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					       Human Resource
State Employment Law Summary




                    LOUISIANA
                                                       Table of Contents
                                                                                                                                                   Page

Abortions ...........................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.6
Appearance and Grooming.................................................................................................................... 4
   Uniforms ..................................................................................................................................... 4
Arrest and Conviction Records ............................................................................................................. 4
At-Will Employment ............................................................................................................................. 4
Breaks and Rest Periods ........................................................................................................................ 5
   Minors ......................................................................................................................................... 5
   Adults .......................................................................................................................................... 5
   Breastfeeding .............................................................................................................................. 5
Child Labor ............................................................................................................................................ 5
   Federal Law ................................................................................................................................ 5
   Types of Work ............................................................................................................................ 5
     Minors Under Age 16 ............................................................................................................. 6
     Minors Under Age 14 to 15 .................................................................................................... 7
   Hours of Work ............................................................................................................................ 7
     Minors Under Age 16 ............................................................................................................. 7
   Permits and Postings ................................................................................................................... 7
COBRA ................................................................................................................................................. 7
   Insurance Continuation ............................................................................................................... 7
Coercion of Employee Trade ................................................................................................................ 7
Employee Conduct and Work Rules ..................................................................................................... 8
   Guns in the Workplace................................................................................................................ 8
Equal Employment Opportunity and Equal Pay ................................................................................... 8
Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) ..................................................................................................... 8
   Bone Marrow .............................................................................................................................. 8
   Pregnancy.................................................................................................................................... 8
Files and Access .................................................................................................................................... 9
   Employee Review of Files .......................................................................................................... 9
Hiring Procedures .................................................................................................................................. 9
   Credit and Investigative Checks ................................................................................................. 9
   New Hire and Rehire Reporting Requirements .......................................................................... 9
   Mandatory Background Checks .................................................................................................. 9
Holidays ................................................................................................................................................. 9
Jury, Witness, and Voting Leave......................................................................................................... 10
   Jury Leave ................................................................................................................................. 10
   Witness Leave ........................................................................................................................... 10
   Voting Leave ............................................................................................................................. 10
Labor-Management Relations ............................................................................................................. 10
Layoff and Reduction in Force............................................................................................................ 10
Medical Testing and Examinations ..................................................................................................... 10
   Drug (Alcohol) Testing ............................................................................................................. 10
  Medical Examinations .............................................................................................................. 11
  Genetic Testing ......................................................................................................................... 12
  HIV Testing .............................................................................................................................. 12
Military Leave ..................................................................................................................................... 12
Noncompetition Agreements............................................................................................................... 12
Overtime .............................................................................................................................................. 13
Political Activities ............................................................................................................................... 13
Polygraph/Lie Detector Tests .............................................................................................................. 13
Reference Requests ............................................................................................................................. 13
  Protection for Employers .......................................................................................................... 13
Sick Leave ........................................................................................................................................... 14
Smoking ............................................................................................................................................... 14
  Written Policy ........................................................................................................................... 14
  Use of Lawful Products Off the Premises................................................................................. 14
Termination Procedures....................................................................................................................... 14
  Paychecks .................................................................................................................................. 14
  Deceased Employees ................................................................................................................ 14
Unemployment Compensation ............................................................................................................ 15
Vacations ............................................................................................................................................. 15
  Payment at Termination ............................................................................................................ 15
Wages and Hours................................................................................................................................. 15
  Paydays ..................................................................................................................................... 15
  Minimum Wage ........................................................................................................................ 15
  Withholding or Docking Pay .................................................................................................... 15
  Garnishment .............................................................................................................................. 15
  Direct Deposit ........................................................................................................................... 16
  Living Wage.............................................................................................................................. 16
Whistleblower Protection .................................................................................................................... 16
Workers’ Compensation ...................................................................................................................... 16
Required Posters .................................................................................................................................. 17
  Required Federal Posters .......................................................................................................... 17
  Required Louisiana Posters and Contacts ................................................................................. 17
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                           STATE LAW SUMMARY

Appearance and Grooming


  Uniforms

  Louisiana has no statute governing appearance and grooming in the workplace, nor a statute
  governing whether employers may require employees to pay for required uniforms.

Arrest and Conviction Records


  An employer may not discriminate against an employee or applicant in any trade, occupation,
  or profession for which a license, permit or certificate is required to be issued by the state of
  Louisiana or any of its agencies or political subdivisions, solely because of a prior criminal
  record, except in cases in which the applicant has been convicted of a felony, and such
  conviction directly relates to the position of employment sought, or to the specific
  occupation, trade or profession for which the license, permit or certificate is sought.

