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Agenda October 21_ 2008

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									Board
of
Education
       Agenda
           meeting of



  October 21, 2008




  Aurora Public Schools
        1085 Peoria Street
      Aurora, Colorado 80011
                                  AURORA PUBLIC SCHOOLS
                                     1085 Peoria St.
                                    Aurora, CO 80011

                                     AGENDA
                                 BOARD OF EDUCATION
                                   October 21, 2008
                                      6:30 p.m.

                                      I – PRELIMINARY

A.   CALL TO ORDER

     1.     Roll Call

B.   PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

C.   WELCOME TO VISITORS

     The regular meeting of the Aurora Public Schools Board of Education will convene in the Dr.
     Edward and Mrs. Patricia Lord Boardroom of Educational Services Center 4. Individuals
     wishing to address the Board of Education on a specific agenda item are requested to sign
     up at the table on the south side of the boardroom prior to discussion of the Information and
     Action Items. Individuals wishing to address the Board of Education on a non-agenda item
     are requested to sign up and will be provided an opportunity, limited to three minutes, at the
     beginning of the meeting and, limited to three minutes, at the end of the meeting during
     Opportunity for Audience.

     Please contact the Aurora Public Schools at 303-344-8060, ext. 28988 if, because of a
     disability, you require special assistance (such as sign language or oral interpreting services)
     in order to participate in a meeting of the Board of Education. Persons with such needs are
     requested to make contact at least one week prior to the Board of Education meeting, if
     possible, in order to allow staff to coordinate arrangements.

D.   APPROVAL OF AGENDA

     The October 21, 2008, agenda is presented for approval.

E.   APPROVAL OF MINUTES

     The minutes of the regular meeting of the Board of Education held on October 7, 2008, are
     presented for approval.

F.   STUDENT PERFORMANCE

     Students from South Middle School will perform a musical selection at the October 21 Board
     of Education meeting.

G.   OPPORTUNITY FOR AUDIENCE




                                                1
October 7, 2008, Minutes
                                                                       October 7, 2008



                               I. PRELIMINARY

      Cook called the October 7, 2008, meeting to order at 6:32 p.m.

Roll Call

      The following members were present:

            Matt Cook, president
            Jeanette Carmany, vice president
            Jane Barber, secretary
            Peter Cukale, treasurer
            Judith Edberg, director
            Mary W. Lewis, director
            Amy Prince, director

      Also meeting with the Board of Education were:

            John L. Barry, superintendent of schools
            Lisa Escárcega, chief accountability and research officer
            Rod Weeks, chief financial officer
            Damon Smith, director of classified and licensed employees
            Anthony Sturges, chief operating officer
            Tonia Norman, assistant to Board of Education

Pledge of Allegiance

      Cook led the Board and audience in the pledge to the flag. He then welcomed
      visitors to the meeting.

Approval of Agenda

      The October 7, 2008, agenda was approved as written.

Approval of Minutes

      The minutes of the regular meeting of the Board of Education held September
      16, 2008, were approved as written.

Opportunity for Audience

                              II. INFORMATION ITEMS

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

      Reports from the Board of Education

      Barber was privileged to be in the audience as Congressional Medal of Honor
      recipient Gordon Roberts addressed students and staff at East Middle School.
      The kids were well behaved and the school was decorated nicely.

      Barber attended the joint town hall meeting sponsored by the Hispanic
      Scholarship Fund and APS on Thursday, September 17. More than 800 people
      attended the event. Well done!

      Barber also had the opportunity to attend the grand opening celebration at
                                        8511
                                                                    October 7, 2008



Crossroads and a play at Hinkley.

Barber read a statement in which she thanked and recognized classified
employees throughout the district. Please know that your contributions do not
always receive the numeration and recognition deserved but your contributions
are valued and appreciated.

Prince attended the Medal of Honor Ceremony for Thomas Kelley at Gateway.
Kelley’s speech was very touching and the kids were great.

Prince attended the Anschutz grant kickoff celebration on September 24. She
was very excited to see all of the students from the Aurora LIGHTS Program at
the kickoff celebration.

Prince was privileged to attend the grand opening celebration for the Kid’s Clinic
at Crawford. She thanked Edberg for pushing the district to open the health
clinic for APS students. It is long overdue.

Prince had an opportunity to attend a choir concert at Mrachek Middle School.
The concert was packed and the kids were wonderful.

Lewis also attended the grand opening celebration for the Kid’s Clinic at
Crawford. Students from ten schools will benefit from the clinic. Lewis thanked
Edberg and Mary Beth Rensberger for all their efforts to get the clinic open.

Lewis shared that more than 500 volunteers passed out literature and placed
signs in yards in support of the 3A and 3B campaign. She asked everyone to
vote in support of 3A and 3B.

Lewis thanked and recognized classified employees throughout the district. She
was especially grateful to school secretaries, who are often the first contact in the
building and school custodians, who work so hard to ensure the building is clean
and well-maintained for staff, parents and community members. Lewis shared a
quote from author Ann Lamont in that “librarians and teachers have a place at
the table in heaven near the dessert table.” This is true for teachers and all
district staff, especially librarians who are often classified employees.

Edberg spoke at the grand opening celebration for the Kid’s Clinic at Crawford
and was thrilled that the program has finally become a reality. It has been a
combined effort of so many agencies and individuals including: University of
Health Sciences Center; Aurora Mental Health Center; dental care agencies;
APS school nurses: principals, district staff and community members. It has
been exciting to work with all of the different groups to get the clinic up and
running. Edberg thanked Mary Beth Rensberger for all her help and support.
What a thrilling day it was.

Edberg attended the grand opening celebration at Crossroads. This center
houses two special education programs. It is exciting to see both programs in
one building.

Edberg thanked all of the volunteers who passed out flyers in support of 3A and
3B on Saturday. Volunteers had placed flyers on her own door by the time she
arrived home from passing out flyers in the Gateway attendance area on
Saturday morning.

Carmany expressed “hats off” to the ACES team for the phenomenal job they did
                                    8512
                                                                    October 7, 2008



recruiting and organizing volunteers to pass out literature and yard signs in
support of 3A and 3B on Saturday. She volunteered at Hinkley and shared how
they could not handout literature and yard signs fast enough for the many
volunteers. Like Edberg, flyers were on her door and signs had been placed in
many yards throughout the district by the time she arrived home on Saturday
afternoon.

Carmany was touched by the awarding of the Anschutz Medical Grant and the
excitement of the kids in the Aurora LIGHTS Program. The community came
together and awarded APS the largest grant of its kind in the country.

Carmany had an opportunity to attend the grand opening celebration at
Crossroads and the Congressional Medal of Honor ceremony for Gordon
Roberts at Hinkley.

Carmany and Barber attended Pinwheels for Peace at Kenton Elementary. What
kids think peace represents is so different from what adults think peace
represents. Kids hope for peace at home and peace for their animals as well as
food, clothes and shelter. It brings into perspective what adults need to think
about to provide peace for their kids.

Hats off to all of the classified employees for all they do to support the district. A
special thanks to school bus drivers, who are often the first person who kids see
in the morning as well as school secretaries and custodians, who many teachers
know run the building. We could not do our jobs without the support of classified
employees.

Cukale also recognized and thanked classified staff throughout the district.

Cukale had an opportunity to be the honorary coin flipper at the Hinkley/Gateway
football game. It was an enjoyable game and Gateway won, 28 to 14.

Cukale attended math night at Paris Elementary. It was phenomenal watching
kids playing games and teaching their parents how to use number sense. It was
an enjoyable week.

Cook attended the 25th anniversary celebration and open house at Rangeview
High School. Principal Turner and staff did a superb job summarizing 25 years
of history at Rangeview.

Hats off to everyone involved in the APS middle school swim championships.
Close to 400 swimmers and 1,000 parents attended the event hosted by Aurora
Central.

Cook announced the new arrival of Jason Thomas Cook, class of 2026. He also
wished happy birthday to Jeanette Carmany and Superintendent John Barry.

Lewis and Edberg both shared that while vacationing out-of-town, relatives had
either heard about or watched Superintendent John Barry on World News
Tonight with Brian Williams. Barry is a fellow of the Broad Academy, which
provides training for proven leaders aspiring to be district superintendents.

Items of Current Interest

Barry congratulated the APS School Services Department and APS family
liaisons for their success with the first Hispanic Scholarship Community Meeting.
                                     8513
                                                                October 7, 2008



Nearly 1,000 parents and students attended the event. This was an outstanding
parent and community involvement occasion.

Thanks to Coldwater Creek for donating $1,000 to Vassar Elementary School. In
addition to the donation, Coldwater staff members will be reading to Vassar
students twice a month and setting a book donation box at their store. Barry
presented Vassar Elementary School Principal Stacey Stuart with a coin for
Stacy Lohse.

The Old Chicago Restaurant and the Rock Bottom Foundation are new partners
with Yale Elementary School. Recently, they provided lunch to Yale staff for an
in-service day and each month they supply lunch for Yale’s Star Students. The
restaurant also held “Yale School Nights,” where they donated 10 percent of the
sales to the school. At Christmas, they will provide gifts for 100 Yale families
through the Giving Tree Program. APS is excited about this partnership and are
very thankful for their contributions and generosity. Barry asked Rock Bottom
Foundation representative Chad Daelow to come forward to receive a
Superintendent recognition coin.

The Aurora Police Department School Resource Officers who serve APS are
some of the best in the country. This group was recently selected as a "National
Model Agency" by the National Association of School Resource Officers. For the
past 13 years, APS and APD have worked together to keep students and staff
safe. Lt. Mike Shultz of APD was present to accept recognition of this honor on
behalf of district SROs. Congratulations!

Recognition of Colorado Classified School Employees Week

Cook asked members of the Classified Employees Council to come forward as
he read a proclamation in recognition of Colorado Classified School Employees
Week.

                            PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, the Colorado Classified School Employees are an essential part of
the Aurora Public Schools education system; and

WHEREAS, classified employees are dedicated to assisting in the provision of
quality education for the students of Aurora Public Schools; and

WHEREAS, the classified employees of our school district perform the daily
cleaning and maintenance of school property, safely transport students to and
from school, prepare and serve nourishing lunches, maintain records and
reports, assist in classrooms and on school playgrounds; and perform a variety of
other tasks on behalf of our children; and

WHEREAS, it is appropriate for the Aurora Public Schools to recognize the role
classified school employees hold in our education system and to salute them for
the valuable service they provide to our students and to our communities; and

NOW, THEREFORE, we, the Aurora Public Schools Board of Education,
proclaim October 12 through October 18, 2008, as

                 Colorado Classified School Employees Week


                                   8514
                                                                      October 7, 2008



     In recognition of Colorado Classified School Employees Week, the Board held a
     drawing to select schools and sites to receive lunch on behalf of the Board. Sites
     selected were: Crawford, Fulton, Columbia, North, and Hinkley.

     Thank you classified employees for all you do to support APS students, parents,
     staff and the community.

DIVISION OF ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESEARCH

     No Items

DIVISION OF FINANCE

     No Items

DIVISION OF HUMAN RESOURCES

     No Items

DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES

     K-12 Math Program

     Escárcega invited Dave Schoenhals and Rachael Rishley, math instructional
     coordinators, to the staff table to present information on the K-12 math program.
     Linda Damon, director of professional learning, and Amy Weed, director of
     student achievement, were also present.

     Rishley introduced Michelle Totman, teacher at Rangeview High School; Joanne
     Carroll, teacher at South Middle School; Kim Komar, teacher at Jewell
     Elementary; and Elaine Karubus, teacher at Jewell Elementary.

     Schoenhals reviewed slides of CSAP data showing student math proficiency
     percentages over the past few years. We are not happy with the percentage of
     proficient students in APS but are encouraged with the positive trends and
     significant increases seen at both the elementary and middle school levels. We
     are making progress at the ninth grade level but still have some work to do at the
     tenth grade level. Progress that has occurred at the secondary level is due in
     part to equity created by moving all math classrooms to grade level content.

     Rishley presented a clip from “Ma and Pa Kettle” highlighting adults using
     number sense. She shared that APS follows the six Colorado State Standards
     for grades K-12. Each standard is named by content as follows:

        number sense
        algebra
        probability and statistics
        geometry
        measurement
        computation

     Each standard contains a process standard that ends with the requirement that
     students must understand the content in problem solving and communicate
     reasoning used to solve it. Students are asked to problem solve every day, in
     every activity and in every content area. This is supported by the Colorado State
                                        8515
                                                                  October 7, 2008



Standards.

The Board was provided with examples of CSAP released items from the
elementary and high school levels to get a sense of what is expected from math
students. Schoenhals reviewed an example of a ninth-grade math level problem
representing integration of statistics algebra and computation. Students are
expected to use an equation in which they have the answer to and explain how
they came to it, and provide the meaning of the slope within the context of the
problem to demonstrate and communicate thinking and make sense of the math
in the given context. The work that we are doing with students is related to
number sense and problem solving that is expected on the CSAP test.

Komar reviewed examples of multiplication clusters used as starters at the fifth-
grade level. Students in her fifth grade class were having problems with clusters
because they did not know basic multiplication facts. Komar provided each
student with a basic multiplication fact inventory broken out by different sections
that tested a different strand in mathematic facts. Ninety-two percent of students
were proficient in multiplication groups of 10; eight percent were partially
proficient in multiplication groups of 10. In multiplication groups of nine, 19
percent of students were proficient; 15 percent of students were partially
proficient; and 66 percent of students had a basic understanding. Students did
not have multiplication facts memorized and did not have a strategy to problem
solve. A variety of models, methods, and formats were reviewed to help with
student understanding and learning, including the array visual that uses four
multiplication groups of 10 and four multiplication groups of nine. Students used
the visual to problem solve multiplication clusters by adding four groups of 10
and subtracting as needed to form an answer. The array visual helped students
gain understanding and 22 out of 26 students were able to grasp the strategy.

Lewis asked if students received multiplication instruction as late as fifth grade.
Komar replied that multiplication is taught at all grade levels. Through the
models, kids are making sense and using more reasoning to problem solve.
Prince shared that her son is in Ms. Komar’s fifth-grade class and is getting math
so much quicker.

Karubus is a former teacher leader in literacy and presently teaches third grade
math at Jewell. Math instruction has changed dramatically and we are teaching
more of an understanding, process and application in problem solving. Karubus
and Komar participated in a grant that was awarded to Jewell to develop
additional professional development for math instruction. Through the grant,
teachers were able to study specific strands such as number sense and have
vertical dialogs with each other. We learned that what we taught affects and
impacts each grade level. Students learn to add in equal groups in second
grade; we want them to have mastery of it by the fifth grade. We hope that basic
addition facts have been mastered by the third grade.

Karubus gave her third-grade students an addition inventory clustered by
strategies. None of the students were proficient but many were right on the cusp.
Strategies were developed such as “make 10 and add what is leftover” to help
with student understanding. Ten is considered to be a friendly number in the
primary grade levels. Karubus uses a 10-frame model as well as flashcards to
help students reason and problem solve. Students also write strategies to
increase understanding.

Cook asked if strategies were more of a mastery of what is occurring in lieu of
lining up numbers and working the problem. Komar replied that there is nothing
                                   8516
                                                                    October 7, 2008



wrong with lining up numbers and working the problem. The learning/forgetting
cycle has been fairly well documented among students in that by the end of
second grade, 99 percent of students are proficient with all of their facts. By the
time the student enters third grade, only 45 percent are proficient with all of their
facts. Students did not have a strategy to fall back on. This is a much stronger
model to help kids remember and we have a lot more research on how the brain
succeeds in memorizing and knowing. The way parents were taught math is not
wrong but it is more helpful for kids to know these strategies.

Lewis commented that new strategies are aligned with CSAP questions.
Escárcega noted that kids were having trouble with constructive responses on
the CSAP test. Rishley shared that students are now responsible for a lot more
than answers. We are trying to enhance our students’ abilities to retain and build
from year to year as opposed to continually reteaching the same concepts.

Both Prince and Cukale encouraged parents to attend an elementary math night
to get a better sense and understanding of models and strategies.

Carroll is a teacher at South and has seen positive changes as a result of how
math is now taught. The math pacing guides have helped determine placement
of kids transferring within APS. The big ideas in math pacing guides allow
teachers to determine what we want to do and how we want to accomplish it.
We have content planning a couple of times a week and it feels like we have
become a learning organization where both teachers and kids are growing.

Totman is a teacher at Rangeview and agrees with Carroll in regard to positive
changes and growth seen in both students and teachers. In the past, teachers
were continually reteaching the same standards to kids. We are now teaching
and hitting the six standards multiple times in ninth, tenth and eleventh grades
and kids are getting it. Schoenhals also taught at Rangeview and shared that
when curriculum was not working, it was changed. How we teach is the most
important piece of what teachers do.

Rishley shared that we have high quality curriculum as well as K-12 instructional
models that overlays any curriculum. We have had good success in putting
math models in place across all grade levels and have consistent K-12 staff
development to give teachers time to learn instructional models. Schoenhals
concurred that APS students have consistency across all grade levels. We are
putting our students first.

Komar has number talks built around computation and number sense with
students each day for about 15 minutes. She shared two examples of student
work from the number talk checkup that she provides with students each Friday.
Students sit on the floor during the oral checkup as Komar projects number talks
utilizing the model on the board. They are given time to think, form an answer
and share out with a partner in order to provide time to rehearse and practice.
Komar walks around the room to review strategies and select students to share
out with the entire class. Strategies are then documented on the whiteboard.

Karubus added that kids have a tremendous bank of strategies that they can rely
on to connect to math and solve problems. It is also exciting to see the
connection between literacy and math.

Komar added that the entire fifth grade team is using the models and we are
taking part in collaborative coaching and learning. We are working with our
teacher leader and math coach to build our understanding of strategies that the
                                    8517
                                                                   October 7, 2008



kids use to work toward fluency in their multiplication facts. It has been a
tremendous help working with other teachers as well as math and teacher
leaders to gain understanding.

Prince asked if teachers used algorithms at all. Komar shared that some
teachers are using it. It is fine as long students can use reasoning and fully
understand the problem. Karubus shared that it is discouraged at the third grade
level because kids are at the beginning stages of understanding and it becomes
more of a trick than an understanding.

Carroll commented that kids are part of a larger learning organization. Teachers
at South made a commitment this week to further develop number talks and are
splitting talks to address patterns and move around different topics. Part of the
math period is dedicated to numeracy and number sense, so students have a
chance to warm up to math and practice multiplication. Students play math
games during the period so Carroll can work with kids in small groups.

Totman shared that at the high school level we do a three-part lesson, which
includes launch, explore and summarize. Students summarize in groups or in
pairs to help them retain learning and engagement. Students now have a
common base and take ownership of their learning. It also helps teachers
monitor student learning.

Rishley thanked all of the teachers for taking the time to present information to
the Board.

Carmany asked how students who have not been exposed to integrated math in
elementary and middle schools are transitioning to it and what is happening to
their scores. Escárcega shared that historically when we disaggregate data for
new students, scores are always lower. It has never been noted that the
difference is higher for high school math. Part of the reason for the drop is due to
kids moving from school to school but we cannot discern whether the drop is due
to the curriculum.

Schoenhals shared that we have had connective math for the last five years and
kids transferring within APS should have been learning connective math. Some
kids that were learning the traditional approach and are now learning the
integrated approach have shared that math now makes sense and they have a
better understanding of it. Escárcega added that we have not seen drops in test
scores.

Carmany commented that it often takes a year or two to understand new teaching
processes. What are we offering to students who do not understand the new
approach? Rishley shared that one of the things we take seriously is
individualization regardless of program or content. We know our kids and will
change approaches in small groups or try to create a program within the program
to help with individual learning and understanding. Prince asked if a student was
having problems for example with patterns, is it continually brought back
throughout the school year for discussion. Schoenhals replied yes. He added
that at the middle school level, students have 70 to 90 minutes of math each day
and is one of the reasons that we have seen increases. At the high school level,
students have 100 minutes of math every other day. If there was more time for
math instruction, teachers would have more opportunities to meet some of the
issues students are experiencing at the high school level.

Carmany noted that most schools offer math nights for parents. What else is
                                    8518
                                                                      October 7, 2008



     being done to help with parent understanding of integrated math? Rishley
     replied that we offered a districtwide parent math night but it was not very well
     attended. We will continue our outreach efforts. Barry shared that we will utilize
     more communication tools such as ConnectEd to get the word out and remind
     parents of upcoming events. Weed added that we are getting better at aligning
     homework from planning and pacing guides so teachers give students more
     meaningful homework that aligns with math units. The homework task force is
     also discussing online homework for parents that will support the instruction that
     is taking place in the classroom.

    Carmany commented that research conducted last year indicated that only 30
    percent of APS parents had home computers. Will parents receive explanations
    of concepts in addition to online information? Weed replied that some schools
    are opening up libraries for parents to access computers. Linda Damon is also
    working with area grocery stores to set up computer centers for parent use.

    Schoenhals shared that there is an excellent FAQ for parents on the core plus
    Web site. Risley added that having an empowered confident student is one of
    our best communication tools for parents. Lewis commented that connecting
    math and expanding it to real world experiences such as the financial crisis
    would draw more parents and students in. Cook commented that CDE lists both
    family math and business math but neither course counts toward standards.
    Escárcega believes that a standard will be addressed once they are redone by
    CDE. At this time, courses do not count toward graduation in core math.

    Barry commented that kids now have more strategies that they can approach
    from many different ways. In today’s world, businesses want innovative people
    who can problem solve and we are giving our students the tools to approach
    problems from many different facets and use their innovative skills to do it.

     Instructional Materials Adoption

     Escárcega shared that the Board approved the “Western Civilization” textbook for
     the International Baccalaureate Program last year. School sites would like to
     purchase additional books but it is out of print. It has a new copyright, which
     requires Board approval.

     Lewis asked about the cost for additional books. Escárcega did not have the
     exact figure but believes it is within budget.

     This item will return for action in two weeks.

DIVISION OF SUPPORT SERVICES

     Budget Adjustments for Bond Accounts

     Sturges invited Amy Spatz, manager of construction management, to the staff
     table to present information on budget adjustments for bond accounts. At the
     most recent Citizens Bond Oversight Committee meeting, the budgets for four
     projects were discussed and adjustments were recommended and approved by
     the committee.

     Spatz shared that we had a few projects that needed additional funding to
     complete and we are shifting some funds out of central contingency to cover
     expenses. Some of the projects have already been brought before the Board.

