. But gold leaving Japan
would reduce spending there, causing a recession in Japan.
             Under Bretton Woods, the Federal Reserve Bank in New York and the Bank of Japan would
both buy yen (sell dollars). The increased number of dollars held by Americans would reduce the recession
here. The reduced number of yen held by Japanese would cause a recession there.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 19        1. B    2. C     3. C   4. B    5. D
                                      Page 17
Chapter 20

Page 243 You need to plot the data yourself to see the trade-off in the 1960s, the shift to the right in the
1970s, and the shift back to the left since then. The combination of inflation and unemployment that
existed in 2000 represents both lower inflation and also lower unemployment than existed in the 1970s or
1980s.

Page 246. You would expect the rise in the price of oil to cause Real GDP to fall, unemployment rates to
rise, and inflation rates to rise. Real GDP did indeed fall and unemployment rates did indeed rise.
However, there are many causes of these changes. The inflation rate did not rise. Partly this may result
because the price of oil did not stay high. Instead, after rising, it fell back. It also may be true that the
American economy is less dependent on oil than it was in the 1970s.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 20. 1. A        2. A     3. A    4. B    5. B

Chapter 21

All of the assignments in this chapter are internet related assignments or are answered in the body of the
text. The answers will be different depending on the time that you look up the information.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 21. 1. B       2. A    3. B     4. A    5. F    6. D    7. G    8. I   9. A 10. B

Chapter 22

Page 268. 1. Total Reserves = $10,000. Required Reserves = $2,000. Excess Reserves = $8,000
              M-1 will grow by 0
           2. Total Reserves = $10,000. Required Reserves = $2,000. Excess Reserves = $8,000
              M-1 will grow by $8,000
Page 269 3. Bank A: Total Reserves = $2,000 Required Reserves = $2,000 Excess Reserves = 0
              Bank B: Total Reserves = $8,000 Required Reserves = $1,600 Excess Reserves = $6,400
          4. $10,000 times 5 = $50,000
          5. $10,000

Page 269 There would then be $1,000 of excess reserves. The bank could make a new loan of $1,000 and
         The money supply would rise.

Page 270 1. If banks hold excess reserves, the money supply declines because they do not make new
             loans.
         2. As interest rates rise, the money supply rises because (1) people hold checking accounts
            instead of currency (so the banks can make new loans) and (2) because people hold more
            time deposits instead of checkable deposits (where the reserve requirement is lower).
Page 271 1. This is for you to do in your own words.
         2. Excess reserves increase by $1,000. The money supply increases by $1,000 times 10 =
             $10,000. The multiplier rises from 5 to 10.

Page 273   1. This is for you to do in your own words.
           2. Monetary base rises by $1,000. Excess reserves rise by $1,000. The money supply rises
              by $1,000 times 5 = $5,000.

Page 274 1. When the Fed sells Treasury securities, the dealer gets the securities. The Fed gets the IOU
            of the Fed. Since the Fed would then owe itself, the debt ceases to exist. Since the debt is
            money, the money supply decreases.
         2. Monetary base rises by $1,000. Excess reserves rise by $1,000. The money supply rises
             by $1,000 times 5 = $5,000.
                                       Page 18

Page 275   1. This is for you to do in your own words.
           2. Since the interest payment is fixed, the interest rate adjusts as the price changes. Say there is
              a $10,000 one-year security with an interest rate of 5%. At the end of the year, the recipient
              will get $10,000 plus $500, or $10,500. Suppose the price falls to $9,000. The recipient
              will still get $10,500 at the end of the year. This is a return of $1,500 on a payment of
              $9,000,or 16 2/3%.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 22. 1. A 2. A 3. C 4. B 5. A 6. C 7. B 8. C 9. A 10. B

Chapter 23

Page 282     1. shift to the right   2. shift to the right   3. move along   4. shift to the right

Page 282     The supply of money rises as interest rates rise because, as interest rates rise, people are more
             likely to hold checking accounts rather than currency and also because people are more likely
             to hold savings accounts, CDs, and so forth (that have a zero reserve requirement) rather than
             checking accounts.

Page 284   There is a recessionary gap of $100 billion. With a marginal propensity to consume of 9/10,
            The expenditures multiplier is equal to 10 (1 divided by 1-9/10). Therefore, business
            investment spending needs to increase by $10 billion ($10 billion times 10 = the needed $100
            billion). This means that real interest rates need to fall by 2 percentage points. To make this
            happen, the money supply needs to increase by $20 billion. (If the money multiplier is equal to
           10, the monetary base would need to be increased by $2 billion, as $2 billion times 10 would
           equal the needed $20 billion.)

Page 284     Both cases are identical. In both cases, shift the demand for money to the right. The result is
             That interest rates rise.