  Caution: Private employers considering using arrest or conviction records should do so with
  caution, even in states that allow the use of arrest or conviction records for employment
  purposes. An arrest might never result in a criminal guilty plea or conviction and it is always
  possible that a person has been arrested for something he or she did not do. Moreover, the
  federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has stated that use of conviction records
  might be discriminatory given that, according to the EEOC, minorities are often more likely
  to have such a record. The EEOC cautions that employers should only inquire about felony
  convictions, should state that a criminal record is not an automatic bar to employment and
  should ensure that there is a legitimate business reason for requesting such information.
  Employers should consult with their attorneys for more information and guidance on this
  issue.

At-Will Employment


  Absent a fixed term of employment, a Louisiana employer employs someone on an at-will
  basis and can discharge the employee with or without cause. A discharged employee may
  have a public policy claim against an employer who discharges him/her in violation of rights
  provided by a statute or constitutional provision, e.g., under the Louisiana worker's
  compensation laws.
Breaks and Rest Periods


  Minors

  No Louisiana employer may require a minor to work for more than 5 consecutive hours
  without a 30-minute meal period.

  Adults

  Louisiana has enacted no statute that requires private employers to provide breaks and rest
  periods to adult employees, except for workers in air compression chambers.

  Breastfeeding

  Louisiana prohibits discrimination against breastfeeding in any public accommodation, resort
  or amusement. It is unlawful segregation to ask a breastfeeding woman to move to another
  location or leave a public accommodation.

Child Labor


  Federal Law

  Minors may be limited in the hours they work and may not be employed in occupations
  considered hazardous by federal law or by the U.S. Department of Labor’s rules and
  regulations. When school is in session, federal law requires work of minors age 14 and 15 to
  be limited to three (3) hours per day and eighteen (18) hours per week. When school is not in
  session, minors age 14 and 15 may work up to eight (8) hours per day and forty (40) hours
  per week between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. (or 9:00 p.m. June 1 through Labor Day). Federal
  law does not limit work hours for minors age 16 and 17, regardless of whether or not school
  is in session. Except in limited circumstances, employers are generally prohibited from
  hiring minors under age 14. In addition to these federal restrictions, the following provisions
  address employment of minors in Louisiana. Additional Louisiana provisions regulate both
  the type and hours of work in which minors can engage. Note that the stricter law, the one
  that most benefits employees, prevails.

  Types of Work

  No minors (except those indentured as apprentices in accordance with Louisiana law) shall
  be employed, permitted or suffered to work any of the following occupations:
     oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting, or in applying belts to pulleys;

     in or about any mine or quarry;

     where stone cutting or polishing is done;
   any plant manufacturing explosives or articles containing explosive components, or in the
    use or transportation of the same;

   iron or steel manufacturing plants, ore reduction works, smelters, foundries, forging
    shops, hot rolling mills, or in any other place where the heat treatment of metals is done;

   operation of machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metals or in the operation of
    power-driven machinery for punching, shearing, stamping, bending or planing metals;

   saw mills or cooperage stock mills;

   operation of power-driven woodworking machines, or off bearing from circular saws;

   logging operations;

   as a driver of any motor vehicle used for commercial or industrial purposes, except for
    those minors who are 16 years or older and who drive a motor vehicle of no more than
    two axles occasionally and incidentally to their employment;

   operation of passenger or freight elevators or hoisting machines;

   spray painting or in occupations involving exposure to lead or its compounds or to
    dangerous or poisonous dyes and chemicals;

   in any place or establishment in which the sale of alcoholic beverages constitutes its main
    business, unless as a musician under a written contract under direct supervision of a
    parent or legal guardian (note that any place or establishment holding a duly issued retail
    dealer's alcoholic beverage license or permit, for which the sale of alcoholic beverages
    does not constitute the main business of the establishment, may employ anyone under the
    age of 18, provided that the minor's employment does not involve the sale, mixing,
    dispensing, or serving of alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises); or

   in any other place of employment or in any other occupation deemed hazardous to the
    life, health, safety or welfare of a minor.

    Minors Under Age 16

    Minors under age 16 may not be employed:
   in, or about, or in connection with a poolroom or billiard room;

   in, or about, or in connection with power-driven machinery;

   in any manufacturing or processing establishment, or in any manufacturing, mechanical,
    or processing occupation;

   in the close proximity of any lounge or other location where alcoholic beverages are sold;
     in any other occupation for which a higher minimum age is required; or

     in the distribution or delivery of goods or messages for any person engaged in the
      business of transmitting or delivering of goods or messages.