                                          8519
                                                                      October 7, 2008



     Sturges noted that we still have $1 million in our central contingency
     administration budget.

     This item will return for action in two weeks

     Contingent Cancellation of Projects at Aurora Hills Middle School

     Sturges shared that the contingent cancellation of projects at Aurora Hills Middle
     School was also discussed at the Citizens Bond Oversight Committee meeting.

     Spatz shared that Aurora Hills was selected as the number one choice for a
     whole building remodel contingent on the successful passage of the bond. We
     recommend that we cancel projects due to the remodel project and put funds
     back into the central contingency administration budget.

     Sturges shared that the contingent cancellation was strongly recommended by
     the LRFAC as well.

     This item will return for action in two weeks

                     III. CONSENT AGENDA - ACTION ITEMS

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

     No Items

DIVISION OF ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESEARCH

     No Items

DIVISION OF FINANCE

     No Items

DIVISION OF HUMAN RESOURCES

     Classified Personnel

     Licensed Personnel

     Non-Licensed Administrative and Professional/Technical Personnel

     Barber noted disappointment in the resignation of Rebecca Bryon on the consent
     agenda. Smith acknowledged that Bryon has done a great job for the district.

DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES

     No Items

DIVISION OF SUPPORT SERVICES

     No Items

     Cukale moved and Prince seconded to approve the consent agenda as
     presented.

                                         8520
                                                                    October 7, 2008



     Roll Call: Barber, Carmany, Cook, Cukale, Edberg, Lewis, Prince        #8032

     Approved on a vote of 7-0

                                 IV. ACTION ITEMS

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

     No Items

DIVISION OF ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESEARCH

     No Items

DIVISION OF FINANCE

     No Items

DIVISION OF HUMAN RESOURCES

     No Items

DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES

     No Items

DIVISION OF SUPPORT SERVICES

     No Items

                                 IV. CONCLUDING ITEMS

Opportunity for Audience

Correspondence

Next meeting date

     The next business meeting of the Board of Education will be held October 21,
     2008, at 6:30 p.m. in the Dr. Edward and Mrs. Patricia Lord Boardroom.

Adjournment

     The regular meeting of the Board of Education adjourned at 8:40 p.m.

                                                     _________________________
                                                              President

                                              ATTEST _________________________
                                                              Secretary




                                       8521
Information Items
Agenda, October 21, 2008                                                        Board of Education

                                 II - INFORMATION ITEMS


A.   SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

     1.    Reports from the Board of Education                          Staff Responsible – Board
                                                                                       6:30 - 6:40

     2.    Items of Current Interest                                     Staff Responsible – Barry
                                                                                       6:40 - 6:50

     3.    VISTA 2010 Update                                       Staff Responsible – Leadership
                                                                                        6:50 - 7:00

     4.    New America School Waiver Request                         Staff Responsible – Hostetler
                                                                                       7:00 - 7:10

           (Attachment II-A-4)

           The Board of Education will review Board policy waiver requests submitted by New
           America School. These are identical to the waiver requests submitted by New America
           School and approved by the Board previously.

     5.    Pilot School Proposal                              Staff Responsible – Van Gytenbeek
                                                                                      7:10 - 8:10

           (Attachment II-A-5)

           The Pilot Schools Joint Steering Committee met on September 17, 2008, to review
           Fletcher's Pilot School proposals and to hear a presentation from Fletcher’s Design
           Teams. The Joint Steering Committee asked the Fletcher Design Teams to respond to a
           series of questions regarding their proposal. The Joint Steering Committee voted to
           approve Fletcher’s applications to open as the district’s second and third Pilot Schools in
           August of 2009.

           Members of the Fletcher Design Teams will present the details of their proposals to the
           Board as information.

     6.    Communication Audit Report                                   Staff Responsible – Duran
                                                                                       8:10 - 8:40

           The Communication Audit Report will be presented to the Board of Education as
           information.

B.   DIVISION OF ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESEARCH

           No Items
                                                2
Agenda, October 21, 2008                                                     Board of Education


C.   DIVISION OF FINANCE

     1.    Budget Scenarios                                          Staff Responsible – Weeks
                                                                                     8:40 - 8:50

           The Board of Education will be provided with several budget scenarios that consider
           different outcomes relative to the upcoming election and student enrollment. These
           outcomes will significantly impact the current budget year and the 2008-09 budget year.

D.   DIVISION OF HUMAN RESOURCES

           No Items

E.   DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES

           No Items

F.   DIVISION OF SUPPORT SERVICES

     1.    Citizens Bond Oversight Committee                           Staff Responsible – Sturges
           (CBOC) Annual Report                                                       8:50 - 9:10

           (Attachment II-F-1)

           Board of Education Director Mary Lewis will present the annual report from the Citizens
           Bond Oversight Committee.




                                               3
Consent Agenda – Action Items
Agenda, October 21, 2008                                                  Board of Education

                                  III - CONSENT AGENDA - ACTION ITEMS


A.   SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

           No Items

B.   DIVISION OF ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESEARCH

           No Items

C.   DIVISION OF FINANCE

           No Items

D.   DIVISION OF HUMAN RESOURCES

     1.    Classified Personnel                                    Staff Responsible – Allen
                                                                                 9:10 - 9:12

           a.    Resignation

                  1)   Bethelehem Bahta 10-02-08      Assistant, Nutrition Services, Aurora
                                                      Central
                  2)   Meleia Monsey       10-24-08   Clerk, Department, Hinkley
                  3)   Comfort Tawiah      09-26-08   Assistant, Nutrition Services, Mrachek
                  4)   Allison Waters      10-17-08   Accountant, Budget, ESC 1

           b.    Appointment

                  1)   Fernando Acero      10-06-08   Custodian, Sixth Avenue
                  2)   Maria Acero         10-01-08   Assistant, Nutrition Services, Murphy
                                                      Creek K-8
                 3)    Felicia DeLeon     10-01-08    Assistant, Nutrition Services, Wheeling
                 4)    Sara Dickerson     10-01-08    Assistant, Nutrition Services, Kenton
                 5)    Monica Ginez       10-01-08    Assistant, Nutrition Services, Peoria
                 6)    Mireya Honeycutt 10-01-08      Assistant, Nutrition Services, Boston
                 7)    Bridgette Jones    10-07-08    Paraeducator, Preschool, Side Creek
                 8)    Michelle McConnell 09-29-08    Facilitator, Preschool, Park Lane
                 9)    Honorio Mercado 10-13-08       Custodian, Tollgate
                 10)   Rudy Thompson      10-10-08    Campus Monitor, West
                 11)   Rebecca Valadez- 10-01-08      Assistant, Nutrition Services, Boston
                                 ElQuammah
                 12)   Karen Young        10-01-08    Assistant, Nutrition Services, Peoria

           c.    Extension of Leave of Absence


                                             4
Agenda, October 21, 2008                                                   Board of Education

                       Chandra Doris      09-10-08     Medical
                                                       Paraeducator, Cross Categorical, South

           d.    Leave of Absence

                  1)   Joyce Glenn-Greer 09-16-08      Medical
                                                       Clerk, Department, East
                  2)   Gloria Medina      09-24-08     Medical
                                                       Custodian, Tollgate
                  3)   Maria Salas        09-30-08     Medical
                                                       Assistant, Nutrition Services, Clyde
                                                       Miller

           e.    Return from Leave of Absence

                  1)   Sheila Dailey      09-29-08     Facilitator, Preschool, Montview

                  2)   Joyce Glenn-Greer 10-07-08      Clerk, Department, East

           f.    Reassignment

                       Karin Ide          09-29-08     Assistant, Nutrition Services, Mrachek
                                                       to Tollgate
           g.    Retirement

                       Michael Landry     10-31-08     Custodian, Head Elementary, Fletcher

     2.    Licensed Personnel                                       Staff Responsible – Allen
                                                                                  9:12 - 9:14

           a.    Resignation

                  1)   Monica Ashby         05-22-08    Natural Science, Hinkley
                        (change in status from retirement)
                  2)   Eva Brodin           05-22-08    Math/TOSA -Teacher Leader, Mrachek
                  3)   Jennifer Econopouly 09-29-08     School Psychologist, Vassar/Park Lane
                  4)   Michelle Tuffield    12-19-08    Physical Curriculum, Aurora Central

           b.    Appointment

                  1)   Katelyn Bond       09-30-08     Math, North
                  2)   Sarah Keckler      10-15-08     Grade 2, Wheeling
                  3)   Ramona Olivas      10-07-08     ELA teacher, Aurora Central
                  4)   John Plaza         10-02-08     ROTC, Aurora Central
                  5)   Bonnie Silva       10-13-08     Counselor, Aurora Central
                  6)   Kellie Soderlund   10-01-08     Counselor, Aurora Central
                  7)   Lisa Valente       10-13-08     TOSA-Truancy Specialist, ESC 4

                                            5
Agenda, October 21, 2008                                                Board of Education

                  8)   Alan Willis        09-22-08   Counselor, Rangeview

           c.    Leave of Absence

                  1)   Katherine Irons    10-14-08   Medical
                                                     ELA teacher, Aurora Hills
                  2)   Annalee McBee      09-18-08   Medical
                                                     Cross Categorical, Aurora Central

           d.    Return from Leave of Absence

                       Lindsey Dowell     10-01-08   Social Worker, Crossroads Transition
                                                     Center

           e.    Reassignment

                  1)   Audrey Allen       10-09-08   TOSA–Truancy Specialist, Gateway to
                                                     ESC 4
                  2)   Lindsey Dowell     07-30-08   Social Worker, Crossroads Transition
                                                     Center/South to Crossroads Transition
                                                     Center/ESC 2
                  3)   Joanne Geiss       10-09-08   TOSA-Truancy Specialist, Side Creek to
                                                     ESC 4
                  4)   Angelica Paz       10-09-08   TOSA-Truancy Specialist, Laredo to
                                                     ESC 4
                  5)   Pattie Zielinski   08-18-08   Special Ed Teacher- ECE, CDC to
                                                     Dartmouth

           f.    Transfer

                       John Scruggs       10-06-08   Science, Aurora Central to Counselor,
                                                     Hinkley

           g.    Disability Retirement

                       Steve Norman       09-30-08   Industrial Arts/Technology Ed., Pickens
                                                     Technical College

     3.    Non-Licensed Administrative and                        Staff Responsible – Allen
           Professional/Technical Personnel

           No Items

           RECOMMENDATION: The Board approve the personnel actions.

E.   DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES


                                              6
Agenda, October 21, 2008                Board of Education

           No Items

F.   DIVISION OF SUPPORT SERVICES

           No Items




                                    7
Action Items
Agenda, October 21, 2008                                                         Board of Education

                                       IV - ACTION ITEMS


A.   SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

           No Items

B.   DIVISION OF ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESEARCH

           No Items

C.   DIVISION OF FINANCE

           No Items

D.   DIVISION OF HUMAN RESOURCES

           No Items

E.   DIVISION OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES

     1.    Instructional Materials Adoption                              Staff Responsible – Stuart
                                                                                        9:14 - 9:24

           (Attachment IV-E-1)

           The Board was presented with a list of proposed instructional materials for adoption at the
           October 7 Board of Education meeting.

           RECOMMENDATION: The Board of Education adopt the basic and supplemental
           textbooks and instructional materials as presented.

F.   DIVISION OF SUPPORT SERVICES

     1.    Budget Adjustments to Bond Accounts                         Staff Responsible – Sturges
                                                                                        9:24 - 9:34

           The approved budget for Hinkley was reduced by the Board in December 2006. The
           amount of the recommended reduction turned out to be excessive due to a spreadsheet
           error. The approved budget for Aurora Frontier also was previously reduced but we
           subsequently incurred an unanticipated additional cost. The added cost for Crossroads
           was the result of environmental charges to clean up contaminated soil discovered on the
           construction site. The added cost for the Columbia project is the result of a negotiated
           settlement of an equipment failure issue on this project, a cost which is being shared with
           the designer and contractor. Sufficient funds are still available in the central contingency
           account to cover these adjustments. Since all projects in the 2002 bond program are now
           complete, no future needs for contingency funds are anticipated. These adjustments were
                                                 8
Agenda, October 21, 2008                                                                 Board of Education

           explained to the Citizens Bond Oversight Committee at their final meeting on September
           10. The committee recommended Board approval of these changes.

             Number                Project                   Current Budget          Change       New Budget
              5601      Hinkley Whole Building Remodel       $29,785,770.00        $160,000.00   $29,945,770.00
              5852         Aurora Frontier Construction      $12,360,691.00        $15,000.00    $12,375,691.00
              5854          Crossroads Construction           $2,900,000.00        $155,000.00   $3,055,000.00
              5707    Columbia Mechanical Improvements            $67,000.00       $10,000.00      $77,000.00
              5899            Central Contingency                 $344,627.00     -$340,000.00     $4,627.00


           RECOMMENDATION: The Board will be requested to approve changes to bond accounts.

     2.    Contingent Cancellation of Projects at Aurora Hills                  Staff Responsible – Sturges
                                                                                                 9:34 - 9:44

           Aurora Hills is recommended for a $23.2 million total remodel in the next bond program.
           Improvements planned under the 2002 bond are included in the budget for the new project.
           Since the exact scope of the future remodel has not yet been determined, there is a risk
           that money spent on repairs and improvements to the building prior to the remodel may be
           wasted. The issue was raised at this time, rather than waiting for the election results, so
           we could present the matter to the Citizens Bond Oversight Committee before it disbanded.
            The matter was discussed at the committee’s September 10 meeting and the committee
           concurs with the recommendation being presented. The following projects are
           recommended for cancellation contingent on voter approval of the 2008 bond referendum.
           If the referendum is not approved, these projects will remain active, but until the status of
           the referendum is known, no further work will be done on these projects.

             5706                   Aurora Hills Replace DX A/C                            $136,400.00
             5733                    Aurora Hills Replace Doors                            $35,500.00
             5739               Aurora Hills, Repairs & Improvements                       $660,500.00


           RECOMMENDATION: The Board approve the contingent cancellation of projects at
           Aurora Hills.




                                                      9
Concluding Items
Agenda, October 21, 2008                                                      Board of Education

                                   V - CONCLUDING ITEMS

A.   OPPORTUNITY FOR AUDIENCE

B.   CORRESPONDENCE

C.   NEXT MEETING DATE
     The next business meeting of the Board of Education will be held on November 11, 2008, at 6:30
     p.m. in the Dr. Edward and Mrs. Patricia Lord Boardroom at Educational Services Center 4.

D.   ADJOURNMENT




                                               10
         Attachment II-A-4
New American School Waiver Request
                              NEW AMERICA SCHOOL
                                WAIVER REQUESTS

State Statutes

Pursuant to C.R.S. § 22-30.5-104(6), New America School (“NAS”) hereby requests the
board of education of Aurora Public Schools (Joint School District 28J of the Counties of
Adams and Arapahoe, the “School District”) to apply on its behalf for the “automatic
waivers of state statutes” promulgated by the Colorado Department of Education.


Board Policies

Pursuant to C.R.S. § 22-30.5-104(6), NAS hereby requests of the board of education of
the School District to grant waivers from the district policies set forth below. NAS
requests all such waivers for the duration of its Charter School Agreement with the
School District.

1. DJG; Vendor Relations; establishes policies for vendor relations

2. DJB/DJB-R; Purchasing Procedures; establishes polices for purchasing procedures.

Note: NAS’s replacement for this policy will be generally consistent with the policy
being waived with respect to ( l) requiring competitive bidding for all projects over
$20,000; and (2) ensuring that school personnel do not use bids, purchase orders, manual
checks, petty, cash or the school’s tax exempt status to obtain materials equipment or
services for their personal benefit.

3. EFJ; Nutrition Services

4. FEG; Construction Contracts.

Rationale: Pursuant to the Charter Schools Act NAS is responsible for its own operation,
including contracting for services and the management of its property. Accordingly, all
of the matters addressed in these board policies should be delegated to NAS’s board of
directors.

Replacement Plan: The board of directors of NAS has adopted policies to address vendor
relations, purchasing authority, nutrition services and construction contracts.

Financial Impact: NAS anticipates that the requested waivers will have no financial
impact on the School District. NAS has adopted policies and prescribe rules and
regulations consistent with its budget.
How the impact of the Waiver Will be Evaluated: The impact of this waiver will be
measured by the performance criteria and assessments that apply to NAS, as set forth in
the Charter School Agreement.

Expected Outcome: As a result of this waiver, NAS will be able to carry out its
educational program, administer its affairs in an efficient manner, and accomplish its
mission as set forth in the Charter School Agreement.

5. All policies under Section G “Personnel” except the following as to which waiver is
not currently sought: GBAA: Racial & Sexual Harassment; GBEA: Conflict of interest;
GBEBC: Gifts policy; GDCCF: Federally Mandated Family & Medical leave.

Rationale: All of these policies have to do with personnel matters. Pursuant to the
Charter Schools Act, NAS will be responsible for its own personnel matters, including
employing its own staff and establishing its own terms and conditions of employment,
policies, rules and regulations, and providing its own training. Therefore, NAS requests
that these duties be delegated from the School District’s board of education to the
principal and board of directors of NAS. The success of NAS will depend in large part
upon its ability to select, employ, train and evaluate its own staff in accordance with the
Charter School Agreement and the goals and objectives of NAS. All school staff will be
employed on an at-will basis.

Replacement Plan: NAS will be responsible for these matters rather than the School
District. NAS’s employment policies have previously been provided to the School
District.

Financial Impact: NAS anticipates that the requested waivers will have no financial
impact upon the School District. NAS must operate within its budget and the cost of
employing staff has been included in that budget.

How the Impact of the Waivers Will be Evaluated: The impact of the waivers will be
measured by the same performance criteria and assessments that apply to NAS, as set
forth in the Charter School Agreement.

Expected Outcome: As a result of these waivers, NAS will select, employ, train and
provide professional development for its own teachers and staff, in accordance with the
terms and conditions set forth in the Charter School Agreement.

6. IC/ICA; School Year; School Calendar; establishes policy for adopting school
calendar

Rationale: NAS operates independently from other schools in the School District and
should be delegated the authority to adopt its own calendar. NAS does not request
waiver of the minimum teacher contact hours. However, the specific days upon which
those hours occur should be within the purvey of NAS’s board of directors.




                                             2
Replacement Plan: The board of directors of NAS will adopt annually a calendar for
NAS.

Financial Impact: NAS anticipates that the requested waivers will have no financial
impact on the School District. NAS will be able to adopt policies and prescribe rules and
regulations consistent with its budget.

How the impact of the Waiver Will be Evaluated: The impact of this waiver will be
measured by the performance criteria and assessments that apply to NAS, as set forth in
the Charter School Agreement.

Expected Outcome: As a result of this waiver, NAS will be able to carry out its
educational program, administer its affairs in an efficient manner, and accomplish its
mission as set forth in the Charter School Agreement.

7. IC/ICA; School Year

8. ID; School Day

9. IE; Organization of Instruction

10. IHAE; Physical Education

11. IKA; Grading System

12. IKAB; Report Cards

13. IKF; Graduation Requirements

Note: NAS acknowledges that if its students are to receive a district diploma, they will be
required to meet the standards of this policy and any replacement policy will take this
requirement into account.

14.. IJJ/IJK; Textbook Selection and Adoption

15. IL; Testing Programs

Rationale: Under the Charter School Agreement the board of directors of NAS has the
authority to determine the educational program and textbooks to be used in NAS.

Replacement Plan: NAS’s educational program and curriculum are detailed in the charter
application.

Financial Impact: NAS anticipates that the requested waiver will have no financial
impact upon the School District or NAS.




                                             3
How the Impact of the Waiver Will be Evaluated: The impact of this waiver will be
measured by the performance criteria and assessments that apply to NAS, as set forth in
the Charter School Agreement.

Expected Outcome: NAS expects that as a result of this waiver it will be able to
implement its curriculum and ensure that students meet the educational standards of
NAS.

17. JF; School Completion Age

Note: It is understood that the waiver of this policy will not affect New America School’s
ability to obtain funding for such students, a matter which is governed by the School
Finance Act and applicable regulations.




                                            4
          Request for Waiver from Colorado Statutes and/or Rules
                              On Behalf of Charter Schools


Authorizing body:
       □ Charter School Institute
       □ Local School District _____________________________________(name of SD)
                                          Aurora Public Schools
Name of authorizer representative:
Mailing address for authorizer:
                            1085 Peoria Street
       Street/PO Box_________________________
                                                                80011
       City _________________________________ Zip Code ___________________
            Aurora
       Phone _______________________________
                303.344.1994

       Email address ______________________________________________________
                            kahostetler@aps.kas.co.us



Name of charter school: ____________________________________________________
                                New America School

Name of charter school representative ________________________________________
                                                     Craig Cook

       Title of charter school representative ____________________________________
                                                             CBO

Mailing address for charter school ____________________________________________
       Street/PO Box ______________________________________________________
                            303 East 17th Street, Suite 220
       City _________________________________ Zip Code ___________________
              Denver                                             80203

       Phone _______________________________
                 303.894.3164

       Email address ______________________________________________________
                            ccook@newamericaschools.org



Charter school projected enrollment or actual enrollment __________________________
                                                          400


Grades served by charter school:
     K__ 1__ 2__ 3__ 4__ 5__ 6__ 7__ 8__ 9__ 10__ 11__ 12__

Term of charter school contract: ___/___/____(mo/day/year) through June 30, 20__
                                 07   01  2008                                13



If this is a renewal, year the charter school originally opened: ____________
                                                                 2005


                                                            Craig Cook
Waiver request prepared for the charter school by: _______________________________
      Preparer’s phone number: _____________________________________________
                                  303.894.3164

      Preparer’s email address: _____________________________________________
                                   ccook@newamericaschools.org




Automatic waivers the charter school is applying for:
     __ 22-9-106. C.R.S. Local board duties concerning performance evaluations for
         licensed personnel
     __ 22-32-109 (1)(f), C.R.S. Local board duties concerning selection of personnel
         and pay
     __ 22-32-110 (1)(h), C.R.S. Local board powers concerning employment
         termination of school personnel
     __ 22-32-126, C.R.S. Employment and authority of principals
         __ 22-63-201, C.R.S. Teacher employment, compensation and dismissal act of
            1990; Employment – License Required – Exception
         __ 22-63-202, C.R.S. Teacher employment, compensation and dismissal act of
            1990; contracts in writing – duration – damage provision
         __ 22-63-203, C.R.S. Teacher employment, compensation and dismissal act of
            1990; probationary teachers – renewal and nonrenewal of employment contract
         __ 22-63-206, C.R.S. Teacher employment, compensation and dismissal act of
            1990; transfer of teachers -- compensation
         __ 22-63-301, C.R.S. Teacher employment, compensation and dismissal act of
            1990; grounds for dismissal
         __ 22-63-302, C.R.S. Teacher employment, compensation and dismissal act of
            1990; procedures for dismissal of teachers and judicial review
         __ 22-63-401, C.R.S. Teacher employment, compensation and dismissal act of
            1990; teachers subject to adopted salary schedule
         __ 22-63-402, C.R.S. Teacher employment, compensation and dismissal act of
            1990; license, authorization or residency required in order to pay teachers
         __ 22-63-403, C.R.S. Teacher employment, compensation and dismissal act of
            1990; payment of salaries

  If any other waiver(s) from statute or rule is/are being requested, list those below.




