Docstoc

Exam Review

Document Sample
Exam Review Powered By Docstoc
					      Exam 1 Review

PSY 400, Cognitive Neuroscience



       October 12, 2010
                   Housekeeping




• Exam is October 19, Review is today,
• Decety is October 14.
                       Jean Decety




                  Jean Decety, U of Chicago
“The contribution of emotion and cognition to moral sensitivity:
              a neuro-developmental approach”


          Oct. 14th, 2-3pm Gifford Auditorium; HBS
       Some remarks on the problem set




• Raw score (in red), added 1 point.
• 3 As, 9 Bs, 5 Cs (prior to corrections)
• We can all do better.
• Shall we talk about the problems?
                   Exam Conduct




• No phones, hand-held devices
• No books or notes, retrieving stuff from bags
• No leaving your seat without permission
• Note that there are a great many wrong answers
• I will prosecute exam misconduct aggresively
A special note about last-minute emergencies




• I don’t usually go for these, but sometimes stuff really does
  happen.
• You should be able to prove it.
• You should make every possible effort to contact me before
  the exam.
                    Strategic factors




• There will be questions that you don’t know the answer
  to...i test your ability to reason and extrapolate.
• Do not adopt a “bag of words” strategy—if you say things
  that are false or nonsense, you will not get points (and may
  lose some).
• The exam is graded blind.
                      Don’t despair!




The exam is intended to be hard—missing a lot of questions
doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to get a “bad” grade.
Do not give up on the exam because you don’t know the
answers to a bunch of questions.
                   Graph questions




• Do not adopt the strategy of making a squiggly line and
  hope part of it goes where I want it to—this will not be
  rewarded.
• If you are concerned about your drawing ability, it is fair to
  write a verbal description of what you’re trying to draw as
  well. These must correspond and the verbal description
  must be correct (picture 1000 words etc).
We’re going to have “wiring questions”
                         Overview



• Introduction to Neurobiology
• Neuroimaging
• Sensory Principles
• Vision
• The other senses
• Chapter 9: Decision-making, conjunctive coding and
  movement initiation.
           Introduction to Neurobiology




• Parts of neurons, brain.
• Basis of resting potential
• Action potential
• Synaptic transmission
              Neuroimaging methods




• (Lesions)
• Intracellular/extracellular recordings
• PET
• TMS
• fMRI
• EEG/MEG
Neuroimaging methods
            What is a double dissociation?




. . . and what is the method of subtraction?
       Principles of sensory processing




• Physical stimulus enhancement
• Sensory transduction
• Adaptation (fast and slow)
• Acuity
• Modularity, topographic organization, magnification
                  Adaptation
Slow adaptation
                  Adaptation
Fast adaptation
Acuity and magnification
Modularity
                          Vision




• Lateral inhibition and receptive fields
• Color vision and opponency (what’s this like)
• Illusions (what are they? what could they mean?)
• Motion perception and aftereffects (what’s this like).
Two eyes, two sides of the world
On-center off-surround cells
On-center off-surround cells
Color receptors and perception
Color constancy
Color constancy
How would you wire a red+/green- cell?
Can we make sense of these?
                     Other senses




• Hearing: tonotopic map, decomposability of sounds,
  localization of sound
• Mechanosensory perception: on-center/off-surround
  cutaneous fields, pencil illusion, vestibular sense, plasticity
  of receptive fields
Computation and Cognition in Motor Systems




• Decision-making
• Conjunctive coding of movements
• Movement initiation
Motion decision
from Gold & Shadlen, 2007
Movement initiation circuit
Movement initiation circuit II
        Parkinson’s and movement initiation




In Parkinson’s Disease, dopaminergic cells in the substantia
pars compacta die, . . . which leaves the caudate and putamen
less active, . . . which means the pallidus and substantia nigra
pars reticulata remain active, . . . which means the thalamus
keeps being inhibited.
        Parkinson’s and movement initiation




In Parkinson’s Disease, dopaminergic cells in the substantia
pars compacta die, . . . which leaves the caudate and putamen
less active, . . . which means the pallidus and substantia nigra
pars reticulata remain active, . . . which means the thalamus
keeps being inhibited.
        Parkinson’s and movement initiation




In Parkinson’s Disease, dopaminergic cells in the substantia
pars compacta die, . . . which leaves the caudate and putamen
less active, . . . which means the pallidus and substantia nigra
pars reticulata remain active, . . . which means the thalamus
keeps being inhibited.
        Parkinson’s and movement initiation




In Parkinson’s Disease, dopaminergic cells in the substantia
pars compacta die, . . . which leaves the caudate and putamen
less active, . . . which means the pallidus and substantia nigra
pars reticulata remain active, . . . which means the thalamus
keeps being inhibited.
                     Awakenings




• How did they get the patients with encephalitis lethargica
  to move?
• Why did these allow movement initiation in terms of the
  neural circuit?
                      Assignment




• I’ll have office hours Friday.
• Hope to see you Thursday—it will be on the exam.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:7
posted:8/27/2011
language:English
pages:40