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					     California State University, Long Beach
  College of Education and Affiliated Programs
  in the College of Health and Human Services


Professional Administrative Services

         Credential Program





                            Prepared for Merged Accreditation Visit of

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and

                     California Commission on Teacher Credentialing,

                                  Committee on Accreditation (CCTC)

                                      April 28 - May 2, 2007
  Professional Administrative Services Credential Program


                                Prepared for

                        Merged Accreditation Visit of
   National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and
         California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC)
                        Committee on Accreditation


                                     by

                     Marilyn Korostoff, Coordinator
      Educational Administration Tier I & Tier II Credential Programs

                  California State University, Long Beach
    Department of Educational Psychology, Administration & Counseling
                           1250 Bellflower Blvd.
                           Long Beach CA 90840
                               562/985-5705
                           marilynk@csulb.edu


Accreditation Application Based on the Standards of Quality and Effectiveness
      for Administrative Services Credentials (adopted January 2004)




                                 April 2007
                   Professional Administrative Services Credential Program

                                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS

Contents ......................................................................................................................................... i

Overview of Documents Submitted to the CTC........................................................................ iii

Original Submission Cover Letter ............................................................................................ iv

Common Standards ......................................................................................................................1
  Standard 1: Education Leadership ........................................................................................1
  Standard 2: Resources ...........................................................................................................3
  Standard 3: Faculty ...............................................................................................................6
  Standard 4: Evaluation ........................................................................................................10
  Standard 5: Admission ........................................................................................................11
  Standard 6: Advice and Assistance .....................................................................................14
  Standard 7: School Collaboration .......................................................................................17
  Standard 8: District Field Supervisors ................................................................................19

Part 5: California Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Professional Clear
   Administrative Services Credential Programs ...................................................................21

Preconditions for Standards-based Professional Clear Administrative Services
   Credential Programs* ..........................................................................................................22

Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Standards-based Professional Clear
   Administrative Services Credential Programs ...................................................................25

Category I: Program Design and Curriculum .........................................................................25
   Standard 1: Program Design, Rationale and Coordination .................................................25
   Standard 2: Design of the Professional Credential Induction Plan .....................................31
   Standard 3: Curriculum Content .........................................................................................32
   Standard 4: Scope and Delivery of the Professional-Level Curriculum .............................36
   Standard 5: Curricular Individualization.............................................................................39

Category II: Support and Mentoring Plan ...............................................................................40
   Standard 6: Provision of Mentoring Experiences ...............................................................40
   Standard 7: Mentor Qualifications ......................................................................................42

Category III: Candidate Competence and Performance ........................................................44
   Standard 8: Expectations for Candidate Performance ........................................................44
   Standard 9: Assessment of Candidate Competence ............................................................45



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Reviewers’ Comments on Common Standards 1-8 of the Original Program Submission
   Document ...............................................................................................................................47

Reviewers’ Comments on Program Standards 1-9 of the Original Program Submission....49

Program Response to Reviewers’ Comments on Common Standards 1-8
   of the Original Program Submission ...................................................................................51
   Standard 1: Education Leadership ......................................................................................51
   Standard 2: Resources .........................................................................................................51
   Standard 3: Faculty .............................................................................................................52
   Standard 4: Evaluation ........................................................................................................54
   Standard 5: Admission ........................................................................................................55
   Standard 6: Advice and Assistance .....................................................................................56
   Standard 7: School Collaboration .......................................................................................58
   Standard 8: District Field Supervisors ................................................................................61

Program Response to Reviewers’ Comments on Program Standards 1-9
   of the Original Program Submission ...................................................................................62
   Standard 1: Program Design, Rationale and Coordination .................................................62
   Standard 2: Design of the Professional Credential Induction Plan .....................................68
   Standard 3: Curriculum Content .........................................................................................69
   Standard 4: Scope and Delivery of the Professional-Level Curriculum .............................75
   Standard 5: Curricular Individualization.............................................................................78
   Standard 6: Provision of Mentoring Experiences ...............................................................79
   Standard 7: Mentor Qualifications ......................................................................................80
   Standard 8: Expectations for Candidate Performance ........................................................81
   Standard 9: Assessment of Candidate Competence ............................................................82




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                    Professional Administrative Credential Program

                            Overview of Documents Submitted
                 to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing


 I.     California Commission on Teacher Credentialing Program Approval Letter, October 24,
        2006 (See separate PDF file)

 II.    Original Professional Administrative Services Credential Program Submission: Cover
        Letter and Application Document – January, 2005

 III.   Reviewers’ Comments on Original Program Submission Document

 IV.    Program Response to Reviewers’ Comments




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                           Original Submission Cover Letter
                                    (January, 2005)


                                        January 20, 2005

Dear Jim,

Enclosed please find California State University, Long Beach’s application for accreditation for
the Professional Administrative Services Credential Program. The application includes the
College of Education’s and Preliminary and Professional Administrative Credential Programs’
responses to the Common Standards. However at this time, the focus of the application itself rests
with the Preconditions and Standards Responses for the Professional Credential only. The
Preliminary level program application will be submitted by the January 2006 deadline under the
coordination of the new preliminary credential program coordinator, Dr. Thelma Moore-Steward.

We are anticipating a favorable review and look forward to providing the Commission with any
additional information or clarification needed to gain program approval.

Thank you so much for your assistance and guidance with the entire process. Your help was
invaluable.

Sincerely,


Marilyn Korostoff, Ed.D.
Coordinator, Professional Administrative Services
Credential Program




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                                     Common Standards

                            Standard 1: Education Leadership
The program sponsor (faculty, dean/director and program administration) articulates and
supports a vision for the preparation of professional educators. All professional preparation
programs are organized, governed, and coordinated with the active involvement of
credential program faculty. Program leadership fosters cohesiveness in management;
delegates responsibility and authority appropriately; resolves each professional preparation
program’s administrative needs as promptly as feasible; and represents the interests of each
program in the institution, the education profession, and the school community.

                                             Response
The College of Education is very clear about its vision and mission for the preparation of school
leaders:

Theme/Vision: Teaching for Life-Long Learning, Professional Growth, and Social Responsibility

Mission:
 • Our mission is to foster a learning and teaching community committed to educational
     excellence. Our community
 • Promotes intellectual, personal, and interpersonal growth for all students;
 • Prepares socially responsible leaders for a rapidly changing, technologically-rich world;
 • Values diversity and prepares students for a diverse word;
 • Serves and Collaborates with other educators and the community;
 • Promotes school improvement for all students; and
 • Engages in research, scholarly activity, and ongoing evaluation

Developed in 2000, the theme/vision and mission statements are posted throughout the College.
Instructors place the theme on all syllabi for widespread dissemination. The theme and mission
statements form the basis of the College of Education’s Strategic Planning Document. The
Strategic Planning Committee assumes the leadership regarding ongoing development and
implementation of the goals and objectives of the strategic plan as well as its evaluation. The entire
College faculty is encouraged to provide input regarding the plan and its contents thus making
teamwork an ongoing part of program implementation. (See Appendix 1 for Strategic Planning
Document)

A program chair heads each department in the College of Education. Within each department, a
designated coordinator assumes overall responsibility for program coordination. Under the
leadership of the department chair, program coordinators meet monthly to discuss programmatic
issues and participate in decision making regarding overall program concerns such as enrollment,
budget, admissions procedures and office support (See Appendix 2 for sample coordinators’
meeting agendas). The program coordinators confer on a regular basis with adjunct faculty


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through monthly meetings, email, phone calls, and in advisory committee meetings to ensure
facilitation and articulation of the program. (See Appendix 3 for sample Program and Advisory
Committee Agendas).

The College of Education is supportive of the program’s goals and efforts. The administrative
officers of the college are the Dean, three Associate Deans, and three Department Chairs. The
University Coordinator of the Single Subject Credential Program is given quasi-chair status in the
college and attends department chair meetings and budget discussions. The Administrative
Credential programs enjoy the collegial support of administration and faculty in the Department
of Teacher Education and the Department of Educational Psychology, Administration and
Counseling, both of which provide courses for certain aspects of the preliminary administrative
services program.
Consistent with CSU system policy and traditions, faculty have the primary responsibility for
governance of program and curriculum decisions. All program and course changes are reviewed
by the Department Curriculum Committee followed by the College of Education Curriculum
Committee, and by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Academic Senate. Close
involvement in faculty governance is actively honored by university faculty and supported by the
administration.
Passage and implementation of the new administrative standards provided the most dramatic
opportunity for review and revision of the Administrative Services Credential programs.
Beginning in the spring, 2004, program faculty and advisory committee members examined the
existing program in light of both the new standards and best practices in administrator preparation,
and took the opportunity to revise existing courses, add new courses, and re-vision how it works
with beginning administrators.
Advocacy for the credential programs, the education profession as a whole, and the local school
community is conducted in multiple ways. A few examples include: 1) The Development of the
Professional Development School (PDS) partnership with Long Beach Unified School District
where credential candidates are educated in authentic settings, 2) the successful, nationally
acclaimed Long Beach Partnership between the University, Long Beach Unified School District,
and Long Beach and Cerritos Community Colleges, 3) our veteran Credential Processing Office
Director, Carol Riley who is a constant advocate for our credential programs in Sacramento, and
4) our own educational administration coordinators who also visited Sacramento and the CTC
meetings during the development phases of the new Educational Administration standards and
program options.

Documentation * for Standard 1:
Appendix 1 [EH] Strategic Planning Document
Appendix 2 [H]      Sample coordinators’ Meeting Agendas
Appendix 3 [H]      Sample Program and Advisory Committee Meeting Agendas



*
 Letters in brackets [ ] in the appendix title refer to availability of documents in the Exhibits
Room: [E] = document exists only electronically, [H] = document exists only in hard copy, [E,H]
= document exists in both electronic and hard copy.



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                                   Standard 2: Resources

Sufficient resources are consistently allocated for the effective operation of each credential
preparation program, to enable it to be effective in coordination, admission, advising,
curriculum, instruction, and field experiences. Library and media resources, computer
facilities, and support personnel, among others, are adequate.

                                            Response
Institutional and College Support for Programs
California State University, Long Beach is a comprehensive urban university with an extensive
array of institutional resources to support the effective operation of credential programs.

College of Education programs are funded through two sources: state funds generated by FTES
and funds generated by courses offered through University College and Extension Services
(UCES). State funds pay for almost all faculty and lecturer positions, operating expenses, and
instructional equipment. UCES funds augment and supplement campus budget allocations.

Colleges, departments, and programs are funded primarily from state allocations disbursed
through the Office of the Chancellor to each of the 23 campuses in the system. The CSU system
funds each university on a historical and prior year performance basis; since the 1990s, no special
course-related formulas have been used. Budget allocations are made on the basis of each campus
projecting Full Time Equivalent Student (FTES) enrollment targets. Allocations for operating
expenses are based on a formula determined by the number of full-time equivalent students
(FTES) and the number of full-time equivalent faculty (FTEF).

The President of the university is responsible for final determination of budget allocations for all
campus programs and operations. Consultation with university administrators and faculty occurs
regarding campus-wide budget requests, and equitable distribution is assured through established
formulas. The Resources, Personnel, and Policy (RPP) committee, working with the President, has
primary responsibility for setting the budget vision at CSULB. Deans are regularly consulted in
matters related to Academic Affairs budget development, allocations and adjustments.

Allocations to departments originate with the University’s allocation; the campus-wide budget
committee recommends distribution to colleges. Colleges then distribute funds to departments and
programs. Enrollment targets are allotted to the CSU campuses, to each of the colleges, and to
departments. Additional funds are generated through UCES programs offered by departments.

In the recent past, the college benefited greatly from increases in CSU allocations, which have
been used in great part for basic credential program development. With the current state budget
crisis however, funding for college programs has been reduced to meet newly imposed budget
constraints. Nevertheless, the college remains committed to the CSU policy of admitting all
qualified candidates to basic credential programs.




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Library and Media Resources
Chief among the learning resources on the campus is the University Library. It houses over one
million books, along with bound periodicals, federal and state documents, rare books, maps,
videos, CDs, films, and other non-print materials.

Members of the library faculty conduct instructional sessions and workshops covering library
research and electronic resources, as well as offering one-on-one assistance. Interlibrary loan and
borrowing through a linked system can supply free of charge to the campus community many
materials not held by CSULB. In addition, mutual use agreements permit students to use the
collections of other CSU libraries and a number of local institutions of higher learning. CSULB
participates in a number of electronic database services, such as the Education Resources
Information Clearinghouse (ERIC) database. The library provides a document delivery service for
journal articles for faculty and graduate students.

The Audiovisual Materials Center functions as an important and vital service agency on campus.
Faculty can check out equipment needed for instruction, and have it delivered directly to the
classroom.

Computer Facilities
College of Education computer labs support both Windows and Macintosh platforms. The
computer labs located in the Liberal Arts Building 2 have been recently updated and provide an
excellent environment for training credential candidates in the instructional uses of technology.
A great variety of software is available, including productivity packages (word processing,
spreadsheets, etc.), graphics packages, statistical programs, and network applications (web
browsers, telnet, email, etc.). Student email accounts are available at no cost from Academic
Computing Service; university computer labs are located at both the south and north ends of
campus. The office of Academic Computing offers regular workshops for both students and
faculty in a variety of computer applications.

Administrative Services Credential Programs
The program currently services approximately sixty candidates in the Master’s Degree/
Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program and fifteen candidates in the Professional
Level program. Resources are allocated on a full-time equivalent faculty basis. Faculty units are
assigned for fieldwork supervision (in the preliminary program) and instruction in both the
preliminary and professional levels. Currently, there are two full-time tenured faculty who teach
and coordinate the programs. The faculty load is twelve units per semester.

At the preliminary level, faculty duties include candidate advisement on admission and course
requirements, supervision of field experiences, teaching the required courses, and assistance with
the general development of a candidate's competence. Tenured faculty, along with adjunct
instructors (2-3) who are practitioners in the field, take full responsibility for teaching the required
courses and supervising fieldwork experiences and one tenured faculty is responsible for
preliminary program coordination. At the professional level, two tenured faculty and two adjunct
instructors currently teach in the program with one tenured member assuming coordination duties.
The tenured faculty member also teaches the introductory Induction course which provides for


EdAdminII 4/07                                     4
individualized assistance while developing the Induction Plan. At both levels, all students are
assigned an advisor and all candidates are encouraged to meet with their advisors each semester.

The Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program coordinator has three units of
assigned time per semester and the Professional Administrative Services Credential Program
coordinator has one semester of assigned time, for three units, which allows sufficient staff and
administrative time to support effective communication and collaboration with the other agencies/
organizations participating in the program such as cooperating school districts in both the
preliminary and professional programs.




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                                      Standard 3: Faculty

Qualified persons are hired and assigned to teach all courses and supervise all field
experiences in each credential preparation program. Faculty reflect and are knowledgeable
about cultural, ethnic, and gender diversity. The program sponsor provides support for
faculty development, and recognizes and rewards outstanding teaching. The program
sponsor regularly evaluates the performance of course instructors and field supervisors, and
retains in credential programs only those individuals who are consistently effective.

                                              Response
The College of Education strives to ensure that faculty members are intellectually, professionally,
and experientially qualified to provide high value, challenging, research-based preparation in its
education credential programs. Programs are delivered through the teaching and advising efforts
of a mix of tenure track, full-time lecturer and part-time lecturer appointments.

Full-time faculty members are employed as a result of nationwide searches which are conducted in
accordance with established university policies. The college continues to make cultural, ethnic,
and gender diversity a priority in recruitment and hiring decisions. Faculty members are
committed to ensuring a broad range of experiences and perspectives and to recruiting
ethnic/minority participants to meet the needs of the diverse student populations being served. All
tenure track faculty members hold a terminal degree of either the doctor of philosophy or the
doctor of education. Faculty members are assigned to teach courses based on their advanced
studies and professional experience. They bring to their teaching and advising substantial
expertise in such areas as educational leadership, bilingual education, multicultural foundations of
education, curriculum and instruction, language development and acquisition, language arts,
reading, math, science and social studies content areas, and administration. Virtually all faculty
has K-12 school experience. This reflects experience as classroom teachers as well as
administrators, counselors, curriculum specialists, and staff developers. This seasoned experience
contributes to the faculty’s effectiveness in providing relevant course work and supervision in
field placements.

Part-time faculty members in the college bring similarly strong credentials to their work with
credential candidates. Part-time faculty members are either current K-12 classroom teachers, have
significant K-12 experience or are site or district level administrators. All part-time faculty has at
least a Masters degree, and a number have doctorates. They, too, bring a wealth of experience and
advanced training to their work with students. Since many are employed as K-12 educators, they
bring current, first-hand experience to their work with credential candidates.

Faculty from across the unit are actively involved in professional associations and provide
education-related services at the local, state, national, and/or international levels in their areas of
expertise and interest.




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Opportunities for Professional Development
The university offers a number of opportunities for improving instructional and faculty
development. These opportunities are communicated on the University and College websites and
through College-wide or department email postings.

Faculty Development Center. The Faculty Development Center provides on-going training
opportunities in a variety of topics related to effective teaching, including assessment, the use of
technology, syllabus development, teaching strategies, discussion techniques, affirmative action
policies, and sexual harassment. It also holds other workshops in the areas of professional life and
scholarly activity.

Counseling and Psychological Services. CSULB offers professional consultation to assist
employees in solving a wide range of human problems that might affect their personal lives or
professional careers.

Special Conferences and Workshops. Throughout the year, faculty and administrators have
access to a number of special conferences and workshops that serve to enhance professional
growth and development.

Assigned Time/Faculty Loads. The university has made it a priority to support new faculty by
providing three units of release time for all new full time faculty members during both semesters
of the first year of employment. This incentive allows for optimal opportunity for new faculty to
integrate to the demands of the university and to develop a productive, professional work style.

Part time Faculty Orientation. Beginning Fall 2000, all part-time college faculty receive
mandatory orientation. At the orientation they learn about university review and retention policies,
and specifically how review is carried out in the college. Most of the professional development
opportunities available to full-time faculty are also available to part-time faculty.

Brown Bag Lecture Series. The college sponsors periodic “Brown Bag” presentations, which give
faculty opportunities to share research results and report on special projects.

Recognition for Outstanding Teaching
The university Office of Academic Affairs sponsors a competitive process for recognizing
excellence in teaching and scholarship. Individual faculty members from throughout the university
are nominated for the annual Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award. Recipients of these awards
are honored at various awards ceremonies, luncheons and dinners.

Faculty Evaluation Procedures
University policy requires that all full- and part-time faculty must have formal student evaluations
for a minimum of two courses each semester. Evaluation surveys are machine-scored and
tabulated by University Research. The original surveys, which include student narrative
comments, and Summary Reports are returned to department chairs and individual faculty.
Summary Reports provide faculty with mean scores in 8 survey categories, along with
comparative mean scores for the department and college. Faculty with sub-standard student


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evaluations are urged to address the areas needing improvement. Poorly performing part-time
faculty and university supervisors are dropped from the program when remediation is not
effective. Tenure track faculty can have their teaching responsibilities re-assigned.

Preliminary and Professional Administrative Services Credential Programs
The full time faculty who teach the courses and supervises the field experiences in the preliminary
program all have doctorate degrees and administrative credentials. All have had school site and/or
district office administrative experiences. Courses are assigned based on the academic expertise
levels, experiences, and interests of the faculty. Each instructor brings a wealth of practical and
academic experiences that qualifies him/her to teach each course.

A brief description of each faculty member is presented below. (See Appendix 4 for Faculty
Vitaes).

Full-Time Faculty:
Dr. Marilyn Korostoff Professor (Tier 1 and Tier 2 Faculty). Former district office
administrator (Burbank Unified), elementary principal, (Fullerton School District) classroom
teacher (Los Alamitos Unified and Huntington Beach City), educational research and evaluation
consultant.

Course               EDAD 544: Legal Aspects of Education
Responsibilities:    EDP 595: Qualitative Research Methodology
                     EDAD 695: Master’s Research Study Supervision
                     EDP 711 Field Research I: Qualitative Research Methods
                     (UC Irvine/CSU Joint Doctoral Program)
        Coordinator, Master’s Degree program in Educational Administration
        Coordinator, Professional Administrative Services Credential Program

Part-time Faculty
Dr. Frank Tyrrell (Tier 2 Faculty): Assistant Superintendent, Human Resources, Torrance
Unified School District. National Consultant on Organizational Development and Management

Course            EDAD 658: Organizational Development, Culture and Change
Responsibilities: EDAD 692: Administrative Portfolio Exhibition and Assessment

Dr. Charles Slater (Tier 2 Faculty): Former Superintendent, San Antonio Texas. Director of the
doctoral program in Educational Leadership, CSULB.

The Educational Administration Program has had few opportunities in recent years to hire
full-time faculty, however there is a well-defined protocol that must be followed to hire full-time
tenure track and adjunct faculty members. Briefly, all potential faculty members must submit an
application packet documenting their education levels and their work experience. Candidates who
successfully pass the paper screening are requested to present a one hour seminar to program and
College faculty. A search committee elected by each department which generally consists of three
faculty members oversees the process. Since our mission statement clearly states that the College


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of Education “values diversity and prepares students for a diverse world”, search committees look
for evidence through paper documentation, letters of recommendation, or practical experiences to
insure that faculty members and field supervisors have current knowledge of schools and
classrooms that reflect the cultural diversity of society.