 (If additional space is needed, please attach a separate sheet of paper.)


____________________________________               ______________________________
Printed name of authorizer representative          Signature of authorizer representative
Craig Cook
____________________________________              _________________________________
Printed name of charter school representative     Signature of charter school representative

Include as attachments to this request:

 1. a copy of the charter contract, which would include a complete request for waivers
    as an appendix. A complete request includes rationale, replacement plan, how the
    impact will be evaluated and expected outcome (see sample at
    http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdechart/guidebook/gov/index.htm

 2. a copy of the charter application or renewal application.
  Attachment II-A-5
Pilot School Proposal
FLETCHER PRIMARY SCHOOL – PILOT SCHOOL APPLICATION
  o Per the Joint Steering Committee Recommendations – Includes Revisions
     10-3-08

The Aurora Public Schools (APS) requests proposals for the creation of Pilot
Schools in accordance with the conditions stipulated in the Aurora Public Schools
Pilot Schools Overview, the Guidelines for Essential Features, the Memorandum
of Understanding and the identified Sequence for becoming a Pilot School. The
proposals must be organized in the following format and include a table of
contents:

   1. OVERVIEW OF THE PILOT SCHOOL
        A. Name of the school: Fletcher Primary School
        B. Type of Pilot School (conversion, start-up or conversion to a
           separate school within the same facility) : Separate School Within
           the Same Facility with projected enrollment of 350 students
        C. Location: 10455 East 25th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80010
        D. Narrative describing what will make this school unique:

Fletcher will be unique in several ways. First is how teaching and learning time will be
organized. Content will be cohesive and integrated so the school day is less chopped up
by individual subject areas. A thematic approach will be one strategy for providing
longer blocks of time that are based on student needs. Curriculum will be more in-depth
(e.g. science and social study awareness, non-fiction writing). Specials will be connected
to content themes of courses. All students will have access to technology. The schedule
will be flexible to accommodate targeted interventions and allow for flexible grouping of
students. Since the K-3 school will serve most of the same families as the 4-8 school, it
is important that there is coordination and articulation between the two schools. Families
must feel that there is an overall community and seamless connection for all children
enrolled at the Fletcher site. Although the two schools will be different because of
different grade levels and specific areas of focus, we want to ensure that families retain
the sense of community that is so important to the philosophy of both schools. Primary
provides the foundations for learning how to learn, how to read, how to write and basic
number sense. The intermediate school will be a science-based learning community that
will expand the roles and responsibilities of students as learners.

The Fletcher Primary School will provide a comprehensive plan for teaching English that
considers native language as an asset. There will be an increased focus on cultural
awareness and diversity school-wide. A better intake process that includes assessment
and testing in the native language will focus appropriate English language acquisition
supports. English Language Acquisition (ELA) training will be provided to all staff, and
they will be encouraged to work toward an endorsement or certification in ELA.

Teachers will have opportunities for flexible, co-teaching, teaming and collaboration –
both in teaching and planning. There will be longer blocks for time for staff planning.
Professional development will be on-going, differentiated and focused. It will be targeted



                                            1
to match the teacher’s and school’s goals and responsive to the needs of students. There
will be more job-embedded professional development.

A major emphasis will be placed on community building – both within the school and
with parents and the community. Within the schedule there will be time built in to
encourage interaction among students and with parents. Fletcher will become the hub of
the community it serves. There will be an educational component for parents to become
learners as well. There will be before and after-school learning opportunities (both
academic and enrichment) that are open to all students and adults. Fletcher Primary will
actively seek community partnerships and connections.

      E. Narrative explaining how the autonomies granted will allow greater
innovation in achieving student achievement

In order to achieve our vision and mission, we need maximum control over how we
organize the schedules for staff and our students. Blocks, immersions, interventions,
flexible groupings, cross grade level offerings and integrated content demand that the
school be organized differently. It is essential to provide teachers with blocks of time for
planning, collaboration and professional development so they can be more innovative and
provide different models of teaching and learning. To design curriculum and resources to
respond to student needs, teachers must have to opportunity to work together and team.
This time to collaborate will create a cohesive staff with a sense that these are all “our
kids” rather than class by class ownership. ELA support can be embraced by everyone
and provided to impact the entire school – not assigned as a responsibility of a specific
teacher. Professional development in any area can be based on students and delivered to
best meet needs of each staff member.

With staffing autonomy, the roles of staff can be based more directly on the vision and
mission of the school and better meet the specific needs of students. There can be more
services in the areas of counseling, social work, mental health and family support.

To fulfill our plan, Fletcher Primary must be a small school with small class sizes in
order to create a cohesive school community. The ability to support students based on
individual needs demands a smaller student body if we are to build a genuine school
community that engages and empowers our students and our parents. Staff will truly be
able to know all students and collaborate with parents.

We believe that because teachers design the programs and have buy-in to the school,
there will be less staff turnover. A cohesive staff committed to Fletcher will ensure
success.

        F. Narrative describing a typical student day Each day could look different
based on the deeper blocks of learning and the professional development of teachers. But
some things would be consistent. For example, each day could begin with an optional
“invitation” to breakfast that would include students, families and staff. It would be
designed as a gathering to establish a sense of community.



                                             2
Students would begin each day with a teacher in a designated small “community” with a
morning meeting. The focus would include social development, grounding, academic
checks, and activities to foster sharing and getting to know other students.

Academics would be delivered in a variety of ways based on student needs but with a
thematic, integrated design that provides blocks, immersions, etc. There would be fluid
grouping for language development, while maintaining the integrity of the community.
There would not be the continual transition between subjects that currently occurs. Art,
music, technology and physical education could be connected to academics and content.
Lunch would continue with a community focus that allows students time to eat, play and
socialize. The end of the week would include a “closing” either for individual
communities or the whole school.

The result is that each student’s academic and social needs would be met in a supportive,
collaborative school community that honors students’ cultural backgrounds and
languages while fostering critical, creative thinkers.

See 4C for sample schedule of student day.

   2. DESIGN TEAM PROFILE AND PLANNING PROCESS

The design team began meeting in November 2007 to develop a proposal for the K-5
school at Fletcher for implementation in 2008-2009. When it became apparent that
Fletcher’s projected enrollment would exceed 500, the design team requested support
from the staff to develop proposals for two separate schools within the same facility at
Fletcher Elementary. The survey results were supportive and the design team divided to
form two new teams: one for a K-3 primary school and the other for a 4-8 intermediate
school. Each design team added new members and began meeting to develop proposals.
The Primary School was able to take most of the work already completed and refine and
reorganize to better respond to the structure and needs of a K-3 student population.

           A. Identify who is on the Design Team to establish this Pilot School

Jori Botvinick         Second Grade                 AEA member
Carla Chavez           ELA
Cindy Gray             First Grade
Jody Jones             Third Grade                  AEA member
Kelsey Muellner        Kindergarten                 AEA member
Toni Pinkstaff-Smith   Educational Assistant
Lisa Nieto             Principal

           B. Time line and feasibility of opening by the target date

Fletcher Primary School would open for the 2009-2010 school year. We believe that
planning for implementation throughout this school year will enable us to open on the



                                               3
projected date. The Primary School will be drawing exclusively from neighborhood
students, and we expect to have approximately 325 to 350 students enrolled.

Proposed Timeline for Fletcher Primary School
   o October 21, 2008        Proposal presented to APS Board of Education
   o November 11, 2008 Board approval of Fletcher Primary School
   o Nov. 18-Dec. 9, ’08 Establishment of Governing Board
   o Dec. 10-17, ’08         Criteria for Selection of Principal
   o Dec. 18, ’08            Principal for Primary School Position Posted
   o Jan. 5-21, ’09          Principal Selection (Interviews, Selection)
   o Jan. 22-30, ’09         Annual Election to Work finalized
   o Feb. 2-5, ’09           Teachers Sign Annual Election to Work
   o Feb. 9 (Confer HR) Positions for Primary School Posted

3. SCHOOL VISION

       A. Statements of the Vision and Mission

Vision: Prepare all students to be community contributors who embrace multi-
culturalism and succeed in the 21st century.

Mission: In partnership with our community, Fletcher Primary School highlights
children’s varied learning strengths and honors students’ cultural backgrounds and
languages. Technology is the bridge connecting students to learning and experiences
that foster critical, creative thinkers.

       B. Provide narrative of the school’s core values and principles

At Fletcher, we are accountable for putting children first and teaching the whole child by
valuing engagement, relationships, professionalism and diversity in order to develop life-
long learner.

We believe:

Everyone can learn
Everyone needs to feel known and cared for
Everyone has value
Everyone is both a learner and a teacher
Everyone has something to contribute
Primary language is fundamental to thinking learning and creativity
Native language is an asset
Bilingualism is a cognitive, social and economic asset
Students must be met where they are
School must be a risk-free environment
Equity does not mean equal




                                            4
       4. KEY CHARACTERISTICS

       A. Describe the programmatic scope of school and, if applicable, community
interest and participation in establishing this Pilot School. (From community,
provide letters of support.)

Fletcher Pilot School will be organized as total school community with a unity of
purpose, philosophy and instruction. Learning will be organized around a standards-
based, language enriched curriculum designed for a linguistically diverse population.
Common content based units will be selected within classrooms, across grade levels and
through out the school so all students share common experiences and have access to the
same content and understanding. The delivery of instruction will be differentiation of
delivery and curriculum adapted to best meet the needs of each student. The philosophy
is that content is a primary vehicle for learning and developing skills such as reading and
writing. An overriding goal is to help students become critical consumers and creators of
information. Technology is the bridge connecting students to learning and experiences
that foster critical, creative thinkers.

The standards-based program will be anchored by a focus on deep conceptual and
linguistic development. Instruction and community outreach will be organized to build
on and value students’ native language and background knowledge. The intent is to
deepen all students’ conceptual understanding along with connections to oral
communication and interaction with text through reading and writing. There will be a
commonly agreed upon set of critical topics that link the natural and social sciences based
on state and district standards.

We propose that the first year the focus be on an agreed upon set of outcomes organized
around natural and social science delivered in four thematic units or blocks of time.
Teachers will collaboratively develop the curriculum units to identify what we expect all
students to know and be able to do. Science and social studies will be integrated.
Reading and writing will be connected to topics with language enrichment. Math will be
a stand alone content area but will be organized with the same philosophy of delivery. In
addition, as content based units are developed they will include potential links to math
concepts and understandings.

An amount of time for specials (art, music, technology and physical education) will be
determined for each grade level. Strategies will be developed to ensure specials are
organized around the commonly agreed upon topics and content focus.

In addition, all personnel (classroom teachers, specialists, para-educators, counselors)
will be supported in using a variety of instructional strategies that are known to promote
language development and are designed to allow students to actively participate in and
benefit from their instruction.

       B. How will the school be organized and structured



                                             5
The school will be organized to ensure a sense of community. Knowing the families of
the children we teach and working with them as partners is essential to children’s
education. The structure will support the philosophy that the social curriculum is as
important as the academic curriculum. The structure will emphasize the ideal that it is
not your student and my student, but rather OUR students. How the adults at school
work together is as important as their individual competence. We believe lasting change
begins with the adult community. It is important to hear families’ insights and help them
better understand the school’s teaching approaches.

As a result, professional development will be focused on the needs of our students versus
the entire district. Through the flexible grouping of teachers and students we can better
be more responsive to our students. We will bring in outside resources/ consultants as
needed. The structure of the school will support on going, data driven discussions for
planning and delivery of curriculum within and across grade levels based on student
performance. There will be common, collaborative planning times for teachers and
vertical teams.

Teacher training will be offered in such areas as diversity, integrated technology, the
responsive classroom model, science and English Language Acquisition.
                  a. ELA
                          i. Strategies would include: Language Experience Approach,
                             Shared Writing, Sheltering Techniques
                         ii. Use of the Assessment Inventory for formative assessment
                             information
                  b. Training on inquiry learning and science content
                          i. Projects such as WET, WILD, Learning Tree, Aquatic
                         ii. In subsequent years units will be further refined to deepen
                             project-based learning emphasis.
                        iii. Through partnerships with Colorado Schools of Mines


               C. The school calendar and daily schedule for both staff and students

This calendar is based on the district-adopted 2008-2009 calendar since there is not an
adopted calendar for 2009-2010. In order to better accommodate parents, Fletcher will
coordinate its calendar to the degree possible with the district calendar once a calendar
is adopted by the Board of Education.

This schedule further assumes that Life Skills will be relocated in order to
accommodate both the K-3 and 4-8 grades at Fletcher.

The calendar reflects longer periods of time per subject area; scheduling week as a whole
rather than daily schedule.
Before School Retreat: 2daysx8h=16h
Before School Professional Development: 3daysx8h=24h



                                            6
Total before School Hours=40h

Teacher Work Day: 7:15-3:15 = 8hrs
Student hours M-Th 7:45-2:45=7 hrs
             F     7:45-12:05

Key Items                                                                 Changes
*same APS vacation days                                                   *student day increase M-Th
by ½ hour
*8 hours work day                                                         *planning time on Friday
(early release)
*1/2 hour before and ½ hour after school planning                         *shift in-service day to
beginning of quarter
*same APS start dates and end date (for kids)
*same quarters as district                                            TBD
                                                                      *lunch schedule
                                                       *exact dates pending 2009-2010 calendar

                                    APS Hours                        Pilot School Hours
Q1                                  49 days: 392h                    352h
Q2                                  47 days: 376h                    376h
Q3                                  47 days: 376h                    376h
Q4                                  44 days: 352h                    352h
                          Total                                      1456 + 40 BOY
                                    1496                             1496

Traditional APS Student Day                            Possible Fletcher Primary Student Day
7:45-8:10           Morning meeting                    7:30-7:45          Community Breakfast
8:10-8:20           Book trade                         7:45-8:30          Morning Meeting
8:20-8:40           Skills                             8:30-9:00          Language Development
8:40-9:40           Reading                            9:00-10:30         Literacy Block read/write integrated
          8:40-8:50 mini lesson                                           to support Content units
          8:50-9:15 independent reading                                    * Whole Group Mini lesson
          9:15-9:40 closing/share                                          * Independent Practice
9:40-10:25          Writing                                                 *Language Acquistion Practice
          9:40-9:50 mini lesson                                            * Extentions -
          9:50-10:20 independent writing                                   * Summary/Share
10:25-11:05         Recess/lunch                       10:30-11:10        Lunch/Recess with Lang. Dev.
11:05-12:00         Content                            11:10-12:30        Math Block or 2nd Lit Block
12:00-1:30          Math                                                   * Whole Group
          12:00-12:15         number talk                                  * Small Group/Independent
          12:15-12:40         stations                                     * Summary Share
          12:40-1:30          investigations           12:30-1:30         Content
1:30-2:15           Specials                           1:30-2:15          Specials to support Content


The Day is organized to meet the needs of the student, which is determined by assessments of the student. If
a double literacy block is required two days a week, that will occur; and student will receive a math block at
least three times a week. Math concepts will be discussed during Content and in the Integrated Specials.




                                                      7
                D. The proposed class sizes and teacher-student loads

The goal is: K-1 grades: 1 to 18 and 2-3 grades: 1-23
These are general averages taking into account needs of students being served, learning
goals, support staff provided and joint classrooms.

                E. How students and staff will be grouped for instruction

The key concept for both students and staff will be fluid grouping.
Students
Classrooms will be created heterogeneously with an emphasis on community.
       Teams will group and regroup students based on academic and language needs, as
       needed
       Groups will remain flexible to effectively differentiate the curriculum.

Staff
Organized in grade level teams
       Each teacher on grade level teams will have an area of expertise to create cross-
       grade level teams (math team, literacy team, science team)
       Goal is for every grade level team to include 1 ELA staff and 1 classified support
       In addition, there will be support from coaching, support staff and administration.

                F. Methods for supporting students (e.g. those at risk, methods of
                intervention, academic and personal counseling)

Knowing the children we teach – individually, culturally, and developmentally – is as
important as knowing the content we teach. To be successful academically and socially,
all students need a set of social skills in the areas of cooperation, assertion, responsibility,
empathy and self control. All students will be encouraged to notice and internalize
expected behaviors through modeling techniques. The physical classroom will be set up
in ways that encourage independence, cooperation and productivity. The focus will be on
logical consequences that respond to misbehavior in a way that allows students to fix and
learn from their mistakes while preserving their dignity. We believe the greatest
cognitive growth occurs through social interaction. The social curriculum is as important
as the academic curriculum. With respect to knowing the child academically, a better
intake process that includes academic assessment and language testing in the native
language will focus appropriate English language acquisition supports. We will increase
student motivation by differentiating instruction and allowing students teacher-structured
choices in their work. How students learn is as important as what they learn. Process
and content go hand in hand. The emphasis on knowing each child individually,
culturally and developmentally will allow for meeting the needs of transient students, as
well as the stable core student community.

        5. PILOT SCHOOL GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE
              A. How the governance structure will support the goals and
                 objectives of the plan


                                               8
The Governing Board will ensure there is collaborative decision making around
significant decisions of the school. Using a shared decision-making model, the
Governing Board will make decisions relating to program, school enrollment, class size,
schedule, length of school day and school year, and the amount and type of required
professional learning for teachers at the school needed to fulfill the vision and mission.

               B. Governing Board membership and responsibilities

The Governing Board will have at least 12 members comprised of the principal, four
teachers who are AEA members, elected by all members of the site’s bargaining unit (one
of the AEA teacher representatives will be the building association representative), at
least one classified representative chosen by peers, a minimum of four parents selected by
parents and at least two non-parent community members selected by the Governing
Board. We understand that if the Governing Board grows beyond 12 members, one-third
will be AEA members.

The Governing Board will meet the requirements required by the state for school
accountability committees. The Governing Board will develop its bylaws and will be
responsible for making all final decisions for educational and operational policies at the
school within the agreed upon school vision.

               C. Matrix for the structures that will be in place to make decisions
                  with identification of who is responsible for which decisions




Fletcher K-3 Decision Matrix




                                             9
Key:
A- Awareness
D- Decision: decides plan of action
I- Input
SD- Participates in decision making



                                      Governing     Principal     School            Staff     Parents
                                       Board                     Committee
School Goals/ Data                    D             SD                          SD            I
Budget                                D             SD                          I             A
Master Schedule                       D             SD                          I             A
Content Teams                         D             SD           SD             I
Staff Hiring                                        D            SD             I
Staff Performance/Evaluation                        D
Principal Evaluation                  SD *Deputy                                I             I
                                      Supt.-D
Professional Development                          SD          SD                I
Responsive Classroom/Discipline                   SD          SD                I             A
Student Intervention                              SD          SD                I
Community Partnerships                            SD          SD                I             A
Fundraising/Grants                                D           SD                A
Facilities Management                             D                             A
School Wide Events                                SD          SD                I             I
Accountability/SQR                 *JSC- D        SD
              D. Description of process for staff input into decisions

The Governing Board is charged with adopting a shared decision making model that
honors and supports the involvement of all staff and includes parents and the community.
.

       6. BUDGET
              A. Proposed budgets (see attached documents Consolidated Title
                  Funds and General Fund)
              B. Strategies for additional fundraising
       The school will aggressively seek dollars from grants, foundations and
       partnerships through a fundraising committee designated by the Governing Board.

               C. Once in place, the Governing Board’s process for responsibly
                  managing the budget to ensure fiscal stability

The process will be developed and shared with all staff so there is transparency around all
budget decisions based on the vision and mission of the school. The process must ensure


                                            10
that funds are used in a manner that supports the goals of the school and stays within
allotted resources. The process should include an opportunity for staff input.


       7. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

               A. The school’s instructional core practices and what teaching will
look like

All delivery will be structured on the understandings of best practices for second
language learners with the confidence that all students, including Native English speakers
students with special needs and at-risk learners, can and will profit from these
approaches. Parents will be engaged as partners in learning so they know the big ideas
that are being taught at school and can support and re-enforce the learning at home.
Parents will be engaged in discussion on ways to improve student learning and helping to
reinforce their conceptual development

Instruction will be anchored by what teachers mutually agree is most important for all
students to know, based on Standards. All students will use inquiry to deepen their
learning. Another goal is to deepen conceptual understanding in the first language.
Intentional language instruction will be provided daily in order to ensure participation.

Within the community culture, students will be grouped and re-grouped to meet
individual needs. Teachers will work together to ensure students do not have a sense of
being “pulled out” for learning because every student at the school is doing the same
thing and will have a culminating activity that demonstrates what they have learned. The
school will reflect a flexible organization to support the common experience for all
students. Within the same topic, teachers will identify and organize materials and
identify resources that are differentiated and high interest for various needs of students.
This allows students the access to the same content and understanding. Instructional
technology will allow for individualization for students better enabling them to expand on
what they are already familiar with as well as to research and learn more about particular
areas of interest. Technology will also be used to set up social networks for sharing
information and learning among students and teachers.

               B. A plan for closing and ultimately eliminating the achievement gap
for all groups at the school

Small school size and small class sizes coupled with the community focus of the school
as a whole will support a focus on success for every child. By engaging all students in
interesting and important units of study, they will be able to use their growing knowledge
to support increased literacy skills.

We will be documenting where every student starts and their on-going progress.
Portfolios will be used to monitor learning for every student. Within those portfolios, we
can determine what students know and understand and teachers can develop common



                                             11
assessments to monitor progress. An important step will be to identify reading and
resource materials at a wide range of levels on common topics and to organize instruction
around project based learning.

Students will be supported through the small school size that allows individual needs to
be identified and provides teachers the opportunity to collaboratively plan and ensures
that professional development is focused on improving instruction. There will be a focus
on deep conceptual and linguistic development. In other words, students will understand
why they are learning concepts and how to apply them. All students will use inquiry to
deepen their learning. .At the same time there will be intentional instruction for language
development to deepen conceptual understanding in the first language.