      Minors Under Age 14 to 15

      Minors under age 14 to 15 may be employed only after school or on non-school days.
      Minors under age 14 may not be employed in any gainful employment.

  Hours of Work

      Minors Under Age 16

      Minors under age 16 typically cannot work during school hours. Such minors cannot
      work more than 8 hours per day or more than 6 consecutive days in one week. When
      school is in session, minors under age 16 may not work more than 3 hours per day or 18
      hours per week. Minors under age 16 cannot work before 7 a.m. or after 7 p.m., except
      that, from June 1 to Labor Day, they may work until 9 p.m. Minors under 18 cannot be
      required to work for any five hour period without at least one thirty-minute meal period.

  Permits and Postings

  No minor under age 18 can be employed without an employment certificate or work permit
  (which the employer must keep on file) issued by the superintendent of the city or parish
  school where the minor resides.

  Child labor law can be both challenging and confusing. Employers of minors should
  closely review federal and state child labor law differences and contact their attorneys
  or the Department of Labor to ensure they are in full compliance.

COBRA


  Insurance Continuation

  Many states have legislation requiring small employers (those not subject to COBRA) to
  provide insurance continuation if an employee becomes ineligible for group coverage (such
  as through a termination). Such provisions are complex and very technical. You may want
  to contact your attorney or insurance broker to determine if you are meeting all applicable
  federal and state requirements.

Coercion of Employee Trade
  No Louisiana employer can coerce its employees to deal or trade with any other person. The
  law does not apply to the sale and purchase of uniforms. Violations of the law are punished
  with criminal sanctions.
Employee Conduct and Work Rules


  Guns in the Workplace

  Workplace violence continues to be a concern for employers. Many organizations adopt
  policies (such as the one found in the HRN manual) banning guns and other weapons on
  company property. However state law differs widely regarding employees’ weapons rights.
  You may want to contact the state employment agency or an attorney for further information
  regarding your specific policy and any possible liability that may result.

Equal Employment Opportunity and Equal Pay


  Similar to federal law, Louisiana state law prohibits discrimination in employment or terms
  and conditions of employment based on age (over 40), race, color, religion, sex (including
  pregnancy, childbirth and related medical conditions), national origin or disability. The
  pregnancy prohibition applies to employers with 25 or more employees; the other provisions
  apply to employers with 15 or more employees. Louisiana law also prohibits discrimination,
  by employers with 20 or more employees, based on the sickle cell trait. Retaliation is also
  prohibited. Complaints are filed with the Louisiana Commission on Human Rights. Various
  notices must be posted.

  Caution: Some municipalities may have adopted city ordinances expanding EEO
  protections. Please check local laws for more details.

Family and Medical Leave (FMLA)


  Bone Marrow

  A Louisiana employer with 20 or more employees must grant paid leave, not to exceed 40
  hours, to any employee who works at least 20 hours per week and seeks to undergo a medical
  procedure to donate bone marrow. The employer may require physician verification before
  allowing the leave. An employer cannot retaliate against an employee who takes such leave.

  Pregnancy

  A Louisiana employer with 25 or more employees must allow a female employee to take up
  to four months of unpaid leave on account of pregnancy. The employee may use accrued
  vacation time and must give reasonable notice of the date and duration of the leave.

  Caution: Complying with the federal FMLA (and state law, if applicable) can be both
  challenging and confusing. You will likely want to contact your attorney, the Federal
  Department of Labor, or the appropriate state agency for further information and
  clarification.
Files and Access


  Employee Review of Files

  Any current or former employee or a designated representative has the right of access to
  employer's records of employee exposures to potentially toxic materials or harmful physical
  agents and employee medical records and any analyses using employee exposure or medical
  records.

Hiring Procedures


  Credit and Investigative Checks

  A Louisiana statute provides that any consumer who is denied employment because of
  information provided by a credit reporting agency may obtain a copy of the credit report
  without charge, provided that the individual requests the report in writing from the agency
  within 60 days of being denied credit by a third party.

  New Hire and Rehire Reporting Requirements

  A Louisiana employer must report all new hires and rehires to the state Department of Social
  Services, Office of Family Support. The report must be made within 20 days of hire or, if
  submitted electronically or magnetically, in two monthly transmissions not less than twelve
  nor more than sixteen days apart. The information to be reported is: the employee's name,
  address and social security number and the employer's name, address and federal
  identification number. A multi state employer may designate one state to which all reports
  will be made if notice is given to the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and
  Human Services. For more information, go to Louisiana’s New Hire Registry website at
  www.dss.state.la.us/html/new_hire_registry.html.