The university requires student evaluations on at least two courses per full-time instructor per
semester. These evaluations, completed anonymously, allow students to comment on instructor
preparation, pedagogy, delivery, knowledge, relevancy of the subject matter, grading policies, and
overall teaching effectiveness. Faculty members use the results of these evaluations to improve
instruction and the relevancy and effectiveness of course content. Other forms of faculty
evaluation where contributions to the overall mission of the program are assessed are
administrative review, retention, tenure and promotion procedures, an evaluation of full time
lecturers, and department surveys of former credential candidates. Those faculty members who
perform in an exemplary fashion are recognized through re-appointment and promotion. Part-time
faculty are required to submit an evaluation portfolio of their work each semester. Student course
evaluations for part-time faculty are reviewed by the program coordinator and Department Chair.
If there are areas of concern with any faculty member's Instructor evaluations, the Chair will
discuss it with that individual personally. (See Appendix 5 for evaluation documents).

Documentation for Standard 3:
Appendix 4 [EH] Faculty Vitaes
Appendix 5 [EH] Evaluation Documents




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                                  Standard 4: Evaluation
The program sponsor regularly involves program participants, graduates, and local
practitioners in a comprehensive evaluation of the quality of courses and field experiences,
which leads to substantive improvements in each credential preparation program, as
needed. Meaningful opportunities are provided for professional practitioners and diverse
community members to become involved in program design, development and evaluation
activities.

                                            Response
The College of Education is involved in unit-wide assessment procedures as outlined in the
College Strategic Planning document (See Appendix 1, Strategic Planning Document, page 2). In
addition, each program is required to maintain a Program Assessment and Evaluation System
notebook where evidence of assessment efforts specifically related to each individual program is
maintained (see Appendix 6 for Program Assessment document collection outline).

Past graduates are surveyed by the College of Education as part of the unit-wide assessment
efforts. The College is at the beginning stages of collecting data in this comprehensive fashion,
however initial results from one College-wide survey have been presented at College faculty,
department, and program meetings for review.

The Department of Educational Psychology, Administration and Counseling recently prepared a
survey that was distributed to candidates in the spring of 2004. Based on an analysis of all
documents, relevant themes regarding strengths and areas of improvement are noted. Data served
as a basis and rationale for adjustments to be made in the program and also influenced the redesign
of both the preliminary and professional programs. The data gathered also influences changes and
modifications in individual course syllabi.

Candidates from both the Preliminary and Professional Credential programs complete program
surveys upon exiting the university. Results are tabulated and then studied at advisory committee
meetings and individually by program coordinators (see Appendix 7 for survey documents;
sample department survey results, and actual Professional Administrative Credential 2004 survey
results). The results of the surveys are taken seriously and inform the changes and redesign of the
program on an ongoing basis. For example, the following actions were taken resulting from the
analysis of the 2004 Professional Program survey data: 1) More emphasis is placed on matching
course activities to standards to assist candidates to meet the standards more fully (see course
proposals with course activities, Appendix 20, and Professional Program Standards 3 and 4 of this
document); 2) Shorten length of the program; 3) Maintain and increase opportunities for
professional interactions (e.g. Team Dialogue Groups, Interactive Models of Conversation); and
4) Continue to maintain qualified, experienced instructors. Additional modifications will be
implemented when the results from the next survey are tabulated and analyzed.

Documentation for Standard 4:
Appendix 6 [H]     Program Assessment Document Collection Outline
Appendix 7 [H]     Survey Documents


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                                   Standard 5: Admission

In each professional preparation program, candidates are admitted on the basis of
well-defined admission criteria and procedures (including all Commission-adopted
admission requirements) that utilize multiple measures. The admission of students from a
diverse population is encouraged. The program sponsor determines that candidates meet
high academic standards, as evidenced by appropriate measures of academic achievement,
and demonstrate strong potential for professional success in schools, as evidenced by
appropriate measures of personal characteristics and prior experience.

             Commission-Adopted Credential Program Admission Requirements
General Advanced Credential Program Admission Requirements—As a group, candidates
admitted into the program each year have attained a level of academic qualifications, using
one or more indicators, equivalent to or higher than candidates admitted to other
post-baccalaureate programs offered by the program sponsor. Each individual has personal
qualities and prior experiences that suggest a strong potential for professional success and
effectiveness in the specialist or service area.

Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Programs—As a group, candidates
admitted into the program each year have attained a level of academic qualifications, using
one or more indicators, equivalent to or higher than candidates admitted to other
post-baccalaureate programs offered by the program sponsor. Each individual has a record
of professional accomplishment demonstrating leadership potential, and exhibits consistent
adherence to moral and ethical standards of behavior.

Professional Clear Administrative Services Credential Programs—Candidates are admitted
into the program in a timely way, once it has been determined that they have successfully
completed requirements for the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential and are
employed in an administrative position by a local education agency.

                                             Response
Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program
The University uses multiple measures to help determine each candidate's academic potential for
success. First, must apply to the university and have at least a 2.85 grade point average. They must
simultaneously apply to the Preliminary Administrative Services Program specifically. At this
level, students must possess a valid California credential in any one of the following areas:
teaching, pupil personnel, librarianship, health services, vocational education, or clinical
rehabilitation. Students must also submit two letters of recommendation from district personnel
who can attest to the skills and interests of the prospective credential candidate, one of which must
be from their immediate supervisor. Any candidate for admission to the Preliminary
Administrative Program must write and submit a statement regarding their education, experience,
and philosophy of leadership, and a current resume. The statement should highlight the candidate's
values, personal qualities, a description of his/her educational and other relevant experiences, and



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future aspirations. The resume should reflect leadership experiences and activities within their
educational organizations and/or at their school sites. The essay and resume are key pieces to the
admissions process; candidates who express values of inclusiveness, respect for diversity,
transformational as opposed to transactional leadership qualities and a commitment to serving
children and the communities in which they live are eagerly sought.

Before students can file for their Certificate of Eligibility, they must pass CBEST if this
requirement has not already been fulfilled; provide verification of three years of successful
experience in a position requiring a credential and show evidence that they have either a course or
equivalent experience in the education of the exceptional child. These requirements are equal to
or higher than the requirements to other programs in our department (See Appendix 8 for a catalog
description of the program admissions requirements and those of other department programs).

The faculty is committed to recruit credential candidates that reflect the school population to be
served. The brochure that describes the program clearly states "Program faculty are actively
seeking applicants who reflect the diversity of California's school-age population." Our current
student population reflects our commitment to quality urban education and the achievement of a
balanced representation of the population by gender, race, ethnicity and disabilities. (See
Appendix 9 for Demographic Breakdown of program participants).

The application process for the Preliminary credential program is rigorous. (Please see Appendix
10 for Preliminary Program Application Packet). After all documents have been received, the
faculty rate each candidate based on a set criteria developed by faculty members. Criteria include
the quality of the information presented in the letters of recommendation, leadership experiences,
number of years teaching, and quality of writing in their personal statements. Successful
candidates move forward to participate in a five-candidate panel interview where each prospective
student must lead the group in a discussion on a topic related to a specific standard. A point system
is used to rate the candidates on six dimensions to ensure fairness as well as equity. Admissions
information and procedures as well as complete program descriptions are provided through
multiple sources: the University Catalog, hard-copies of program description and admissions
documents available outside the department office (these can also be requested by mail) and via
the web at www.csulb.edu. (See Appendix 11 for Candidate Admission/Application Evaluation
Documents).

Professional Administrative Services Credential
Candidates for the Professional Credential Program must possess a valid preliminary services
credential and must be employed in a position requiring an administrative credential. In addition,
they must provide evidence that ongoing support with a mentor will be provided throughout the
candidate's program. The entire program is designed to capitalize on the coursework and practical
experiences gleaned from each candidate’s preliminary administrative services credential program
and their current experiences as practicing administrators.

Admissions information and procedures as well as complete program descriptions are provided
through multiple sources: the University Catalog, hard-copies of program description and
admissions documents available outside the department office (these can also be requested by
mail) and via the web at www.csulb.edu. (See Appendix 12 for Professional Program Application


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packet). For prospective candidates, application packets are sent to superintendents and Human
Resource departments of surrounding school districts to be distributed to new administrative hires.

Documentation for Standard 5:
Appendix 8 [EH] Catalog Description of Program Admissions Requirements
Appendix 9 [H]     Demographic Breakdown of Program Participants
Appendix 10 [EH] Preliminary Program Application Packet
Appendix 11 [H]    Candidate Admission/Application Evaluation Documents
Appendix 12 [EH] Professional Program Application Packet




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                           Standard 6: Advice and Assistance

Qualified members of the program sponsor's staff are assigned and available to advise
candidates about their academic, professional and personal development, as the need arises,
and to assist in their professional placement. Adequate information is readily available to
guide each candidate’s attainment of all program and credential requirements. The
program sponsor assists candidates who need special assistance, and retains in each
program only those candidates who are suited for entry or advancement in the education
profession.

                                            Response
College of Education Support Services
The College of Education is fortunate to be able to draw on the services two strong College of
Education centers, the Credential Processing Center and Educational Career Services. The former
office provides invaluable expertise in all matters regarding state credentialing requirements and
issues for both candidates and faculty. The latter office provides a variety of employment services,
including establishing a placement file, sponsorship of job fairs, and maintenance of hard copy and
electronic files on position openings throughout the state. Each semester workshops are held on
interviewing, resume writing and researching school districts.

University Support Services
A variety of services are available on the university campus of which program students may take
advantage.

Academic Computing Services. This center offers computers for student use as well as workshops
ranging from basic introduction to computers to use of statistical software packages. There are
self-paced tutorials on a variety of topics, and computer tech assistants available for help. There
are several computer labs strategically located on the CSULB campus.

Career Development Center. The Career Development Center teaches skills and techniques to
enhance students abilities in setting and obtaining career goals. Specific services cover a wide
range of topics including resume writing, interviewing techniques and mock interviews.

Communicative Disorders. Students can be referred to this department for assessment of oral
communication, speech or language deficiencies.

Counseling & Psychological Services. Offers a full range of psychological and counseling in both
individual and group modalities to all students. The Center is staffed with clinical psychologists,
post-doctoral psychology interns, and licensed marriage and family therapists. Students may be
use the Center by self-referral or referral from a faculty member.

Disabled Student Services. This office works to ensure educational access for all students with
disabilities. Disabled students are provided with resources and equipment to assist in both the
classroom and laboratory. Students are assisted with career, academic and personal decisions.



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Financial Aid Advising. The Financial Aid Office handles all financial aid advising for students
on campus. Financial aid programs include scholarships, loan, equity fellowships, and work-study
arrangements for students qualifying for financial aid.

Learning Assistance Center. The Center provides a variety of services, including individual or
group tutoring, drop-in tutoring, workshops on topics such as taking exams, note-taking, and study
habits.

Women’s Resource Center. The Women’s Resource Center provides a variety of services
focusing on women’s issues and concerns, with a particular focus on re-entry women. Seminars
are offered throughout the semester and several support groups are offered, some of which have
been developed around particular ethnic-cultural groupings.

Preliminary Administrative Services Credential
Candidates are encouraged to seek advisement prior to applying to the program so that they are
fully aware of program expectations, requirements, course offerings, and deadlines. Program
advisement begins almost immediately upon notification of admission into the Preliminary
Administrative Services Credential Program. A general advisement meeting is held for all new
students each June after notification of acceptance into the program. The advisement session
focuses on information about the mission of the program, program structure, course offerings,
state credential requirements, program expectations for performance and important deadlines (See
Appendix 13 for General Advisement Meeting packet). Students are also introduced to program
coordinators who are also their advisors. Students are urged to explore Financial Aid opportunities
through the Office of Financial Aid or through scholarship assistance available through the
College of Education. Tenured program faculty conduct advisement sessions.

Students are assigned an advisor at the beginning of the program. They are urged to meet with their
advisor once each semester to develop a program of study, to review progress, and to make sure
deadlines are understood. (See Appendix 14 for Program of Study form). This strategy allows each
advisor to assess the candidate’s status throughout the program and to make corrective suggestions
if needed. Candidates who require special assistance with written or oral English communication
or due to disabilities for example, are referred to appropriate diagnostic and remediation resources
on campus such as the Learning Assistance Center. All faculty are required to place the following
on all syllabi:

Students with disabilities who need reasonable modifications, special assistance, or
accommodations in this course should promptly direct their request to the instructor. If a student
with a disability feels that modifications, special assistance, or accommodations offered are
inappropriate or insufficient, s/he should seek the assistance of the Director of Disable Student
Services on campus.

Candidates who continue to struggle or who do not appear suited for success in administration are
counseled about alternative educational pathways.




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Professional Administrative Services Credential
Candidates are required to seek advisement prior to applying to the program so that they are fully
aware of program expectations, requirements, course offerings, and deadlines. Program
advisement begins in the introductory course, EDAD 640 Induction and Professional
Development Planning for the New Administrator. A Program Flowchart is distributed to all
candidates that contains a step-by-step roadmap on requirements, course enrollment information,
basic directions for credential filing and deadlines. (See Appendix 17 for Program Flowchart). The
program coordinator serves as each candidate’s advisor and facilitates and encourages the
development of a strong relationship between candidate and mentor. Strategies for working with
the candidate’s mentor, having multiple mentors, and terminating the mentor/mentee relationship
are discussed. Each candidate must show proof of a mentor’s support upon application to the
program. Mentors are encouraged to contact the program coordinator and the coordinator will
contact the mentor if a candidate is having difficulties. Opportunities for assistance either
informally or through a modification of the Induction Plan are provided (see Appendix 15 for
Induction Handbook). Since candidates are already practicing administrators and under legal
contract to school districts, it is imperative that any issues or concerns be resolved in collaboration
with the candidate’s home school district and mentor.

Documentation for Standard 6:
Appendix 13 [H]    General Advisement Meeting Packet
Appendix 14 [H]    Program of Study Form
Appendix 15 [EH] Induction Handbook
Appendix 17 [EH] Program Flowchart




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                             Standard 7: School Collaboration

For each credential preparation program, the program sponsor collaborates with local
school personnel in selecting suitable school sites and effective clinical personnel for guiding
candidates through a planned sequence of fieldwork/clinical experiences that is based on a
well developed rationale.

                                              Response
College of Education
Programs in the College of Education at California State University, Long Beach engage in
multiple and varied collaborative efforts to design and deliver effective teacher and administrator
preparation programs. A major example of this is the Long Beach Education Partnership. Many of
the activities focus on developing teacher expertise in the content areas, but the activities have also
had many influences on program planning and evaluation across all facets of the curriculum. As
noted by Richard Riley, former U.S. Secretary of Education, in his State of American Education
Address televised from California State University, Long Beach, February 16, 1999, “The Long
Beach Education Partnership is a wonderful example of American education fitting together. I am
so proud of Bob Maxson (CSU Long Beach President), Carl Cohn (Long Beach Unified School
District Superintendent), Jan Kehoe (Long Beach City College President) . . . and others who have
pulled together to form this exciting partnership. Seamless Education really is the wave of the
future.” The mission of the partnership is to “prepare all students for higher education and the
world of work without the need for remediation or special preference (and) to remove existing
barriers to higher education and achieve a meaningful higher education experience driven by
higher standards and achievement at all levels.”

Preliminary Administrative Services Credential
The Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program is linked to approximately 20 school
districts at any one time in a variety of ways. Since all preliminary candidates must participate in
introductory and advanced fieldwork experiences, fieldwork supervisors as well as the program
coordinator work hard to develop working relationships with each student’s home district for the
introductory fieldwork course. They also forge relationships with other surrounding districts in
order to ensure appropriate placements for Advanced Fieldwork activities. These relationships are
generally developed through the university supervisor’s personal contacts and/or candidates
recommendations of exemplary school supervisors and sites. Based on the rationale of bridging
and connecting theory with practice for the aspiring administrator, all site level supervisory
personnel are chosen based on their willingness to mentor and their own experience levels.

To facilitate the fieldwork experiences, the candidate and the site supervisor utilize the Fieldwork
Handbook that contains examples and information about administrative behaviors and
dispositions required of school leaders related to the six administrative standards. Using the
handbook as a guide, each candidate must develop a contract with the site level and university
supervisors outlining specific tasks to be accomplished throughout the fieldwork experience. In
this way, candidates are integrated into the school culture as an administrator performing



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administrative tasks requiring close collaboration with site personnel, the faculty, and the
community (see Appendix 18 for Fieldwork Handbook).

One of the structured ways the program maintains contact with cooperating districts is through
semi-annual Program Advisory Committee Meetings held on campus in the fall and spring of each
year. These meetings bring together district human resources personnel, school site supervisors,
program coordinators and university fieldwork supervisors. The meetings serve as information
exchanges and provide the program with valuable input from the perspectives of our program
partners.

Professional Administrative Services Credential
The Professional Administrative Services Credential program does not have a fieldwork
requirement, however, maintaining an ongoing relationship and open lines of communication with
candidates’ mentors are critical pieces that contribute to a candidate’s success. If requested,
program faculty provide research on institutionalized mentoring, strategies and techniques for
mentoring, effective communication, reflective practices and coaching techniques. The first two
years of the mentoring relationship should focus on the technical, survival skills of the candidate,
while at the same time encouraging the development and refinement of a personal vision. The
mentor should create opportunities for the candidate to reflect upon the efficacy of practice.

Because the literature on mentoring stresses the importance of contact time between mentor and
protégé, this expectation is stressed. During the introductory course, candidates talk about the
mentor relationship, how one should be chosen if one has not already been designated, and how to
maintain a successful working collaboration. Districts are expected to provide mentoring
opportunities to both the mentor and the candidate so that sufficient time can be devoted to the
implementation of the induction plan. It is acknowledged however, that each mentoring
relationship will assume its own characteristics to serve both the mentee and the mentor. At the
time the candidate is accepted into the program, a letter of commitment is required of the school
district mentor pledging support to the candidate throughout the program. (See Appendix 15 for
Induction Handbook mentoring information).

The Mentor Guidelines contained in the Induction Handbook (see Appendix 15) suggested criteria
for mentor selection. The professional program assumes an acceptance on the part of mentors of
a professional responsibility for assisting beginning administrators. The candidate also receives
training in EDAD 640 on maximizing the benefits of the mentor relationship and in seeking
multiple mentors to support goals for which the primary mentor is less prepared.

It is expected that the mentor and candidate will work together to identify existing resources for
support and assistance within the candidate's district, i.e., job-alike groups, resource centers,
training sessions or programs, and particularly helpful individuals. During the Induction Seminar,
candidates and mentors are encouraged to generate a list of professional educator networks which
will serve as an added resource for assistance and support for the candidates. These networks will
be particularly important as it relates to specialization and addressing individual interests of
candidates.




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                         Standard 8: District Field Supervisors

Each district-employed field experience supervisor is carefully selected, trained in
supervision, oriented to the supervisory role, and certified and experienced in either
teaching the subject(s) of the class or performing the services authorized by the credential.
District supervisors and supervisory activities are appropriately evaluated, recognized and
rewarded by the program sponsor.

                                             Response
General College Credential Programs
Linkages with district-employed supervising teachers -- cooperating teachers for early field
experiences and master teachers for student teaching and administrative services credential
program school site supervisors are primarily the responsibility of each individual program in the
College. The Single Subject Credential Program for example, as well as other program offices,
provide administrative support and other assistance as needed. Thus, each program is responsible
for establishing its own district and school contacts. Fieldwork sites are located in multiple school
districts and are reflective of the ethnic, racial, linguistic, and socio-economic diversity of the
region. Advisors look to several quality indicators in determining which schools to collaborate
with, including overall school environment, the strength of the subject area program at the school,
and the quality of prospective supervisors. To secure appropriate sites and classrooms, advisors
work with classroom teachers, department chairs, principals and district personnel. Patterns of
collaboration vary with district preferences. For example, some districts prefer that the program
work through the district offices. Others permit university program coordinators to work directly
with school sites. Some sites prefer that arrangements go through the principal and others prefer to
deal directly with teachers.

Supervising teachers are selected for their skill as classroom teachers, their ability to mentor an
adult learner, and their willingness to spend the extra time required to work with pre-service
candidates. Cooperating teachers who work with program students in early field experiences
frequently also serve as master teachers for student teachers, often with candidates they’ve worked
with previously in early field work. Supervising teachers are required to be credentialed in the
subject they teach, be tenured teachers (or have three years of successful teaching experience),
demonstrate outstanding teaching attributes, teach a content standards-based curriculum, display
effective collegial characteristics, and have an explicit desire to mentor pre-service candidates. A
number of supervising teachers are graduates of the CSULB Single Subject Program. It is, in
general, a desirable goal to link graduates with current pre-service candidates, since both parties
have common experiences as a foundation for professional collaboration.