             C. Specific strategies for addressing needs of diverse learners
including ELA, Gifted and Talented, special needs, etc.

Using data, we can identify targets for each student, provide appropriate supports and
resources to teachers, and monitor progress. Common planning and targeted professional
development will help teachers collaborate and work together to meet the needs of every
learner.

The overriding philosophy of fluid group and re-grouping will ensure that students are
receiving instruction based on their need rather than labels.

Diverse and ELA
       Sheltered Instruction of concepts – Using visual representation, including,
       whenever possible, visualizers and interactive white-boards that are school-wide
       and consistent
       Native Language concept development
       Intentional Parent Programming – what we teach and how the parents can help
       Grouping and regrouping – based on language level and content knowledge
       Intentional teaching of language with language objectives

Special Needs
       Students who are not showing progress academically or socially can be referred to
       intervention team consisting of academic and mental health representation
       Intervention team will also be a part of instructional intervention, following the
       Response to Intervention (RTI) process.
       Utilize district support resources

Gifted and Talented
       Clustered groupings
       Utilize district support resources

               D. The core curriculum all students must have and the overall
curriculum


                                            12
The core curriculum will support language development. Literacy will be connected to
the natural and social sciences with and though language enrichment. In addition, there
will be dedicated time daily for language development. Math connections will be made
daily during content with the majority of math delivered during a 90-minute math block.
Art, music, technology and physical education will be provided to enhance content units.

Curriculum will be designed using standards and concepts that are mutually agreed upon
by teachers. Teachers will continue to investigate current curriculum resources to serve
our linguistically diverse community. The end goal is to develop curriculum that will
prepare our students for the 21st century.

An example of a quarter grade level curriculum alignment that fully supports language
development and concept understanding for all disciplines based on the content area
focus follows. All lessons contain content objectives and language objectives.

                        2nd Grade 1st Quarter Curriculum Alignment 2009-2010
            August                          September – October
                                            First Quarter ends 10/2
Content     Where We Live                   Soils
             Social Studies                 State Science Std.
            8/11-8/22                       The Earth’s materials (rock, soil and water) provide many of
            People live in different places the resources that humans use and reuse.
            with different characteristics  Benchmarks/Students should know and be able to:
                                              Soils have different properties such as color, texture,
            What is a scientist?              capacity to retain water and the ability to support different
            8/25-8/29                         kinds of plants.
            Technical drawings
            Questioning                       Soils retain water with varying degrees of effectiveness
            Predicting                        (e.g., run-off, overly saturated conditions)
            Recording
            Observations 5 senses             Soil is a system and a mixture of decomposed material
                                              (living parts) as well non-living parts (rocks and minerals)

            Language Objectives              Language Objectives Included
            Included
Math        Mathematical Thinking            Navigating Through Measurement – Grade 2
            Per current Pacing Guide         Benchmarks
                                             5.1 Knowing, using, describing, and estimating measures of
                                             length, perimeter, capacity, weight, time, and temperature.
                                             5.2 Comparing and ordering objects according to measurable
                                             attributes (for example, longest to shortest, lightest to heaviest).
                                             5.3 Demonstrating the process of measuring and explaining the
                                             concepts related to units of measurement.
                                             5.4 Using the approximate measures of familiar objects (for
                                             example, the width of your finger, the temperature of a room, the
                                             weight of a gallon of milk) to develop a sense of measurement.
                                             5.5 Selecting and using appropriate standard and non-standard
                                             units of measurement in problem-solving situations.

                                             Changing this District curriculum to 1st Quarter to support
                                             the measuring required for Science exploration of Soils Unit



                                                      13
Reading      Using the Reading Process,          Provide research-based        Resources from school’s resource
             Teaching/Learning Cycle and         instructional model that is   room: Mondo, Into English, Rigby,
             ELD Continuums with                 language-based, student-      Etc.
             Language Objectives                 centered, process-oriented,
                                                 and outcome-based

Writing      Small Moments – Lucy                Nonfiction Procedures and Reports Nonfiction - Lucy
             Calkins Units of Study              Calkins Units of Study
             Focuses on one important            How-To:
             moment of author’s life             Gives instructions or directions on
               o Central character is author     how to do something
               o Plot is developed by taking a   Title introduces topic
             focused moment and stretching       Contains a list of what will be
             it out to describe important        needed
             events or many moments that         Sketches and words provide a series
             are linked by a common focus -      of general steps or actions for
             Focused on Where We Live            carrying out a procedure or activity
             Soc/Studies Unit – Our              Steps and actions are organized in
             Culture                             order by time
                                                 Numbers, transition words, or other
             Science Note-booking                devices (e.g.: headings, question and
             Set up the Scientist’s notebook     answer) are used to indicate
             to record Scientific Process        sequence of steps or actions
                                                 Details help the reader to understand
             Language Objectives Included        the instructions

                                                 All-About:
                                                 Contains facts and information
                                                 focused on one subject
                                                 Topic and context are established in
                                                 introduction
                                                 Main topic is divided into subtopics
                                                 which become separate chapters or
                                                 sections
                                                 Organized by table of contents
                                                 Contains features of nonfiction texts
                                                 that relate to topic such as: labeled
                                                 diagrams, headings, captions, and
                                                 pictures
                                                 Contains pages with unique
                                                 purposes (e.g.: how-to page, partsof-
                                                 page, fun facts page, and
                                                 different-kinds-of-something page)
                                                 May include a simple concluding
                                                 sentence
                                                 Contains names and specialized
                                                 vocabulary related to topic

                                                 Language Objectives Included




          8. STUDENT ASSESSMENT

                A. Describe your school’s philosophy on student assessment




                                                          14
The overall purpose of assessment is to inform instructional decision making. It is
essential to identify what students know and are able to do as soon as they enter our
school. Fletcher would develop a comprehensive intake process for students. There will
be initial testing for all new students in their native language (if available) to determine
levels of academic understanding. An oral language assessment inventory will be used to
provide interpretive data and information on language development.

Fletcher will determine consistent criteria for proficiency. Backwards planning will be
used to determine key concepts, assessments and identify resources. There will be
multiple assessments that will allow students to demonstrate what they know and are able
to do in a variety of formats. Teachers will have time to analyze assessments to determine
next step and give timely feedback to students.

State mandated tests will be used as summative data to determine if kids are proficient on
state standards.

             B. Explain what formative and summative measures you will use to
determine student progress and success

Every new student will be tested in literacy, math and language development.
Throughout the year, we will assess all new students who are not proficient in English in
literacy and oral language using the Mondo oral language assessments or comparable
tests available to assist in making appropriating placements. The Kathy Richardson
assessments in (English and Spanish versions) will be used determining math placement.
In addition, we will use the CELA placement test.

Within each standard based unit will be clear identification of what students should know
and be able to do as well as what proficiency looks like, using Science assessments, such
as Uncovering Student Ideas in Science. Teacher-created assessments can be
collaboratively scored to provide immediate feedback to students and teachers. Portfolios
will monitor learning and include common assessments that are teacher-developed and
rated according to a rubric that identifies whether students are proficient, below or low.
Quarterly curriculum based assessments similar to the District interim assessments will
be administered. This will help teachers gauge student preparedness for state mandated
tests and provide important information on student progress. Results of all testing will be
analyzed in order to differentiate instruction. The data will help teachers make decisions
about instruction.

The DRA2 will be administered to determine student growth in levels of comprehension,
accuracy and fluency. Teachers will use running records, individual conferences and
writing rubrics as formative assessments to drive their instruction. Kathy Richardson and
Investigations assessments will be used in math.

               C. Describe how you will prepare your students for all state mandated
tests such as CSAP, CELA, ACT




                                             15
Fletcher will write annual goals with a minimum of 3% growth in order to reach or
exceed District average in three years on CSAP. (See attached Assessment Target chart)

We will prepare students through focused, intentional instruction that is developed
collaboratively and involves vertical teaming. Standards-based curriculum and third-
grade quarterly assessments will ensure students are being prepared for state assessments.
The quarterly assessments will also help prepare students for the format of state tests.
CELA will be used as a summative assessment to measure language development.

               D. Identify data that will be collected to measure student progress

In addition to achievement data, student progress will be measured through targets for
attendance, and discipline referrals. We will want to maintain being above the District
average for CSAP median growth. (See attached Assessment Target chart)

              E. Describe how the data will be used to assess student needs and
identify students needing help

Following the teaching-learning cycle, data analysis will be a regular part of ongoing
team collaboration, allowing students to be grouped and regrouped regularly according to
their needs. The teacher intervention team will review data for attendance, discipline
referrals and mobility to identify additional resources and support

               F. Explain how the data will be used to guide instruction

Teachers will use quarterly assessments, end of the unit and formative assessments to
monitor student understanding. Teachers will have time provided for joint planning and
to share assessments and to accordingly plan for student needs. Students do not have to
wait for intervention or for extra support. The structure of the school day will allow
teachers to have common time for ongoing collaboration to make instruction
modifications. This will create a deliberate alignment between the data and instructional
data is the guide to instructional planning for meeting the needs of all learners.

       9. LEADERSHIP AND STAFF SELECTION

               A. Describe the proposed staffing plan for the school

Classroom Teachers: K-3 will have a total of 16 classroom teachers reflecting the
agreed upon ratios (K-1 grades: 1 to 18 and 2-3 grades: 1-23 as averages taking into
account needs of students being served, learning goals and joint classrooms).

ELA Support
      1 per grade level
      District-provided staff and support

Special Education


                                            16
       Special Ed endorsed teachers
       District-provided special education staff and support

Specialists
       Art, Music, PE (shared position, proportionately with grades 4 and 5 in 4-8)

Classified Staff
        Media EA (shared position with 4-8 school)
        Technology EA
        Secretary
        Clerk (shared position with 4-8 school)
        Health (shared position with 4-8)
        Parent liaison (shared position with 4-8)
        Paraprofessionals – 8 positions for classroom support and supervision

               B. Explain the proposed leadership structure

The primary leadership will be provided by the principal and the governing board using a
shared decision making model that supports distributive leadership and involvement of
staff in important decisions.

               C. Identify the expectations for leadership and staff

All staff must agree as part of the Annual Election to Work Agreement to serve on at
least one committee. They must have a passion for being part of the K-3 school and must
agree to support the vision and mission and to be actively involved in all aspects of the
school. The principal must be an instructional leader. He or she will attend school
functions and actively participate in all aspects of the school. The principal will attend all
staff meetings and be part of the planning and delivery of staff development. The
principal must regularly spend time in classrooms as well as work collaboratively in
outreach to the community.

The shared expectations are to support small class sizes, good professional development,
shared leadership and mutual respect.

               D. Describe the evaluation process for teachers and leadership

Evaluation for all staff will follow district-approved guidelines for staff.

               E. Describe the plan for recruiting, selecting and retaining staff and
               leadership

The school will identify a hiring committee that will be responsible for recruiting and
hiring recommendations to the principal. Representatives from the school will attend job
fairs. Connections will be made with universities to encourage student teachers to come



                                              17
to Fletcher. The UCD Network for Language, Literacy and Culture will be accessed as a
resource.

               F. Explain how you will ensure adequate support, service and
                  instruction for Special Education and English language learners

Please refer to response in 7C.

       10. ANNUAL ELECTION-TO-WORK AGREEMENT

               A. Complete the template for the Annual Election-to-Work
Agreement attached to this application. The agreement must contain the terms of
employment, including the work day and work year, school schedule and
identification of supplemental hours and tasks necessary to complete the mission of
the school.

The Annual Election-to-Work Agreement is attached and includes required information.
The Annual Election-To-Work Agreement for licensed staff shared proportionately
between the Fletcher Primary School and Fletcher Intermediate Science and Technology
School is attached and includes required information.

               B. Outline job responsibilities in the Agreement

Refer to Agreements.

              C. Identify a dispute resolution process (or if none is included, the
process outlined in the Memorandum of Understanding will govern).

We will follow the dispute resolution process outlined in the Memorandum of
Understanding.

       11. PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND SUPPORT

              A. Explain the goals and process for developing the professional
learning culture of the school

Our goal is to create an environment in which differentiated, job-embedded professional
development is the norm. Teachers will consistently model lifelong learning through their
interactions with students, other teachers, teacher leaders, district coaches, and outside
experts. Learning opportunities will be based on teacher and student need and will
include:
        Coaching – individual and collaborative
        Collaborative team planning (within and across grade levels and disciplines)
        Team Teaching
        Lesson Studies
        Modeling


                                           18
       Dialogues
       Whole group workshops
       New teacher support through coaching and mentors


              B. Describe the proposed plan for providing staff with professional
learning and an outline for how professional learning will occur.

Professional Development
       Conferring with curriculum specialists for integrating curriculum
       Individual and/or collaborative coaching
       Access to district support
           o Science
           o Technology
           o Confer with IC for Math and Literacy

Ongoing daily opportunities for learning will be available through work with teacher
leaders, using the formats mentioned in 11A. Outside experts will also take on coaching
roles, working with teachers, teams, and whole groups. One day per week, teachers will
have 3.5 hours of student contact free time for collaborative team planning based on data,
along with professional learning opportunities as mentioned above. Teacher leaders, team
leaders, outside consultants and district coaches will support this process by facilitating
teams and large groups. Day long opportunities for professional learning will be built in
at the start of the school year, and before each break (fall, winter, spring).

       12. STUDENT SUPPORT

              A. Describe both the academic and affective supports that will be
provided to students, including special education and ELA

All special education legal requirements will be met. Special education will be aligned
with the content area focus of the school with differential supports to help students be
successful in the collaboratively agreed upon academic goals of the school.

Academic support to students will include:
    Assess proficiency in and instruct in native language when available and
      appropriate
    Sheltered instruction for second language learners
    Intervention team (RTI) to recommend intervention when concerns are apparent
    ELA teachers to support classroom teachers
    Para-professionals to provide targeted services
    Special education teachers to provide services
    Speech language pathologist to provide services

Affective support will include:
    School psychologist


                                            19
      School-based mental health therapy
      Social work support
      Parent support

              B. Identify how health services (nursing, counseling, truancy,
homelessness, etc.) will be provided to students

There will be a shared health paraprofessional and support from district-assigned school
nurse and counselor. A parent community support person will be on staff to manage
truancy and homelessness. There will be partnerships with the community to provide
additional support.

              C. Identify any extra and/or co-curricular activities that will be
provided to students

Programs might include: COMPASS, Bluff Lake Partnership excursions, Butterfly
Pavilion Partnership, sports programs through OYD of COA, student council, math
tutoring after school, and after school fine arts program.

       13. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

               A. Explain how families will be involved in their children’s education

Opportunities for involvement will include:
    Four positions on Governing board
    Parent workshops
    Frequent communication meetings
    Meaningful volunteer opportunities (classroom, clerical, supervision, safety,
      library, etc.)
    Parent leadership development (through Denver Foundation, conferences and
      parent trainings)
    Consistent and helpful written communication
    Parent Resource Center
    Parent library

               B. Describe the proposed community engagement plan

The community engagement plan will include subcommittee for community partnerships,
a community liaison (shared with 4-8 school), and a community member on the
Governing Board. In addition connections will be developed with the community to
provide resources for students on Friday afternoons that will include activities, mentoring
and partnerships.

               C. Outline anticipated community partnerships with the school

Proposed community partnerships could include:



                                            20
                                i. Family Literacy
                               ii. Aurora Asian Pacific Development Center
                             iii. City of Aurora (Moorehead, Office of Youth
                                   Development, Aurora Public Libraries, Aurora Police
                                   Department)
                              iv. Bluff Lake Nature Center
                               v. Butterfly Pavilion
                              vi. DAVA
                             vii. Kids Tech
                            viii. Denver Foundation
                              ix. Aurora Mental Health
                               x. Fitzsimmons Science and Technology Center
                              xi. Community College of Aurora
                             xii. Stapleton Healthy Heart Program
                            xiii. Downtown Aurora Business Association

       14. SAFE AND SECURE CAMPUS

               A. Describe how safety and security will be ensured for staff and
students

Safety and security will be maintained through continued adherence to Aurora Public
Schools district-wide plans, including Safe Schools policies, district protocols for safe
campuses (secured doors, lockdown drills, etc.) and training for staff in appropriate
procedures and responses to support school safety.

              B. Describe how students will be engaged in character development,
diversity appreciation and conflict resolution

By following the Responsive Classroom principles, students will learn how to resolve
conflict and take responsibility for their own actions and develop character. In addition,
there will be more school-wide events and projects will focus on culture and diversity.
We will have school assemblies to encourage cultural awareness.




                                             21
   FLETCHER 4-8 PILOT SCHOOL APPLICATION
   o Per the Joint Steering Committee Recommendations – Includes Revisions
     10-3-08

The Aurora Public Schools (APS) requests proposals for the creation of Pilot
Schools in accordance with the conditions stipulated in the Aurora Public Schools
Pilot Schools Overview, the Guidelines for Essential Features, the Memorandum
of Understanding and the identified Sequence for becoming a Pilot School. The
proposals must be organized in the following format and include a table of
contents:

   1. OVERVIEW OF THE PILOT SCHOOL
        A. Name of the school:          Fletcher Intermediate Science and
           Technology School
        B. Type of Pilot School (conversion, start-up or conversion to a
           separate school within the same facility) : Separate School Within
           the Same Facility
        C. Location: 10455 East 25th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80010
        D. Narrative describing what will make this school unique:

As a 4-8 school, Fletcher Intermediate Science and Technology School will provide a
better transition between elementary school and middle school. Since the 4-8 school will
serve most of the same families as the K-3 school, it is important that there is
coordination and articulation between the two schools. Families must feel that there is an
overall community and seamless connection for all children enrolled at the Fletcher site.
Although the two schools will be different because of different grade levels and specific
areas of focus, we want to ensure that families retain the sense of community that is so
important to the philosophy of both schools. K-3 provides the foundations for learning
how to learn, how to read and how to write. The 4-8 program will be a science-based
learning community that will expand the roles and responsibilities of students as learners.
We will engage parents so they can better understand what post-secondary options might
be available for their children.

The school will open in its first year with grades 4, 5, 6 and 7. The next year we will add
8th grade. We anticipate that the majority of the previous year’s 5 th graders will want to
continue at Fletcher. We asked parents if they would be interested in having their
children continue if the Pilot School proposal is approved and have received
overwhelming support. Once our proposal is approved, we will send out letters to all of
our parents with current 5th graders to get a firm commitment. We will also begin
marketing for open enrollment for grade 7 (and 6th as space permits).

 Our teaching and learning time will be organized differently than most traditional
schools. The school day will be organized around large chunks of time devoted to in-
depth study. Learning and teaching is anchored in the integration of scientific inquiry
and exploration. We believe that science is a very powerful focus and it will provide
relevance of study to the lives of students. The focus will be on discoveries and inquiry



                                             1
as the vehicle for learning. Technology will be integrated and used as a tool to transform
learning. The emphasis will be on student-directed learning that centers on student
interest and need. Students will have more academic choice in order to increase student
motivation by differentiating instruction and allowing students teacher-structured choices
in their work. Through guided discovery, materials will be introduced using a format that
encourages creativity and responsibility for learning. Technology will be used as a
learning tool rather than learning about technology. Navigations is a math program that
will help parents walk through the steps for getting their children scholarships.

A better intake process will include assessment and testing in Spanish or other languages
if possible. This process will allow the school to provide appropriate English language
acquisition supports. The diversity committee will help students transition between
their home culture and language and the U.S./ school culture and language while
maintaining the maintaining the integrity of both cultures. There will be a
comprehensive plan for teaching English that considers native language as an asset and
builds upon what students already know in their native language. All staff will receive
ELA and diversity training, and they will be encouraged to work toward an endorsement
or certification in ELA.

The schedule will provide teachers with opportunities for flexible, co-teaching, teaming
and collaboration – both in teaching and planning. There will be longer blocks for time
for staff planning. Professional development will be on-going, differentiated and
focused. It will be targeted to match the teacher’s and school’s goals and responsive to
the needs of students. There will be more job-embedded professional development.
Teachers will have the opportunity to work with experts from outside the school, e.g.
Colorado School of Mines interns, partnerships and access to scientists and researchers.

For all families who enroll their students at Fletcher, whether K-3 or 4-8, they will be
welcomed as an integral and functioning member of the school community. A goal will
be to have a welcome club comprised of parents who can reach out to parents who are
new to Fletcher. This strategy of accelerating the sense of community to new families,
will potentially decrease the amount of families that choose to be transient with the
Fletcher school community. Through parent involvement and outreach to develop
community partnerships, Fletcher will become the hub for the community it serves. The
goal is to build Fletcher into a community center. Once established, Fletcher would
invite all parents and other members of the adult community to take advantage of
learning opportunities (both academic and enrichment) as well as learn how to take on
leadership roles within the school..

           E. Narrative explaining how the autonomies granted to Pilot Schools will
              allow greater innovation in increasing student achievement?


To fulfill our plan, Fletcher must be a small school with small class sizes in order to
create a cohesive school community. It is important to create relationships and instill
within students that they have the ability to succeed. We want to create a culture of


                                             2
success and develop a sense of curiosity for learning within our students. We want to
connect school to the lives of students. The ability to support students based on
individual needs demands a smaller student body if we are to build a genuine school
community that engages and empowers our students and our parents. Staff will truly be
able to know all students and collaborate with parents.

In order to achieve our vision and mission, we need maximum control over how we
organize the schedules for staff and our students. Blocks, immersions, interventions,
flexible groupings, cross grade level offerings and integrated content demand that the
school be organized differently. It is essential to provide teachers with blocks of time for
planning, collaboration and professional development so they can be more innovative and
provide different models of teaching and learning. To design curriculum and resources to
respond to student needs, teachers must have to opportunity to work together and team.
This time to collaborate will create a cohesive staff with a sense that these are all “our
kids” rather than class by class ownership. ELA support and instructional technology can
be embraced by everyone and provided to impact the entire school – not assigned as a
responsibility of a specific teacher. Professional development in any area can be based
on students and delivered to best meet needs of each staff member.

With staffing autonomy, the roles of staff can be based more directly on the vision and
mission of the school and better meet the specific needs of students. There can be more
services in the areas of counseling, social work, mental health and family support.

We believe that because teachers design the programs and have buy-in to the school,
there will be less staff turnover. A cohesive staff committed to Fletcher will ensure
success.