  Mandatory Background Checks

  Many states require mandatory background checks of applicants in certain highly sensitive
  areas such as in teaching, childcare, healthcare and security positions. Such checks may
  include criminal history and fingerprint checks, various reporting requirements, and requiring
  job references. Contact your local state agency or attorney for further information.

Holidays


  No Louisiana statute has been enacted requiring private employers to give employees paid
  holiday time off or to pay premium pay for time actually worked on holidays.
Jury, Witness, and Voting Leave


  Jury Leave

  A Louisiana employee cannot be discharged without cause while serving on jury duty.
  Employers must grant employees a leave of absence to perform jury duty. An employer must
  compensate an employee for up to one day’s pay for each term of jury service. An employer
  may not require an employee to use sick or personal leave or other benefits while on jury
  leave.

  Witness Leave

  An employer cannot discriminate against any employee who acts as a witness to provide
  information to any investigation of possible labor law violations.

  Voting Leave

  Louisiana has enacted no statute that requires private employers to provide voting leave to
  employers.

Labor-Management Relations
  Various labor relations laws allow and/or regulate the rights of employees to unionize,
  bargain collectively, file grievances, picket, strike, and wear union insignia and govern the
  resolution of labor disputes. Contact the Louisiana Department of Labor,
  www.ldol.state.la.us for more information. Note also that federal law governs, and in fact
  pre-empts, many aspects of this area of law.

Layoff and Reduction in Force


  No applicable Louisiana statute exists. Louisiana has not enacted a state "WARN" law or
  other legislation regarding layoffs. However, employers must still comply with the federal
  WARN Act.

Medical Testing and Examinations


  Drug (Alcohol) Testing

  Louisiana law governs the administration and use of drug testing by private employers.
  Employers subjected to federally mandated drug testing programs are not covered by the
  state law.
Employers must conduct drug testing in compliance with guidelines issued by the National
Institute on Drug Abuse ("NIDA"), including using cut off levels, established by NIDA
(except for marijuana), where the cut off shall be no less than fifty nanograms/ml.

Testing should be done pursuant to a written policy. An employer may test for the following
purposes:
   investigation of impairment,

   investigation of accidents,

   maintenance of safety or security, or

   maintenance of productivity.

Testing must conform to scientifically accepted analytical methods and procedures, including
confirmation of any positive result by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass
spectrometry or other comparable and reliable method. The employer must pay the costs of
required testing.

Collection procedures must consider proper sanitation and individual privacy. Collected
samples should be carefully labeled and marked to preclude erroneous identification or
adulteration. An employee should be allowed to present relevant information such as recent
use of prescription medication. Same gender direct observation of a person providing a urine
sample is allowed when: there is reason to believe the person may alter or substitute for the
sample; the individual has provided a sample outside the NIDA-acceptable temperature
range; the last sample provided by the person tested was verified by the medical review
officer as adulterated; doing follow-up testing on positive results; or when testing is done
post-accident or for reasonable cause.

The employer is allowed but not required to collect split samples. Splitting should be done in
view of the donor, with up to 60 ml retained in the second specimen bottle. Proper chain of
custody procedures must be observed for both bottles and the second sample must be
properly secured, stored and refrigerated. After a positive test, the employee is allowed to
request a test of the second sample at the employee's expense. If the second test results are
negative, the first positive results are cancelled.

Except for an employer who annually conducts 10,000 or more tests, confirmed positive
results of tests must first be reported to and reviewed by a medical review officer. An
employee with a confirmed positive result, within seven days of a written request, must be
given access to relevant test records. All information related to testing must be kept strictly
confidential.

Medical Examinations

A private employer must give an employee a copy of any written report from a required
medical examination within 30 days of the date of any written demand for the same. The
employer cannot charge the employee for a copy of the report. An employer cannot require
  an employee to pay the costs of a medical examination, drug test, records of fingerprinting
  required as a condition of employment. Violations of the law are punished with criminal
  sanctions.

  Genetic Testing

  Louisiana employers may not use genetic test information to discriminate against employees
  or job applicants. An employer should contact an attorney or the Department of Labor before
  implementing any genetic testing program.

  HIV Testing

  A private employer may not require an HIV test of an employee or applicant without first
  obtaining informed consent. All test results are considered confidential.