Teaching credential programs use only teachers with valid California credentials as cooperating
teachers for early fieldwork and as master teachers for student teaching. Master teachers orient
student teachers to the school culture and to the curricular and instructional plan for the courses
they will become responsible for, including bringing relevant state content standards and district
curriculum guidelines to the candidate’s attention, discussing students with the candidate, and
familiarizing the candidate with the culture of the school. In the single subject program, candidates



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are introduced to full teaching responsibilities for three subjects at a pace consistent with the
candidate’s developmental readiness. Master teachers are in the classroom as much as required to
successfully mentor the candidate, to make regular, formal observations after “withdrawing” from
the classroom, and to complete mid-term formative and end-of-term summative evaluations of the
student teacher. They conference regularly with the student teacher and are in contact with the
university supervisor regarding the student teacher’s progress. Master teachers are informed of
their responsibilities in the Student Teaching Handbook, which is provided to them by the
program.
Master teachers are informally evaluated by university supervisors and Credential Advisors.
Candidates provide formal written feedback to the program on the Cooperating Teacher Feedback
Form at the conclusion of student teaching. Candidates similarly provide formal written feedback
on university supervisors.

Master teachers are reimbursed at the rate of $20.00 per unit. Most master teachers work with a
student teacher for the full 15 unit student teaching experience. In some subject matter programs,
student teachers have two or three master teachers, in which case the stipend is prorated among
them. The program formally recognizes the contributions of master teachers with a letter of
appreciation at the conclusion of the semester.

Preliminary Administrative Services Credential
Only individuals who possess California Administrative Services Credentials supervise
administrative services credential candidates. This is verified by the fact that school supervisors
are already functioning as school principals, vice-principals, or district office administrators. The
university supervisor meets with the candidate and the site supervisor at the beginning of each
candidate’s fieldwork experience. In this way, the university supervisor can determine if the site
supervisor has remained current with changes in the profession and the student population if
he/she is not already known to the university supervisor. During this initial contact meeting, a
role-orientation and supervisory training of each school site supervisor takes place. The district
supervisor’s observational and coaching skills are generally monitored through candidate
feedback and by site visits conducted by the university supervisor. (See Appendix 17 for
Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Fieldwork Handbook).

Professional Administrative Services Credential
At the professional level, the candidate’s mentor generally serves as a resource and might be
considered a “fieldwork coach” as opposed to a supervisor. Candidates choose their own mentor
as it is extremely important that the candidate becomes comfortable with his/her mentor and that
trust is established as soon as possible. Candidates are encouraged to develop multiple
relationships with several mentors if one mentor is unable to fulfill all the needs of the beginning
administrator. During the introductory Mentoring and Professional Development Course, EDAD
640, instructions on developing a working relationship with a mentor as well as mentor
responsibilities is presented (see Appendix 15, Mentoring section).

Documentation for Standard 8:
Appendix 18 [EH] Fieldwork Handbook



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                               Part 5:

          California Standards of Quality and Effectiveness
           for Professional Clear Administrative Services
                        Credential Programs



                            Preconditions

                    Program Design and Curriculum

                      Support and Mentoring Plan

                 Candidate Competence and Performance




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                 Preconditions for Standards-based Professional Clear
                    Administrative Services Credential Programs*

The General Preconditions established by the Commission (Preconditions 1–7) and the
Preconditions established by state law (Preconditions 8-10) found in the section of this handbook
for Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Programs also apply to these Professional
Clear Administrative Services Credential Programs and must be addressed in program proposals.
In addition, the following preconditions specific to the Professional Clear Credential must be
addressed.

                 Specific Preconditions Established by the Commission for the
                    Professional Clear Administrative Services Credential
    1. Initial Employment Requirement. An entity that operates a program for the Professional
       Clear Administrative Services Credential shall determine, prior to admission to the
       credential program, that the candidate is employed in a position requiring an administrative
       credential. Statutory basis: Education Code Section 44270 (b) and 44270.1 (a)(2).

    Upon submission of application documents to the program, candidates must include a letter on
    district letter-head verifying current employment as a California school administrator.
    Candidates are notified of this requirement on all program application documents, on the
    program website, and on an informational brochure. (See Appendix 12).

    2. Prerequisite Credential. An entity that operates a program for the Professional Clear
       Administrative Services Credential shall determine, prior to admission to the credential
       program, that the candidate possesses a valid Preliminary Administrative Services
       Credential. Statutory basis: Education Code Section 44270.1 (a)(1).

    Upon submission of application documents to the program, candidates must include a copy of
    their valid preliminary administrative services credential. Candidates are notified of this
    requirement on all program application documents, on the program website, and on an
    informational brochure. (See Appendix 12).

    3. Individualized Induction Plan. An entity that operates a program for the Professional
       Clear Administrative Services Credential shall provide for the development of a written
       individualized program of professional development activities (professional credential
       induction plan) for the advanced preparation program based upon individual needs. The
       plan shall be developed in consultations among the candidate, employer and university
       representative. Statutory basis: Education Code Section 44270.1 (a)(3).

    The written individualized induction plan is created, developed and completed in EDAD 640
    Mentoring and Professional Development for the New Administrator. In this course, students
    complete a self assessment of their perceived competency levels in not only each of the six
    CPSEL standards but in the Technology Standards for School Administrators as well. They
    also complete a self analysis matrix where they rate their competency on specific leadership
    indicators and access a Myer’s Briggs Personality Inventory online. After a careful analysis of


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    all self assessment data, strengths are identified as well as areas of need. Based on their self
    assessment and subsequent analysis, candidates write personalized goals related to each of the
    six CPSEL standards, identify strategies to meet the goals, determine artifacts that will serve
    as evidence of goal progress or goal mastery and create a timeline and target date for goal
    achievement. The entire induction plan must be presented to the class where candidates
    explain how their goals were developed and justify how accomplishing their goals will
    promote their development as school leaders. The induction planned is signed by the
    candidate, the candidate’s mentor, and the university supervisor as evidence of the plan’s
    development through consultation (see Induction Plan documents, Appendix 15).

    4. Non-university Activities Option. A college or university that operates a program for the
       Professional Clear Administrative Services Credential may allow approved non-university
       activities to be included in the professional credential induction plan in consultations
       among the candidate, employer's representative and university representative. Statutory
       basis: Education Code Section 44270.1 (a)(3).

    As part of the induction plan, candidates must develop strategies to meet their goals. One
    strategy could be to participate in non-university activities such as district sponsored staff
    development workshops, professional conferences, professional development courses through
    professional organizations, etc. Non-university activities must connect to the candidate’s
    identified goals as presented in the professional induction plan (see Induction Plan documents,
    Appendix 15).

    5. Administrative Experience Requirement. An entity that operates a program for the
       Professional Clear Administrative Services Credential shall determine, prior to
       recommending a candidate for the credential, that the candidate has verified completion of
       a minimum of two years of successful experience in a full-time administrative position in
       a public school or private school of equivalent status while holding the Preliminary
       Administrative Services Credential. Statutory basis: Education Code Section 44270.1
       (a)(2).

    Prior to being recommended for the Professional Administrative Services Credential,
    candidates must provide verification of two years administrative employment through a letter
    on district letter-head, or on the standard form created and disseminated by the CTC, The letter
    or form must be submitted to the Credential Processing Center at California State University,
    Long Beach. Candidates are notified of this requirement on all program application
    documents, on the program website, and on the program informational brochure (see
    Appendix 16 for Program Exit Directions).

    6. Inclusion of University Coursework. An entity that operates a program for the
       Professional Clear Administrative Services Credential shall ensure that the professional
       credential induction plan developed for each candidate includes university coursework
       among the required professional development activities. Statutory basis: Education Code
       Section 44270.1(a)(3).




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    All students enrolled in the Professional Clear Administrative Services Credential program
    must take the following university courses: EDAD 640 Mentoring and Professional
    Development for the New Administrator, EDAD 658 Organization Development, Culture, and
    Change, EDAD 659 Educational Governance, Politics, and Policy, and EDAD 692,
    Administrator Portfolio Development and Exhibition.

    Candidates who are approved to enroll in the “Streamlined Program” (which is only under
    consideration as of spring, 2005), reserved only for those students who have had four years of
    administrative experience and whose five year time period is terminating must enroll in EDAD
    640 and EDAD 692. (See Appendix 15, Induction Plan Handbook that includes coursework
    requirements as well as Appendix 8 for Catalog description of required courses).

Documentation for Preconditions:
Appendix 16 [EH] Program Exit Directions

* These preconditions do not apply to the guidelines-based professional clear programs
addressed in Part 6.




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             Standards of Quality and Effectiveness
     for Standards-based Professional Clear Administrative
                 Services Credential Programs

                                     Category I
                            Program Design and Curriculum

                 Standard 1: Program Design, Rationale and Coordination

The professional credential program is supported by a cogent rationale, draws on a defined
knowledge base, is responsive to the individual candidate's needs, and is coordinated
effectively.

                                            Rationale
New administrators need to experience programs that are designed cohesively on the basis of a
sound rationale that makes sense, and that are coordinated effectively in keeping with their
intended designs. The program should be designed to give options to individual candidates to
pursue coursework and other professional development opportunities that meet their own
particular needs.

Program Design
The Professional Administrative Services Credential Program is designed to fulfill the theme of
the College of Education – Teaching for Life-Long Learning, Professional Growth, and Social
Responsibility. In addition, the program is structured to incorporate the College’s mission – to
foster a learning and teaching community committed to educational excellence that focuses on 1)
promoting student growth, 2) preparing socially responsible leaders, 3) valuing diversity, 4)
developing collaboration, 5) promoting school improvement, and 6) engaging in research,
scholarly activity and ongoing evaluation. Both the theme and mission provide the scaffolding of
the Professional program’s intent to provide candidates with meaningful, practical, and
challenging experiences in order to meet the high expectations outlined in the Standards of Quality
and Effectiveness for Administrative Services Credential Programs.

The Professional program’s design is influenced by multiple factors in addition to the College’s
mission and theme: 1) candidates’ personal and professional needs and goals as practicing
administrators, 2) current academic literature that informs practice related to effective leadership
principles, 3) a well defined conceptual knowledge base, (Bolman & Deal, 1996; Fullan, 2002,
2003, 2004; Sergiovanni, 1992; Starratt, 1992, 1999; Barth, 2001; Lambert, 2002), 4)
management, organizational, and political themes, and 5) the importance of developing
collaborative learning communities where candidates learn from each other. Coursework is
constructed to reinforce our purpose of educating practicing administrators to meet the changing
needs of our urban school population and to facilitate understanding of the major organizational,
social, cultural, economic, and political implications that affect their work.


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An additional factor that influences the design of the Professional program centers around the
program’s mission – To help educational leaders develop the courage, compassion, competence
and commitment necessary to change the world of schooling. The Program’s primary areas of
emphasis, 1) promoting the understanding of the role of schooling in a democratic society, 2)
producing compassionate and competent instructional leaders to work with diverse populations, 3)
assisting candidates to acquire the necessary skills to build collaboratives to manage and guide
change, and 4) promoting the understanding of the nature of urban school issues, also influence the
design and structure of the program.

The Professional Administrative Services candidates are practicing administrators. Most were
teachers for several years before becoming educational leaders in administrative capacities.
Having been exposed to various leadership theories during their Preliminary preparation programs
(which at this point in time may or may not have been at CSULB), they must now translate their
knowledge into the day-to-day real world of leadership. They must acquire the necessary tools,
strategies, and methods to lead multiple followers to guide their schools toward excellence. The
Professional program builds on the basic course foundations of the preliminary program, but
maintains a much stronger practical application component. To facilitate this emphasis, and to
maintain a seamless connection to candidates’ preliminary credential program’s coursework (if
undertaken in California) the program is also designed and structurally and conceptually grounded
in the six California Professional Standards for Educational Leadership (CPSELs).

With the above considerations and foundational guidelines in mind, professional level candidates
follow an organizational structure that forms a logical sequence among its instructional
components. The coursework sequence is presented below:

                                     Program Requirements
Mentoring and Professional Development
EDAD 640: Mentoring and Professional Development for the New Administrator
In this course, the candidate, the University advisor and the school district mentor work together
to develop an individualized induction plan for the support and professional development of the
beginning administrator. The plan is based on a pre-assessment of the candidate’s skills and
competence. The plan includes a mentoring component, academic coursework, and a
non-university based professional development activity if desired by the candidate. Emphasis is
placed on preparation to provide leadership in socially, culturally, ethnically, and linguistically
diverse schools.

Academic University Coursework Component
EDAD 658: Organizational Development, Culture, and Change
Prerequisite: EDAD 640. This seminar explores the elements that influence schools as effective
organizations. Based on a collaborative vision of learning, the practice of transformational
leadership and organizational development to provide continuous student and staff growth is
examined. Learning strategies on developing successful school cultures and instructional
programs by creating community as the heart of an organization is a primary focus. The course
also includes the systematic study of the larger political, social, legal and supervisory perspectives


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related to organizational leadership and change contexts using theory and practice from the
behavior/management sciences as well as successful educational and business organizations.
Letter grade only (A-F).

EDAD 659: Organizational Governance, Politics, and Policy
Prerequisites: EDAD 640. Students will examine the systemic impact of governance systems in
California Public Schools from the federal, state and local levels. Students will understand how
policies are developed and implemented especially as they relate to their successful leadership in
education. The politics of public education as well as the micro-politics of school sites are
explored from both a theoretical and pragmatic perspective. Letter grade only (A-F).

Assessment of Candidate Competence
EDAD 692: Administrator Portfolio Development and Exhibition
This course requires 1) completion of the mentoring and professional development plan, including
the core courses and 2) a presentation of the candidate’s professional portfolio consisting of
artifacts documenting academic course accomplishments related to goal progress and/or goal
accomplishment. The presentation will be made to the instructor, the school district mentor, and a
panel of other candidates.

Program Structure
Candidates are admitted to the regular program as a single cohort each summer with coursework
taking seven months to complete. The cohort consists of fifteen to twenty students who are all
practicing administrators. This structural format was chosen because of the strong emphasis on
building collaborative working environments where administrators can share their triumphs as
well as their challenges as a group. The majority of our students are vice-principals or principals,
however candidates may enter the program with various other administrative district or school site
assignments. Because candidates come from a variety of surrounding districts, the cohort structure
provides powerful collaborative learning experiences and multiple opportunities for sharing,
networking, and learning across various school and district organizational cultures.

Program Rationale
The Professional Administrative Credential program centers around our overarching areas of
emphasis: To provide candidates with meaningful experiences that 1) promote the understanding
of the role of schooling in a democratic society; 2) produce compassionate and competent
instructional leaders to work with diverse populations, 3) assist candidates to acquire the necessary
skills to build collaboratives to manage and guide change, and 4) promote the understanding of the
nature of urban school issues. Leadership in public schools today presents challenges that require
strong leaders who are capable of addressing the major social, cultural, economic, and political
implications that affect their work. Leaders must constantly be open to understanding and learning
innovative leadership strategies and methods. They must be life-long learners and accept that
educational leadership means an ongoing commitment to learning. With these goals in mind,
candidates experience a well-defined sequential program consisting of coursework that includes
practical, school-based experiences coupled with readings on related theoretical concepts.




EdAdminII 4/07                                   27
Overall, the program has been constructed based on the expectation and belief that each school site
administrator who enters the program is capable of directing his/her own learning experiences and
who, with guidance and input, will function as an adult learner. Candidates therefore have the
latitude to construct their Induction Plans based on their own assessment of their immediate and
long-term needs and to choose the objectives and learning strategies that will assist them to attain
their own self-selected goals. Program faculty believe that candidates first need to learn how to
lead themselves and develop their own sense of personal leadership before they can be expected to
lead others.

Defined Knowledge Base
The theoretical and conceptual knowledge guiding the Professional Administrative Services
Credential Program is an extension of the Preliminary program’s foundation. Grounded primarily
in the work of Bolman and Deal (1995),Starratt (1992, 1999), Sergiovanni (1992), Fullan (2002,
2003, 2004), and Lambert (1999, 2002), professional level courses are constructed to provide a
balanced approach that not only exposes candidates to contemporary educational theories but
allows for the practical application of theory in contemporary settings as well. The administrative
and leadership conceptual frameworks upon which the program is based provides multiple
perspectives on how to develop leaders who exhibit non-traditional leadership characteristics and
strategies, who initiate and manage change, who tackle social justice issues, and who guide
schools to meet the many challenges of a diverse and ever-changing environment that is
continually affected by political influences.

School leaders must create environments where competing perspectives along with multiple
demands from various stakeholders must be considered. Recognizing that the essence of
leadership involves orchestrating and influencing relationships to attain common goals, leaders
must reconceptualize their roles using their hearts, hands, and souls rather than simply functioning
as site managers (Bolman & Deal, 2001; Starratt, 1998). This shifting view of leadership requires
school administrators to exhibit non-traditional leadership characteristics and to initiate and
manage change on multiple levels.

Leadership characteristics have certainly evolved and continue to change rapidly as schools
transform themselves from bureaucratic organizations to true learning communities. School
leaders as change agents must be prepared to acknowledge that school environments are difficult,
complex, and historically resistant to change. Maneuvering through the change minefields
requires candidates to be skilled in personal as well as institutional vision-building, inquiry, and
collaboration (Fullan, 1993). Preparing leaders to manage change with an organizational and
political knowledge is key to transforming schools and remains a primary focus of the Professional
Administrative Services Credential Program.

Streamlined Program Structure
Program faculty would like to implement a “Streamlined Program” for those students who have
been employed as school administrators for at least four years. The rationale for considering this
approach stems from program faculties’ experience working with new administrators (those
within their first two years of service) and those with four or more years on the job. Candidates
who have worked as administrators for at least four full years have needs that are often different


EdAdminII 4/07                                  28
and more complex. Simply by virtue of time on the job, these administrators have far more
practical experience than those new to the profession. Although not encouraged, it is a reality that
some administrators simply wait until the very last year possible to complete the Professional
Administrative Services Credential program. By having this streamlined option available, it
provides the program with more flexibility which serves to accommodate the individual needs of
more seasoned administrators in the University’s service area who still need to fulfill their
credential requirements.

Candidates who qualify for this program would be required to participate in the introductory
course, EDAD 640 Mentoring and Professional Development for the New Administrator. Since
this course is highly individualized and very candidate driven, it allows more experienced
administrators to tailor their goals and strategies to their own situations. Candidates will also be
required to participate in EDAD 692 Portfolio Exhibition and demonstrate the same level of
competency with supporting evidence of progress to goal attainment or goal mastery as their
regular program counterparts. During the time between EDAD 640 and EDAD 692, the program
coordinator will function as a streamlined program candidate’s advisor and provide individual
guidance and direction to each candidate as needed. Approval to enroll in this option rests with the
Program Coordinator and Department Chair, will only be used on a limited basis, and based on a
prospective candidate’s individual situation.

Coordination
Overall Tier 2 program coordination is the responsibility of one full-time tenured faculty member
who receives three units of assigned time per academic year. The program is well coordinated
between the University faculty and the part-time adjunct practitioner faculty who teach in the
program. For example, close verbal and e-mail contact is maintained on an on-going basis. The
two adjunct faculty members meet together with the program coordinator each year to discuss
program issues, candidates’ progress, and future programmatic directions. Other issues discussed
each semester involve providing information regarding student admission procedures,
enrollments, textbook ordering, or securing class locations as well as consultations regarding
syllabi development and course content and expectations. The coordinator also held meetings with
the two adjunct professors regarding the redesign of the professional credential program. They
contributed heavily to the curriculum review process by submitting course proposals for the two
core courses.

The Tier 2 coordinator continually interfaces with the Credential Processing Office personnel.
Their assistance plays a significant role in assisting candidates when applying for credentials. Both
the coordinator and the Credentialing office work together to facilitate the process. For example,
the credential analyst notifies the coordinator when each candidate applies for the professional
credential and reviews the documents that may still be needed for each candidate. The coordinator
and the credential analyst also work together to problem solve and facilitate the late application
process if a candidate’s Tier 1 credentials are about to expire before Tier 2 program completion.
(See Appendix 23 for sample credential application status notification form). To further
coordination, each candidate must complete a mentor information sheet where each mentor is
asked if he/she requires additional assistance or information regarding mentoring. In this way, the
coordinator maintains contact with each candidate’s mentor if requested.



EdAdminII 4/07                                   29
To insure that each candidate understands the nature of the entire Professional credential
experience, each candidate (as well as each instructor) receives an Induction Handbook in EDAD
640 that contains information about the program and the resources available. A program
flow-chart is provided that sequentially lists each Tier 2 task and activity (and its due date) that
must be completed before program completion. This flow-chart is invaluable to insure that all Tier
2 faculty and candidates move through the program in a coordinated and informed fashion (see
Appendix 17, Professional Administrative Services Program Flowchart).




EdAdminII 4/07                                  30
         Standard 2: Design of the Professional Credential Induction Plan

The candidate, the university advisor, and the employer's representative(s) work together to
develop a professional credential induction plan for the support and professional
development of each beginning administrator. The design of the plan is coherent, is based on
a stated rationale, and includes a mentoring component, advanced academic coursework,
and may include non-university based professional development activities.