           F. Narrative describing a typical student day

In order to meet the needs of parents who are likely to have students enrolled in both the
K-3 and the 4-8 schools, the beginning and ending times will need to be the same.

Each day, each student will interact with a teacher in a designated small community. The
focus would include social development, grounding, academic checks, and activities to
foster sharing and getting to know other students. The outcome is to provide an
exceptional learning and teaching environment that is student-driven and anchored in
scientific inquiring using technology to transform the learning experience.

All students will be engaged in challenging science-based curriculum that develops
academic concepts. The learning would be organized around collaborative activities and
scaffold instruction to build students’ academic proficiency. We would draw on
students’ backgrounds, their cultures and their languages. There would be fluid
grouping for language development, while maintaining the integrity of the community.
There would not be the continual transition between subjects that currently occurs. Art,
music, technology and physical education could be electives for grades 6, 7 and 8. There




                                             3
would be student choice and the content would be student driven. Older students would
have opportunities for off-site learning experiences and mentorships.

The goal is to create confident students who value education, the diversity of others and
value themselves as learners. Each student’s academic and social needs would be met in
a supportive, collaborative school community that honors students’ cultural backgrounds
and languages while fostering critical, creative thinkers.

See 4C for sample schedule of student day.

   2. DESIGN TEAM PROFILE AND PLANNING PROCESS

The design team began meeting in November 2007 to develop a proposal for the K-5
school at Fletcher for implementation in 2008-2009. When it became apparent that
Fletcher’s projected enrollment would exceed 500, the design team requested support
from the entire staff to develop proposals for two separate schools within the same
facility at Fletcher Elementary. The survey results were supportive and the design team
divided to form two new teams: one for a K-3 school and the other for a 4-8 school.
Each design team added new members and began meeting to develop proposals. This 4-8
school proposal includes some of the work from the K-5 design team but needed to
expand and re-focus to ensure appropriate learning supports for a student body that
includes middle school.

The 4-8 school will open with grades 4-7 and will add 8th grade the following year.
Feedback from our parents indicates that most would want to continue into 6 th grade after
their children complete 5th grade at Fletcher. Open enrollment will be marketed and
encouraged for 7th grade (and 6th grade if space is available.) An outline of our intended
open enrollment plan is attached. The following year we will expand our efforts to
include 8th grade. Although first preference will be given to APS students (as outlined in
both district policy and state law), our plan includes reaching outside of APS boundaries
as space permits, especially to the nearby Stapleton neighborhood.

       A. Identify who is on the Design Team to establish this Pilot School

Angelina Walker, 4th grade teacher          AEA member
Lori Martin, 4th grade teacher              AEA member
Jody VanderHamm, ELA teacher
Ben Gondrez, tech educational Assistant
Lisa Nieto, principal
Ryann Patrick, Consultant (APS District Science Instructional Coordinator)

        B. Time line and feasibility of opening by the target date
The Intermediate school plans to open for the 2009-2010 school year. The 4th and 5th
grade students will be enrolled from neighborhood boundaries. All current 5 th graders
will be invited and encouraged to remain at Fletcher for their 6 th grade year. In addition,




                                              4
a marketing plan will be in place to open enroll students to fill slots in 6 th grade and 7th
grade. District policies for open enrollment will be followed.

Proposed Timeline for Fletcher Intermediate School
   o October 21, 2008        Proposal presented to APS Board of Education
   o November 11, 2008 Board approval of Fletcher Intermediate School
   o Nov. 18-Dec. 9, ’08 Establishment of Governing Board
   o Dec. 10-17, ’08         Development of Marketing Plan for grades 6 and 7
   o Jan. 5-21, ’09          Implementation of Marketing Plan (Parents sign
                             Letters of Intent for 6th grade)
   o Jan. 22-30, ’09         Annual Election to Work finalized
   o Feb. 2-5, ’09           Teachers Sign Annual Election to Work
   o Feb. 9 (Confer HR) Positions for Intermediate School Posted


        3. SCHOOL VISION

        A. Statements of the Vision and Mission

Vision: Create confident students who value education, the diversity of others, and who
are able to apply scientific inquiry and exploration to succeed in the 21 st century.

Mission: The Fletcher Intermediate Science and Technology School is dedicated to
creating an exceptional learning and teaching environment that is student-driven and
anchored in scientific inquiry using technology to transform the learning experience so
students can be successful in our diverse, global community.



        B. Provide narrative of the school’s core values and principles

At Fletcher, we are accountable for putting children first and teaching the whole child by
valuing engagement, relationships, professionalism and diversity in order to develop life-
long learners. Teachers are responsible for fostering an environment that empowers
students to make personal choices that are relevant to their success in both school and
life.

We believe:

Everyone can learn
Everyone needs to feel known and cared for
Everyone has value
Everyone is both a learner and a teacher
Everyone can has something to contribute
Primary language is fundamental to thinking learning and creativity
Native language is an asset
Bilingualism is a cognitive, social and economic asset


                                               5
Students must be met where they are and taken to the next level
Students are responsible for their own learning
Students must feel safe both physically and emotionally
Students must be in a place where risk taking is encouraged and supported
Students’ cultural identifies will be supported and celebrated
A science and technology focus will provide an environment for teaching and
learning to foster critical, creative thinking.


       4. KEY CHARACTERISTICS

       A. Describe the programmatic scope of school and, if applicable, community
interest and participation in establishing this Pilot School. (From community,
provide letters of support.)

Each student will be part of a home community and a teacher will be an advisor and
advocate. The school will offer blocks of time for common standards-based content
units. Within those standards-based content units there will be opportunities to organize
students within areas of choice and student interest. Project-based learning will ensure
that students understand how what they are learning is connected to the real world.
Multi-disciplinary groups of teachers will ensure students are taught social studies,
literacy, math and science. Units will be selected within classrooms, across grade levels
and through out the school so all students share common experiences and have access to
the same content and understanding. The delivery of instruction will be differentiated in
delivery and curriculum adapted to best meet the needs of each student. Choice of
electives will be made according to interest in areas such as art, music, physical
education, technology and language. There will be ongoing support for language
development and appropriate interventions. The goal is to ensure students master skills
and gain a growing understanding of how things learned in the classroom are connected
to each other, the outside world, and to their own lives.

       B. How will the school be organized and structured

The school will use the principles of the Responsive Classroom approach as its basis.
This means the school will be organized in a way to ensure a sense of community.
Knowing the families of the children we teach and working with them as partners is
essential to children’s education. The structure will support the philosophy that the social
curriculum is as important as the academic curriculum. How the adults at school work
together is as important as their individual competence. We believe lasting change
begins with the adult community. It is important to hear families’ insights and help them
better understand the school’s teaching approaches. Collaborative problem solving will
be developed by using conferencing, role playing and other strategies to engage students
in problem solving. Through guided discover, materials will be introduced using a
format that encourages creativity and responsibility. Students will be involved in
creating the rules for their classrooms that allow all members to meet their learning goals.




                                             6
The following outline key components within the organization and structure of the
school:
Building a sense of community
   1. Multidisciplinary teams
   2. Home community for each student
   3. Advisory
   4. School wide activities and opportunities for students and teachers to interact
Professional Development
   5. Interns, outside resource consultants
   6. Ensuring diversity understanding
   7. Assure that teachers feel comfortable using the technology already incorporated in
        technology
   8. Opportunities for extensions for teachers to advance their knowledge of
        technology
   9. Bring technology into their classrooms to differentiate instruction to change their
        classroom into dynamic learning environments
   10. Extended team planning


              C. The school calendar and daily schedule for both staff and students

This calendar is based on the district-adopted 2008-2009 calendar since there is not an
adopted calendar for 2009-2010. In order to better accommodate parents, Fletcher will
coordinate its calendar to the degree possible with the district calendar once a calendar
is adopted by the Board of Education.

This schedule further assumes that Life Skills will be relocated in order to
accommodate both the K-3 and 4-8 grades at Fletcher.

There are longer periods of time per subject area; scheduling week as a whole rather than
daily schedule. Students will have choices in determine their science/technology courses
of study.

Before School Retreat: 2daysx8h=16h
Before School Professional Development: 3daysx8h=24h
Total before School Hours=40h


Teacher Work Day: 7:15-3:15 = 8hrs
Student hours M-Th 7:45-2:45=7 hrs
             F     7:45-12:05


Key Items                                                  Changes
*same APS vacation days                                    *student day increase M-Th
by ½ hour



                                            7
*8 hours work day                                                     *planning time on Friday
(early release)
*1/2 hour before and ½ hour after school planning                     *shift inservice day to
beginning of quarter
*same APS start dates and end date (for kids)
*same quarters as district

                                                                      TBD
                                                                      *lunch schedule
                                                                      *exact dates pending 2009-
2010 calendar

                                    APS Hours                     Pilot School Hours
Q1                                  49 days: 392h                 352h
Q2                                  47 days: 376h                 376h
Q3                                  47 days: 376h                 376h
Q4                                  44 days: 352h                 352h
                          Total                                   1456 + 40 BOY
                                    1496                          1496

Traditional APS Student Day (5th)               Possible Fletcher Intermediate Student Day
7:45-8:10           Morning meeting                 7:30-7:45         Community Breakfast
8:10-8:20           Book trade                      7:45-8:15         Advisory/ Mentorships
8:20-8:40           Skills                          815-8:45          Homeroom Community
8:40-9:40           Reading                         8:45-10:45        Literacy Block - Readers
          8:40-8:50 mini lesson                                         Writers Workshop
          8:50-9:15 independent reading                                 Tech Presentations
          9:15-9:40 closing/share                                       Speech Presentations
9:40-10:25          Writing                                            *Language Acquistion Practice
          9:40-9:50 mini lesson                     10:45-11:30       Elective -
          9:50-10:20 independent writing            11:30-12:15       Lunch Recess (Gr 4 & 5)
10:25-11:05         Recess/lunch                    12:15-2:15        Content – Student Directed
11:05-12:00         Content                                           With embedded math
12:00-1:30          Math                                              practiced authentically
          12:00-12:15         number talk                             through science exploration
          12:15-12:40         stations
          12:40-1:30          investigations
1:30-2:15           Specials


                    D. The proposed class sizes and teacher-student loads

     20:1 Student/Teacher Ratio

                    E. How students and staff will be grouped for instruction

The key concept for both students and staff will be fluid grouping.

Students


                                                    8
    1. Teams will group and regroup students based on academic and language needs,
    as needed, also based on interest
Staff
    1. Multidisciplinary teams

               F. Methods for supporting students (e.g. those at risk, methods of
               intervention, academic and personal counseling)

We believe that a teacher can open the door but it takes the student to go through. We
will strive to help students see themselves as academically oriented. We believe it is
preparation gap and not an achievement gap. We will identify what students need to
know and do to be successful. We will connect students to areas that ignite their interest
in learning. Collaborative instructional planning and focused school-wide goals will
make certain we know the children we teach – individually, culturally, and
developmentally – is as important as knowing the content we teach. To be successful
academically and socially, all students need a set of social skills in the areas of
cooperation, assertion, responsibility, empathy and self control. All students will be
encouraged to notice and internalize expected behaviors through modeling techniques.
The physical classroom will be set up in ways that encourage independence, cooperation
and productivity. The focus will be on logical consequences that respond to misbehavior
in a way that allows students to fix and learn from their mistakes while preserving their
dignity. We believe the greatest cognitive growth occurs through social interaction. The
social curriculum is as important as the academic curriculum. We will increase student
motivation by differentiating instruction and allowing students teacher-structured choices
in their work. How students learn is as important as what they learn. Process and content
go hand in hand. The emphasis on knowing each child individually, culturally and
developmentally will allow for meeting the needs of transient students, as well as the
stable core student community.

       5. PILOT SCHOOL GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE
              A. How the governance structure will support the goals and
                 objectives of the plan

The Governing Board will ensure there is collaborative decision making around
significant decisions of the school. Using a shared decision-making model, the
Governing Board will make decisions relating to program, school enrollment, class size,
schedule, length of school day and school year, and the amount and type of required
professional learning for teachers at the school needed to fulfill the vision and mission.

                 B. Governing Board membership and responsibilities

The Governing Board will have at least 12 members comprised of the principal, four
teachers who are AEA members, elected by all members of the site’s bargaining unit (one
of the AEA teacher representatives will be the building association representative), at
least one classified representative chosen by peers, a minimum of four parents selected by
parents and at least two non-parent community members selected by the Governing



                                             9
Board. We understand that if the Governing Board grows beyond 12 members, one-third
will be AEA members.

The Governing Board will meet the requirements required by the state for school
accountability committees. The Governing Board will develop its bylaws and will be
responsible for making all final decisions for educational and operational policies at the
school within the agreed upon school vision.

               C. Matrix for the structures that will be in place to make decisions
with identification of who is responsible for which decisions

Fletcher 4-8 Decision Matrix

Key:
A- Awareness
D- Decision: decides plan of action
I- Input
SD- Participates in decision making




                                             10
                                      Governing     Principal     School            Staff     Parents
                                       Board                     Committee
School Goals/ Data                    D             SD                          SD            I
Budget                                D             SD                          I             A
Master Schedule                       D             SD                          I             A
Content/Integration Teams             D             SD           SD             I
Staff Hiring                                        D            SD             I
Staff Performance/Evaluation                        D
Principal Evaluation                  SD *Deputy                                I             I
                                      Supt.-D
Professional Development                            SD           SD             I
Responsive Classroom/Discipline                     SD           SD             I             A
Student Intervention                                SD           SD             I
Community Partnerships                              SD           SD             I             A
Fundraising/Grants                                  D            SD             A
Facilities Management                               D                           A
School Wide Events                                  SD           SD             I             I
Accountability/SQR                    *JSC- D       SD




                 D. Description of process for staff input into decisions

As identified in the matrix, committees will develop recommendations for the governing
to review and approve through consensus (whenever possible) or a 2/3 vote. Committees
will be responsible for including staff input into recommendations for the governing
board. The decision making process will be open and transparent and ensure two-way
communications so that anyone can provide input and suggest actions to the committees.
Specifics on the structure and process will be confirmed by the governing board once it is
in place.

       6. BUDGET
            A. Proposed budgets (see attached documents Consolidated Title
               Funds and General Fund)
             B. Strategies for additional fundraising

The school will aggressively seek dollars from grants, foundations and partnerships
through a fundraising committee designated by the Governing Board.

                 C. Once in place, the Governing Board’s process for responsibly
                    managing the budget to ensure fiscal stability

The process will be developed and shared with all staff so there is transparency around all
budget decisions based on the vision and mission of the school. The process must ensure
that funds are used in a manner that supports the goals of the school and stays within
allotted resources. The process should include an opportunity for staff input.

       7. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION



                                            11
               A. The school’s instructional core practices and what teaching will
look like

The standards-based science learning community will support students as they develop
their individual courses of study. Students will be able to transform their learning
through the use of technology. Our general philosophy is that all students are becoming
young scientists. The focus will be on natural and social sciences and learning will be
deepened through inquiry. Students will be expected to write, develop and publish
products. Based on student interest, four units of study will be selected each year that
will ensure that core understandings are addressed and are aligned with CSAP. Pacing
guides and interim assessments will used as resources to monitor student progress.

Language demands will be evaluated for all grade levels and for new comers to ensure
more focus and to provide support based on language needs. If necessary, a student
could have additional language support.

Instruction will be organized around units that connect the natural and social sciences and
are standards-based. Within the community culture, students will be grouped and re-
grouped to meet individual needs. And within the same topic, teachers will identify and
organize materials and identify resources that are differentiated and high interest for
various needs of students. This allows students the access to the same content and
understanding.

Science content will be divided into four, nine-week standards-based units of study that
focus on the natural and social sciences to ensure that all students are prepared for CSAP
in all areas. Learning will be deepened through inquiry. The first seven weeks of each
content unit is common for all students at each grade level. The remaining 2 weeks in the
quarter will have students choosing topics within the scope of the course of study to do
independent work called self selected extensions. For example, upon culmination of a 7-
week unit on Space, students will be given approximately 4 choices that will allow them
to “dig deeper” into the content. For the Space unit, examples could be: Lunar Geology;
biology on how space travel affects the human body; a robotics course involving space
vehicles working with local aerospace engineers; and a course on a space simulation
mission. Each of these choices will be coordinated and developed by a member of that
grade-level team (teacher). Students will be held accountable for their learning during
the self-selection extensions by making presentations to their grade levels, families and
other members of the community to demonstrate their understanding of how what they
are learning connects to the real world. Students will be able to transform their learning
through the use of technology. Our general philosophy is that all students are young
scientists. Pacing guides and interim assessments will used as resources to monitor
student progress.

Science and social studies will be integrated into literacy so that reading and writing is
supported across the curriculum. For example, during a science unit on space, teachers
may select space related texts for shared reading or reading demonstration as well as use
the topic of space in their writing demonstrations when it applicable. Social Studies



                                            12
content will be integrated into science or literacy depending on the topic. For example,
Colorado History and Western expansion can be integrated into the science unit on
Colorado Wildlife, but there will be an infusion of content through literacy throughout
 the school day. Math will be taught as a stand alone course of study, but it will be
deliberately connected to the content areas. Math may be offered in longer blocks of time
(e.g., three days a week with longer times but a plan that ensures practice every day in
other courses).

As students progress through the grades they will have more opportunity each year to
adopt their own content related course of study based on their own interests. They will
be able to pursue courses within a “drop-down” menu for their self-selected extensions
that is teacher developed. We will offer career advising and establish mentorships for
students through partnerships (e.g., City of Aurora, Youth Development participation in
math, science and technology and partnership with Colorado School of Mines). Courses
of study will be tied to middle school standards. Grades 4 – 6 will be expected to
participate in community projects. By 7th and 8th grade students will be connected to
mentors and get in-depth experience in their areas of interest.

We will use Gen Yes and TechYes as the basis for technology infusion and instruction to
integrate science and technology.. GenYes is an elective where students are instructed to
become the technology mentors to the teachers. A technology facilitator guides the
learning of the students and coordinates the student’s support in technology throughout
the school. TechYes is designed to introduce students to technology and information
literacy through science projects. This project-based approach ensures that students can
be assessed both for science content and technology use. This program is correlated to
the standards and meets the NCLB eighth grade technology mandate. The TechYes
science projects are incorporated into the science curriculum. Students can use the
TechYes student guides to plan and create projects for expanding their expected
culminating evidence.

Technology/science fairs will be the culminating evidence to demonstrate knowledge.
The upper grade of students will be able to compete in state, regional and, even,
international fairs. A further advantage of demonstrations and presenting of projects is
that students become more effective communicators and can present in front of
audiences.

Overall, the first two years in the intermediate school will offer students a variety of
choices in science so that by sixth grade, students can start to make more focused
choices. Fourth and fifth grades are the transition years to more in-depth and focused
courses of study by 6th grade. Initially, in 2009-2010, the 4-5 curriculum structure will
look more like K-3 for language development and specials (Music, art, technology
and pe.) will be offered and then by 7-8 will transition into content topics. Language
demands will be evaluated for all grade levels and for new comers to ensure more focus
and to provide support based on language needs. If needed, a student could have double
blocks of language development. In subsequent years, as the students entering the 4-8




                                            13
school have transitioned from the K-3 Pilot School, the curriculum structure will shift to
a modified model of the 6-8 grades.

Electives for grades 6-8, initially and then expanding down to grades 4 and 5; could
include creative writing, strategy games, debate teams, student government or leadership
as well as art, music, foreign language and physical education.


               B. A plan for closing and ultimately eliminating the achievement gap
for all groups at the school

As students continue to become proficient in English, they will receive content
development in their native language. Language enrichment time will allow students to
take what they know and improve in content understanding. The goal is to provide
opportunities for enrichment that will focus on what they need to know. With the
common focus of learning, students will be able to explore and extend and we will be
able to evaluate and organize units and teaching strategies that respond to their needs.
Our goal will be to have language expertise on each teaching team. We will provide
structures that organize students by language proficiency within groups that ensure
learning is sparked, regardless of the language proficiency. The school structure will
allow for small group work. By engaging all students in interesting and important units
of science inquiry, they will be able to use their growing knowledge to support increased
literacy skills. The students will be guided and advised into choosing their science unit of
study in consideration of their interests and to expand their content understanding.
Technology will be infused throughout the inquiry process.

Each Friday morning, students will have time for science exploration and note-booking.
This will be a time for students to catch up or accelerated and interventions will be
provided as needed. Small grouped can be pulled for whatever the students need. We
can target responses if it is language development, concept building or advisory support.

       C. Specific strategies for addressing needs of diverse learners including ELA,
Gifted and Talented, special needs, etc.

Using data, we can identify learning goals for each student, provide appropriate supports
and resources to teachers, and monitor progress. Common planning and targeted
professional development will help teachers collaborate and work together to meet the
needs of every learner.

The overriding philosophy of fluid grouping and re-grouping will ensure that students are
receiving instruction based on their need rather than labels.

An advantage of having the K-3 primary school on the same premises will be that
teachers can more easily talk to the students’ previous teachers. Research also indicates
that students can lose learning when they change schools. By staying in the same
building K-8, they have the advantage of continuity.



                                            14
Diverse and ELA
       Sheltered Instruction of concepts – Using visual representation, including
       interactive white-boards and visualizers, that is school-wide and consistent
       Continuing native Language concept development
       Daily language enrichment
       Intentional parent outreach to help parents understand what we teach and how the
       parents can help
       Grouping and regrouping – based on language level and content knowledge and
       content interest
       The Intermediate school focus of science and technology philosophy of
       instruction will be organized around units that connect the natural and social
       sciences and are standards-based. This will allow for the integration of scientific
       inquiry essential for success of the diverse and second language student.

Special Needs
       Students who are not showing progress academically or socially can be referred to
       intervention team consisting of academic and mental health representation
       Intervention team will also be a part of instructional intervention, following the
       Response to Intervention (RTI) process.
       Wider range of electives will support engagement and better connect students to
       learning

Gifted and Talented
       Clustered groupings
       Middle school program based on accelerating learning for grades 6, 7 and 8
       (acceleration also possible for 4 and 5 once established

                        a. The core curriculum all students must have and the
                           overall curriculum

Every morning students will start their day in a home community with a teacher. In
addition, every student will be assigned an adult who serves as an advisor to help students
direct their own learning and make appropriate choices.