  Caution: In addition to state law, employers should also ensure that any testing undertaken
  conforms with federal law (e.g., the ADA and FMLA). Contact your attorney if you propose
  to undertake such testing.

Military Leave


  A Louisiana employer cannot discriminate against an employee because of membership
  obligations in the Louisiana National Guard or the United States Armed Forces. Such
  employees required to perform services must be allowed to use any amount or combination
  of accrued annual leave, paid military leave, vacation or compensatory time and must
  continue to accrue leave time as if not on leave. An employer may not deduct from such an
  employee's pay the cost of replacing the employee while on leave. Employees who have been
  on leave to serve in the National Guard or military reserve and have satisfactorily completed
  such service must be reinstated to the same or comparable employment without loss of
  seniority or benefits. If the employee who has been on leave is no longer qualified for the
  position formerly held, the employer should put the employee in a job the employee is
  qualified to perform. Employees on leave longer than five years do not have the same
  reinstatement rights. Employees must seek re-employment within certain time deadlines.

  Caution: Military leave legislation is complicated and technical. In addition to any
  applicable state law requirements, employers should ensure that they are in compliance with
  federal laws.

Noncompetition Agreements
  A Louisiana statute and case law govern the enforceability of noncompete agreements.
  Enforceable agreements must be for no more than two years, specify the parish or parishes or
  municipality or municipalities in which it applies, and specify the employer's business.
  Agreements may only limit competition in a business similar to the employer. Such
  agreements are strictly construed against the employer.
Overtime


   No Louisiana statute has been enacted that exceeds federal requirements requiring overtime
   payment of one and one-half times regular pay after 40 hours worked/week.

Political Activities


   A Louisiana employer with 20 or more employees may not forbid or prevent any of its
   employees from engaging or participating in politics or from becoming a candidate for public
   office or attempt to control or direct the political activities of employees or coerce or threaten
   employees on political matters. Violations of the law can result in employee lawsuits for
   damages.

Polygraph/Lie Detector Tests
   Louisiana has no statutory requirements that exceed federal requirements. Federal law states
   that the refusal to take a polygraph cannot be the basis for denying or terminating
   employment.

Reference Requests


   Protection for Employers

   Any employer that, upon request by a prospective employer or a current or former employee,
   provides accurate information about a current or former employee's job performance or
   reasons for separation is immune from civil liability and other consequences of such
   disclosure provided such employer is not acting in bad faith. An employer is considered to be
   acting in bad faith only if it can be shown by a preponderance of the evidence that the
   information disclosed was knowingly false and deliberately misleading.

   A Louisiana employer that is a financial institution may not be held liable for giving written
   reference information, including matters reported to federal regulators, when such
   information is also sent to the employee and unless the information is false and provided with
   knowledge of its falsity and malice.

   Other employers who provide accurate information at the request of a prospective employer
   are immune from liability unless they knowingly or recklessly provide false and misleading
   information. An employer who reasonably relies on reference information cannot be held
   liable for negligent hiring or retention.
Sick Leave


  No Louisiana statute requires employers to provide paid sick leave or to pay for accrued paid
  sick leave at termination.

  Caution: If sick leave is provided, employers should ensure that it is provided on a non-
  discriminatory basis and in accordance with established policy and practice.

Smoking


  Written Policy

  A Louisiana employer with 25 or more employees must have a written policy on smoking in
  the workplace which provides for: using existing structures and ventilation, accommodating
  the needs of smokers and nonsmokers and clearly marking nonsmoking areas. The policy
  must be posted and announced within three months of adoption.

  Use of Lawful Products Off the Premises

  A Louisiana employer cannot discriminate against an employee or applicant because the
  employee or applicant is a smoker or nonsmoker, provided the employee complies with
  applicable law and any workplace policy regulating smoking.

Termination Procedures


  Paychecks

  On termination of employment, final wages must be paid by the next regular payday or no
  later than 15 days following the date of discharge, whichever is first. Employees who resign
  must be paid on or before the next regular payday or 15 days after resignation, whichever
  comes first. Vacation pay will be considered due if, under the employer's policy, at the time
  of termination, the employee has an accrued right to vacation and has not taken it. Rights of
  continuation of health care coverage may also be available to the employee.

  Deceased Employees

  A Louisiana employer must pay wages, sick leave, annual leave or other benefits (not to
  exceed $6,000) that are due a deceased employee to the surviving spouse or, if none, to the
  major child.
Unemployment Compensation
  Extensive laws cover this area in Louisiana. Contact the Louisiana Department of Labor,
  www.ldol.state.la.us, for more information.