                                            Rationale
The professional credential induction plan outlines the plan to build professional competence for
each beginning administrator. This plan builds on each beginning administrator's assessed needs
and outlines specific activities for facilitating each beginning administrator's professional
development.

Mentoring and Professional Development
EDAD 640: Mentoring and Professional Development for the New Administrator
An entire course, EDAD 640 Mentoring and Professional Development for the New Administrator
is devoted to the creation, development, preparation, and completion of an individualized plan that
a candidate follows to accomplish his/her professional goals.

In this course, students complete a self-assessment of their perceived competency levels in not
only each of the six CPSEL standards but in the Technology Standards for School Administrators
as well. They also complete a self-analysis matrix where they rate their competency on specific
leadership indicators. Additionally, candidates must access a Myer’s Briggs Personality Inventory
online where their personality styles are identified. Candidates must analyze the results from the
online indicator and determine the implications of their personality types on their leadership
styles. After a careful analysis of all self-assessment data, including any previous performance
evaluations from their places of employment, strengths are identified as well as areas of need.
Based on their self assessment and subsequent analysis, candidates write personalized goals
connected to each of the six CPSEL standards, and/or the Technology Standards for School
Administrators to identify strategies to meet the goals, determine artifacts that will serve as
evidence of goal progress or goal mastery and create a timeline and target date for goal
achievement. In addition, two core courses, EDAD 658 and EDAD 659 serve as the academic
components that assist candidates to identify and obtain the theoretical and practical application
knowledge needed to meet their goals. Candidates maintain a mentor contact log that documents
the nature of the mentor’s assistance to assist in goal achievement. The entire Induction Plan must
be presented to the class where candidates explain how their goals were developed and justify how
accomplishing their goals will promote their development as school leaders. The Induction Plan is
signed by the candidate, the candidate’s mentor, and the university supervisor as evidence of the
plan’s development through consultation (see Induction Plan documents, Appendix 15).




EdAdminII 4/07                                  31
                            Standard 3: Curriculum Content
The content of the curriculum has a strong conceptual base and is organized to address
principles of administrative practice in the thematic areas defined below:

    •   Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a
        vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community
    •   Advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program
        conducive to student learning and staff professional growth
    •   Ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe,
        efficient, and effective learning environment
    •   Collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse
        community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources
    •   Modeling a personal code of ethics and developing professional leadership capacity
    •   Understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic,
        legal and cultural context

                                            Rationale
The principles outlined in these broad thematic areas are intended to suggest a holistic, integrated
approach to instructional leadership and to the design of a curriculum intended to produce such
leaders. Each set of principles interrelate in important ways and are expected to be woven
throughout the curriculum.

The Induction Experience
The program begins with EDAD 640 Mentoring and Professional Development for the New
Administrator. Candidates completely immerse themselves in self-reflection and analysis of their
current and future roles as educational leaders. They participate in multiple self-assessment
activities. As stated in the previous standard, students complete a self-assessment of their
perceived competency levels in not only each of the six CPSEL standards but in the Technology
Standards for School Administrators (TSSA) as well. They also complete a self-analysis matrix
where they rate their competency on specific leadership indicators. Additionally, candidates must
access a Myer’s Briggs Personality Inventory online where their personality styles are identified.
Candidates must analyze the results from the online indicator and determine the implications of
their personality types on their leadership styles. The key is in the analysis where candidates must
organize and then analyze their data so that proper and appropriate decisions can be made
regarding the creation of their goals and objectives. Class discussions focus on how to develop and
structure goals, how to create evidence of goal mastery as well as examples of what will constitute
evidence of their progress and of the implications of their choices of goals in the short and long
term. Each one of the self selected goals must be matched to a CPSEL or TSSA standard. Overall,
the seminar assists candidates in clarifying their own visions of leadership for themselves as well
as for those they will lead.




EdAdminII 4/07                                  32
Academic University Coursework Component
The academic coursework component consists of two core courses: EDAD 658 Organizational
Development, Culture, and Change, and EDAD 659 Governance, Politics and Policy. Table 1
below outlines the learning outcomes expected of each candidate and the main standard to which
it is related. It is understood that multiple standards can be applied to each learning activities.

Table 1: Core Courses and Corresponding, Standards Based Learning Activities
EDAD 658                Study and analyze current contexts of schooling and the important
                        societal issues that affect schools and their development;(Standard #4)

                        Identify and articulate various political, social, legal, and cultural forces
                        that influence the organizational development of schools; (Standard #6)

                        Explore systems theory and how organizations are affected using the
                        theory; (Standard #2)

                        Explore change theory and its various applications in developing schools
                        with high student outcomes; (Standard #3)

                        Understand the importance of managing the learning environment with a
                        focus on marshalling human resources to promote student learning;
                        (Standard #4)

                    Apply the concepts of transformational and moral leadership within the
                    context of students’ own organizational environments. (Standards #1 and
                    #5)
EDAD 658 outline of • Systems Theory
subject matter      • Change Theory
                    • Characteristics of Effective Organizations
                    • Visionary School Leadership for Organizational Development
                    • Shaping School Culture to Build Professional Learning Communities
                    • Social, Cultural and Political Forces Affecting Schools as
                        Organizations
                    • Leadership for Meaningful Change in Schools
                    • School Planning and Action Research for Continuous Improvement
                    • Leadership at School: Managing the Learning
                    • Environment
                    • Moral, Political, Social, Legal, and Cultural Leadership
                    • Collegial Mentorship in the Community
EDAD 659            Participate in classroom activities that analyze political behavior in
                    relation to the wider contexts of social, economic, legal and cultural
                    settings; (Standard #6)

                        Become familiar with models for successful organizations and their



EdAdminII 4/07                                   33
                      leadership within the current educational milieu related to student
                      learning and professional growth; (Standard #2)

                      Understand the principles of conflict and its resolution as critical to the
                      management of a successful organization; (Standard #3)

                      Explore how special interest groups impact student learning; (Standard
                      #4)

                      Recognize that true leadership is the “mobilization of bias in preparation
                      for action” and apply the “Six Keys to Successful Leadership” to their
                      own school settings to maximize their ability to implement educational
                      reform and improvements; (Standard #5)

                  Understand and value the importance of expertise power in the field of
                  curriculum and instruction and how it relates to successful school site
                  leadership. (Standard #1)
EDAD 659 Outline Micro-political environment of schools
of Subject Matter Political behavior and school leadership
                  Current school organizational models
                  Conflict resolution
                  Special interest groups’ effects on student achievement
                  “Six Keys to Successful Leadership”
                  Educational reform
                  Decision making models
                  Expertise power and school leadership

Defined Knowledge Base
The theoretical and conceptual knowledge guiding the Professional Administrative Services
Credential Program is an extension of the Preliminary program’s foundation. The preliminary
program is designed to provide basic knowledge of administrative principles in the following
areas:

EDAD 541 Leadership, Decision Making and Collaboration
EDAD 544 Educational Law: Equity and Access
EDAD 647 Human and financial Resources
EDAD 648 Schools as Organizations
EDAD 649 Urban Leadership
EDAD 650 Instructional Leadership and Assessment
EDP 677 Curriculum/Program Development and Evaluation
EDAD 580 Introduction to Fieldwork
EDAD 680 Advanced Fieldwork

Extending the foundational concepts from the preliminary curriculum, grounded primarily in the
work of Bolman and Deal (1995),Starratt (1992, 1999), Sergiovanni (1992), Fullan (2002, 2003,



EdAdminII 4/07                                34
2004), and Lambert (1999, 2002) among others, professional level courses are constructed to
provide a balanced approach that not only exposes candidates to contemporary educational
theories but allows for the practical application of theory in contemporary settings as well. The
administrative and leadership conceptual frameworks upon which the program is based provides
multiple perspectives on how to develop leaders who exhibit non-traditional leadership
characteristics and strategies, who initiate and manage change, who tackle social justice issues,
and who guide schools to meet the many challenges of a diverse and ever-changing environment
that is continually affected by political influences.

School leaders must create environments where competing perspectives along with multiple
demands from various stakeholders must be considered. Recognizing that the essence of
leadership involves orchestrating and influencing relationships to attain common goals, leaders
must reconceptualize their roles using their hearts, hands, and souls rather than simply functioning
as site managers (Bolman & Deal, 2001; Starratt, 1998). This shifting view of leadership requires
school administrators to exhibit non-traditional leadership characteristics and to initiate and
manage change on multiple levels.

Leadership characteristics have certainly evolved and continue to change rapidly as schools
transform themselves from bureaucratic organizations to true learning communities. School
leaders as change agents must be prepared to acknowledge that school environments are difficult,
complex, and historically resistant to change. Maneuvering through the change minefields
requires candidates to be skilled in personal as well as institutional vision-building, inquiry, and
collaboration (Fullan, 1993). Preparing leaders to manage change with organizational and political
knowledge is key to transforming schools and remains a primary focus of the Professional
Administrative Services Credential Program.

EDAD 692 Portfolio Exhibition
EDAD 692 allows the students to reflect on the goals they created during the Induction phase of
the program and analyze and assessment the degree to which their goals have been attained, the
positive influences they have experienced that have allowed them to move toward goal mastery
and the barriers that may have inhibited them from reaching their desired state. Presenting their
program before the entire class and receiving written feedback from all participants provides
valuable information regarding their progress. In addition, others are able to listen to various
aspects of administrative work conducted by colleagues and learn about strategies that worked
well that they might be able to replicate. This course provides closure but it also allows candidates
to return to their sites and continue to work on their goals with new learnings and perspectives
experienced by others.




EdAdminII 4/07                                   35
      Standard 4: Scope and Delivery of the Professional-Level Curriculum

The curriculum for the university and non-university components of the Professional
Administrative Services Credential program builds upon the foundation of the Preliminary
Administrative Services Credential program, and applies conceptual knowledge to
administrative practice in ways that engage candidates in important issues of theory and
practice.

                                           Rationale
The candidate's preliminary level program was designed to acquaint candidates with the broad
range of administrative and leadership responsibilities in schools. The prior coursework and field
experiences have prepared persons to begin administrative service. The curriculum at the
professional level should extend those learnings, and allow for in-depth study of defined areas of
interest for the new administrator.

The four program courses which include the Induction and Portfolio Exhibition experiences are
designed to allow each candidate to pursue their own interests based on individual needs and the
contexts in which each works. Table 2 below shows the activities from each program course that
extends candidates understanding of their topics of interest, allows for application of concepts
learned and promotes personal reflection and integration of theory and practice.

Table 2: Course Activities* that Relate to the Six Curricular Thematic/Standard Areas (See
course outlines for expanded descriptions of each course activity)
Systematic Study that
Extends Understanding                                           Personal Reflection and
Through Specific               Application in Job Setting       Integration of Theory and
Self-Selected Areas of                                          Practice
Interest
EDAD 658: Action Research      EDAD 658: Team dialogue          EDAD 658 Reflective
Study (#4)                     Sessions (#4)                    Planning Journal (#1, #2)
                               EDAD 659: Utilization of
                                                                EDAD 659: Meta Cognitive
EDAD 659:                      innovative interactive models of
                                                                Journal that synthesizes
Mini-ethnographic study of     conversation and nontraditional
                                                                concepts developed in class
governance structures (#3)     meeting formats applied to their
                                                                (#5, #6)
                               school sites (#2)
                                                                EDAD 640: Analysis of
                                                                strengths/areas of need based
EDAD 640: Exposure to the                                       on self- assessments.
work of scholars that provide                                   Analysis leads to the
the conceptual framework for                                    development of a personal
systematic study. (#1)                                          vision of administrative
                                                                responsibility presented in
                                                                EDAD 692 (#5)




EdAdminII 4/07                                 36
Table 2: Course Activities* that Relate to the Six Curricular Thematic/Standard Areas (See
course outlines for expanded descriptions of each course activity)
Systematic Study that
Extends Understanding                                           Personal Reflection and
Through Specific               Application in Job Setting       Integration of Theory and
Self-Selected Areas of                                          Practice
Interest
                                                               Table 2 continued on next page




EdAdminII 4/07                               37
Table 2: Course Activities* that Relate to the Six Curricular Thematic/Standard Areas (See
course outlines for expanded descriptions of each course activity)
Systematic Study that
Extends Understanding                                               Personal Reflection and
Through Specific                  Application in Job Setting        Integration of Theory and
Self-Selected Areas of                                              Practice
Interest
EDAD 692: Exit                    EDAD 692: Exit                    EDAD 692: Exit
Portfolio Assessment where        Portfolio Assessment where        Portfolio Assessment where
candidates share their            candidates share their strategies candidates share their
strategies for goal progress or for goal progress or attainment strategies for goal progress or
attainment related to the six     related to the six thematic areas attainment related to the six
thematic areas (#1 - #6)          (#1 – #6)                         thematic areas (#1 - #6)
* Candidates may choose their own areas of emphasis related to their own goals, as identified in
their Induction Plans, and the unique needs of their schools. Candidates’ goals are constructed
and identified based on the six thematic/standards areas.

All of the activities outlined above provide a high degree of individualization while covering the
subject matter listed in Standard 3. By incorporating various forms of data collection through
Action Research and Mini Ethnographic studies for example, candidates learn to look more
critically at various aspects of their schools in order to analyze issues and offer viable solutions.
Engaging in critical research in both courses is pivotal to extend the depth of content learned in the
preliminary program. Furthermore, the areas to be studied are self-directed, therefore making the
end result meaningful to not only the candidate but to the school site as well.




EdAdminII 4/07                                   38
                       Standard 5: Curricular Individualization

The curriculum of the program provides for specialization and individual development
based on an assessment of each candidate's needs, interests, and career goals.

                                           Rationale
A range of curricular offerings within the university and non-university component of the program
to effectively meet the needs of beginning administrators in a variety of contexts. Specialization
and individualization may occur by providing a variety of coursework, specialized strands, or by
individualized learning opportunities within a specific course or professional development
experience.

The learning opportunities in the individualized program for each candidate is based on an
extensive assessment of each candidate’s strengths and areas of need conducted in the program’s
introductory course, EDAD 640 Mentoring and Professional Development for the New
Administrator. Candidates are encouraged to solidify their career goals and expand an awareness
of future professional opportunities. Although the program is conducted within a cohort structure,
which includes a core curriculum of 10 units, the candidate structures his/her learning in each
course in relation to each candidate’s self-selected, standards based goals. Candidates may choose
their own areas of study for research or other course/site related assignments (see course
proposals/syllabi for EDAD 640, EDAD 658 and EDAD 659 for a description of course
assignments where individualization is provided – Appendix 19). Self-selection of study areas
related to candidates’ self-identified needs based on their assessment in EDAD 640 allows for
curricular freedom and personal responsibility regarding the outcome of their work.

Throughout the candidate’s period of enrollment in the program, it is important to note that
adjustments can be made to the Induction Plan. It is likely that as the candidate develops
professionally, the outcomes and expectations may take on new meaning or direction. Changes
can be made at any time in conjunction with the candidate’s mentor and the university supervisor.
These changes may in turn influence their choices of study projects within the core courses and in
their professional development choices. Candidates have the freedom to select their own staff
development opportunities (e.g. CSLA, ACSA workshops, district professional development,
additional coursework) to assist them with goal mastery and attainment. Program faculty are
always available to provide suggestions for various learning opportunities in relation to the
candidate’s pursuits. In addition, the mentor component is another source for individualized
professional development and advisement. All candidates are encouraged to set their own paths in
the core courses through collegial interaction with their instructors and to negotiate the best
possible academic experiences that will assist them with goal mastery.

Documentation for Standard 5:
Appendix 19 [EH] Course Syllabi




EdAdminII 4/07                                 39
                                       Category II
                               Support and Mentoring Plan

                   Standard 6: Provision of Mentoring Experiences

The beginning administrator's professional credential induction plan specifies provisions
for mentoring and support activities to be provided by one or more experienced colleagues
throughout the candidate's enrollment in the credential program.

                                             Rationale
The purpose of the Induction and Professional Development for the New Administrator course,
EDAD 640, is to assist the candidate in developing a self-directed professional, academic
experience that includes university coursework, mentoring activities, professional development
activities through non-university organizations and strategies for measuring goal progress or
mastery. It is the responsibility of both the faculty supervisor and the candidate’s mentor to assist
the candidate in the analysis and identification of professional growth needs based on the results
of the assessment activities. This analysis assists the candidate in developing a meaningful and
practical Induction Plan.

Program faculty work with candidates to assist them in developing a meaningful and supportive
relationship with their mentors. The focus of the relationship stems from research on
institutionalized mentoring, strategies and techniques for mentoring, effective communication,
reflective practices and coaching assessment. Candidates are led through various activities
designed to elicit their goals for personal development, administrative qualities, and leadership
techniques. Initial mentoring experiences should focus on the technical, survival skills of the
candidate while at the same time encourage the development and refinement of a personal vision.
Candidates are guided through an initial contact experience where they must interview their
mentor and collaboratively determine the best ways to carry out the mentor/mentee relationship
and determine the most appropriate opportunities for the candidate to reflect upon the efficacy of
practice.

Because the literature on mentoring stresses the importance of contact time between mentor and
protégé, expectations with regard to ongoing mentoring responsibilities will be communicated to
the mentor at the beginning of the program by both the candidate and university supervisor (See
Appendix 15). Districts are expected to provide time to both the mentor and the candidate so that
sufficient time can be devoted tot he implementation of the Induction Plan. At the time the
candidate is accepted into the program, a letter of commitment is required of the school district
pledging support for the mentor/mentee relationship.

Mentor Guidelines are included in the course materials in EDAD 640 and suggest criteria for
mentor selection. The professional program assumes an acceptance on the part of the mentors of
a professional responsibility for assisting beginning administrators. The candidate also receives
information on maximizing the benefits of the mentor relationship and in seeking multiple mentors



EdAdminII 4/07                                   40
to support goals for which the primary mentor is less prepared (see Appendix 15, Induction
Handbook).




EdAdminII 4/07                             41
                            Standard 7: Mentor Qualifications

Experienced administrators selected as mentors are qualified for this professional role,
prepared for their responsibilities, assigned appropriately, evaluated for their effectiveness,
and recognized for their contributions.

                                              Rationale
The Program faculty recognizes and strongly believes that the candidate has the primary
responsibility for identifying qualified mentors for the program. To assist candidates in this
process, guidelines have been developed that recommend criteria for mentor selection, mentoring
behaviors and activities, time commitments, evaluation, recognition and rewards for service.

Mentor Qualifications: The Mentor Guidelines (see Appendix 15) suggest that in order to serve as
a mentor an individual should:

    •   have impacted student learning in a positive way,
    •   be able to coach, facilitate, and assist,
    •   be on the cutting edge of the profession by leading,
    •   be a change agent,
    •   have demonstrated excellence in school leadership,
    •   have the ability to communicate well,
    •   demonstrate a willingness to share expertise,
    •   preferably not the supervisor of the candidate,
    •   be a recognized leader and expert in diversity issues,
    •   be skilled in consensus building and collaboration.

Mentor Preparedness for Responsibility: The faculty is provided with specific and individualized
mentor guidance through the induction seminar format as it relates to the specific candidate.
Candidates are coached in how to develop a mentor/mentee relationship in order to complete the
Mentor Information Sheet (see Appendix 15, Induction Plan, Mentor Qualifications Form).

Candidates are instructed to provide his/her mentor with the list of suggested mentor behaviors
and activities (see Appendix 15, Induction Plan, Mentoring Section). If requested, the university
supervisor will communicate with any mentor that requests additional assistance. Proven
strategies and techniques for mentoring are encouraged. The Mentor Guidelines and training
developed by the program faculty will assist the mentor and candidate in determining the types of
support activities to include in the mentoring component. The frequency and duration of these
activities should also be addressed since the literature on mentoring clearly indicates that time
spent is critical to the effectiveness of the relationship. The mentor will also assist the candidate in
accessing district resources and in identifying secondary mentors for areas of candidate
specialization of interest.

Appropriate Mentor Assignments: Because of the level of intensity and time commitment
involved with effective mentoring, the ideal mentor-to-candidate ratio is one to one; however,


EdAdminII 4/07                                    42
extenuating circumstances might alter that ratio. Possible justifications for increased ratios might
include the mentor being compensated financially by the school district for the added time devoted
to mentor services, size of district and number of new administrators in relation to the number of
available qualified mentors, or the unique needs of the new administrator. During the Mentoring
and Induction Seminar, EDAD 640, the process for matching mentor and candidate to ensure
compatibility of goals, values, job responsibilities, and personality is articulated.

Evaluation of Mentor/Mentee Relationships: Each candidate is responsible for monitoring the
success of the collaboration between the mentor and mentee and is required to maintain a
Mentor/Mentee Contact Log documenting the frequency and kind of interactions in which they
engaged as well as an assessment of the effectiveness of the mentoring event (see Appendix 20).
Program faculty will assist candidates to change their mentor if/when the match is found to be
unsuitable or when the relationship lacks the proper fit. As part of each candidate’s Portfolio
Exhibition, EDAD 692, candidates are asked to rate the effectiveness of the mentorship
relationship as well as the level of interaction and to provide feedback to the mentor and instructor
regarding the interactions that were the most helpful and productive.

