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The Salvation Army Letchworth Garden City NEWSLETTER June 2010 www

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The Salvation Army Letchworth Garden City NEWSLETTER June 2010 www Powered By Docstoc
					            The Salvation Army
                Letchworth Garden City
           NEWSLETTER
                              June 2010
                        www.letchworthcorps.co.uk


                       MAIN EVENT
                News from the Main Event
                     3-4th July 2010
 The Main Event is an all age, family event run by the Salvation Army in
the London North East Division. That means we at Letchworth Corps
are included!!

Building on the success of a previous event held in 2007 this year
promises to be bigger and better with an improved programme of
sports activities, more venues, more seminars, more covered space,
more food (something many of you have been asking about!) and
much more fun for all!!

So what is the Main Event? The Main Event is a celebration of praise
for our families, friends, and above all our relationship with Jesus. It
promises to be a life-changing weekend.

On Sunday 4th July there will be no meetings in our hall at Letchworth.
We are hoping as many of you as possible will obtain tickets for the
Main Event, if you need transport, please see Gerald Birkett when he
returns from holiday and he will make every effort to arrange some for
you.

Our older young people have already made arrangements to attend
and our Songsters and Young Peoples Band are taking part on
Sunday. So please do come along for a chance to see The Salvation
Army as it is today outside of Letchworth.


                                                    Captain Barrie.
                          Update
                         Congratulations....
....to Reg and Brenda Smith who will be celebrating their Golden Wedding
anniversary on 4 June whilst they are in Jerusalem with Andy and Gwen Cox
and their Holy Land Tour,
....to Bandmaster David Fisher who celebrates his 50th birthday on the 9th,
....and to Stuart Elliott who celebrates his 50th birthday on the 17th.

                        Long Service Award
Bandmaster David Fisher has been presented with a long service award by the
Salvation Army Symphonic Wind Ensemble (SASWE). As a founder member of
SASWE, David has played with them for the past 17 years.

                           Major Robinson
Captain Sharon Robinson has been promoted to Major and we offer her our
congratulations and good wishes in her continued ministry in Weston-super-
Mare.
                              STOP PRESS
After a very long illness, David James has been promoted to glory from the
Foxhill Nursing Home in Hitchin. The funeral will be in our hall on 9 June and
will be conducted by Captain Barrie.


             What’s on this month
 th
6     10.30am Coffee 11am All Age Service
      5.30pm Commanding Officers
 th
7     2.15pm Afternoon Tea and Bring & Buy Sale
      7.45pm Ladies Fellowship
 th
8       10am Corps Bible Study
   th
12    10am—12 noon Messy Church
   th
13    10am Lt Colonel Sandy Morrice
      5.30pm Lt Colonels Sandy and Maureen Morrice
   th
19    Songsters at Luton - 7.30pm Music for a Summer’s Evening, tenor
        horn soloist Philip Fisher
   th
20    10am Ladies Fellowship Secretary Maureen Carver
        5.30pm Bandsman Nick Carver
   th
26    Band at All Saints Church, Sutton, Biggleswade, at 7pm
   th
27    10am and 5.30pm Majors Nigel and Linda Govier, THQ
30th    House Group Fellowship, details to be confirmed
               Musical Evenings in June
If you would like to hear some good music this month, both our Band
and Songsters have engagements to which you are welcome to come
and attend.

On Saturday the 19th, our Songsters will be taking part in ‘Music for a
summer’s Evening’ at the Salvation Army in Luton and the evening
starts at 7.30pm. Our own Philip Fisher will be the instrumental soloist
on his tenor horn, and the well known contralto singer Susan Turner
from Stowmarket, will be the vocal soloist, and an instrumental quintet
will perform. It promises to be a good evening.

If banding is your scene, our Band will be giving a varied programme
at All Saints Church in the village of Sutton, near Biggleswade on
the following Saturday, the 26th.

All Saints Church dates back to the 13th century, so it will make a
lovely venue for the concert. I wonder if this is the first time that a
Salvation Army band has played there.

Come along for a good evening of Christian music-making, starting at
7pm.

                          Going for Gold

Ben Carver is preparing for his Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award, which
will take the form of an expedition in Snowdonia in October.

He has already completed training sessions on camp craft, tenting, and
night navigation with very small lights. On June 26 he undertakes
training at Ampthill Park in navigation without maps.

All this knowledge will no doubt come in very useful for Ben when he
goes with fellow students at Knights Templar School in July on an
expedition to the Himalayas.

More of that next month
                     United Kingdom Territory Annual Review

Lifting Lives: The Salvation Army's Annual Review 2009

'Lifting and enriching human lives is at the heart of what The Salvation Army
does'

Community involvement, work with young people and social action are some of the
highlights in The Salvation Army's Annual Review for the financial year 2008/ 2009.

Taking the theme ‘lifting lives', the 20-page A4 report features the many and varied
social welfare and church activities undertaken by The Salvation Army in
communities across the UK Territory with the Republic of Ireland.

Lifting Lives: The Salvation Army's Annual Review reveals the church and registered
charity, which is one of the largest providers of social welfare in the UK and Ireland
after the government, spent £125m on social welfare and community programmes in
2008/ 2009.