The focus will be on natural and social sciences. Technology will be the bridge that
connects students to learning experiences that foster critical, creative thinkers. Literacy
will be connected to content with language enrichment. Math connections will be made
during content with the majority of math delivered during a math block. Every team will
have strong literacy and strong science expertise. Each grade level, 6-8, will focus on
identified science standards (for example, 6th grade might focus on life science and 7th
and earth science). Grades 4 and 5 will receive more of a sampler of science to help
identify areas of interest. There will be a range of electives available that are geared
toward student interest.




                                            15
Although math will be a stand-alone course, other content will be infused throughout the
curriculum. Content will be designed using standards and concepts that are mutually
agreed upon by teachers. Teachers will continue to investigate current curriculum
resources to serve our linguistically diverse community. The end goal is to develop
curriculum that will prepare our students for the 21st century. One way will be to ensure
mentorships to all 7th and 8th grade students.

Technology will be that bridge that transforms learning


       8. STUDENT ASSESSMENT

               A. Describe your school’s philosophy on student assessment

The overall purpose of assessment is to drive instruction and to measure student learning.
Ongoing assessment based upon identified benchmarks and the use of district interim
assessments as a resource will be used to identify what students know and are able to do.

Fletcher will determine consistent criteria for proficiency. Backwards planning will be
used to determine key concepts, assessments and identify resources. There will be
multiple assessments that will allow students to demonstrate what they know and are able
to do in a variety of formats. Teachers will have time to analyze assessments to determine
next step and give timely feedback to students. State mandated tests will be used as
summative data to determine if kids are proficient on state standards.

In addition, interest surveys will be given to students to identify interests. Other surveys
will measure learning attitudes to measure the shift in thinking in how students perceive
themselves.

             B. Explain what formative and summative measures you will use to
determine student progress and success

Our goals in reporting will be the same as any other school in the district, but how we get
there will be different. Surveys, benchmarks and quarterly assessment will be used to
define and develop curriculum in order to respond to the needs of every student. Student
developed portfolios will provide cumulative evidence confirming student learning
outcomes. The student project demonstrations and participation in science/technology
fairs will provide summative evidence of student success. We will have a standards-
based district report card system.

               C. Describe how you will prepare your students for all state mandated
tests such as CSAP and ACT

Within each standard based unit will be clear identification of what students should know
and be able to do as well as what proficiency looks like. Quarterly assessments and
teacher-created assessments can be collaboratively scored to provide immediate feedback



                                             16
to students and teachers. Portfolios will monitor learning and include common
assessments that are teacher-developed and rated according to a rubric that identifies
whether students are proficient, below or low. Curriculum aligned quarterly assessments,
similar to District interim assessments (in Spanish and English) will be administered.
This will help teachers gauge student preparedness for state mandated tests and provide
important information on student progress. Results of all testing will be analyzed in
order to differentiate instruction. The data will help teachers make decisions about
instruction.

The DRA2 standards and benchmarks will align with science content inquiry. Fletcher
will write annual goals with a minimum of 3% growth in order to reach or exceed District
average in three years on CSAP. (See attached Assessment Target chart). Kathy
Richardson and Investigations assessments will be used in math.

Standards-based curriculum and the use of quarterly assessments as a resource will
ensure students are being prepared for state assessments. The quarterly assessments will
also help prepare students for the format of state tests. CELA will be used as a
summative assessment to measure language development.


               D. Identify data that will be collected to measure student progress

In addition to achievement data, student progress will be measured through targets for
attendance and discipline referrals.

              E. Describe how the data will be used to assess student needs and
identify students needing help

Information about each student’s social, personal and academic needs will be assessed in
order to formulate an appropriate course of study to ensure personal growth. Students
will be supported and empowered to learn how to direct their own learning and make
choices. Families will be engaged as partners to better support the learning needs of their
children. Other information about the student will be provided by the advisor to help
connect the student with appropriate resources.

All this information will help identify interventions and supports for academic and
personal success.

               F. Explain how the data will be used to guide instruction

Teachers will use quarterly assessments, end of the unit and formative assessments to
monitor student understanding. Teachers will have time provided for joint planning and
to share assessments and to accordingly plan for student needs. Students do not have to
wait for intervention or for extra support. The structure of the school day will allow
teachers to have common time for ongoing collaboration to make instruction




                                            17
modifications. This will create a deliberate alignment between the data and instructional
data is the guide to instructional planning for meeting the needs of all learners.

       9. LEADERSHIP AND STAFF SELECTION

   A. Describe the proposed staffing plan for the school

Administrator – 1

Classroom Teachers
       2009 – 80 students projected 4th – 4 teachers 20:1
       2009 – 80 students projected 5th – 4 teachers 20:1
       2009 – 60 students projected 6th – 3 teachers 20:1
       2009 – 58 students projected 7th – 3 teachers 20:1
                         14 classroom teachers


       2010   89 students projected 4th – 4 teachers 22:1
       2010   75 students projected 5th – 4 teachers 19:1
       2010   72 students projected 6th – 4 teachers 18:1
       2010   58 students projected 7th - 3 teachers 20:1
       2010   57 students projected 8th – 3 teachers 19:1
                          18 classroom teachers


ELA/Technology Support
     Classroom teachers ESL Endorsed or HQ; then resource proportionately
     Technology EA

Special Education (Mild/Moderate)
       Classroom teachers Special Ed endorsed or HQ; then resource proportionately
       Interventionist

Electives Offered
       Music, Foreign Language, Strategy Games (Math), Leadership, Physical Ed
       (Creative Movement, Dance)
       Guest teachers – Artists in Residence, Contractual

Character/Career Development
       1 Coordinates Advisory and Mentorships
       1 Counselor and/or social worker to support behavioral and social needs

Classified Staff
        4 initial then 5 classroom support; 1 per grade level
        Office Support: Secretary


                                             18
Shared Staff between Two Pilot Schools Sharing Facilities
Initial Year
        Specialists (Art, Music, P.E., Tech) for grades 4 and 5
Classified Staff
        Health Para
        Clerk
        Media EA
        Nutritional Staff
        Custodial Staff

               B. Explain the proposed leadership structure

The principal will ensure distributive leadership principles are followed. Using a shared
decision-making approach, the principal will work collaboratively with the governing
board to include staff, parents and community.


               C. Identify the expectations for leadership and staff

All staff will be expected to be engaged and support the vision and mission of the school.
Through the annual election-to-work agreement, staff will know what is expected of
them. Staff will be expected to work collaboratively with colleagues on Friday
afternoons for planning and professional learning. Each person is expected to serve on at
least two school communities to support the requests of the governing board and the
organization of the school.

               D. Describe the evaluation process for teachers and leadership

Evaluation for all staff will follow district-approved guidelines

               E. Describe the plan for recruiting, selecting and retaining staff and
               leadership


Most of the staff will come from the current Fletcher staff. Once the two proposals for
the K-3 and 4-8 school is voted on and accepted by Fletcher staff and approved by the
Joint Steering Committee and ultimately the Board of Education, staff at Fletcher will
have the opportunity to submit which school and grade level they would prefer. The
design team will act as the de-facto governing board until the staff is identified and
confirmed at each of the two schools. In the event, that there are more requests than are
available for a position, staff will be asked to submit a second choice. In cases where a
person’s first or second choice cannot be met, the design team will interview the persons
and determine who would be the best placement for the position.



                                             19
               F. Explain how you will ensure adequate support, service and
instruction for Special Education and English language learners

We will continue to access and receive district provided resources for these learners. In
addition, our school structure and plans for meeting the needs of every student explained
in 7B and 7C will ensure adequate support, service and instruction.

       10. ANNUAL ELECTION-TO-WORK AGREEMENT

               A. Complete the template for the Annual Election-to-Work
Agreement attached to this application. The agreement must contain the terms of
employment, including the work day and work year, school schedule and
identification of supplemental hours and tasks necessary to complete the mission of
the school.

The Annual Election-to-Work Agreement is attached and includes required information.

The Annual Election-To-Work Agreement for licensed staff shared proportionately
between the Fletcher Primary School and Fletcher Intermediate Science and Technology
School is attached and includes required information.



               B. Outline job responsibilities in the Agreement

(See agreements)

              C. Identify a dispute resolution process (or if none is included, the
process outlined in the Memorandum of Understanding will govern).

We will follow the dispute resolution process outlined in the Memorandum of
Understanding.

       11. PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND SUPPORT

              A. Explain the goals and process for developing the professional
learning culture of the school

Our goal is to create content experts at each grade level. Each grade level Team will
have a Science, Math, Technology and Literacy Expert; with all highly qualified in ELA.
A grade level team could have an additional Special Ed or ELA expert, depending on the
students’ needs. Learning Communities will be grade level and vertical. The graduate
Interns from Colorado School of Mines will work directly with the Science content
expert at each grade level. Teachers will consistently model lifelong learning through
their interactions with students, other teachers, teacher leaders, other professionals, and




                                            20
outside experts. Learning opportunities will be based on teacher and student need and
will include:
        Coaching – individual and collaborative
        Collaborative team planning (within and across grade levels and disciplines)
        Team Teaching
        Lesson Studies
        Dialogues
        Whole group workshops


              B. Describe the proposed plan for providing staff with professional
learning and an outline for how professional learning will occur.

Professional Development
       Conferring with curriculum specialists for integrating curriculum (i.e. Nancy
       Language Dev., Responsive Classroom, Dennis TechYes)
       Coaching Model
           o Collaborative
           o Individual
       APS Support
           o Science
           o Technology
           o Confer with IC for Math and Literacy

Ongoing daily opportunities for learning will be available through work with content
coaches (Science, Math, Technology, Literacy), using the formats mentioned in 11A.
Outside experts (consultants or graduate interns) will also take on coaching roles,
working with teachers, teams, and whole groups. One day per week, teachers will have 4
hours of student contact free time for collaborative team planning based on data, along
with professional learning opportunities as mentioned above. Teacher leaders, team
leaders, outside consultants and district coaches will support this process by facilitating
teams and large groups. Day long opportunities for professional learning will be built in
at the start of the school year, and before each break (fall, winter, spring).



       12. STUDENT SUPPORT

              A. Describe both the academic and affective supports that will be
provided to students, including special education and ELA

All special education legal requirements will be met. Special education will be aligned
with the content area focus of the school with differential supports to help students be
successful in the collaboratively agreed upon academic goals of the school.




                                            21
              B. Identify how health services (nursing, counseling, truancy,
homelessness, etc.) will be provided to students

There will be a shared health para-professional and support from the district assigned
school nurse as well as a counselor. An affective needs/parent community support person
will be on staff to manage truancy and homelessness. There will be partnerships with the
community to provide additional support.


              C. Identify any extra and/or co-curricular activities that will be
              provided to students

Colorado School of Mines Bechtel Grant
          o Graduate interns in classrooms
          o Excursions to Colorado school of Mines
GenYes – TechYes
             o After-school curriculum for teaching student mastery of technology to
                 support the staff

Internships with City of Aurora
Bluff Lake Partnership Excursions
Calwood Educational Annual Experience
Leadership Council (Students)


       13. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

              A. Explain how families will be involved in their children’s education

Our Comprehensive Parent Involvement Plan will be coordinated with the K-3 school
and will include:

      Four positions on the Governing Board
      Parent workshops
      Frequent communication meetings
      Meaningful volunteer opportunities (classroom, clerical, supervision, safety,
       library, etc.)
      Parent leadership development (through Denver Foundation, conferences and
       parent trainings)
      Consistent and helpful written communication
      Parent Resource Center
      Parent library

              B. Describe the proposed community engagement plan




                                          22
A committee will be established to coordinate and seek community partnerships. Further
partnerships will be created as students engage in mentorships and community projects.
The student projects will give something back to the community through service and will
help students gain an appreciation and understanding of their community.

               C. Outline anticipated community partnerships with the school

Proposed community partnerships:

                                  i. Colorado School of Mines
                                 ii. Learning Source - Family Literacy
                               iii. City of Aurora (Moorehead, Office of Youth
                                     Development, Aurora Public Libraries, Aurora Police
                                     Department)
                                iv. Bluff Lake Nature Center
                                 v. Calwood Educational Center
                                vi. Stapleton Foundation
                               vii. Donnell Kaye Foundation
                              viii. Kids Tech
                                ix. Denver Foundation
                                 x. Aurora Mental Health
                                xi. Fitzsimmons Science and Technology Center
                               xii. Community College of Aurora
                              xiii. Downtown Aurora Business Association

Fletcher will partner with the City of Aurora, specifically the Office of Youth
Development to coordinate support for students and families. Areas included are early
childhood, at-risk interventions, and affective supports such as anger management,
mentorships and recreational activities.

       14. SAFE AND SECURE CAMPUS

               A. Describe how safety and security will be ensured for staff and
students

Safety and security will be maintained through continued adherence to Aurora Public
Schools district-wide plans, including Safe Schools policies, district protocols for safe
campuses (secured doors, lockdown drills, etc.) and training for staff in appropriate
procedures and responses to support school safety.

              B. Describe how students will be engaged in character development,
diversity appreciation and conflict resolution


Student presentations in science/technology fairs and internships will help students
develop as learners and contributing members of society. By following the Responsive



                                             23
Classroom principles, students will learn how to resolve conflict and take responsibility
for their own actions and develop character. In addition, there will be more school-wide
projects such as culture day, yearbook, student council, college days, and other leadership
opportunities.

The structure for learning will be choice-based as the students learn to develop their path
of science study and determine their projects as evidence of their learning as they use
technology to transform learning. This increased responsibility, partnered with the
guidance from the student’s personal advisor, will encourage positive academic and
social decision making.

Respect for student diversity will be embraced and modeled by everyone in the school
community. Diversity will include race, gender, religious beliefs and personal
differences. We will consistently design and deliver instruction that incorporates
diversity concepts. Student and family appreciation of various cultural values and
beliefs will be fostered. Teachers will consistently use an unbiased curriculum and
materials that promote an inclusive classroom climate, enhancing students’ skills and
knowledge to interact with each other. All adults will communicate in a culturally
responsive and linguistically appropriate manner with students’ families.




                                            24
            ANNUAL ELECTION-TO-WORK AGREEMENT
                        FLETCHER PRIMARY SCHOOL

When hired, and annually thereafter, each Pilot School staff person is required to
sign an Annual Election-to-Work Agreement. This agreement must include the
areas included in the following template. Since teachers elect or choose to teach
at a pilot school and certain work rules are determined by the Pilot School rather
than the Negotiated Agreement, it is essential that each school clearly outline the
working conditions, terms and expectations for employment. The teacher vote
on the Annual Election- to-Work Agreement will be by secret ballot and
conducted by the AEA Building Representative. The vote must take place
between February 1 and March 1 each year.


SCHOOL NAME: FLETCHER PRIMARY SCHOOL
YEAR CONTRACT IS IN EFFECT: 2009-2010

   (1) Introduction

   I understand that teachers of the Pilot School continue to be members of the
   bargaining unit under the Master Agreement between AEA and APS, and
   retain all rights as specified in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
   which is attached to this document.

   I, FIRST AND LAST NAME, am voluntarily electing to work at FLETCHER
   PRIMARY SCHOOL. I am signing this Annual Election-to-Work Agreement to
   indicate I understand and agree to the following terms and conditions of my
   employment. I further understand that my assignment at the Pilot School is
   on a yearly basis, subject to my re-assignment at the Pilot School.

    FLETCHER PRIMARY SCHOOL operates under the Pilot Schools guidelines
   described in the AEA-APS Master Agreement, the Pilot Schools MOU
   between APS and the AEA and in the Pilot Schools Request for Proposals.
   Teachers of Pilot Schools are to receive wages and all benefits as they would
   at any other Aurora Public School, as specified in the MOU. Other terms and
   conditions of employment will be determined by FLETCHER PRIMARY
   School and the FLETCHER PRIMARY School’s Governing Board, rather than
   by the APS-AEA Master Agreement. While not attempting to be exhaustive,
   this election states the more important terms and conditions. These terms
   and conditions will be reviewed annually and may be subject to change as
   determined by the Governing Board.

   (2) Salary, benefits, seniority, and membership in the Aurora Education
       Association
   I will continue to accrue seniority as I would if I were working elsewhere in
   Aurora Public Schools. If I am hired as a teacher, I will receive the salary and


                                        1
benefits as specified in the MOU. Teachers at FLETCHER PRIMARY School
have the right to fully participate in the functions of the Aurora Education
Association, retain the same right to representation as any member of the
bargaining unit, and also retain the same opportunity as any other teacher in
APS to join the Aurora Education Association.

(3) Terms of employment

      Outline work day and work year: Teachers at FLETCHER PRIMARY
      School will not be required to work beyond the contract hours agreed
      upon between AEA and the district. Teachers are required to work a
      total of 1,496 hours (187 days multiplied by 8 hours), which is inclusive
      of all duties that occur prior to students’ school year, during the school
      year and following the students’ school year. There may be different
      work schedules for different employees, but the total number of hours
      will not exceed 1,496. CALENDAR AND WORK DAY ATTACHED

      Include school schedule: SCHEDULE ATTACHED

   No supplemental hours and tasks will be required to complete the
   mission of the FLETCHER PRIMARY School.

(4) Responsibilities

       Outline all job responsibilities
           As a teacher at FLETCHER PRIMARY School, I agree to share
   responsibility for creating a school organized around the school’s stated
   vision and mission. I agree to participate in all aspects of the school
   program and community – teaching and caring for all students; developing
   and documenting differentiated curriculum, assessments and standards
   within a school-wide plan; participating in the governance of the school;
   and contributing as a member of the school community.
           I agree to regularly attend school-wide or team planning and
   professional development activities within the teacher workday. Non-
   contact time with students will include, team planning, individual planning,
   supervision, professional development, special education staffings, and
   staff meetings for school business. I will attend the two-day retreat at the
   beginning of the school.
           I agree to adhere to a shared decision making model and support
   consensus decisions.        I will serve on at least two school-based
   committees.
       I agree to perform other duties as assigned that fall within my contract
       hours.

(5) Performance Evaluation




                                     2
   The principal will evaluate staff using the district-approved process for
   regular or alternative evaluations.

(6) Dispute resolution

   The school’s dispute resolution process will follow the process outlined in
   the MOU.

(7) Transfers

   The following language must be included:

   If a position at Fletcher PRIMARY School is converted or eliminated, if the
   teacher is involuntarily transferred or if a teacher chooses to transfer from
   the Pilot School, the process outlined in the MOU will be followed.

(8) Termination

   I understand that I will be subject to termination from Aurora Public
   Schools in accordance with existing law and Articles 35 and 37.

(9) Signatures

   By signing this document, I acknowledge that I have read all the
   provisions of this Annual Election-to-Work Agreement and that I agree to
   all its terms.

   _____________________________                 _______________________
   Employee                                        Date

   ___________________________                    ______________________
   Principal                                       Date




                                     3
            ANNUAL ELECTION-TO-WORK AGREEMENT
    FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL

When hired, and annually thereafter, each Pilot School staff person is required to
sign an Annual Election-to-Work Agreement. This agreement must include the
areas included in the following template. Since teachers elect or choose to teach
at a pilot school and certain work rules are determined by the Pilot School rather
than the Negotiated Agreement, it is essential that each school clearly outline the
working conditions, terms and expectations for employment. The teacher vote
on the Annual Election- to-Work Agreement will be by secret ballot and
conducted by the AEA Building Representative. The vote must take place
between February 1 and March 1 each year.


SCHOOL NAME: FLETCHER INTERMEDITE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
SCHOOL
YEAR CONTRACT IS IN EFFECT: 2009-2010

   (1) Introduction

   I understand that teachers of the Pilot School continue to be members of the
   bargaining unit under the Master Agreement between AEA and APS, and
   retain all rights as specified in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
   which is attached to this document.

   I, FIRST AND LAST NAME, am voluntarily electing to work at FLETCHER
   INTERMEDIATE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL. I am signing this
   Annual Election-to-Work Agreement to indicate I understand and agree to the
   following terms and conditions of my employment. I further understand that
   my assignment at the Pilot School is on a yearly basis, subject to my re-
   assignment at the Pilot School.

    FLETCHER Intermediate Science and Technology SCHOOL operates under
   the Pilot Schools guidelines described in the AEA-APS Master Agreement,
   the Pilot Schools MOU between APS and the AEA and in the Pilot Schools
   Request for Proposals. Teachers of Pilot Schools are to receive wages and
   all benefits as they would at any other Aurora Public School, as specified in
   the MOU. Other terms and conditions of employment will be determined by
   FLETCHER Intermediate Science and Technology Pilot School and the
   FLETCHER Intermediate Pilot School’s Governing Board, rather than by the
   APS-AEA Master Agreement. While not attempting to be exhaustive, this
   election states the more important terms and conditions. These terms and
   conditions will be reviewed annually and may be subject to change as
   determined by the Governing Board.
(2) Salary, benefits, seniority, and membership in the Aurora Education
    Association
I will continue to accrue seniority as I would if I were working elsewhere in
Aurora Public Schools. If I am hired as a teacher, I will receive the salary and
benefits as specified in the MOU. Teachers at FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL have the right to fully participate in
the functions of the Aurora Education Association, retain the same right to
representation as any member of the bargaining unit, and also retain the
same opportunity as any other teacher in APS to join the Aurora Education
Association.

(3) Terms of employment

      Outline work day and work year: Teachers at FLETCHER
      INTERMEDIATE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY School will not be
      required to work beyond the contract hours agreed upon between AEA
      and the district. Teachers are required to work a total of 1,496 hours
      (187 days multiplied by 8 hours), which is inclusive of all duties that
      occur prior to students’ school year, during the school year and
      following the students’ school year. There may be different work
      schedules for different employees, but the total number of hours will
      not exceed 1,496.       CALENDAR AND WORK DAY ATTACHED

      Include school schedule: SCHEDULE ATTACHED

  No supplemental hours and tasks will be required to complete the
  mission of the FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE SCIENCE AND
TECHNOLOGY School.

(4) Responsibilities

       Outline all job responsibilities
          As a teacher at FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE SCIENCE AND
   TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL, I agree to share responsibility for creating a
   school organized around the school’s stated vision and mission. I agree
   to participate in all aspects of the school program and community –
   teaching and caring for all students; developing and documenting
   differentiated curriculum, assessments and standards within a school-wide
   plan; participating in the governance of the school; and contributing as a
   member of the school community.
          I agree to regularly attend school-wide or team planning and
   professional development activities within the teacher workday. Non-
   contact time with students will include, team planning, individual planning,
   supervision, professional development, special education staffings, and
   staff meetings for school business. I will attend the two-day retreat at the
   beginning of the school.
          I agree to adhere to a shared decision making model and support
   consensus decisions.      I will serve on at least two school-based
   committees.
      I agree to perform other duties as assigned that fall within my contract
      hours.