Recognition and Contributions: The Program faculty has developed several ways to recognize and
reward mentors for their service to the candidates and to the profession. The University will
include mentors on the University Program Advisory Council and offer professional development
credit to mentors to meet their own credential renewal requirements. In addition, mentors will
receive a Certificate of Recognition for their services to the candidate.

Documentation for Standard 7:
Appendix 20 [EH] Mentor/Mentee Contact Log




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                                    Category III
                        Candidate Competence and Performance

                 Standard 8: Expectations for Candidate Performance

Expectations for excellence in candidate performance are developed for each candidate,
aligned with the principles of administrative practice outlined in Standard 3, and included
in the individual induction plan.

                                             Rationale
During the induction seminar, the candidate engages in a pre-assessment that guides the
development of the Individual Induction Plan. The candidate, the candidate's mentor and the
EDAD 640 University faculty establish outcomes for the candidate and identify multiple means
for assessing progress labeled as Evidence. Artifacts used as evidence to indicate that their
performance toward goal mastery must be of the highest quality. These methods of assessment are
recorded on the Induction Plan. It is the candidate's, the mentor's, and the university advisor's
responsibility to determine formative evaluation checkpoints such as formal evaluation meetings
with the mentors or discussions with the program coordinator.

Another means of formative evaluation occurs during the core courses with an assessment of the
candidate's mastery of course objectives that are related to the Induction Plan outcomes and related
Standards. Various assessment techniques such as ethnographic studies, non-traditional
communication models, reflective journals, and analytical activities will be utilized within the
courses at the discretion of the instructors in order to monitor candidate performance. Candidates
are expected to produce products that reflect the knowledge and skills learned through each of
these activities, that are aligned with the principles of administrative practice outlined in Standard
3, and that are suitable for portfolio inclusion.




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                  Standard 9: Assessment of Candidate Competence

Prior to recommending each candidate for a Professional Clear Administrative Services
Credential, the program advisor and the mentor verify that the candidate has met the
expectations for excellence in candidate performance that are outlined in the professional
credential induction plan.

                                             Rationale
The primary distinction between the competencies expected of candidates at the Professional
Level as compared to the Preliminary level is application. During the induction and planning
portion of the program, the district mentor, the university advisor and the candidate target
activities which demonstrate the candidate's ability to apply theory to practice and record them in
the Induction Plan through the selection of individual goals related to each of the administrative
standards..

Each candidate must enroll in EDAD 692 in the final semester of his/her program. Through this
seminar, a summative assessment of the candidate's competence, knowledge, and performance is
conducted. The candidate, the mentor, and the advisor must confirm that the expectations set forth
in the Induction Plan were successfully met. This will be done through an examination of the
candidate's portfolio and through the delivery of a 30-45 minute exhibition of their own work
supported by accompanying artifacts and evidence of goal attainment or progress. Each candidate
will receive a Portfolio Feedback Protocol completed by the mentor, the university faculty, and
other candidates (see Appendix 21, Portfolio Feedback Protocol).

The portfolio may include but is not limited to such things as journals, learning logs, candidate
created fieldwork projects, non-university activity descriptions and products created as a result of
participation in the activity, assessment of candidates by fellow administrators, teachers, students,
parents, etc., grant applications, strategic planning documents, videos of conflict mediation
sessions, community involvement projects/products, summaries of professional organization
workshops and conferences, and presentations to professional community organizations.
Whatever the candidate chooses, the artifacts must be sufficiently persuasive as ample evidence of
the candidate’s competence.

In addition to the final assessment portfolio, each mentor must complete a letter describing the
candidate’s competency level in each of the six thematic areas (Standards). This letter serves as a
key evaluation document from the candidate’s employer that supports endorsement of the
candidate’s application for the Professional Administrative Services Credential.

The candidate will be recommended for the Professional Administrative Services Credential when
the following minimum requirements have been met:

    •   Satisfactory completion of all requirements and activities as outlined in the Induction Plan
        as verified by the Induction Plan Cover Sheet signed by the candidate, the mentor and the
        faculty advisor (see Appendix 15, Induction Plan, p. 10);



EdAdminII 4/07                                   45
    •   Completion of required induction, core, assessment and elective courses and/or
        non-university activities verified by grade cards, certificates, and/or transcripts;
    •   Development, presentation and review of the Exit Portfolio by peers, mentor, and faculty
        advisor;
    •   Letter of Recommendation by the candidate’s mentor;
    •   Minimum of two years of successful, full-time school administrative experience in the
        public school, or private school of equivalent status;
    •   A Preliminary Administrative Services Credential.

Final course credit for the Assessment seminar and recommendation for the credential rests with
the university faculty (see Appendix 16, Portfolio Exhibition and Program Exit Directions/Packet
and Appendix 22 for sample Credential Application Status Form).

Documentation for Standard 9:
Appendix 21 [EH] Portfolio Feedback Protocol Form




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                  Reviewers’ Comments on Common Standards 1-8
                        of the Original Program Submission

STD 1 - Education Leadership                  [Standard Met]

STD 2 – Resources                             [Needs More Info. or N/A]

STD 3 – Faculty                               [Needs More Info. or N/A]

STD 4 – Evaluation                            [Needs More Info. or N/A]

STD 5 – Admissions                            [Needs More Info. or N/A]

STD 6 - Advice and Assistance                 [Needs More Info. or N/A]

STD 7 - School Collaboration                  [Needs More Info. or N/A]

STD 8 - District Field Supervisors            [Needs More Info. or N/A]

Comments:
Standard Two: The last sentence in the second to last paragraph states "all candidates are
encouraged to meet with their advisors each semester." Need more specifics regarding
professional candidate advisement. This sentence is too general and does not give sufficient
information to determine quality and assurances of candidate advisement.

Standard Three: This response addresses preliminary services credential. (1) For example, the
section "Preliminary and Professional Administrative Services Credential Programs" speaks only
to Preliminary Services Credential with no mentions of Professional. (2) In the second paragraph,
"Part-time faculty are either current K-12 classroom teachers, ..." is inconsistent with the standard
which starts with "Qualified person...." for the Professional Credential. Current classroom teachers
would not be considered qualified for the Professional Credential. Inconsistent information was
given regarding faculty evaluation as to the faculty who are reviewed, full-time and part-time, see
pages 7 and 9.

Standard Four: The last sentence in Standard Four needs evidence to verify “Meaningful
opportunities are provided for professional practitioners and diverse community members to
become involved in program design, development and evaluation activities.”

Standard Five: Not enough definitive information regarding the Professional Credential to
address all elements in the standard. Need more information in the standard response rather than
putting all information in the appendixes; this makes it very difficult to find all the needed
information.

Standard Six: How often does the program sponsor review each candidate's competence? Where
are the designated checkpoints? Is there a process in place after the review occurs? This response


EdAdminII 4/07                                   47
needs more specific information regarding each element of the standard. Two examples of
confusion regarding coordination between standards are (1) Program advisement “begins in the
introductory course…” and thus what of standard five concerning admissions, etc. (2) “Each
candidate must show proof of a mentor’s support upon application…. Mentors are encouraged to
contact the program coordinator…if a candidate is having difficulties…” The information
provided does not communicate the responsibility of the University to support the candidate’s
selection, progress, and mentor support and collaboration.

Standard Seven: Need more specific evidence of program collaboration beyond “maintaining an
ongoing relationship and open lines of communications…” Need more specifics regarding mentor
training and guidance. Need more information regarding “well developed rationale.” Note: This
review panel has responded only to the Professional Credential and not the Preliminary credential.
However, in this standard’s response, the review panelists wish to share their concern regarding
the statement, "All site supervisory personnel are chosen based on their willingness to mentor and
their own experience level." The panel recommends that the University establish criteria for site
supervisory personnel, for example, by recommendation of the superintendent or having a track
record of being an outstanding principal or providing instructional leadership which improves
student achievement.

Standard Eight: Not enough definitive information regarding the Professional Credential to
address all elements in the standard. The four sentences provided do not offer sufficient
information regarding training, orientation, evaluation, recognition, and reward. Need more
information in the standard response rather than putting all information in the appendixes; this
makes it very difficult to find all the needed information.

                                      Review Common Standards




EdAdminII 4/07                                  48
                        Reviewers’ Comments on Program Standards 1-9
                              of the Original Program Submission

Standard 1: Program Rationale and Coordination
 Review this Standard

[Needs More Info. or N/A]
Comments: The response needs to be more precise, structured, and specific in order to determine
if the standard has been met.

Standard 2: Design of the Professional Credential Induction Plan
 Review this Standard

[Standard Met]
Comments:

Standard 3: Curriculum Content
 Review this Standard

[Needs More Info. or N/A]
Comments: Need more specific information on how the University has addressed the CPSEL's
specifically in the curriculum. Please include this in the standard response and not in the appendix.

Standard 4: Scope and Delivery of the Professional-Level Curriculum
 Review this Standard

[Needs More Info. or N/A]
Comments: Need more information on scope and delivery of each of the CPSELs' in the
University Program. Need more information on Non-University components. Need more
information on candidate assessment per CPSELs'.

Standard 5: Curricular Individualization
 Review this Standard

[Standard Met]
Comments:

Standard 6: Provision of Mentoring Experiences
 Review this Standard

[Standard Met]
Comments:

Standard 7: Mentor Qualifications
 Review this Standard




EdAdminII 4/07                                   49
[Standard Met]
Comments:

Standard 8: Expectations for Candidate Performance
 Review this Standard

[Needs More Info. or N/A]
Comments: Need more specific information on how this standard is met.

Standard 9: Assessment of Candidate Competence
 Review this Standard

[Needs More Info. or N/A]
Comments: Need more information on how candidate's assessment addresses the CPSELs'. For
example, the Portfolio Feedback Protocol needs to be clarified as to how it specifically meets the
CPSELs' and upon what measurement evaluations are based (rubric). Peer review is referred for
the first time in this standard response and needs clarification. Ultimate responsiblity of candidate
assessment needs clarification.




EdAdminII 4/07                                   50
                Program Response to Reviewers’ Comments on
            Common Standards 1-8 of the Original Program Submission
                                 (June 2006)

Please note that the responses below pertain to Common Standards 1-8 for the entire College
of Education at California State University, Long Beach. These responses were written
generically for the entire College in the original response submitted January, 2005. Responses to
the Common Standards that pertain to the Professional Administrative Services Credential are
included where required by the CTC document. Many apologies if this was not clear in the original
document.

Standard 1: Leadership
Standard Met

Standard 2: Resources
Reviewers’ Comments: The last sentence in the second to last paragraph states “all candidates
are encouraged to meet with their advisors each semester.” Need more specifics regarding
professional candidate advisement. This sentence it too general and does not give sufficient
information to determine quality and assurances of candidate advisement.

Program Clarification for Reviewers
At the professional level, candidates are required to seek advisement from the program coordinator
prior to application submission so that they are fully aware of program expectations, requirements,
course offerings, and deadlines. The pre-admission advisement requirement is found on the
program website as part of the introductory information any prospective Professional candidate
would read. This same information is available in the program’s hard copy brochure. During the
pre-admission advisement session, the introductory information found on the website or in the
brochure is reviewed in detail and candidate’s questions are answered.

Formal program advisement begins once the candidate has been formally admitted into the
program. Initial advisement can occur via phone, email, or in person. Individual and group
advisement continues in the introductory course, EDAD 640 Induction and Professional
Development Planning for the New Administrator. This seminar is taught by the Professional
Administrative Services Credential program coordinator. In addition, the program coordinator
serves as each candidate’s advisor; all candidates are told upon admission into the program that the
program coordinator is their main contact throughout the entire experience. This direct
relationship facilitates ongoing monitoring of a candidate’s progress and allows for personalized
and consistent attention to the candidates’ particular or specialized needs. A record describing the
content of all formal advisement sessions (in person, email, by phone) is maintained by the
program coordinator as documentation of a candidate’s concerns and needs throughout the
program as well as the disposition after the advisement, if follow-up was required.




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To assist each candidate further as each progresses through the program, a Program Flowchart is
distributed by the program coordinator to all candidates during the introductory course that
contains a step-by-step roadmap on requirements, course enrollment information, basic directions
for credential filing and deadlines. The Flowchart serves as an advisement tool that the candidates
can use independently if desired, as they navigate through the program.

In addition to the ongoing advisement from the program coordinator, the coordinator meets once
again with the entire cohort at the first meeting of the candidates’ last class in the program, EDAD
692, Administrative Portfolio Development and Exhibition. The purpose of the meeting is to
revisit one of the topics, ”Exit Requirements” presented during their first course EDAD 640. In
addition, the procedures on filing for their Professional Administrative Services Credentials with
the university Credential Processing Center are reviewed. Candidates are directed to call the
program coordinator during any aspect of credentialing filing for assistance if needed.

Standard 3: Faculty
Reviewers’ Comments: This response addresses preliminary services credential. (1) For example,
the section “Preliminary and Professional Administrative Services Credential Programs” speaks
only to Preliminary Services Credential with no mentions [sic] of Professional. 2) In the second
paragraph, “Part-time faculty are either current K-12 classroom teachers, . . .” is inconsistent
with the standard which starts with “Qualified person . . .” for the Professional Credential.
Current classroom teachers would not be considered qualified for the Professional Credential.
Inconsistent information was given regarding faculty evaluation as to the faculty who are
reviewed, full-time and part-time, see pages 7 and 9.

Program Clarification for Reviewers
   1. Reviewer’s Comment: For example, the section “Preliminary and Professional
      Administrative Services Credential Programs, speaks only to Preliminary Services
      Credential with no mentions [sic] of Professional.”

        The first sentence under the heading Preliminary and Professional Administrative Services
        Credential Programs should read, “The full-time faculty who teach the courses and
        supervise field experiences in the preliminary program and full-time faculty who teach in
        the professional level program all have doctorate degrees and administrative credentials.”
        Included below are the brief descriptions of each faculty member’s assignments (their
        complete resumes are in Appendix 4 of the original document). Please note that the courses
        faculty teach were designated in BOLD and are included here again for reference. There
        have been a few assignment changes since the document was originally submitted in 2005.

Full-Time Faculty:
Dr. Marilyn Korostoff, Professor (Tier 1 and Tier 2 Faculty). Former district office
administrator (Burbank Unified), elementary principal (Fullerton School District), classroom
teacher (Los Alamitos Unified and Huntington Beach City), Lecturer, UCLA Master’s and
Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program, educational researcher and evaluation
consultant.



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Course            EDAD 544:     Legal Aspects of Education
Responsibilities: EDP 595:      Qualitative Research Methodology
                  EDAD 695:     Master’s Research Study Supervision
                  EDAD 698:     Master’s Thesis Supervision
                  EDP 711:      Field Research I: Qualitative Research Methods
                                (UC Irvine/CSU Joint Doctoral Program)
                  EDAD 640: Mentoring and Professional Development Planning for the New
                                Administrator (Tier 2)
Coordinator, Professional Administrative Services Credential Program (Tier 2)

Part-time Faculty
Dr. Frank Tyrrell (Tier 2 Faculty). Assistant Superintendent, Human Resources, Torrance
Unified School District. National Consultant on Organizational Development and Management.

Course            EDAD 658:        Organizational Development, Culture and Change
Responsibilities: EDAD 659:        Policy, Politics, and Governance
                  EDAD 692:        Administrative Portfolio Exhibition and Assessment

2) In the second paragraph, “Part-time faculty are either current K-12 classroom teachers, . . .”
is inconsistent with the standard which starts with “Qualified person . . .” for the Professional
Credential. Current classroom teachers would not be considered qualified for the Professional
Credential.

The sentence in the paragraph to which the reviewer refers is part of the general, overall
description related to the policies and procedures of the entire College of Education, not the
Professional Credential Program specifically. Since this standard is part of the Common Standards
section and applies to all credential programs in our College, it seemed appropriate to present a
response that characterizes the nature of the policies and procedures for our entire College first
followed by department level or program specific information. As a further explanation, in that
same sentence as part of the College level response, please note that there are three categories in
which part-time faculty may fall: 1) current K-12 classroom teachers, 2) those who have
significant K-12 experience, OR 3) are site or district level administrators. Further, the response
states that “All part-time faculty have at least a Masters degree and a number have doctorates.”
We completely agree that classroom teachers would not be considered qualified to teach in the
Professional Credential program. Therefore, please refer to the brief descriptions of our faculty
above where the qualifications of those who teach in our Tier I and specifically in Tier II, are
listed. Their qualifications are clearly appropriate for quality instruction in the Professional Level
Program.

3) Inconsistent information was given regarding faculty evaluation as to the faculty who are
reviewed, full-time and part-time, see pages 7 and 9.

Please see the revised response that follows. Hopefully, any inconsistencies have been clarified.

University policy requires that all full and part-time faculty must have formal student evaluations
of instructors for a minimum of two courses each semester. Evaluation surveys are


EdAdminII 4/07                                   53
machine-scored and tabulated by University Research. The original surveys, which include
student narrative comments, and Summary Reports are returned to department chairs and
individual faculty. Summary Reports provide faculty with mean scores in 8 survey categories,
along with comparative mean scores for the department and college. Faculty with sub-standard
student evaluations are urged to address the areas needing improvement. The procedures described
above apply to all faculty throughout the entire university which includes the College of
Education. This policy applies to tenured and tenure-track faculty, full-time and part-time
lecturers. Poorly performing part-time faculty and university supervisors are dropped from the
program when remediation is not effective. Tenure track faculty can have their teaching
responsibilities re-assigned.

Additionally, as part of the university evaluation policy as outlined on page 7 in the original
document, other forms of faculty evaluation that are required at the university and department
levels for tenure track only, where contributions to the overall mission of the program are assessed,
are administrative review which includes retention, tenure and promotion procedures for tenure
track full-time faculty (RTP). All tenure track faculty must submit documentation regarding their
university teaching, scholarship and service responsibilities. Retention, Tenure, and Promotion
Committees at the Department and College levels evaluate all files and make recommendations to
our College Dean. Those tenure track faculty members who perform in an exemplary fashion are
recognized through re-appointment and promotion.

Part-time faculty are required to submit an evaluation portfolio of their work each semester. The
type of information required is similar (although not as extensive) to the type of documentation
required of tenure track faculty. This is a department specific requirement which goes beyond the
university guidelines as explained above. If there are areas of concern with any faculty member's
documents including the student evaluations of instructors, the Department Chair will discuss it
with that individual personally. Poorly performing part-time faculty and university supervisors are
dropped from the program when remediation is not effective.

To summarize, the College level response is generic and applies to all faculty (as part of the
Common Standard section that applies to the entire College of Education), however the
department level in which the Professional Credential program resides, requires a more extensive
evaluation procedure. This may be where the perception of inconsistency arose.

Standard 4: Evaluation
Reviewers’ Comments: The last sentence in Standard Four needs evidence to verify “Meaningful
opportunities are provided for professional practitioners and diverse community members to
become involved in program design, development and evaluation activities.”

Program Clarification for Reviewers:
In reality, over the past two years, due to multiple changes in Tier I coordination (which affects
Tier II since community involvement efforts are traditionally combined with Tier I) and due to two
sabbaticals within our program, a once active and involved community advisory board has simply
not been as participatory as it should/could be. To rectify this situation, the following steps have
been taken: 1) coordination of the Tier I program has been reassigned in the hopes that consistency



EdAdminII 4/07                                   54
can be established, 2) program faculty discussed on November 7, 2005 and again on February 6,
2006 the procedures to reconstitute a Community Advisory Committee. The main focus of the
Committee will be to comment and provide input on the design, development, and evaluation
procedures for both the Preliminary and Professional programs on an ongoing basis. In the past,
the Committee was actively involved in a) examining the administrative services credential
program standards, b) providing input regarding the types of activities that would benefit both
Preliminary and Professional candidates related to the standards, c) interpreting program survey
data, and d) sharing multiple perspectives on the practical aspects of school leadership which
informed the construction and development of fieldwork experiences. (Please see Appendix 3, last
two pages, for the agenda and working document of the November 14, 2003 Community Advisory
Meeting), 3) Faculty have been asked to submit names of community members that would be able
to provide guidance and assistance consistently, 4) several current and past Tier II candidates will
be asked to serve (as well as others who hold appropriate and relevant positions in the community)
who have experienced both our Preliminary and Professional programs. These former candidates
will be in a unique position since they will have a connected perspective on the program as a
whole.

Standard 5: Admissions
Reviewers’ Comments: Not enough definitive information regarding the Professional Credential
to address all elements in the standard. Need more information in the standard response rather
than putting all information in the appendixes [sic]; this makes it very difficult to find all the
needed information.