Page 287     1. falls;    rising

Page 288     2. Some reasons for the downward trend in the demand for money might be a better ability to
                manage one’s money due to computer technology (this might be especially true for
                businesses), the greater availability of credit cards (reducing the need to hold money), more
                convenient ability to obtain funds through ATMs and so on, a greater number of savings
                options that are alternatives to money, perhaps the advent of computer banking, and so on.
                You may be able to come up with some other reasons.

Page 290     12.4 weeks is equal to .238 of a year (12.4 divide by 52). 4% of 140.9 million is equal to 5.636
             million. So 5.636 million people were unemployed on average over the year. If each person
             was unemployed an average of .238 of a year, then 23.681 million must have gone through the
             job search process in the year (5.636 divided by .238). Of course, the real number is a bit
             different because the unemployment rate and the duration of unemployment were not the same
             each month.

Page 290     The use of temporary agencies has reduced the duration of unemployment by matching
             workers with jobs. The reduction in the number of 16 to 19 year olds has reduced the number
             of people who are likely to quit a job and look for a different job several times in a year. And
             the greater experience of female workers means that they are likely to stay on a job longer and
             that they do not need as long as they once needed to find a new job.

Page 293     1. Similarities include: velocity being seen as constant, there being no cyclical unemployment
             except temporarily, production being at Potential Real GDP in the long run, inflation being
                                      Page 19

             caused only by increases in the money supply, and so forth.
             2. An increase in the price of oil would raise prices of goods and services that depend on oil
             for their production. With only so much demand, if people had to spend more on these goods,
             they would have to spend less on other goods. The average price would not change. Even if it
            did, prices would rise but then stop rising. The analogy is to a campfire. If it is lit, it will burn.
            But if you just watch it, it will burn itself out. Inflation, in their view, cannot persist without an
            increase in the money supply.

Practice Quiz for Chapter 23 1. B 2. A 3. C 4. C 5. B 6. C 7. A 8. C 9. B 10. D

Chapter 24

Page 305 Monetary policy is expansionary when the money supply is increasing at a faster rate and when
         the interest rate is falling. It was quite expansionary during the recession years of 1969 to 1971
         and 1974 to 1975. Otherwise, the effect is more modest.

Page 306 Assume that the natural rate of unemployment was 4.5%. The increase in the money supply
         should be consistent with a rise in the rate of change of wages, a rise in the inflation rate, and a
         fall in the unemployment rate. And it basically is. As unemployment falls below 4.5%, the
         inflation rate should be rising faster and faster. This does not occur.

Page 306 Other factors include the rise in government spending, the budget deficits, the rise in oil prices
         after 1972, and so on.

Page 306    decrease; increase; decrease; decreases; decreases; decrease; decrease
            For the description of the short-run and the long-run as well as the graphs, see the next section
            of the chapter.

Page 312     Based on the growth of the money supply and interest rates, monetary policy was expansionary
             mainly until 1983. It was reasonably contractionary after that.

Page 313     The expansionary monetary policy period is associated with a rise in unemployment and a
             decline in inflation. Clearly, the expansionary policy was a response to the economic
             problems, not a cause. The contractionary period is associated with a fall in the unemployment
             rate, a fall in the inflation rate, and a much slower growth of wages. This is exactly what the
             view of the Monetarist economists would predict.

Page 313     Other factors would include the tax reductions, the defense spending, the very high budget
             deficits, the decline in oil prices, and so forth.

Page 316     1. Keynesian     2. Monetarist 3. Classical and Monetarist          4. Classical
             5. Monetarist    6. Keynesian   7. Monetarist                       8. Monetarist
             9. Monetarist       10. Monetarist

Practice Quiz for Chapter 24       1. C    2. A    3. B     4. A 5. B
                                   6. B    7. A    8. B     9. A 10. A
                                    Page 20

Chapter 25

Page 322     In 1980, the person would have been in the 39% marginal tax rate. So $3,900 would have
             gone to the government in taxes. In 2000, the person would have been in the 28% marginal
             tax rate. So $2,800 would have gone to the government in taxes. Keeping the additional
             $1,100 might provide a greater incentive to earn the extra income.

Page 327     A supply side economist would recommend a reduction in marginal tax rates. This is indeed
             what was proposed by President George W. Bush. The reduction in marginal tax rates, they
             would argue, would provide greater incentives to work, save, and otherwise earn income.
             Income would rise so much that the recession would end. Tax revenues would rise and the
             budget deficits would decline. That, at least, would be their argument.

Page 330      You will see that government spending in California was reduced somewhat. And there were
              small tax increases (called “revenue enhancements”). But these all were very small and will
              have little overall economic effect. Had government spending been reduced more or taxes
             increased more (as may have to happen in 2003), the effect could be to worsen the recession.
             The state of California found legal ways to borrow, even though budget deficits are not
             allowed.

Page 330     You will see the answers you need when you read the next section of the text.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:13
posted:8/28/2011
language:English
pages:20