(5) Performance Evaluation

   The principal will evaluate staff using the district-approved process for
   regular or alternative evaluations.

(6) Dispute resolution

   The school’s dispute resolution process will follow the process outlined in
   the MOU.

(7) Transfers

   The following language must be included:

   If a position at Fletcher INTERMEDIATE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
   SCHOOL is converted or eliminated, if the teacher is involuntarily
   transferred or if a teacher chooses to transfer from the Pilot School, the
   process outlined in the MOU will be followed.

(8) Termination

   I understand that I will be subject to termination from Aurora Public
   Schools in accordance with existing law and Articles 35 and 37.

(9) Signatures

   By signing this document, I acknowledge that I have read all the
   provisions of this Annual Election-to-Work Agreement and that I agree to
   all its terms.

   _____________________________                _______________________
   Employee                                       Date

   _________________________                  _______________________
   Principal                                     Date
            ANNUAL ELECTION-TO-WORK AGREEMENT
  FOR TEACHERS WORKING AT BOTH FLETCHER PRIMARY SCHOOL
 AND FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL

When hired, and annually thereafter, each Pilot School staff person is required to
sign an Annual Election-to-Work Agreement. This agreement must include the
areas included in the following template. Since teachers elect or choose to teach
at a pilot school and certain work rules are determined by the Pilot School rather
than the Negotiated Agreement, it is essential that each school clearly outline the
working conditions, terms and expectations for employment. The teacher vote
on the Annual Election- to-Work Agreement will be by secret ballot and
conducted by the AEA Building Representative. The vote must take place
between February 1 and March 1 each year.


SCHOOL NAME:       FLETCHER PRIMARY SCHOOL AND FLETCHER
INTERMEDIATE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL
YEAR CONTRACT IS IN EFFECT: 2009-2010

   (1) Introduction

   I understand that teachers of the Pilot School continue to be members of the
   bargaining unit under the Master Agreement between AEA and APS, and
   retain all rights as specified in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
   which is attached to this document.

   I, FIRST AND LAST NAME, am voluntarily electing to work at both
      FLETCHER PRIMARY SCHOOL and FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE
   SCHOOL. I am signing this Annual Election-to-Work Agreement to indicate I
   understand and agree to the following terms and conditions of my
   employment. I further understand that my assignment at EACH of the Pilot
   Schools is on a yearly basis, subject to my SEPARATE re-assignment at
   EACH OF the Pilot Schools.

    FLETCHER PRIMARY SCHOOL AND FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE
   SCHOOL operate under the Pilot Schools guidelines described in the AEA-
   APS Master Agreement, the Pilot Schools MOU between APS and the AEA
   and in the Pilot Schools Request for Proposals. Teachers of Pilot Schools
   are to receive wages and all benefits as they would at any other Aurora Public
   School, as specified in the MOU. Other terms and conditions of employment
   will be determined by FLETCHER PRIMARY School AND FLETCHER
   INTERMEDIATE School and the FLETCHER PRIMARY and INTERMEDIATE
   School’s Governing Boards, rather than by the APS-AEA Master Agreement.
   While not attempting to be exhaustive, this election states the more important
   terms and conditions. These terms and conditions will be reviewed annually




                                        1
and may be subject to change as determined by EACH OF the Governing
Boards.

IN THE EVENT THAT THE TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT BETWEEN THE
TWO SCHOOLS DIFFER AND ARE NOT CONGRUENT, I UNDERSTAND
THAT I WILL SIGN TWO SEPARATE, ANNUAL ELECTION-TO-WORK
AGREEMENTS THAT IDENTIFY THE DIFFERENCES.

(2) Salary, benefits, seniority, and membership in the Aurora Education
    Association
I will continue to accrue seniority as I would if I were working elsewhere in
Aurora Public Schools. If I am hired as a teacher, I will receive the salary and
benefits as specified in the MOU. Teachers at FLETCHER PRIMARY School
AND FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL have the right to fully participate
in the functions of the Aurora Education Association, retain the same right to
representation as any member of the bargaining unit, and also retain the
same opportunity as any other teacher in APS to join the Aurora Education
Association.

(3) Terms of employment

      Outline work day and work year: Teachers at FLETCHER PRIMARY
      AND INTERMEDIATE Schools will not be required to work beyond the
      TOTAL contract hours agreed upon between AEA and the district.
      Teachers ASSIGNED TO BOTH SCHOOLS are required to work a
      total of 1,496 hours (187 days multiplied by 8 hours), which is inclusive
      of all duties that occur prior to students’ school year, during the school
      year and following the students’ school year. There may be different
      work schedules for different employees, but the total number of hours
      will not exceed 1,496. CALENDAR AND WORK DAY ATTACHED

      Include school schedule: SCHEDULE ATTACHED

   No supplemental hours and tasks will be required to complete the
   mission of the FLETCHER PRIMARY School.

(4) Responsibilities

      Outline all job responsibilities
          As a teacher at both FLETCHER PRIMARY School AND
   FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE School, I agree to share responsibility for
   creating a school organized around EACH school’s stated vision and
   mission. I agree to EQUITABLY participate in all aspects of the school
   program and community IN PROPORTION TO MY ASSIGNMENT AT
   EACH SCHOOL – teaching and caring for all students; developing and
   documenting differentiated curriculum, assessments and standards within


                                     2
   a school-wide plan; participating in the governance of the school; and
   contributing as a member of the school community.
           PRINCIAPALS OF EACH SCHOOL AGREE TO DEVELOP AN
   EQUITABLE SCHEDULE SO THAT I CAN regularly attend school-wide or
   team planning and professional development activities within the teacher
   workday. Non-contact time with students will include, team planning,
   individual planning, supervision, professional development, special
   education staffings, and staff meetings for school business. I will
   COLLABORATE WITH THE PRINCIPALS OF BOTH SCHOOLS TO
   DETERMINE          A   SCHEDULE         FOR     PARTICIPATION          FOR
   PROFESSIONAL          DEVELOPMENT,         PLANNING        AND      OTHER
   ACTIVITIES THAT IS EQUITABLE TO MY INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENTS
   AT EACH SCHOOL AND DOES NOT CAUSE ME TO EXCEED 1,496
   HOURS TOTAL. I WILL attend the PORTIONS OF EACH SCHOOLS
   two-day retreats at the beginning of the school AS AGREED UPON AND
   SCHEDULED IN ADVANCE FOR EACH SCHOOL.
           I agree to adhere to a shared decision making model and support
   consensus decisions. I will serve on at least ONE school-based
   committee AT EACH SCHOOL.
       I agree to perform other duties as assigned that fall within my contract
       hours.

(5) Performance Evaluation

   The principal will evaluate staff using the district-approved process for
   regular or alternative evaluations.

(6) Dispute resolution

   The school’s dispute resolution process will follow the process outlined in
   the MOU.

(7) Transfers

   The following language must be included:

   If a position at Fletcher PRIMARY School OR FLETCHER
   INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL is converted or eliminated, if the teacher is
   involuntarily transferred or if a teacher chooses to transfer from the Pilot
   School, the process outlined in the MOU will be followed.

(8) Termination

   I understand that I will be subject to termination from Aurora Public
   Schools in accordance with existing law and Articles 35 and 37.




                                    3
(9) Signatures

   By signing this document, I acknowledge that I have read all the
   provisions of this Annual Election-to-Work Agreement and that I agree to
   all its terms FOR BOTH FLETCHER PRIMARY SCHOOL AND
   FLETCHER INTERMEDIATE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SCHOOL.

   _____________________________              _______________________
   Employee                                     Date

   ___________________________                 ______________________
   Principal of Primary School                  Date

   ___________________________                  _____________________
   Principal of Intermediate School             Date




                                   4
Fletcher Intermediate School of Science and Technology - Grades 4-8

Vision: Create confident students who value education, the diversity of others, and
who are able to apply scientific inquiry and exploration to succeed in the 21 st
century.

Mission: The Fletcher Intermediate Science and Technology School is dedicated to
creating an exceptional learning and teaching environment that is student-driven
and anchored in scientific inquiry using technology to transform the learning
experience so students can be successful in our diverse, global community.

In 2009-2010, the initial year of Fletcher Intermediate School of Science
and Technology, 6th and 7th grades will be added.

To accomplish enrollment at the projected enrollment numbers, active
retention of the current fifth grade students of Fletcher will occur, to
ensure that the majority of the 80 students will stay at Fletcher as sixth
grade students. Per communications with Fletcher families and the
continued efforts of marketing the school’s focus this can be accomplished.
Letters of commitment will be signed by parents in the Spring of 2009 to
show their support and commitment to attending the Fletcher Intermediate
School of Science and Technology.

Adding the 7th grade was strategically decided upon per the Vision and
Mission of the Intermediate School of Science and Technology; we will
market this grade level addition in two manners. First we will target and
actively recruit our 2007-2008 5th graders back to Fletcher, as a school of
choice within Aurora Public Schools. Secondly, we will intentionally recruit
seventh grade students back to APS, which have transferred out of District.
This second group of targeted seventh graders will be new students to APS
or returning students to APS, choosing to come as a choice per the above
outlined reasons as their first experience with APS.

These three targeted groups of sixth and seventh graders will have
separate, specific marketing plans, customized for each group. Some of the
strategies of the marketing plans will be to foster the community
partnership relationships, have comprehensive communication (mailings,
open-houses, promotions) of the choice of grades 6-8 and regular positive
publicity to promote the Vision and mission of the Intermediate School of
Science and Technology and then accurately reflect the results we are
achieving. All of these strategies will increase the interest and desire to
the point of eventually having a waiting list for admission to these three
grades, assuring we maintain the small school criteria essential to the
success of the Intermediate pilot school. The three operational plans will be
finalized upon the approval of Pilot School status for the Fletcher
Intermediate School of Science and Technology. The plan will then be
expanded to recruitment of 8th graders for 2010-2011.
Fletcher Intermediate School of Science and Technology - Grades 4-8

Vision: Create confident students who value education, the diversity of others, and
who are able to apply scientific inquiry and exploration to succeed in the 21st
century.

Mission: The Fletcher Intermediate Science and Technology School is dedicated to
creating an exceptional learning and teaching environment that is student-driven
and anchored in scientific inquiry using technology to transform the learning
experience so students can be successful in our diverse, global community.


To achieve our Vision of successfully dividing and expanding the current K-5
school into the Fletcher Primary School serving grades K-3 and the Fletcher
Intermediate School of Science and Technology serving grades 4-8; a
strategic Marketing/Recruitment Plan for Choice of Grades 6, 7 and 8 will
be implemented.

The rational and development of why Fletcher intentionally chose Science
and Technology emphasis and why will it increase enrollment for Fletcher for
the Intermediate School of Science and Technology for Grades 4-8. Also
details the Strategies, Plans of Action/Decisions, and potential resources or
partnerships being developed that will specifically draw students to become
a Choice for grades 6-8.

Technology Rational;
Per information published in the August 24, 20080 edition of The Denver
Post, the following has been reported… *
   o Colorado is generally recognized as one of the top states in the nation
       for information technology. Colorado ranked ninth overall in the 2007
       State New Economy Index, released by the Ewing Marion Kauffman
       Foundation and the Information Technology and Innovation
       Foundation. Colorado earned several top 10 rankings among the
       index’s 26 individual indicators, including second in workforce
       education, second in IPOs, second in entrepreneurial activity and third
       in high-tech jobs. …. Colorado ranks at 70 percent for being a major
       user of technology and has the fifth highest percentage of
       households with computers in the nation. Colorado is also recognized
       as a leader in wireless communications. And lastly, Colorado is not only
  a hub of IT research and development but also produces many high-
  tech products.
o Some tech career related facts (numbers): **
     o 98% - Colorado tech workers earn 98 percent more than the
        average private sector worker
     o 55% - high-tech goods accounted for 55 percent of Colorado’s
        exports in 2006, the fourth highest percentage in the nation.
     o 3rd – Colorado is third in tech worker concentration with 83 of
        every 1,000 private sector workers employed in technology
        firms
     o 4th – Colorado is fourth in the nation for monies raised from the
        nation’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.
        SBIR funding indicates the state’s level of technological
        sophistication.
     o 5th – Colorado has fifth largest employment base in the
        software publishing industry
             Strategic actions in place
                     Establishing classroom models for Technology
                     integration increased instructional technology
                        o All classrooms are Sustainable Classrooms
                            with single laptop, LCD projector, document
                            camera or visualizer, screen and classroom
                            amplification system
                        o Some classrooms additionally have
                            interactive whiteboard or panel and wireless
                            response system
                     Progress on the Technology continuum from
                     Enhancing the learning experience with technology
                     use to transforming the learning experience
                        o Provide after-school GenYes project for 5th
                            graders to become role models and
                            important leaders for technology support at
                            Fletcher. The GenYes program teams
                            students up with teachers to develop lessons
                            and projects using technology. Teachers are
                            experts in sharing knowledge – the students
                            become experts in technology for the ideal
                            partnership.
                   Established and Potential Partnerships
                          Stapleton Foundation
                          Donnell Kay Foundation
                          Learning Source - Family Literacy
                          City of Aurora (Moorhead, Office of Youth
                          Development, Aurora Public Libraries, Aurora
                          Police Department)
                          The Denver Foundation

Science Rational;
Partnering with Colorado School of Mines.
Fletcher is the recipient of the Bechtel K-5 Educational Excellence
Initiative which partners us with the Colorado School of Mines. Fletcher is
the only APS elementary school involved in this outreach project. Goals of
The Bechtel K-5 Educational Excellence Initiative goals are:
 1) To complete research on why K-5 students lost interests in mathematics
and science and how this trend can be reversed or prevented;
 2) To create K-5 programs that promote interest in mathematics, science
and engineering; and
 3) To create pre-service and in-service programs that improves elementary
teachers’ competence and confidence in their mathematical and scientific
knowledge and increased their use of hands-on instruction in the classroom.

Per information published in the August 24, 20080 edition of The Denver
Post, the following has been reported… ***
   o Colorado School of Mines is one of three Colorado academic
       institutions that offer nationally ranked graduate engineering
       programs or degrees
   o Colorado School of Mines was one of nine recipients of a $10 million
       total grant from the Hewlett Foundation. The grant was designed to
       further undergraduate engineering studies and research in 2005 and
       was awarded to schools viewed as role models for other institutions of
       higher education in engineering
          o Strategic Action in place: six Fletcher teachers participated in
              Colorado School of Mines Science workshop in Summer, 2008
              that addressed mathematical, scientific and engineering
              content and instructional pedagogy. Graduate intern provides
              direct assistance to these participating teachers at Fletcher in
             these six classrooms throughout the academic year. Teachers
             also meet throughout the year with the graduate intern to
             receive guidance in the teaching process and to jointly plan the
             science classroom instruction.
Career opportunities for Engineering ****
   o Colorado’s Aerospace Industry is second largest in the United States
   o In 2007, aerospace employment in Colorado surpassed Texas, with
      26,650 private workers and 29,200 military personnel. These 55,850
      workers in the aerospace industry support an additional 115, 400
      worker in other industries throughout Colorado, bringing direct and
      indirect employment supported by the aerospace industry to 171,250
      workers
   o Key component of Colorado’s aerospace industry is its workforce of
      highly skilled, highly educated workers which propels the industry
      forward. Colorado’s workforce ranks ninth in the nation for science
      and engineering doctorate holders as a percent of the overall
      workforce.
         o Strategic Action in place; 4th grade students participating in
             outreach experience with moon walk simulation and experience
             with aerospace careers at Challenger Learning Center in
             Colorado Springs
                   Results:
                   Thank you for allowing students from Fletcher Elementary School to fly a
                    mission with the Challenger Learning Center. Ms. Martin's students were hard
                    working, prepared and enthusiastic for our mission to the moon. CLCC
                    features a Mission Control Center modeled after the one at Johnson Space
                    Center and a Spacecraft simulator where experiments are performed and probes
                    are "launched" into outer space.

                    All the students had to demonstrate teamwork and problem-solving skills, but
                    several students did stand out as being exceptional.

                    Bre'Ajahe and Jazmin were exceptional Communications officers. They spoke
                    clearly and patiently, followed the correct protocol and kept the
                    information flowing smoothly between Mission Control and the Spacecraft.

                    Alejandra and Luis became experts at prioritizing messages at the Data
                    position. They used a software program called the STK and kept track of the
                    Spacecraft's location at all times.

                    Te'ron and Selene performed many important experiments as the Life Support
                    officers. They determined the humidity levels were dangerously low and saved
                    the astronauts. They also were able to determine the correct angle for the
                    solar arrays to be turned to in order to restore the electrical power to the
                    spacecraft.

                    You should be proud of the behavior and efforts of your students. They
                    certainly represented not only their teacher, but also the entire student
                    population in a very respectful and responsible manner. It is our hope that
                    as a result of the missions, Fletcher Elementary School students will
                    continue to be fascinated with math, science and space.
                   Sincerely,
                   Susan Corrigan, Denelle Hartt, and Tracey Tomme
                   Flight Directors, Challenger Learning Center of Colorado

                  Thank you for sharing the "good news" about the Challenger Learning Center trips for APS
                   (Fletcher) students. The story is posted on the main page of the APS Web site and at:
                   http://apscms.net/enews/2008/02/28/aps-students-lift-off-to-challenger-learning-center
                   The story will run on the back page of the Aurora Sentinel paper tomorrow, March 7. We
                   have also submitted it to yourhub.com at:
                   http://denver.yourhub.com/AuroraSouth/Stories/Education/General-
                   Education/Story~435414.aspx
                   Keep sharing the great teaching and learning in APS.


         o Established and potential partnerships:
                        Colorado School of Mines
                        Bluff Lake Nature Center
                        Calwood Educational Center

* Research reported by: Development Research Partners, Inc., Dun and
Bradstreet Inc. and Marketplace Database, Ewing Marion Kauffman
Foundation, 2007 State New Economy Index
** Research reported by: AeA Cyberstates 2008, Corporation for
Enterprise Development, 2006, AeA, Trade in Cyberstates 2007
*** Research reported by: U.S. News & World Report, America’s Best
Graduate Schools 2009, Hewlett.org
**** Research reported by: Development Research Partners, Inc., Dun and
Bradstreet Inc. and Marketplace Database
           Fletcher primary school
               october, 21, 2008

                         Vision
Prepare all students to be community contributors who
embrace multi-culturalism and succeed in the 21st
century.
                        Mission
In partnership with our community, Fletcher Primary
School highlights children’s varied learning strengths and
honors students’ cultural backgrounds and languages.
Technology is the bridge connecting students to learning
and experiences that foster critical, creative thinkers.


                    PACESetters!
            Fletcher Primary school
                  Enrollment
         2006-07   2007-08   2008-09     2009-10     2010-11     2011-12
          Actual    Actual   Projected   Projected   Projected   Projected

Kinder    98        91         83          90          90          90
First     79        96         99          84          91          90

Second    87        85         85          94          79          86
Third     66        87         74          84          92          78
Totals   330       359        341         352         352         344
                  Fletcher primary school
                        philosophy




 Content is a                     Total school
    primary                       community        Natural and
  vehicle for       Standards-   with a unity of       social
 learning and          based,       purpose          sciences
  developing         language
                                                   infused with
skills such as        enriched
                                   Specials        instructional
    reading,        curriculum
                                 connected to       technology
writing & basic
number sense                       content




                         PACESetters!
                       Fletcher Primary School
                            demographics

                                           Fletcher vs District
                                            2008-09 Ethnicity
          100.0

           90.0

           80.0

           70.0
Percent




           60.0

           50.0

           40.0

           30.0

           20.0

           10.0

            0.0
                  Nat Amer         Asian               Black              Hispanic   White


                             Fletcher                          Dist CSAP Grades



                                        PACESetters!
                   Fletcher primary school
                        demographics

                               Fletcher vs District
                             2008-09 Demographics
          100.0
           90.0
           80.0
           70.0
Percent




           60.0
           50.0
           40.0
           30.0
           20.0
           10.0
            0.0
                  ELA               SpEd                   AGATE         F/R Lunch


                        Fletcher                      Dist CSAP Grades



                                   PACESetters!
                                                    Fletcher Primary School
                                                    CSAP proficiency Targets

                                           Fletcher Primary School CSAP Proficiency Targets
                                     50
CSAP Percentages of Proficiency to




                                     45

                                     40
    Reach District Averages




                                     35

                                     30

                                     25
                                                                                                      Grade 3 Read (47)
                                     20                                                               Grade 3 Write (28)
                                                                                                      Grade 3 Math (47)
                                     15

                                     10

                                     5

                                     0
                                          Y 07-08     Y 08-09     Y 09-10     Y 10-11       Y 11-12


                                                                 Growth Targets Each Year

                                                                PACESetters!
                           Fletcher primary school
                               truancy targets

                                               Fletcher
                                        Student Truancy Trends
                     100

                     90

                     80
Number of Students




                     70

                     60

                     50

                     40

                     30

                     20

                     10

                       0
                           Y 06-07   Y 07-08            Y 08-09    Y 09-10


                                     Maintain Trend of Reduction



                                     PACESetters!
             Fletcher primary school
           discipline referrals targets

                                        Fletcher
                        Discipline Male Over-Representation Rate
          40.00

          35.00

          30.00
Percent




          25.00

          20.00

          15.00

          10.00

           5.00

           0.00
                  Y 07-08      Y 08-09         Y 09-10   Y 10-11   Y 11-12

                     Male over Rep       District


                               PACESetters!
                     Fletcher primary school
                            calendar

• Teacher Work Day:             7:15-3:15 = 8hrs
• Student Day:                  M-Th 7:45-2:45=7 hrs
                                F    7:45-12:05=4 hr 20 min.