Program Clarification for Reviewers:
Professional Administrative Services Credential
Applicants to the Professional Administrative Services Credential Program are admitted as a
cohort in August of each year. Applications are accepted on a year round basis however, to insure
that all eligible candidates have an opportunity to enroll in a Professional Credential Program and
secure a seat with the next cohort. Prospective candidates must apply by June 15 to be accepted
into the August cohort. All candidates are notified no later than July 1 regarding their acceptance
into the program. However, candidates are accepted on a first come, first qualified, first served
bases, so notification may come sooner than July 1 of each year if all admissions criteria are met.

The Program faculty uses multiple measures to help determine each candidate's academic potential
for success. Candidates for the Professional Credential Program must 1) complete a program
application and resume, 2) submit a personal narrative describing the candidate’s philosophy of
leadership including a section describing their academic and professional goals, 3) possess and
submit a copy of a valid preliminary services credential, 4) show evidence of employment in a
position requiring an administrative credential, 5) obtain at least one experienced mentor and
provide evidence of the mentor’s commitment to work with the candidate for the duration of the
program, and 6) contact and the program coordinator for an interview.

The resume as well as the initial interview, assists the program coordinator with the task of
assessing the quality and depth of a candidate’s personal qualities and prior experiences. The
personal narrative allows program faculty an opportunity to learn about each candidate’s


EdAdminII 4/07                                  55
professional goals before core coursework begins. In that way, course activities can be designed
with the candidate’s specific needs in mind that are relevant, applicable, and meaningful to the
newly or recently inducted administrator. The copy of a valid preliminary services credential as
well as evidence of employment insures that candidates are indeed eligible to enroll in the
Professional level credential program.

Admissions information and procedures as well as complete program descriptions are provided
through multiple sources: the University Catalog, hard-copies of program description and
admissions documents available outside the department office (these can also be requested by
mail) and via the web at http://www.ced.csulb.edu/edpac/academic/edadmin/documents.cfm. For
prospective candidates, application packets are sent to superintendents and Human Resource
departments of surrounding school districts to be distributed to new administrative hires.

Standard 6: Advice and Assistance
Reviewers’ Comments: How often does the program sponsor review each candidate’s
competence? Where are the designated checkpoints? Is there a process in place after the review
occurs? This response needs more specific information regarding each element of the standard.
Two examples of confusion regarding coordination between standards are (1) Program
advisement “begins in the introductory course…” and thus what of standard five concerning
admissions, etc. (2) “Each candidate must show proof of a mentor’s support upon application….
Mentors are encouraged to contact the program coordinator …if a candidate is having difficulties
…” The information provided does not communicate the responsibility of the University to support
the candidate’s selection, progress, and mentor support and collaboration.

Program Clarification for Reviewers:
Professional Administrative Services Credential
Candidates are required to seek information prior to applying to the program so that they are fully
aware of program expectations, requirements, course offerings, and deadlines. This information is
provided                         through                       online                      access:
http://www.ced.csulb.edu/edpac/academic/edadmin/professional.cfm, written information posted
outside department offices, via email when prospective candidates personally request information,
or further clarification beyond that provided on the website and via telephone when requested.

Formal program advisement begins in the introductory course, EDAD 640 Induction and
Professional Development Planning for the New Administrator. A Program Flowchart is
distributed to all candidates that contains a step-by-step roadmap on requirements, course
enrollment information, basic directions for credential filing, and deadlines.

The program coordinator serves as each candidate’s advisor and facilitates the development of a
strong relationship between candidate and mentor. An Advisor/Advisee Advisement Log is
maintained by the coordinator to document all interactions between advisor and advisee.
Strategies for working with the candidate’s mentor, having multiple mentors, and terminating the
mentor/mentee relationship are discussed in the introductory course, EDAD 640, Induction and
Professional Development Planning for the New Administrator. This information is also provided



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in the Induction and Professional Development Planning document that all candidates must read
and complete in order to obtain credit for the Induction seminar.

Each candidate must show proof of a mentor’s support upon application to the program.
Candidates choose their own mentors since personal selection is the best method to ensure
appropriate fit and a sense of trust between mentor and mentee. Those students who do not have
mentors are advised in EDAD 640 (as well as in the Induction and Professional Document itself)
how to select mentors and the roles they should fulfill. Once a mentor has been identified, each is
contacted by the program coordinator at the beginning of the program; the coordinator will contact
the mentor if a candidate is having difficulties during the program. Opportunities for assistance
either informally or through a modification of the Induction Plan are provided at any time it is
requested by a candidate, the mentor, or program coordinator. Candidates are required to maintain
a mentor contact log (Appendix 19) recording the nature of the assistance and value of the
interaction between themselves and their mentors. This log can serve as documentation of the
mentor’s effectiveness while working with their mentees as well as the mentee’s progress during
the program. Since candidates are already practicing administrators and under legal contract to
school districts, it is imperative that any issues or concerns be resolved in collaboration with the
candidate’s home school district and mentor and discussed as early as possible. The institution has
the responsibility of assisting the candidate to overcome and rectify any job performance issues.
However, employment in a school district as a school administrator is contractual in nature
between the employing school district and the administrator. Any deficiencies or concerns
regarding an administrator’s performance are subject to interventions and support as outlined in
specific board and personnel policies. Serious concerns or issues are subject to legal remedies of
equal protection and due process and are available to the administrator if the administrator
believes the concerns must be addressed through legal intervention. The university can serve as a
support to assist in any remediation plans that may develop if the need arises but may not take legal
responsibility for discharging a candidate from an administrative position.

Overall, there are multiple checkpoints where competence is assessed to insure early on that all
professional level candidates will be successful in their current administrative assignments (please
also see Standard 9 response):
    • At program entry with a review of program application documents;
    • During the introductory Induction seminar (EDAD 640) where all academic and personal
        assessments are completed and reviewed;
    • At the conclusion of EDAD 640 where a course grade is assigned indicating successful
        completion of the required course elements;
    • During the second seminar, EDAD 658 and at the conclusion of the course where student
        learning outcomes are assessed;
    • During the second seminar, EDAD 659 and at the conclusion of the course where student
        learning outcomes are assessed;
    • On an ongoing basis throughout the program via at least one contact with the candidate’s
        mentor by the program coordinator;
    • At the end of the program through participation in EDAD 692, Portfolio Exhibition, where
        candidates demonstrate progress and mastery of their goals related to the six Standards of
        Competency and Effectiveness.



EdAdminII 4/07                                   57
At both the Preliminary and Professional credential levels, it should be noted that in order to
minimize the legal risks associated with premature student advisement, CSULB makes a
distinction between providing information to candidates prior to being officially enrolled in the
university, and formal advisement once the candidate has been accepted to the program and
university. Advising students regarding personal issues or personal career development before
being formally admitted in a program, without the protection of university policy, puts the faculty
and university at risk of advisement malfeasance. Thus, the distinction between providing
information and formal advisement.

Standard 7: School Collaboration
Reviewers’ Comments: Need more specific evidence of program collaboration beyond
“maintaining an ongoing relationship and open lines of communications . . .” Need more specifics
regarding mentor training and guidance. Need more information regarding “well developed
rationale.” Note: This review panel has responded only to the Professional Credential and not the
Preliminary credential. However, in this standard’s response, the review panelists wish to share
their concern regarding the statement, “All site supervisory personnel are chosen based on their
willingness to mentor and their own experience level.” The panel recommends that the University
establish criteria for site supervisory personnel, for example, by recommendation of the
superintendent or having a track record of being an outstanding principal or providing
instructional leadership which improves student achievement.

Program Clarification for Reviewers:
Professional Administrative Services Credential
The rationale for establishing a collaborative environment for the new administrator centers
around the fact that recruiting talented and committed educators into the principalship is an
increasingly difficult task. Furthermore, as the demands on administrators become more complex,
stress and burnout contributes to a high turnover rate (cited in Lindley, 2003). One way to support
the new administrator is to foster collaborative relationships in multiple settings and from various
sources. In this way, new administrators have resources on which they can rely in order to meet the
challenges that they continually face.

The Professional Administrative Services Credential program does not have a fieldwork
requirement, however, maintaining an ongoing relationship and open lines of communication that
facilitate the collaboration between the candidate, the candidates’ mentors, and the university
supervisor as well as between the school district and the university themselves, are critical pieces
that contribute to a candidate’s success. In essence, the candidate’s worksite becomes his or her
“experimental backyard” where assistance by his or her own mentor who knows the exact context,
culture, and environment in which they work becomes essential. Examples of maintaining an
ongoing relationship and open lines of communication include a variety of methods such as 1)
joint meetings with the candidate, mentor, and university supervisor, 2) working with the district
superintendent or assistant superintendent of human resources to find an appropriate mentor if one
has not already been identified, 3) mentor participation in any Professional Administrative
Services Credential program class sessions or activities, 4) in-district training for mentors (if
requested), and 5) any other forms of collaboration creatively developed that may emerge as
candidates’ needs and goals are identified.


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Because the program does not have an explicit Fieldwork component where the university
supervisor has consistent, onsite contact with the mentor or mentee, candidates provide
information to their mentors on the roles of the mentor and mentee before the relationship is
formally established between the two or as an ongoing part of a pre-existing relationship that has
already been formed before the candidate enters the program. Information on mentoring can be
found in the Induction Handbook which is given to each mentor. Program faculty provide
information to the candidates on institutionalized mentoring, strategies and techniques for
mentoring, effective communication, reflective practices and coaching techniques that go beyond
the information provided to all candidates by the coordinator in EDAD 640 Mentoring and
Professional Development Planning for the New Administrator. Mentors are asked by their
mentees in a required mentor interview as part of EDAD 640, if further information or training on
mentoring is desired. If so, it is the university supervisor’s responsibility to provide it and lend any
assistance necessary to insure that the candidate has adequate support. The primary information
source on mentoring is The Portable Mentor; A Resource Guide for Entry-Year Principals and
Mentors by Lindley (2003).

Mentors should not be assigned. Since the success of the mentor relationship is paramount to the
success of the new administrator, mentor selection should be held in the hands of the beginning
administrator. For those candidates who have not already chosen a mentor, candidates are
presented some criteria (taken in part from Dukess, L.F., (2001) Meeting the Leadership
Challenge. Designing Effective Principal Mentor Programs: The Experiences of Six New York
City Community School Districts. New York: New Visions for Public Schools) to consider in the
following areas when choosing a mentor:

    Knowledge
    Learning Theory
    Administrative Standards
    District/school culture
    Change Management
    Data Analysis
    Basic concepts of educational law

    Skills
    Expertise as a Principal (Has Led a Top Academically Ranked School)
    Track Record of Success
    Problem Solving
    Time Management
    Data Collection
    Active Listening
    Conflict Management
    Organization

    Attitudes
    Professional demeanor
    Tolerance and Respect


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    Positive and Caring
    Credible with Peers
    Trustworthy/Maintains and Models Integrity
    Supportive
    Confident
    People Oriented
    Wants to be a Mentor

The candidate is empowered to make the decision of when, how often, and through what method
of communication, to contact his/her mentor. In turn, the mentor must decide the level to which
his/her mentees require assistance which dictates the degree of contact. Each candidate must
maintain a Mentor Contact Log where the nature of each interaction with the mentor as well as its
degree of usefulness is maintained. In this way, the candidates themselves (and/or in consultation
with the program coordinator) can evaluate the effectiveness of the relationship with the mentors
on an ongoing basis and are empowered to do so.

It is expected that the mentor and candidate will work together to identify existing resources for
support and assistance within the candidate's district, i.e., job-alike groups, resource centers,
training sessions or programs, and particularly helpful individuals. During the Induction Seminar
EDAD 640, candidates and mentors are asked to generate a list of professional educator networks
which will serve as an added resource for assistance and support for the candidates. These
networks will be particularly important as they relate to specialization and to addressing individual
interests of candidates.

Because the candidates in the Professional Program are contractually assigned to their positions,
the review of suitability regarding their job placement legally resides with the district itself,
however Professional Level program faculty, which includes the coordinator, are always available
to consult and offer assistance regarding job placement suitability.

Regarding the Reviewers’ Comments related to the Preliminary Administrative Services
Credential Program: Need more information regarding “well developed rationale.” Note: This
review panel has responded only to the Professional Credential and not the Preliminary
credential. However, in this standard’s response, the review panelists wish to share their concern
regarding the statement, “All site supervisory personnel are chosen based on their willingness to
mentor and their own experience level.” The panel recommends that the University establish
criteria for site supervisory personnel, for example, by recommendation of the superintendent or
having a track record of being an outstanding principal or providing instructional leadership
which improves student achievement.

The following paragraph (embedded in a larger context) was submitted (January, 2006) as part of
the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program Application. Hopefully, this will
accommodate the reviewers concerns. The reviewers comments are duly noted and appreciated.

    The Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program is linked to approximately 20
    school districts at any one time in a variety of ways. Since all preliminary candidates must
    participate in introductory and advanced fieldwork experiences, fieldwork supervisors as


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    well as the fieldwork program coordinator work hard to develop working relationships
    with each student’s home district for the introductory fieldwork course. They also forge
    relationships with other surrounding districts in order to ensure appropriate placements for
    Advanced Field Experience activities. These relationships are generally developed through
    the university supervisor’s personal contacts and/or candidates’ recommendations of
    exemplary school supervisors and sites. Based on the rationale of bridging and connecting
    theory with practice for the aspiring administrator, all site level supervisory personnel are
    chosen because of 1) a proven track record of high level engagement with prior fieldwork
    candidates, 2) recommendations by superintendents who believe a practicing administrator
    has the commitment and skills required to be an effective school site supervisor, 3) a
    specific area of expertise such as research and evaluation, curriculum development,
    student assessment related to state standards which may require placement with a district
    office administrator, and 4) their willingness to supervise. The suitability and quality of all
    field placement sites are evaluated each semester by the supervising program faculty.
    Those sites designated as Advanced Field Experience sites are deleted from the list of
    possible placements by the University Field Experience supervisor if the site supervisor
    does not fully engage with and support the candidate.

Standard 8: District Field Supervisors
Reviewers’ Comments: Not enough definitive information regarding the Professional Credential
to address all elements of the standard. The four sentences provided do not offer sufficient
information regarding training, orientation, evaluation, recognition, and reward. Need more
information in the standard response rather than putting all information in the appendixes [sic];
this makes it very difficult to find all the needed information.

The Professional Administrative Services Credential Program does not have a Fieldwork
Component. Furthermore, when examining the Factors to Consider in the Standard, the
Factors have no direct applicability to the Professional Credential because of the absence of
an explicit Fieldwork experience.




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                  Program Response to Reviewers’ Comments on
            Program Standards 1-9 of the Original Program Submission
                                  (June 2006)

                    Standard 1: Program Rationale and Coordination

Reviewers’ Comments: The response needs to be more precise, structured, and specific in order
to determine if the standard has been met.

Program Clarification for Reviewers
Due to the all encompassing requirement of the feedback provided by the reviewers’, the standard
has been reorganized and augmented in order to be more precise, structured and specific. All
elements of the standard have been underlined in the hopes of explicitly identifying how the
standard has been met and is organized around the four basic elements of the standard: 1) Cogent
Rationale, 2) Defined Knowledge Base, 3) Coordinated Effectively, and 4) Responsive to the
individual candidate’s needs. The design of the program itself, including course descriptions,
conclude the standard response.

                 Standard 1: Program Design, Rationale and Coordination

The professional credential program is supported by a cogent rationale, draws on a defined
knowledge base, is responsive to the individual candidate's needs, and is coordinated
effectively.

                                            Rationale
New administrators need to experience programs that are designed cohesively on the basis of a
sound rationale that makes sense, and that are coordinated effectively in keeping with their
intended designs. The program should be designed to give options to individual candidates to
pursue coursework and other professional development opportunities that meet their own
particular needs.

Program Rationale on which the program design is based:
The Professional Administrative Services Credential Program is designed to fulfill the theme of
the College of Education – Teaching for Life-Long Learning, Professional Growth, and Social
Responsibility. In addition, the program is structured to incorporate the College’s mission – to
foster a learning and teaching community committed to educational excellence that focuses on 1)
promoting student growth, 2) preparing socially responsible leaders, 3) valuing diversity, 4)
developing collaboration, 5) promoting school improvement, and 6) engaging in research,
scholarly activity and ongoing evaluation. The rationale for designing the program based on the
College of Education’s theme and mission is to provide a seamless connection between the
overarching goals of the College and the specific goals of the program. As such, we desire a direct
connection to the theme and mission which provides the primary foundation of the Professional
program’s intent to provide candidates with meaningful, practical, and challenging experiences


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that will assure that the mission of the College is realized. We also believe that the College’s
mission and the activities and learnings that Professional level candidates will experience will
allow them to meet the high expectations outlined in the Standards of Quality and Effectiveness
for Administrative Services Credential Programs. Clearly, all candidates should be educated to
become life long learners, to engage in continuous professional growth, and most importantly, to
become socially responsible school leaders. Our candidates should also learn how to promote
student growth, become socially responsible, value diversity, develop collaborations, promote
school improvement and know how to engage in research, scholarly activity and ongoing
evaluation.
The secondary foundation that provides the basic rationale for the program’s design is our specific
program mission that was developed by educational administration program faculty: To help
educational leaders develop the courage, compassion, competence and commitment necessary to
change the world of schooling. In order to prepare candidate’s to realize the program’s mission,
the faculty selected as its primary areas of emphasis: 1) promoting the understanding of the role of
schooling in a democratic society, 2) producing compassionate and competent instructional
leaders to work with diverse populations, 3) assisting candidates to acquire the necessary skills to
build collaboratives to manage and guide change, and 4) promoting the understanding of the
nature of urban school issues. Again, using the basic tenets of the College of Education’s mission
as well as the program’s upon which to design our program provides a logical foundation upon
which to design our program and direct curriculum construction.

A third foundation that provides an additional rationale on which to base the program design is that
the Professional Administrative Services candidates are practicing administrators and by
definition, adult learners capable of making informed and professional decisions regarding their
own learning. Most were teachers for several years before becoming educational leaders in
administrative capacities. Having been exposed to various leadership theories during their
Preliminary preparation programs (which at this point in time may or may not have been at
CSULB), they must now translate their knowledge into the day-to-day real world of leadership.
They must acquire the necessary tools, strategies, and methods to lead multiple followers or
groups of stakeholders to guide their schools toward excellence. The Professional program builds
on the basic course foundations of the preliminary program, but maintains a much stronger
practical application component. To facilitate this emphasis, and to maintain a seamless
connection to candidates’ preliminary credential program’s coursework (if undertaken in
California) the program is also designed and structurally and conceptually grounded in the six
California Professional Standards for Educational Leadership (CPSELs) which provides the basis
for the practical application orientation of the program.

Additional Considerations that Provide a Cogent Rationale for Program Design
The Professional Administrative Credential program centers around our mission: To provide
candidates with meaningful experiences that 1) promote the understanding of the role of schooling
in a democratic society; 2) produce compassionate and competent instructional leaders to work
with diverse populations, 3) assist candidates to acquire the necessary skills to build collaboratives
to manage and guide change, and 4) promote the understanding of the nature of urban school
issues. Leadership in public schools today presents challenges that require strong leaders who are
capable of addressing the major social, cultural, economic, and political implications that affect
their work. Leaders must constantly be open to understanding and learning innovative leadership


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strategies and methods. They must be life-long learners and accept that educational leadership
means an ongoing commitment to learning. With these goals in mind, candidates experience a
well-defined sequential program consisting of coursework that includes practical, school-based
experiences coupled with readings on related theoretical concepts.

Responsiveness to the Candidate’s Individual Needs
Overall, the program has been constructed based on the expectation and belief that each school site
administrator who enters the program is capable of directing his/her own learning experiences and
who, with guidance and input, will function as an adult learner. Candidates therefore have the
latitude to construct their Induction Plans based on their own assessment of their immediate and
long-term needs and to choose the objectives and learning strategies that will assist them to attain
their own self-selected goals in consultation with their university supervisor, other faculty, and
their mentor. Program faculty believe that candidates first need to learn how to lead themselves
and develop their own sense of personal leadership before they can be expected to lead others.

Defined Knowledge Base
The theoretical and conceptual knowledge guiding the Professional Administrative Services
Credential Program is an extension of the Preliminary program’s foundation. Grounded primarily
in the work of Bolman and Deal (1995), whose work concentrates primarily on organizational
theory and organizational problem solving, Starratt (1992, 1999), who promotes the concept of
servant leadership, Sergiovanni (1992), who also believes in leader as servant but who extends the
belief to acknowledge that leadership involves a moral commitment and the ability to connect
people to their work in meaningful ways in order for schools to succeed, Fullan (2002, 2003,
2004), whose work guides all leaders through change and the process of becoming change agents,
and Lambert (1999; 2002) whose work strongly advocates the concept that leadership involves
“reciprocal processes” that enable all stakeholders in an educational community to construct
meanings collaboratively that lead toward a shared purpose of schooling, professional level
courses are constructed to provide a balanced approach that not only exposes candidates to
contemporary educational theories but allows for the practical application of theory in
contemporary settings as well. The administrative and leadership conceptual frameworks upon
which the program is based provides multiple perspectives on how to develop leaders who exhibit
non-traditional leadership characteristics and strategies, who initiate and manage change, who
tackle social justice issues, and who guide schools to meet the many challenges of a diverse and
ever-changing environment that is continually affected by political influences.