Vacations


  Payment at Termination

  Vacation pay will be considered due if, under the employer's policy, at the time of
  termination, the employee has an accrued right to vacation and has not taken it.

  Caution: If paid vacation leave is provided, employers should ensure that it is provided on a
  non-discriminatory basis and in accordance with established policy and practice.

Wages and Hours


  Paydays

  Private employers engaged in manufacturing of any kind, or engaged in boring for oil and in
  mining operations, that employ ten or more employees must pay employees as often as once
  every two weeks or twice during each calendar month. Paydays shall be two weeks apart as
  near as is practicable, and such payment or settlement shall include all amounts due for labor
  or services performed up to not more than ten days previous to the time of payment.

  Minimum Wage

  Louisiana has enacted no minimum wage provision that exceeds the federal minimum wage
  rate of $5.15 per hour.

  Withholding or Docking Pay

  A Louisiana employer may not make deductions from wages on account of fines. However,
  an employer may deduct actual losses where the employee pleads guilty or is convicted of
  stealing employer funds or where the employee willfully damages the goods or works of the
  employer. No deductions may be made for costs of required medical exams or furnishing
  records unless the employee terminates employment after less than 90 days.

  Garnishment

  75% of an employee’s disposable earnings for any week is exempt from garnishment, but in
  no case shall this exemption be less than an amount in disposable earnings which is equal to
  30 times the federal minimum hourly wage in effect at the time the earnings are payable.
  A Louisiana employer cannot discharge an employee solely because of an assignment or
  garnishment of wages.

  Direct Deposit

  A private employer may require an employee to use direct deposit.

  Living Wage

  A number of local governments (e.g. cities, towns, counties, school districts, etc.) have
  enacted laws known as “Living Wage” ordinances. These laws, although not always
  imposing the same types of requirements, typically mandate that any entity contracting or
  doing business with the local government or getting a tax abatement from the local
  government must pay its employees a set wage. The ordinances are typically called Living
  Wage ordinances because the set wage rate is typically much higher than the applicable
  minimum wage, thus better allowing the employees to live on the wage. If your business is
  within a jurisdiction that has passed a Living Wage ordinance and you are doing business
  with that jurisdiction, your business may be required to pay the mandated higher wage rates.

  The state of Louisiana has prohibited local governments from establishing minimum wage
  ordinances, and the Louisiana Supreme Court has upheld the prohibition. Consequently,
  living wage ordinances enacted in New Orleans and other jurisdictions are ineffective. For
  more information on developments in the living wage movement, go to
  www.livingwage.com.

Whistleblower Protection
  A Louisiana employer cannot retaliate against any employee who, acting in good faith, does
  any of the following:
     discloses or threatens to disclose a reasonable belief of illegal activity;

     provides information to a public body conducting an investigation; or

     objects or refuses to participate in any violation of law.

  Violations of this law may be redressed by a civil lawsuit.

Workers’ Compensation
  Extensive laws cover this area in Louisiana. Contact the Office of Workers' Compensation
  Administration, www.ldol.state.la.us/sec2owca.asp, for more information.
Required Posters
  Listed below are the current listings for government agencies from which required posters
  can be obtained. Posters frequently can be obtained free of charge. Poster requirements may
  change from time to time, and employers should check to assure up to date compliance.

  Required Federal Posters
        Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Minimum Wage
        Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
        Job Safety and Health Protection – Occupational Safety and Health
        Equal Employment Opportunity Act
        Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act (MSPA)
        Notice to Work with Disabilities (FLSA, SCA, and Walsh-Healey Act)
        Employee Polygraph Protection Act (EPPA)

  These posters can be accessed at                the   Department    of   Labor    website:
  www.dol.gov/osbp/sbrefa/poster/main.htm.

  Required Louisiana Posters and Contacts


    Sickle Cell Anemia                           Civil Rights Bureau
                                                  755 Third Street
                                                  Baton Rouge, LA 70802
                                                  225-342-2700
                                                  www.dss.state.la.us/index.htm


    Fair Employment and Age Discrimination       Louisiana Dept. of Labor
                                                  P.O. Box 94094
    Minor Labor Laws                             Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9094
                                                  225-342-3280
    Notice of Compliance to Employees            www.ldol.state.la.us

    Workers’     Compensation            Fraud
     (recommended)

    Unemployment Insurance

    Out-of-state Motor Vehicle Registration

    Smoking

    Genetic Testing

				
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