The report includes the creation of The Sandwich People social enterprise run from
The Salvation Army's Booth House Lifehouse in Swindon, the launch of The Seeds of
Exclusion research with the University of Kent and Cardiff University into social
exclusion and a new emergency response vehicle donated by FedEx Corporation to
serve the Heathrow and Greater London area.

Lieut-Colonel Marion Drew, The Salvation Army's Secretary for Communications,
says: ‘The Annual Review is a compelling presentation of what The Salvation Army is
achieving in the lives of people, families and communities in the UK, Ireland and
around the world. We have a tremendously diverse expression, which the report helps
to capture as well as to explain our Christian motivation to lift up and to enrich lives
by actively serving the community and working for social justice.'

Lifting Lives: The Salvation Army's Annual Review is aimed at all stakeholders,
including government departments, local authorities, ecumenical contacts, funders,
staff and supporters. This review is the story of our work over the past, eventful year.
It shows how we have taken our Christian faith into communities across the UK and
worldwide, and turned it into action to lift and improves people's lives.

NB You can download a copy of the review from www1.salvationarmy.org.uk
                          HISTORY LESSON

Who thinks history isn’t fun and isn’t interesting? Just read the following facts
and make up your own mind.

The next time you are washing your hands and complain that the water isn’t
hot enough, think about how things used to be! Here are some facts about the
1500’s:

...Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May,
and they still smelled pretty good by June! However since they were staring to
smell....brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odour. Hence the
custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting married.

...Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had
the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the
women and finally the children. Last of all the babies. By then the water was
so dirty you could actually lose someone in it! Hence the saying, ‘Don’t throw
the baby out with the bath water’.

...House had thatched roofs—thick straw piled high—with no wood
underneath. It was a place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other
small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery,
and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof. Hence the saying,
‘It’s raining cats and dogs’.

...There was nothing to stop things falling into the house. This posed a real
problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your
nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top
afforded some protection. That’s how canopy beds came into existence.

...The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence
the saying, ‘Dirt poor’. The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in
the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on the floor to help keep
their footing. As the winter wore on, they spread more thresh until when you
opened the door, it would spill outside. A piece of wood was placed across the
entrance, hence ‘a threshold’.

...Most people did not get much meat to eat, but occasionally they would get
some pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they
would hang up the bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man could
‘bring home the bacon’. They would cut off a little to share with the guests and
they would all sit around and ‘chew the fat’.
History Lesson—continued
...Those with money had plates of pewter. Food with high acid content caused
some of the lead to leach on to the food, causing death by lead poisoning.
This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so,
tomatoes were considered poisonous!

...Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the
loaf, the family got the middle, and the guests got the top, or ‘upper crust’.


...England is old and small and the local people started running out of places
to bury people. So they would dig up coffins, take the bones to a bone-house
and re-use the grave. When opening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were
found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realised they had been
burying people alive! So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead
it through the coffin, up through the ground, and tie it to a bell. Someone would
have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift) to listen for the
bell. Thus, someone could be ‘saved by the bell’ or was considered to be ‘a
dead ringer’.

And that’s the truth. Whoever said history was boring!?




                           Monday 7th June
                              2.15pm

                           Afternoon Tea
                                  &
                         Bring & Buy Sale
                            In aid of the
                       Helping Hands Appeal

       The Cost for this Special Afternoon will be
                          £3.00

                         Everyone Welcome
                BE STRONG IN THE GRACE OF
                        THE LORD
         Let us continue to pray for:   Worship
Don and Vi Stevenson, Len Cole,         Jesus indicated the importance of
Lily Pryke, Jared Trice.                worship in his prayer for his
Sam Sweetman, battling ill health       disciples. “Our father in heaven,
again. Captains Barrie and Maria        hallowed be your name....” This
Sampson; the situation in Chile,        involves worship, to hallow God’s
Haiti, Afghanistan.                     name is to honour it above all
All our young people involved in        other names. When done with
exams, at whatever level.               sincerity you will not help but to
                                        worship for what and who he is.
What a wonderful privilege - we         When you go to God in prayer,
can actually talk with God! Think of    remember you bare all in his divine
it! The heavenly father has told us     presence. Offer the God of all
to come to him with our needs, our      creation the worship he duly
praise, and our heartfelt desires.      deserves. Take time out to reflect
Yes, we can pray to God. He is          on his greatness. As you does,
listening!                              your spirit will be uplifted and your
Yet isn’t it strange that though we     sense of God’s presence will
have God’s gracious invitation to       increase. The Lord himself will
come to the ‘throne of grace’ so        receive     your    adoration     and
few of us do. What’s wrong?             worship.
I’d like to suggest that there are      (Next month: - Thanksgiving and
five basic elements of prayer to        Confession)
help us with content, not merely
contact. The five are worship,          Augustine said: “We pray not in
thanksgiving,           confession,     order that God may be instructed,
petition, and intercession.        I    but in order that we may be
would share with you some               constructed.
thoughts under each heading this
month and in future months:-

                             Can you help?
We currently do not have enough volunteer helpers at our Care and Share
shop. Can you spare a morning or an afternoon to help with this very
worthwhile service?
It is more than just raising much needed funds for our community work - it
provides help and support to many members of the community and is an
expression of The Salvation Army’s service to the local community.

If you can help, or if you know someone who could, please see Captains
Barrie or Maria.

				
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