School leaders must create environments where competing perspectives along with multiple
demands from various stakeholders must be considered. Recognizing that the essence of
leadership involves orchestrating and influencing relationships to attain common goals, leaders
must reconceptualize their roles using their hearts, hands, and souls rather than simply functioning
as site managers (Bolman & Deal, 2001; Starratt, 1998). This shifting view of leadership requires
school administrators to exhibit non-traditional leadership characteristics and to initiate and
manage change on multiple levels.

Leadership characteristics have certainly evolved and continue to change rapidly as schools
transform themselves from bureaucratic organizations to true learning communities. School


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leaders as change agents must be prepared to acknowledge that school environments are difficult,
complex, and historically resistant to change. Maneuvering through the change minefields
requires candidates to be skilled in personal as well as institutional vision-building, inquiry, and
collaboration (Fullan, 1993). Preparing leaders to manage change with an organizational and
political knowledge is key to transforming schools and remains a primary focus of the Professional
Administrative Services Credential Program.

Using 1) the mission of the College of Education, 2) the mission of the program, 3) practical
considerations, 4) the needs of each individual candidate, and 5) a well defined knowledge base to
form a cogent rationale for program design, our students experience a structured program
described below:

                                     Program Requirements
Induction: Mentoring and Professional Development – Introductory Course
Course #1:
EDAD 640 (2 units): Mentoring and Professional Development for the New Administrator
(catalogue description)

In this course, the candidate, the University advisor and the school district mentor work together
to develop an individualized induction plan based on the Administrative Standards of Quality and
Effectiveness (CPSELS) for the support and professional development of the beginning
administrator. The plan is based on a pre-assessment of the candidate’s skills and competence. The
plan includes a mentoring component, academic coursework, and non-university based
professional development activities. Emphasis is placed on preparation to provide leadership in
socially, culturally, ethnically, and linguistically diverse schools.

Rationale: Program faculty believe that a thorough self-assessment performed by each candidate
is necessary to guide them in developing their program goals that address the overarching themes
in each standard. The Induction Plan accompanied by the study of the standards themselves
provide a solid introductory experience and provide direction and focus for their remaining
experiences, not only within the Professional Program but throughout their beginning
administrative years.

Academic University Coursework Component
Course #2:
EDAD 658 (3 units): Organizational Development, Culture, and Change
(catalogue description)

Prerequisite: EDAD 640. This seminar explores the elements that influence schools as effective
organizations. Based on a collaborative vision of learning, the practice of transformational
leadership and organizational development to provide continuous student and staff growth is
examined. Learning strategies on developing successful school cultures and instructional
programs by creating community as the heart of an organization is a primary focus. The course
also includes the systematic study of the larger political, social, legal and supervisory perspectives
related to organizational leadership and change contexts using theory and practice from the


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behavior/management sciences as well as successful educational and business organizations.
Letter grade only (A-F).

Rationale: Program faculty believe that the next step in supporting school leaders is to provide
learning experiences where candidates can explore larger issues (vision, professional growth,
culture, political, social, legal perspectives) that are internally related and contextualized not only
to their specific organizations but to their leadership and influence in their organization’s
development as well.

Course #3:
EDAD 659 (3 units): Organizational Governance, Politics, and Policy
(catalogue description)

Prerequisite: EDAD 640. Students will examine the systemic impact of governance systems in
California Public Schools from the federal, state and local levels. Students will understand how
policies are developed and implemented especially as they relate to their successful leadership in
education. The politics of public education as well as the micro-politics of school sites are
explored from both a theoretical and pragmatic perspective. Letter grade only (A-F).

Rationale: Program faculty believe that the next step in supporting school leaders is to provide
learning experiences where candidates can explore larger issues (governance issues, policy
implementation, political influences, and their implications for school leadership and school
leaders).

Assessment of Candidate Competence
Course #4:
EDAD 692 (2 units): Administrator Portfolio Development and Exhibition
(catalogue description)

Prerequisite: Completion of the Professional Development Plan including the core courses,
electives and/or professional development activities. Presentation of the candidate’s Professional
Portfolio consisting of academic course accomplishments such as papers, projects, action
research; a personal mission statement; a reflective journal and/or artifacts which portray
accomplishment in the administrative work setting, mentor involvement, and optional professional
development activities completed during the credential program. The presentation will be made to
the instructor, the school district mentor, and a panel of other candidates. Credit/No Credit grading
only.

Rationale: Program faculty believe that a formal assessment, where candidates organize and
present their work related to their progress toward goal attainment related to the CPSELs, is
critical to moving them forward in their professional development. They become accountable for
demonstrating their competence as well as responsible for sharing and instructing their fellow
cohort members in the strategies employed to reach their professional goals. This information as
invaluable for group learning, dialogue, expert knowledge sharing, and future networking
experiences in addition to providing a visual and active means of summative assessment and
evaluation.


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Program Structure
Candidates are admitted to the regular program as a single cohort each fall with coursework taking
five months to complete. The cohort consists of fifteen to twenty students who are all practicing
administrators. This cohort format was chosen because of the strong emphasis on building
collaborative working environments where administrators can share their triumphs as well as their
challenges as a group. The majority of our students are vice-principals or principals, however
candidates may enter the program with various other administrative district or school site
assignments. Because candidates come from a variety of surrounding districts, the cohort structure
provides powerful collaborative learning experiences and multiple opportunities for sharing,
networking, and learning across various school and district organizational cultures.

Coordination
Overall Tier 2 program coordination is the responsibility of one full-time tenured faculty member
who receives three units of assigned time per academic year. The program is well coordinated
between the University faculty and the part-time adjunct practitioner faculty who teach in the
program. For example, close verbal and e-mail contact is maintained on an on-going basis. The
adjunct faculty member meets with the program coordinator two to three times each year to
discuss program issues, candidates’ progress, and future programmatic directions. Other issues
discussed each semester involve providing information regarding student admission procedures,
enrollments, textbook ordering, or securing class locations as well as consultations regarding
syllabi development and course content and expectations. The coordinator also held meetings with
the professors regarding the redesign of the professional credential program. They contributed
heavily to the curriculum review process by submitting course proposals for the two core courses.

The Tier 2 coordinator continually interfaces with the Credential Processing Office personnel.
Their assistance plays a significant role in assisting candidates when applying for credentials. Both
the coordinator and the Credentialing office work together to facilitate the process. For example,
the credential analyst notifies the coordinator when each candidate applies for the professional
credential and reviews the documents that may still be needed for each candidate. The coordinator
and the credential analyst also work together to problem solve and facilitate the late application
process if a candidate’s Tier 1 credentials are about to expire before Tier 2 program completion.
(See Appendix 23 for sample credential application status notification form). To further
coordination, each candidate must complete a mentor information sheet where each mentor is
asked if he/she requires additional assistance or information regarding mentoring. In this way, the
coordinator is able to maintain contact with each candidate’s mentor.

To insure that each candidate understands the nature of the entire Professional credential
experience, each candidate (as well as each instructor) receives an Induction Handbook in EDAD
640 that contains information about the program and the resources available. A program
flow-chart is provided that sequentially lists each Tier 2 task and activity (and its due date) that
must be completed before program completion. This flow-chart is invaluable to insure that all Tier
2 faculty and candidates move through the program in a coordinated and informed fashion (see
Appendix 17, Professional Administrative Services Program Flowchart).




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         Standard 2: Design of the Professional Credential Induction Plan

                                   Standard Met




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                            Standard 3: Curriculum Content

Reviewers’ Comments: Need more specific information on how the University has addressed the
CPSEL’s [sic] specifically in the curriculum. Please include this in the standard response and not
in the appendix.

Program Clarification for Reviewers:
In order to respond to the reviewers concerns, the response has been reorganized with more
specific information on how our program addresses the six standards through our Mentoring and
Professional Development Planning seminar, EDAD 640, through our two core courses, EDAD
658 Organizational Development, Culture, and Change, and EDAD 659, Organizational
Governance, Politics, and Policy and through the culminating activity, Administrative Portfolio
Development and Exhibition, EDAD 692. An expanded response follows:

Defined Knowledge/Conceptual Base (repeated from Standard 1 above)
The theoretical and conceptual knowledge guiding the Professional Administrative Services
Credential Program is an extension of the Preliminary program’s foundation. Grounded primarily
in the work of Bolman and Deal (1995), whose work concentrates primarily on organizational
theory and organizational problem solving, Starratt (1992, 1999), who promotes the concept of
servant leadership, Sergiovanni (1992), who also believes in leader as servant but who extends the
belief to acknowledge that leadership involves a moral commitment and the ability to connect
people to their work in meaningful ways in order for schools to succeed, Fullan (2002, 2003,
2004), whose work guides all leaders through change and the process of becoming change agents,
and Lambert (1999, 2002) whose work strongly advocates the concept that leadership involves
“reciprocal processes” that enable all stakeholders in an educational community to construct
meanings collaboratively that lead toward a shared purpose of schooling, professional level
courses are constructed to provide a balanced approach that not only exposes candidates to
contemporary educational theories but allows for the practical application of theory in
contemporary settings as well. The administrative and leadership conceptual frameworks upon
which the program is based provides multiple perspectives on how to develop leaders who exhibit
non-traditional leadership characteristics and strategies, who initiate and manage change, who
tackle social justice issues, and who guide schools to meet the many challenges of a diverse and
ever-changing environment that is continually affected by political influences.

School leaders must create environments where competing perspectives along with multiple
demands from various stakeholders must be considered. Recognizing that the essence of
leadership involves orchestrating and influencing relationships to attain common goals, leaders
must reconceptualize their roles using their hearts, hands, and souls rather than simply functioning
as site managers (Bolman & Deal, 2001; Starratt, 1998). This shifting view of leadership requires
school administrators to exhibit non-traditional leadership characteristics and to initiate and
manage change on multiple levels.

Leadership characteristics have certainly evolved and continue to change rapidly as schools
transform themselves from bureaucratic organizations to true learning communities. School
leaders as change agents must be prepared to acknowledge that school environments are difficult,


EdAdminII 4/07                                  69
complex, and historically resistant to change. Maneuvering through the change minefields
requires candidates to be skilled in personal as well as institutional vision-building, inquiry, and
collaboration (Fullan, 1993). Preparing leaders to manage change with an organizational and
political knowledge is key to transforming schools and remains a primary focus of the Professional
Administrative Services Credential Program.

An additional focus of the program centers around empowering school leaders through
self-directed learning and responsible learning choices. Relying on adult learning theory
pioneered by Malcom Knowles, our Professional Administrative Services Credential Program
subscribes to the following characteristics of adult learning and base the learnings throughout the
program keeping these traits of adult learning in mind (adapted from Lieb, S. (1991) Principles of
adult learning. http://honolulu.hawaii.edu.

Adults are autonomous and self-directed. According to Knowles, Adults need to be free to direct
themselves with the facilitation and guidance of their instructors.

Adults have accumulated a foundation of life experiences and knowledge. These experiences
serve them well as they connect their prior learnings (in our case, the information gained from a
Tier I program and their on-the-job leadership contexts), to the study of the CPSELS and their
application to their current school environments.

Adults are goal-oriented. This concept is extraordinarily important in a Professional
Administrative Services Credential Program where candidates are seeking information that will
assist them to do their jobs more effectively – their primary goal for program participation (as well
as being a state requirement for final certification).

Adults are practical and relevancy-oriented. Candidates must see a practical reason for engaging
in activites and must see relevancy to themselves. That is the primary reason why the Induction
Plan and the experiences in EDAD 640 focuses and candidates’ self-selecting their goals and
means to achieve their goals based on the CPSEL standards. This feature of our program
automatically infuses the sense of practicality and relevancy.

The Professional Administrative Services Credential Program
The Induction Experience
The program begins with EDAD 640 Mentoring and Professional Development for the New
Administrator. In order for candidates to understand the nature of the CPSEL standards which
have great implications for candidates’ professional growth and demonstration of competency,
students are introduced to each of the standards during EDAD 640. They are introduced or in many
cases re-introduced, to all six standards through two vehicles, 1) the Self Assessment document
which requires each candidate to assess themselves on each element of every CPSEL standard, and
2) the Self Assessment document which requires each candidate to assess themselves on each
element of the Technology Standards for School Administrators which are closely aligned to the
CPSELS but with a technology emphasis. This introduction (or re-introduction) involves a
thorough discussion of each standard and its implications, examples of what the standard my look
like in actual school settings, and collegial interaction among all participants where shared


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meaning regarding the standards is constructed. Each standard is thoroughly discussed using the
constructivist theory of learning and leading which is part of the conceptual framework that guides
our program/curriculum design. It is after this thorough analysis that candidates must completely
immerse themselves in self-reflection and analysis of their current and future roles as educational
leaders and complete all the self-assessment activities.

Candidates participate in multiple self-assessment activities. The purpose of the self-assessment
activities is to provide candidates with enough information regarding their strengths and areas of
need to make informed decisions regarding the goals they construct that will guide their
professional growth as new administrators. As stated in the previous standard, students complete
a self-assessment of their perceived competency levels in not only each of the six CPSEL
standards but in the Technology Standards for School Administrators (TSSA) as well. They also
complete a self-analysis matrix where they rate their competency on specific leadership indicators.
Additionally, candidates must access a Myer’s Briggs Personality Inventory online where their
personality styles are identified. Candidates must analyze the results from the online indicator and
determine the implications of their personality types on their leadership styles. The key is in the
analysis where candidates must organize and then analyze their data so that proper and appropriate
decisions can be made regarding the creation of their individualized goals and objectives that stem
from each of the six CPSEL standards. Class discussions focus on how to develop and structure
goals, how to create evidence of goal mastery as well as examples of what will constitute evidence
of their progress and of the implications of their choices of goals in the short and long term. Each
one of the self-selected goals must be matched to a CPSEL or TSSA standard. Overall, the seminar
assists candidates in clarifying their own visions of leadership for themselves as well as for those
they will lead.

Curricular Themes (Curriculum) Related to the CPSELS:
The curriculum of the professional program stems from the principles outlined in the broad
thematic areas of the CTC/CPSELs: Standard 10 – Vision of Learning; Standard 11 – Student
Learning and Professional Growth; Standard 12 – Organizational Management for Student
Learning; Standard 13 – Working with Diverse Families and Communities; Standard 14 –
Personal Ethics and Leadership Capacity; Standard 15: Political, Social Economic, Legal and
Cultural Understanding.




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EDAD 658 Outline of Subject Matter (Curriculum) and corresponding CPSELS that *Major learning activities in
         the curriculum addresses:                                                which candidates will
                                                                                  engage through systematic
         Please note that the curriculum in EDAD 658 covers all six CPSEL study, application, inquiry,
         standards and their various elements through a variety of subject        and reflection to master the
         matter themes.                                                           subject matter (curriculum)
                                                                                  stemming from all six
                                                                                  CPSELS
         *********************************************************
         Systems Theory (CPSELS 12 and 15)                                        Explore systems theory and
         Change Theory (CPSEL 10 and 11)                                          how organizations are
         Characteristics of Effective Organizations (CPSEL 10, 12, and 14)        affected using the theory;
         Visionary School Leadership for Organizational Development (CPSEL
         10, 15)                                                                  Explore change theory and
         Shaping School Culture to Build Professional Learning Communities        its various applications in
         (CPSEL 12, 13, 15)                                                       developing schools with
         Social, Cultural and Political Forces Affecting Schools as Organizations high student outcomes;
         (CPSEL 13, 15)
         Leadership for Meaningful Change in Schools (CPSEL 10, 11)               Study and analyze current
         School Planning and Action Research for Continuous Improvement           contexts of schooling and
         (CPSEL 11, 12)                                                           the important societal issues
         Leadership at School: Managing the Learning Environment (CPSEL 12) that affect schools and their
         Moral, Political, Social, Legal, and Cultural Leadership (CPSEL 15)      development;
         Collegial Mentorship in the Community (CPSEL 13)
                                                                                  Identify and articulate
                                                                                  various political, social,
                                                                                  legal, and cultural forces
                                                                                  that influence the
                                                                                  organizational development
                                                                                  of schools;

                                                                                   Understand the importance
                                                                                   of managing the learning
                                                                                   environment with a focus on
                                                                                   marshalling human
                                                                                   resources to promote
                                                                                   student learning;

                                                                                   Apply the concepts of
                                                                                   transformational and moral
                                                                                   leadership within the
                                                                                   context of students’ own
                                                                                   organizational
                                                                                   environments.
*Each instructor who teaches in the program is responsible for covering the outline of subject
matter listed above. The specific nature of the activities and pedagogies used to cover the subject
matter related to the CPSEL standards is left to the creativity, expertise, and academic freedom of
each instructor. The effectiveness of the instructor’s creativity, expertise, and academic freedom in
covering the subject matter is evaluated through student evaluations of the instructor, by the
products that the students produce within in class, and by the quality of the presentations of each
candidates Exit Portfolio where the students must demonstrate progress toward goal mastery in
each one of the CPSELS.




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 EDAD 659        Outline of Subject Matter (Curriculum) and corresponding      *Major learning activities in
                 CPSELS that the curriculum addresses:                         which candidates will engage
                 Please note that the curriculum in EDAD 658 covers all six    through systematic study,
                 CPSEL standards and their various elements through a          application, inquiry, and
                 variety of subject matter themes                              reflection to master the subject
                                                                               matter (curriculum) stemming
                                                                               from all six CPSELS:
                 **************************************************            Participate in classroom activities
                 *******                                                       that analyze political behavior in
                 Micro-political environment of schools (CPSEL 13, 15)         relation to the wider contexts of
                 Political behavior and school leadership (CPSEL 13, 14, 15)   social, economic, legal and
                 Current school organizational models (CPSEL 11,12, 13)        cultural settings;
                 Conflict resolution (CPSEL 10, 14, 15)
                 Special interest groups’ effects on student achievement       Become familiar with models for
                 (CPSEL 10, 11, 13)                                            successful organizations and their
                 “Six Keys to Successful Leadership” (CPSEL 14)                leadership within the current
                 Educational reform (CPSEL 10, 14)                             educational milieu related to
                 Decision making models (CPSEL 10, 14)                         student learning and professional
                 Expertise power and school leadership (CPSEL 10, 14)          growth;

                                                                               Understand the principles of
                                                                               conflict and its resolution as
                                                                               critical to the management of a
                                                                               successful organization;

                                                                               Explore how special interest
                                                                               groups impact student learning;

                                                                               Recognize that true leadership is
                                                                               the “mobilization of bias in
                                                                               preparation for action” and apply
                                                                               the “Six Keys to Successful
                                                                               Leadership” to their own school
                                                                               settings to maximize their ability
                                                                               to implement educational reform
                                                                               and improvements;

                                                                               Understand and value the
                                                                               importance of expertise power in
                                                                               the field of curriculum and
                                                                               instruction and how it relates to
                                                                               successful school site leadership.
*Each instructor who teaches in the program is responsible for covering the outline of subject
matter listed above. The specific nature of the activities and pedagogies used to cover the subject
matter related to the CPSEL standards is left to the creativity, expertise, and academic freedom of
each instructor. The effectiveness of the instructor’s creativity, expertise, and academic freedom in
covering the subject matter is evaluated through student evaluations of the instructor, by the
products that the students produce within in class, and by the quality of the presentations of each
candidate’s Exit Portfolio where the students must demonstrate progress toward goal mastery in
each one of the CPSELS.




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EDAD 692 Portfolio Exhibition
Within the context and review of the CPSELS, EDAD 692 allows the students to reflect on the
goals they created during the Induction phase of the program that are based on the CPSELS and
analyze and assess the degree to which their goals have been attained, the positive influences they
have experienced that have allowed them to move toward goal mastery and the barriers that may
have inhibited them from reaching their desired state. Presenting their program before the entire
class and receiving written feedback from all participants provides valuable information regarding
their progress. In addition, others are able to listen to various aspects of administrative work
conducted by colleagues and learn about strategies that worked well that they might be able to
replicate. This course provides closure but it also allows candidates to return to their sites and
continue to work on their goals with new learnings and perspectives experienced by others.

By examining the content of EDAD 640, EDAD 658, EDAD 659, and EDAD 692, the program is
designed so that all of the CPSELS are addressed in various ways throughout the entire program.
This comprehensive approach provides multiple opportunities for candidates to become well
acquainted with and experienced in the curricular themes that guide the program and that provide
the foundation for all activities and experiences. It also assists them to master their own
self-selected goals based on the six CPSELS that were identified during the Induction Seminar,
EDAD 640./

It should also be noted that inquiry is infused throughout the program as candidates must explore,
examine, apply, study, analyze, question and study the nature of the CPSELS, their meaning, their
application, and the multiple ways the standards guide and influence each candidate’s actions as
educational leaders.




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      Standard 4: Scope and Delivery of the Professional-Level Curriculum

Reviewers’ Comments: Need more information on scope and delivery of each of the CPSELs’
[sic] in the University Program. Need more information on Non-University components. Need
more information on candidate assessment per CPSELs’ [sic].

Program Clarification for Reviewers:
In order to respond to the Reviewers’ Comments, the following response is organized to address
three primary areas as suggested by the reviewers comments. First, the chart below identifies the
scope of the standard, (meaning the multiple places the standard can be found). Second, the data in
the table address the curriculum delivery mode and third, describes the way(s) assessment occur(s)
per each CPSEL. Following the chart is a description of how the non-university components
complement a candidate’s entire experience. The total response begins with a brief overview of the
requirements for the Preliminary Credential which provides the foundational scaffolding of
program knowledge.

The theoretical and conceptual knowledge guiding the Professional Administrative Services
Credential Program is an extension of the Preliminary program’s curricular/thematic foundation.
The preliminary program is designed to provide basic knowledge of administrative principles in
the following areas:

EDAD 541         Leadership, Decision Making and Collaboration
EDAD 544         Educational Law: Equity and Access
EDAD 647A        Financial Resource
EDAD 647B        Human Resources
EDAD 649         Urban Leadership
EDAD 677A        Curriculum/Program Development and Evaluation
EDAD 677B        Instructional Leadership and Assessment

EDAD 580         Introduction to Fieldwork
EDAD 680         Advanced Fieldwork

The Professional Program extends the Tier I administrative principles in relationship to the broad
overarching themes of the CPSELs. See chart below:




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CPSEL            Scope/     Delivery – How content is examined and            Assessment
                 Location   analyzed. (Multiple teaching pedagogies
                            chosen at the discretion of the instructors and
                            selected by the candidates themselves based
                            on their own learning acquisition styles):
#10 - #15        EDAD 640   Examination and study of each standard, its       Completion and quality of
                            meaning, what it looks like, how it can be        Induction Plan which includes 1) 6
                            applied. Accomplished through self-study,         self selected goals based on each of
                            class discussion, group problem solving,          the CPSELs, 2) strategies for
                            various readings, multiple self-assessments of    achieving or making progress
                            current competency levels on the 6 CPSEL          toward goals, 3) evidence to be
                            standards.                                        used to document goal attainment,
                                                                              4) additional professional
                            Construction of a comprehensive Induction         development experiences that the
                            Plan.                                             candidate identifies to assist them to
                                                                              reach their goals, 5) Examples of
                                                                              evidence to be used to document
                                                                              goal progress or attainment, 6)
                                                                              Timeline of expected goal
                                                                              completion date(s).
#10 – Vision     EDAD 658   Application of concepts of various forms of       Quality and depth of information
of Learning                 leadership and vision within candidate’s own      contained in Reflective Journal.
                            organizational environments.

                 EDAD 659   Study of governance within candidate’s own        Quality of mini-ethnographic study
                            district and/or school identifying vision of      of governance structures.
                            leadership.
#11 – Student    EDAD 658   Exploration of systems theory including the       Quality and depth of information
Learning and                nature of student learning within the system      contained in Reflective Journal.
Professional                itself and its relationship to professional
Growth                      growth.

                 EDAD 659   Utilization of innovative, interactive models     Quality and depth of
                            of conversation and non-traditional meeting       meta-cognitive journal, including
                            formats applied to their school sites to          an analysis and reflection on
                            structure dialogue on student learning and        application of the standard that
                            their own professional growth.                    synthesizes concepts developed in
                                                                              class.
#12 –            EDAD 658   Exploration of change theory and its various      Quality and thoroughness of Action
Organization                application in developing and organizing          Research Study including
al                          schools with high student outcomes in all         appropriate and relevant data
Management                  areas.                                            collection methods.
for Student
Learning         EDAD 659   Analysis of the principles of conflict and        Quality of mini-ethnographic study
                            resolution strategies as critical to the          of governance structures including
                            management of a successful organization that      identification of conflict resolution
                            promotes student learning;                        strategies currently in place (if any).
#13 –            EDAD 658   Study and analysis of current contexts of         Quality and depth of analysis of
Working                     schooling and the important societal issues       societal issues including
with Diverse                that affect schools and their development.        implications for working with
Families and                                                                  diverse families and communities
Communities      EDAD 659   Team Dialogue Sessions structured around          through an Action Research Study.
                            working with diverse families and strategies
                            for interactive community involvement.




EdAdminII 4/07                                        76
                            Exploration of how special interest groups
                            impact student learning.
#14 –            EDAD 658   Application of concepts of transformational        Quality and depth of information
Personal                    and moral leadership within the context of         contained in Reflective Journal.
Ethics and                  students’ own organizational environments.
Leadership
Capacity         EDAD 659
#15 –            EDAD 658   Identification and articulation of various         Quality and depth of analysis of
Political,                  political, social, legal, and cultural forces at   political, social, legal, and cultural
Social                      candidates’ school and/or district levels.         forces at candidate’s school
Economic,                                                                      presented through an Action
Legal and                                                                      Research Study.
Cultural
Under-standi     EDAD 659   Exploration of how special interest groups         Quality of mini-ethnographic study
ng                          impact student learning.                           of governance structures.
Standards        EDAD 692   Peer presentations and peer sharing of             Instructor, peer, and mentor
#10 - #15                   Candidates’ Portfolios that require each           evaluation of progress made toward
                            candidate to share goals that address all six      the realization of goals via
                            standards, provide strategies for goal progress    instructor and peer feedback
                            or attainment and the methods each used to         summary form; candidate
                            evaluate their progress or attainment of the       self-reflection regarding own
                            self selected goals.                               progress and level of satisfaction
                                                                               with their activities.

Non-University Components:
During EDAD 640, each candidate must complete an Induction Plan consisting of 6 components
(see first section, Assessment for EDAD 640 in table above). One of the assessment components,
#4, requires “additional professional development experiences that the candidate identifies to
assist them to reach their goals.” To explain further, each candidate must identify a professional
development experience in which they will engage to help them to reach their goal. For example,
this experience could be a leadership conference which would aid them in developing some aspect
of creating a vision of learning (CPSEL #10). Candidates could identify a piece of professional
literature to read such as Lisa Delpit’s Other Peoples’ Children to provide insights into working
with diverse children and families (CSPEL # 13 – Collaborating with families and community
members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community
resources). The responsibility for choosing an activity rests with each candidate, however the
choices must be approved by the university supervisor and the candidate’s mentor thus making the
entire process one of “consultative collaboration.” It is important for candidates themselves to
choose an appropriate activity that they believe will serve their interests and their ability to
accomplish their goals. Adult learning theory strongly influences the guidance of this plan since
adults do best when they are empowered to make their own decisions and participate in the process
of making decisions that affect them directly.




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                 Standard 5:

                 Standard Met




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                 Standard 6:

                 Standard Met




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                 Standard 7:

                 Standard Met




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                 Standard 8: Expectations for Candidate Performance

Reviewers’ Comments: Need more specific information on how this standard is met.

Program Clarification for Reviewers:
During the first course in the program, EDAD 640 Mentoring and Professional Development
Planning for the New Administrator, the candidate engages in a pre-assessment that guides the
development of the Individual Induction Plan. A major component of the assessment requires
students to rate themselves on each element of each of the six CPSEL standards and on each one
of the elements of the Technology Standards for School Administrators which are closely aligned
with the CPSELs. By completing this assessment activity, candidates readily determine their areas
of strength and areas that need improvement. The results of this review, along with the results from
the other required assessments are analyzed in the aggregate. Based on the analysis, candidates
identify one major goal related to each standard on which they wish to work during the duration
of the program as well as well beyond into their professional careers. Areas of special emphasis are
determined through the analysis of the results from their assessment data. The end product is an
individualized program of study (Induction Plan) with six overarching goals to form the basis of
the candidates’ individualized program of studies congruent with the six themes related to
administrative practice as outlined in Standard 3.

To insure that each candidate is clear on how to proceed with goal progression and mastery, each
candidate must respond to the following prompts for each developed goal:

    1. A statement of the goal;
    2. Identification of the standard that the goal addresses;
    3. A list of the strategies that will be used to attain the goal;
    4. Identification of the professional development activity (e.g. seminar, workshop, institute,
       course) used to help attain the goal?
           A statement of what the candidate expects to learn from attending the professional
           development activity;
    5. Creation of a timeline for achieving the goal;
    6. A statement of expectations for goal achievement, meaning the assessment evidence that
       the candidate will use to document goal progression and mastery. (Simply attending a
       meeting or an in-service will not be sufficient or reliable evidence).

The candidate, the university supervisor, and the mentor all have input into the design of the goals
(expectations). Each must sign the Induction Plan. In addition, in EDAD 640, the university
supervisor provides specific guidance regarding how to develop appropriate assessment activities
including examples of what constitutes evidence or evidentiary support that document and
measure that expectations have been met. In the same course, various examples of professional
development experiences are also presented and discussed that provide assistance related to
candidate’s specific professional goals. Finally, the assessment activities in the core courses
EDAD 658 and EDAD 659 are structured to complement the goals of each candidate and support
progress toward goal mastery.




EdAdminII 4/07                                  81
                 Standard 9: Assessment of Candidate Competence

Reviewers’ Comments: Needs more information on how candidate’s assessment addressed the
CPSELs. For example, the Portfolio Feedback Protocol needs to be clarified as to how it
specifically meets the CPSELs and upon what measurement evaluations are based (rubric). Peer
review is referred for the first time in this standard response and needs clarification. Ultimate
responsibility of candidate assessment needs clarification.

Please see original response first before reviewing the following response that is provided for
further clarification:

Overall, candidates are assessed on their developmental progress toward mastering each CPSEL
through the creation of six individualized goals, each one being based on the six broad thematic
curricular areas. The formal assessment of a candidate’s competency occurs through EDAD 692 in
the final semester of his/her program. The entire 2 unit course is devoted to insuring that the
candidate has made the appropriate development progress toward mastering the CPSELS.

How does the assessment occur? Summative assessment occurs through:

    A. An examination of the candidate’s portfolio, conducted by the instructor, where artifacts
       that demonstrate competency in the CPSEL standard are presented and articulated to the
       entire cohort;
    B. Instructor and Peer Feedback on the Portfolio Feedback Protocol Form – where each
       candidate as well as the instructor provides specific narrative, qualitative comments
       regarding the candidate’s performance on each one of the CPSELs after each candidate’s
       30-45 minute presentation. The following prompts (taken from the Portfolio Feedback
       Protocol Form) are used to which the fellow candidates and the instructor responds:

        1. You demonstrated your professional growth in the following standards in the following
           ways:
           a. Vision of Learning
           b. Student Learning and Professional Growth
           c. Organizational Management for Student Learning
           d. Working with Diverse Families and Communities
           e. Personal Ethics and Leadership Capacity
           f. Political, Social, Economic, Legal and Cultural Understanding
        2. You applied new learning when you:
        3. You demonstrated process skills (starting in one pace and getting to another) by:
        4. It is apparent that you place a great deal of value on:
        5. Summary Comments or Feedback

    C. Mentor Letter of Support where each mentor must qualitatively describe the level of the
       candidate’s competency in each of the six thematic areas (CPSELs).

Based on a thorough examination of the three major components above (A, B, and C), which
includes an examination of all Feedback Protocol Forms for each candidate and an examination of


EdAdminII 4/07                                 82
the Mentor’s Letter Supporting each candidate’s competency, the university supervisor in
consultation with the instructor of EDAD 692, Administrative Portfolio Development and
Exhibition, rate each candidate on each CPSEL based on the following rubric:

3 – Demonstrates consistent and professional competency and understanding through multiple
examples (3-4) of professional applications (evidence); the scope of the evidence is broad,
indicating internalization and comprehension across multiple levels; there is a strong and
unmistakable link between the evidence submitted to support competency and the CPSEL;

2 – Demonstrates professional competency and understanding through a few examples (2-3) of
professional applications (evidence); the scope of the evidence is adequate, indicating
internalization and comprehension across a few levels; there is an obvious link between the
evidence submitted to support competency and the CPSEL;

1 – Demonstrates basic competency and understanding through one example of professional
application (evidence); the scope of the evidence is limited or inconsistent; limited internalization
and comprehension at only one level; there is only an inferential link between the evidence
submitted and the CPSEL.

Ultimately, it is the responsibility of the University Supervisor to make the final determination of
a candidate’s overall competency, however at noted above, assessment is a multi-faceted and
collegial process.

As part of California State University, Long Beach College of Education’s new Unit Assessment
System, each program is required to develop an assessment plan which will be part of our NCATE
accreditation evaluation in the spring of 2007. To further demonstrate the comprehensiveness of
the assessment process, excerpts from the entire unit assessment document below further describes
the nature and scope of the assessment and evaluation of the Professional Administrative Services
Credential Candidates. The minimum assessment points are Entry, Beginning and Exit as noted
below:




EdAdminII 4/07                                   83
I.B. One page description and summary of how students are assessed at entry, key points during
program progress and at exit (e.g. application process, benchmarks, papers, portfolios, syllabi,
projects, theses, and comprehensive exams). Assessments are explicitly tied to SLOs.

Entry                 Assessment Tools                      Assessment Decision Criteria
                      Program Application Documents -       Satisfactory completion of all application
                      Candidates must:                      documents with valid proof of d and e.
                      a. Complete Tier 2 Program
                      Application and Resume;
                      b. Write a 2-3 page statement of
                      leadership philosophy;
                      c. Provide a copy of Prelim. Adm.
                      Services Credential;
                      d. Show proof administrative
                      employment;
                      e. Provide evidence of mentor
                      support.
Beginning
EDAD 640 –            Induction Self Assessment             1. Satisfactory completion of all assessments and
Mentoring and         Documents:                            analyses;
Professional                                                2. Satisfactory completion of Induction Plan which
Development for the   CA Professional Standards for         includes a) six goals developed from candidates’
New Administrator     Educational Leaders Self Assessment   assessment of their competency in each standard
                      (SLOs);                               (SLO), b) strategies to attain the goals, c) projected
                                                            evidence to demonstrate goal attainment, d)
                      Technology Standards for School       proposed professional development activities and e)
                      Administrators Self-Assessment;       evaluation plan to assess progress toward or actual
                                                            goal mastery;
                      Analysis of Assessment Data           3. Signed approval of Induction Plan by candidate,
                                                            mentor, university supervisor.
                      Multiple Dimensional Leadership
                      Skills Self- Assessment

                      Analysis and Synthesis of Self
                      Assessment

                      Professional Development Plan
Exit
EDAD 692              Exit Portfolio and Exhibition         a. Satisfactory presentation of multiple pieces of
                      Demonstrating Progress Toward and     evidence contained in a Development Portfolio
                      Mastery of SLOs.                      (self-selected work artifacts) that best demonstrates
                                                            candidates progress toward mastery of their goals
                                                            related to six SLOs;
                                                            b. Mentor letter attesting to goal progress related to
                                                            each of the six SLOs;
                                                            c. Peer Portfolio Presentation Feedback
                                                            Information provided to each candidate by peers on
                                                            candidates progress toward and master of SLOs;
                                                            d. Signed Portfolio Assessment Summary Form
                                                            documenting work completed demonstrating master
                                                            or progress toward mastery of SLOs signed by
                                                            candidate, university instructor, and mentor.




EdAdminII 4/07                                         84
I.C. Copies of assessment instruments at entry, along the way, and at exit that measure progress
toward SLOs, including evidence of incorporation of professional, state, and institutional
standards (e.g. tests, protocols, templates, rubrics, etc.). If multiple assessment integrated into
coursework, select key assessments only.

                      Assessment Tools                     Evidence of Incorporation of Professional, State
                                                           and Institutional standards
ENTRY:                Program Application Documents -      Assessment Tool:
Application           Candidates must:                     b. = SLO #10 Vision of Learning
                      a. Complete Tier 2 Program
                      Application and Resume;
                      b. Write a 2-3 page statement of
                      leadership philosophy;
                      c. Provide a copy of Prelim. Adm.
                      Services Credential;
                      d. Show proof administrative
                      employment;
                      e. Provide evidence of mentor
                      support.
BEGINNING:            Induction Self Assessment            Assessment Tools:
EDAD 640 –            Documents:                           a,b,c,d, = SLOs #10-#15
Mentoring and         a. CA Professional Standards for
Professional          Educational Leaders Self
Development for the   Assessment (SLOs);
New Administrator     b. Technology Standards for School
                      Administrators Self-Assessment
                      (SLOs);
                      c. Multiple Dimensional Leadership
                      Skills Self- Assessment Form;
                      d. Professional Development Plan
EXIT:                 a. Exit Portfolio and Exhibition     Assessment Tools:
EDAD 692              including Summary Form;              a.b.c.d. = SLOs #10-#15
                      b. Mentor’s Letter of Support;            a. Presentation of evidence (self-selected
                      c. Mentor Contact Log;                         work artifacts) that best demonstrates
                      d. Portfolio Presentation                      candidates progress toward mastery of
                      Feedback Protocol                              their goals that cover all 6 state CCTC
                                                                     Standards (SLOs);
                                                                b. Mentor must comment on candidate’s
                                                                     work in each of the Standards/SLOs;
                                                                c. Mentor Contact Log demonstrates
                                                                     evidence of support related to
                                                                     accomplishing goals based on SLOs;
                                                                d. Peers provide feedback on progress and
                                                                     mastery of goals related to
                                                                     standards/SLOs.

List of Assessment Tools That are Specifically Used to Assess SLOs Based on Standards
    a. Statement of Leadership Philosophy Prompt
    b. CA Professional Standards for Educational Leaders Self Assessment Tool
    c. Technology Standards for School Administrators Self-Assessment Tool
    d. Multiple Dimensional Leadership Skills Self- Assessment Form
    e. Professional Development Plan



EdAdminII 4/07                                     85
    f.   Portfolio Exhibition Summary Form
    g.   Mentor’s Letter of Support Sample
    h.   Mentor Contact Log
    i.   Portfolio Presentation Peer Feedback Protocol




EdAdminII 4/07                                 86
I.E.       Decision rules and data points for determining candidate performance by candidates
and faculty; what happens if progress is not satisfactory at key points during program (e.g.
intervention review of progress, recommendations for improvement, assistance, etc.)

 Assessment Points of        Assessment                                 Decision Rules
 Candidates’ Competence
 Entry                       Application                                All candidates who complete an application
                                                                        and provide the appropriate and VALID
                                                                        support documentation are admitted into
                                                                        the program until capacity is reached. This
                                                                        number is usually 15 but no more than 20.
 Beginning                   EDAD 640 – Completion of course            Candidates must complete all course
                             requirements.                              requirements and receive a CR for the
                                                                        course in order to move forward in the
                                                                        program. Candidates who fail to earn a CR
                                                                        are either dismissed from the program, are
                                                                        advised to take an Incomplete and take the
                                                                        following year to work on completing the
                                                                        course requirements. After a re-evaluation
                                                                        of the candidate’s work, a candidate can
                                                                        resume the program and continue to take
                                                                        the core courses.
 Middle                      EDAD 658 Organizational                    Individual instructors are responsible for
 (Not designated SLOs, but   Development, Culture, and Change           assigning grades for work that is
 due to short length of                                                 completed. Candidates must maintain a 3.0
 program, student work is    EDAD 659 Educational Governance,           GPA in both courses.
 examined)                   Politics, and Policy
 End                         EDAD 692 – Portfolio Development           Candidates must earn a CR for completion
                             and Exhibition                             of this course in order to be able to file for
                                                                        their Professional Administrative Services
                                                                        Credential. Failure to earn a CR results in a
                                                                        recommendation for additional work to be
                                                                        completed before the candidate is allowed
                                                                        to file. A grade of CR is based on a 3 point
                                                                        rubric with a total of 18 points possible. 12
                                                                        points or above will be adequate to earn a
                                                                        CR in the course.
 Exit                        Exit Procedures:                           All candidates who complete all exit
                             Candidates must:                           procedures will receive their Professional
                             1. Open a credential file with the         Administrative Services Credential from
                             Credential Processing Center;              the CCTC after CCTC review.
                             2. Obtain and submit one set of official
                             transcripts documenting their work in
                             the Professional Administrative
                             Services Credential Program;
                             3. Provide verification of two years
                             administrative experience from their
                             district;
                             4. Provide one copy of their basic
                             teaching credential
                             5. Provide one copy of their Preliminary
                             Administrative Services Credential;
                             6. $55 money order to the CCTC.




EdAdminII 4/07                                        87
Each instructor of each of the four courses is responsible for monitoring progress of each candidate
and insuring that candidates are monitoring themselves through ongoing contacts with their
district based mentor.

At any time during the program, those candidates who are not attending class, not participating in
course activities, not completing work on time, or whose work production is below a “B” grade are
contacted on an individual basis by each individual instructor. If needed, the program coordinator
may be asked to facilitate communication. If the issue or concern is of a serious nature that has the
potential of impacting job performance, the candidate’s mentor is informed of the situation by the
program coordinator and the candidate is appropriately counseled by the program coordinator and
the candidate’s mentor with suggestions for improvement.




EdAdminII 4/07                                   88

				
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