    Key Items                                                  Changes

*same APS  vacation days                            *student day increase M-Th by ½ hour
*8 hours work day                                   *planning time on Friday (early release)
*1/2 hour before and ½ hour after school planning   *shift in-service day to beginning of quarter
*same APS start dates and end date (for kids)
*same quarters as district




                                    PACESetters!
                         Fletcher primary school
                           possible student day

      Traditional APS Student Day                     Possible Fletcher Primary Student Day

•   7:45-8:10              Morning meeting            7:30-7:45     Community Breakfast
•   8:10-8:20              Book trade                 7:45-8:30     Morning Meeting
•   8:20-8:40              Skills                     8:30-9:00     Language Development
•   8:40-9:40              Reading                    9:00-10:30    Literacy Block read/write integrated
•           8:40-8:50 mini lesson                                   to support Content units
•           8:50-9:15 independent reading                           * Whole Group Mini lesson
•           9:15-9:40 closing/share                                 * Independent Practice
•   9:40-10:25             Writing                                  * Language Acquisition Practice
•           9:40-9:50 mini lesson                                   * Extensions -
•           9:50-10:20 independent writing                          * Summary/Share
•   10:25-11:05            Recess/lunch               10:30-11:10   Lunch/Recess with Lang. Dev.
•   11:05-12:00            Content                    11:10-12:30   Math Block or 2nd Lit Block
•   12:00-1:30             Math                                     * Whole Group
•           12:00-12:15 number talk                                 * Small Group/Independent
•           12:15-12:40 stations                                    * Summary Share
•           12:40-1:30     investigations             12:30-1:30    Content
•   1:30-2:15              Specials                   1:30-2:15     Specials to support Content




                                             PACESetters!
 Fletcher primary school
    grade level teams

                  Science
                   Team
                  Member



ELA Team                         Math Team
 Member                           Member




     Classified             Literacy
      Support                Team
     Member                 Member


           PACESetters!
                 Fletcher primary school
                   timeline for staffing


    Date                  Organizational Event
•   October 21, ‘08       Proposal presented to APS Board of Education
•   November 11, ‘08      Board approval of Fletcher Primary School
•   Nov. 18-Dec. 9, ’08   Establishment of Governing Board
•   Dec. 10-17, ’08       Criteria for Selection of Principal
•   Dec. 18, ’08          Principal for Primary School Position Posted
•   Jan. 5-21, ’09        Principal Selection (Interviews, Selection)
•   Jan. 22-30, ’09       Annual Election to Work finalized
•   Feb. 2-5, ’09         Teachers Sign Annual Election to Work
•   Feb. 9 (Confer HR)    Positions for Primary School Posted


                            PACESetters!
                                       Fletcher primary school
                                               budget

                                        Fletcher Primary Sample Budget
                          1200000
Total Budget with Projected




                          1000000
        Allocations




                              800000


                              600000


                              400000


                              200000


                                  0




                                                   Budgetary Allocations

                                               PACESetters!
          Fletcher intermediate science and
                 technology school
                  october, 21, 2008

                           Vision
Create confident students who value education, the
  diversity of others, and who are able to apply scientific
  inquiry and exploration to succeed in the 21st century.
                           Mission
The Fletcher Intermediate Science and Technology School
  is dedicated to creating an exceptional learning and
  teaching environment that is student-driven and
  anchored in scientific inquiry using technology to
  transform the learning experience so students can be
  successful in our diverse, global community.

                      PACESetters!
          Fletcher intermediate science anD
            technology school Enrollment

          2006-07   2007-08   2008-09     2009-10     2010-11     2011-12
           Actual    Actual   Projected   Projected   Projected   Projected

Fourth     81        72         85          74          84          92
Fifth      84        74         60          80          70          79
Sixth                                       54          72          63
Seventh                                     59          52          70
Eighth                                                  57          51
Totals    165       146        145         267         335         355
                  Fletcher intermediate science and
                   technology school demographics

                                           Fletcher vs District
                                            2008-09 Ethnicity
          100.0

           90.0

           80.0

           70.0
Percent




           60.0

           50.0

           40.0

           30.0

           20.0

           10.0

            0.0
                  Nat Amer         Asian               Black              Hispanic   White


                             Fletcher                          Dist CSAP Grades



                                        PACESetters!
                  Fletcher intermediate science and
                   technology school demographics

                                Fletcher vs District
                              2008-09 Demographics
          100.0
           90.0
           80.0
           70.0
Percent




           60.0
           50.0
           40.0
           30.0
           20.0
           10.0
            0.0
                   ELA               SpEd                   AGATE         F/R Lunch


                         Fletcher                      Dist CSAP Grades



                                    PACESetters!
                Fletcher intermediate science anD
                       technology school



• Guided Student Choices - standards-based science
  learning community will support students as they develop their individual
  courses of study. Students will be able to transform their learning through
  the use of technology.

   – Grades 4-5: Specials
   – Grades 5-8: Electives
   – Content Related Course of Study
   – Mentorships and Community Service
   – Participation in Science and/or Technology
     Fairs

                             PACESetters!
                   Fletcher intermediate science anD
                technology school content focus student
                           directed choices


              • Science content will be divided into four, nine-week standards-based
                units of study that focus on the natural and social sciences to ensure
  Quarterly     that all students are prepared for CSAP in all areas. Learning will be
Science Units   deepened through inquiry.



              • The first seven weeks of each content unit is common for all students
 Standard       at each grade level.
Grade Level



              • The remaining 2 weeks in the quarter will have students choosing
  Student       topics within the scope of the course of study to do independent work
  Guided        called self selected extensions.
  Choice




                                 PACESetters!
   Fletcher intermediate science anD
technology school content focus student
      directed technology choices




           PACESetters!
Fletcher intermediate science and technology
          school grade level teams



                      Science
                       Team
                      Member




                      ELA
       Literacy     Certified      Math
        Team                       Team
       Member          or         Member
                    Endorsed



                     Technology
                       Team
                      Member




                  PACESetters!
            Fletcher intermediate science and technology
                          school calendar


• Teacher Work Day:             7:15-3:15 = 8hrs
• Student Day:                  M-Th 7:45-2:45=7 hrs
                                F    7:45-12:05=4 hr 20 min.

    Key Items                                                  Changes

*same APS  vacation days                            *student day increase M-Th by ½ hour
*8 hours work day                                   *planning time on Friday (early release)
*1/2 hour before and ½ hour after school planning   *shift in-service day to beginning of quarter
*same APS start dates and end date (for kids)
*same quarters as district




                                    PACESetters!
               Fletcher intermediate science and technology
                        school possible student day


    Traditional APS Student Day (5th)                             Possible Fletcher Intermediate Student Day

•   7:45-8:10                  Morning meeting                    7:30-7:45   Community Breakfast
•   8:10-8:20                  Book trade                         7:45-8:15   Advisory/ Mentorships
•   8:20-8:40 Skills                                              815-8:45    Homeroom Community
•   8:40-9:40                  Reading                            8:45-10:45  Literacy Block - Readers
•             8:40-8:50 mini lesson                                           Writers Workshop
•             8:50-9:15 independent reading                                    Tech Presentations
•             9:15-9:40 closing/share                                         Speech Presentations
•   9:40-10:25                 Writing                                        *Language Acquisition Practice
•             9:40-9:50 mini lesson                               10:45-11:30 Elective -
•             9:50-10:20 independent writing        11:30-12:15   Lunch Recess (Gr 4 & 5)
•   10:25-11:05                Recess/lunch                       12:15-2:15  Content – Student Directed
•   11:05-12:00                Content                                        With embedded math
              12:00-1:30       Math                                            practiced authentically
•             12:00-12:15      number talk                                    through science exploration
•             12:15-12:40      stations
•             12:40-1:30       investigations
•   1:30-2:15                  Specials




                                                 PACESetters!
                      Fletcher intermediate science and
                     technology school truancy targets

                                               Fletcher
                                        Student Truancy Trends
                     100

                     90

                     80
Number of Students




                     70

                     60

                     50

                     40

                     30

                     20

                     10

                       0
                           Y 06-07   Y 07-08            Y 08-09    Y 09-10


                                     Maintain Trend of Reduction



                                     PACESetters!
          Fletcher intermediate science and technology
                    school discipline targets


                                         Fletcher
                         Discipline Male Over-Representation Rate
           40.00

           35.00

           30.00
Percent




           25.00

           20.00

           15.00

           10.00

            5.00

            0.00
                   Y 07-08      Y 08-09         Y 09-10   Y 10-11   Y 11-12

                      Male over Rep       District



                                 PACESetters!
                                          Fletcher intermediate science and technology
                                                school CSAP proficiency targets


                                          Fletcher Intermediate School CSAP Proficiency Targets
                                     60
CSAP Percentages of Proficiency to




                                     50
    Reach District Averages




                                     40



                                     30
                                                                                                 Grade 4 Read (41)
                                                                                                 Grade 4 Write (30)

                                     20                                                          Grade 4 Math (49)



                                     10



                                     0
                                           Y 07-08   Y 08-09     Y 09-10     Y 10-11   Y 11-12


                                                                Targets Each Year

                                                               PACESetters!
                                          Fletcher intermediate science and technology
                                                school CSAP proficiency targets


                                          Fletcher Intermediate School CSAP Proficiency Targets
                                     70
CSAP Percentages of Proficiency to




                                     60
    Reach District Averages




                                     50


                                     40
                                                                                                Grade 5 Read (50)

                                     30                                                         Grade 5 Write (39)
                                                                                                Grade 5 Math (50)
                                                                                                Grade 5 Science (22)
                                     20


                                     10


                                     0
                                           Y 07-08   Y 08-09    Y 09-10     Y 10-11   Y 11-12


                                                                Targets Each Year

                                                               PACESetters!
                                            Fletcher intermediate science and technology
                                                    school CSAP growth targets


                                            Fletcher Intermediate School READING CSAP Growth
                                                                   Targets
CSAP Percentages of Annual Growth to




                                       80

                                       70
      Reach District Averages




                                       60

                                       50
                                                                                                        Growth Gr 4
                                       40
                                                                                                        Growth Gr 5
                                                                                                        Growth Gr 6
                                       30
                                                                                                        Growth Gr 7
                                       20                                                               Growth Gr 8


                                       10

                                       0
                                             Y 07-08   Y 08-09      Y 09-10       Y 10-11     Y 11-12


                                                                  Reading Targets Each Year

                                                                 PACESetters!
                                             Fletcher intermediate science and technology
                                                     school CSAP growth targets


                                            Fletcher Intermediate School MATH CSAP Growth Targets
                                       90
CSAP Percentages of Annual Growth to




                                       80

                                       70
      Reach District Averages




                                       60

                                       50                                                              Growth Gr 4
                                                                                                       Growth Gr 5
                                       40
                                                                                                       Growth Gr 6

                                       30                                                              Growth Gr 7
                                                                                                       Growth Gr 8
                                       20

                                       10

                                       0
                                              Y 07-08   Y 08-09      Y 09-10       Y 10-11   Y 11-12


                                                                   Math Targets Each Year

                                                                  PACESetters!
             Fletcher intermediate science and
               technology school timeline for
                   staffing & Marketing


    Date                  Organizational Event
•   October 21, 2008      Proposal presented to APS Board of Education
•   November 11, 2008     Board approval of Fletcher Intermediate School
•   Nov. 18-Dec. 9, ’08   Establishment of Governing Board
•   Dec. 10-17, ’08       Development of Marketing Plan for grades 6 and 7
•   Jan. 5-21, ’09        Implementation of Marketing Plan (Parents sign
                          Letters of Intent for 6th grade)
•   Jan. 22-30, ’09       Annual Election to Work finalized
•   Feb. 2-5, ’09         Teachers Sign Annual Election to Work
•   Feb. 9 (Confer HR)    Positions for Intermediate School Posted




                            PACESetters!
                                        Fletcher intermediate science and technology
                                                       school budget


                              1000000          Fletcher Intermediate Sample Budget
                               900000
Total Budget with Projected




                               800000

                               700000
        Allocations




                               600000

                               500000

                               400000

                               300000

                               200000

                               100000

                                    0




                                                             Budgetary Allocations

                                                        PACESetters!
                                      Fletcher K-5         Proposed                     K-3                Grades 4-8
           Account Name               07/08 Budget      Allocation Titles               08/09 as Pilot     08/09 as Pilot

Salaries                               1,128,483.00                          licensed         520,000.00           599,000.00
                                                   split btwn schools -licensed                82,000.00            47,000.00
Salaries                                       -   split btwn schools -classified              66,000.00            42,152.00
Salaries                                 16,741.00 guest teachers                                                   72,000.00
Salaries                                173,126.00                           classif          120,000.00            72,000.00
Extra Duty Pay                           25,118.00 * shift to excur/field                       8,000.00             5,000.00
Extra Duty Pay                                 -
Assemblies                                  700.00 Assemblies                                   1,600.00                500.00
Printing                                       -   Marketing Plan                               1,000.00              2,000.00
Printing                                  1,250.00 Printing - New Name                          1,000.00                800.00
Copier Service                            7,200.00 Copier Service + reduce to Scie              5,234.00              3,100.00
Supplies                                 12,000.00 Elementary                                   7,500.00              6,100.00
Supplies                                  1,700.00 Visual Arts                                  1,000.00                700.00
Supplies                                    800.00 PE                                             700.00                300.00
Supplies                                    800.00 Music                                          700.00                300.00
Supplies                                  1,800.00 Science                                     10,000.00              4,000.00
Supplies                                    600.00 SpEd                                           900.00                500.00
Supplies                                    600.00 Nursing                                        600.00                500.00
Supplies                                  6,000.00 Admin. supplies                              6,500.00              5,000.00
Library Books                             2,300.00 Library                                      3,200.00              1,174.00
Periodicals                                 500.00 Periodicals                                  1,000.00                250.00
Periodicals                                    -
Nonprint Material                           450.00 Non-Print materials                          3,000.00                240.00
Equipment                                 1,000.00 Move to One Line - Instr. Tech
Equipment                                   234.00 Admin Equip.                                 3,500.00                400.00
Internal Transportation                   2,200.00 Field Trips/Excursions *                     8,500.00              5,000.00
Internal Transportation
I t     lT        t ti                         -
Internal Transportation                        -
Internal Transportation                        -
Maintenance - Internal                         -
Maintenance - Internal                         -
Instructional Materials Maintenance            -
Instructional Materials                        -   Instructional Materials                     32,000.00             11,000.00
Equipment                                 3,200.00 Instructional Tech                         125,000.00             28,500.00
Temporary Employees                       1,000.00 Temporary Employees                          1,000.00
Professional Ed. Services                 2,000.00 Professional Ed.                             9,000.00              1,000.00
Travel,Entrance,RegistrationFees          6,422.00 Profess. Dev.                               14,000.00              5,000.00
Supplies                                       -
Salaries                                       -
Salaries                                 86,581.00 administrative salaries Princ.              79,825.00             90,714.00
Salaries                                 62,990.00 administrative salaries Secy.               34,954.00             34,954.00
Overtime                                       -
Overtime                                  1,000.00 Overtime .                                     800.00                500.00
Telephone and Fax                           600.00 Telephone & Fax                                500.00                300.00
Maintenance - Internal                      150.00 Maintenance - Int.                             200.00                 75.00

Total 07/08 Budget                     1,547,545.00                         Actual         1,149,213.00          1,040,059.00
                                                                            Target        $1,149,213.00        $1,040,059.00
PILOT 07/08 Budget                     1,714,491.78 based on 459.5 FTE
                                        Consolidation of Funds
                                     Fletcher Elementary School


Fund          Purpose                                      Total          K-3            4-8

Title I       $889.00 X 416 Free Lunch Students            $369,824       $207,112       $162,722
              $5.00 X 416 Free Lunch Students              $2,080         $1,155         $915
              1-7 hour family liaison
              Family literacy program
              Total Title I                                $371,904       $208,267       $163,637


Title II      .20 TE – District Coach Math                 $16,835
              .20 TE – District Coach Literacy             $21,676
              Total Title II                               $38,511        $21,566        $16,945


Title III     1.0 TE ELA Teacher                           $60,756
              Total Title III                              $60,756        $34,023        $26,733


Title IV      $4.45 per student (505)                      $2,247         $1,259         $988


21st Century Grant                                         $84,333        $47,226        $37,107


Total Funds (NCLB)                                         $557,751       $312,341       $245,410


Please note: When a school consolidates State and local funds from Title I, Part A and most other
Federal elementary and secondary programs, the school must identify the specific programs being
consolidated, and the amount each program contributes to the consolidation, and maintain records that
demonstrate that the schoolwide program addresses the intent and purposes of each of the Federal
programs whose funds are being consolidated to support the schoolwide program.
        Attachment II-F-1
Citizens Bond Oversight Committee
       (CBOC) Annual Report
                                      Aurora Public Schools

                              Division of Accountability and Research




                             Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey


                                        September 5, 2008




Prepared by Marybeth Lehto
Data Analyst
x 28337
                                                                   Aurora Public Schools
                                                          Division of Accountability and Research
                                                         Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey




Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey: Background

●The purpose of this report is to provide a preliminary analysis of the data obtained from the Citizens Bond Oversight Committee (CBOC) Survey. The
survey was developed to provide information in regard to practices used while conducting business with vendors that provided a significant service to the
District throughout the 2002-2008 bond program process. The 2002-2008 bond program included technology systems upgrades, existing facilities
improvements, and new facilities construction. The survey includes items related to the solicitation, execution and closeout phases of the process, as well
as general categorical information.

●The long form of the CBOC survey consisted of twenty-one multiple choice, twelve short comment, eleven rating scale items for a total of 44 items and
was completed by vendors that received more than $50,000. The short form was completed by vendors that received more than $10,000 but less than
$50,000, consisted of twenty-five items, with eleven multiple choice, six short comment and eight rating scale items. No demographic measures
regarding the respondents were collected on either form. 235 surveys were sent out with 37 firms responding for a 16% response rate.

●Survey item responses were measured as follows:
Long Form: A. General Information                                                     B.Solicitation Phase
             Questions #1,2,5,6:      Multiple Choice                                 Questions #1,2,4,6:     Yes No
             Questions #3,4,7 :       Yes No                                          Question #3:            Multiple Choice
             Questions # 8 & 9:       Open-ended Response                             Questions #5,7,9:       Open-ended Response
                                                                                      Question #8:            5-point rating scale

              C. Execution Phase                                                      D. Closeout Phase
              Questions #1,7,10,12:       Yes No                                      Questions #1,3,5,6,7:   Yes No
              Questions: #2-6; 8,9,13:    5-point rating scale                        Questions #2,4,9:       Open-ended Response
              Questions #11,14,15:        Open-ended Response                         Question #8:            5-point rating scale

Short Form: A. General Information                                    B.Solicitation Phase                                C. Execution Phase
            Questions #1,2,3:             Multiple Choice             Questions #1,2,4 & 6:     Yes No                    Questions #1 & 7: Yes No
            Questions #4:                 Yes No                      Question #3:              Multiple Choice           Questions: #2-6 & 8:
                                                                                                                                            5-point rating scale
            Questions #5,6:               Open-ended Response         Questions #5,7,& 9:       Open-ended Response       Questions #9:     Multiple Choice
                                                                      Question #8:              5-point rating scale

●5-point Rating Scale: No items were reverse-scored. In effect, a higher score will always indicate a more favorable evaluation.

                  Poor                     Average                    Outstanding
                   1              2           3             4              5


                                                                                  2
                                                                                     Aurora Public Schools
                                                                            Division of Accountability and Research
                                                                           Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey




Table 1. CBOC Survey Results: Long Form

Survey Part A: General Information Responses by Item
                                                                                       Eng.          Arch.              Const.        Tech.         Supplier    Other Prof.    Other
                               A1. Type of work performed:                           %      n      %       n           %     n      Services
                                                                                                                                    %       n      %      n      Services
                                                                                                                                                                 %      n      %    n
                                                                                    10%     2    19%       4          48%   10      0%      0      0%      0     5%     1     19%      4
Other work types reported include Communication Towers. No Other Professional Work types were reported.

                                                                                                         $10,000 -    $100,000 -    $500,000 –     $1,000,000 –
                                                                                         $0 – 9,999                                                             >$5,000,000
                                                                                                          99,999       499,999       999,999        4,999,999
                        A2. Dollar amount of services provided:
                                                                                         %         n     %       n     %       n     %      n       %      n     %      n
                                                                                         0%        0    19%      4    19%      4    19%     4      10%     2    33%     7

                                                                                            Yes            No
                                   Questions A3, A4, A7
                                                                                          %        n     %      n
A3. Did your firm have a contract directly with the District?                            95%       20   5%      1
A4. Did your firm perform your work for APS as a subcontractor to another firm?          5%        1    95%     18
A7. Did your firm work for APS prior to the 2002-2008 bond program?                      55%       11   45%     9

                                                                                                                                    No Desig.
                                                                                           MBE             WBE           SBE
                                                                                                                                      Rptd
            A5. Does your firm carry any of the following designations?
                                                                                         %      n      %      n      %      n      %       n
                                                                                        50%     1      0%     0     50%     1    100% 19
                                                                                       No source data was reported on the SBE designation.

                                                                                               1          2 to 5        6 to 10       > 10
             A6. How many separate contracts did your firm perform?                       %        n     %       n     %       n    %      n
                                                                                         20%       4    60%     12    15%      3    5%     1

                                                                                                                                                   $101 – 300
                                                                                         $0 – 5 Mil     $6 – 10 Mil   $11 – 25 Mil $26 – 100 Mil
                                                                                                                                                       Mil
                      A8. What is your annual business volume?
                                                                                          %        n     %       n     %       n    %       n       %      n
                                                                                         42%       8    21%      4    16%      3    5%      1      16%     3

                                                                                         0% - 25%       26% - 50%     51% - 75%     76% - 85%
         A9. What percentage of your annual volume is for K-12 Schools?                   %        n     %      n      %      n      %      n
                                                                                         63%       12   21%     4     5%      1     11%     2

Note . Invalid responses were removed prior to calculation on all items.


                                                                                              3
                                                                                      Aurora Public Schools
                                                                             Division of Accountability and Research
                                                                            Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey




Table 2. Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey: Long Form

Survey Part B: Solicitation Phase Responses by Item
                                                                                             Yes           No        Don't Know
                                    Questions B1, B4-B7
                                                                                          %      n      %      n      %         n
B1. Did your firm compete against other firms?                                           90%     19     0%     0     10%        2
B4. Was the solicitation process handled professionally by APS?                          100%    21     0%     0
B5. If no to B4, can you identify a specific issue?                                      No source data was reported on this item.
B6. Was the requested scope of services clearly identified?                              100%    21     0%     0
B7. If no to B6, can you identify a specific issue?                                      No source data was reported on this item.

                                                                                                                             Price &
                                                                                           Low Bid        Qualif.                         Construction       APS P.O.       Don't Know
                                                                                                                             Qualif
                      B2. Was your firm selected on the basis of:
                                                                                           %     Ttl n    %        Ttl n    %     Ttl n    %        Ttl n    %     Ttl n    %     Ttl n
                                                                                          77%     13     91%        11     73%     11     70%        10     67%      6      1%      1


                                                                                        Public Notice Solicitation    Personal        Other
              B3. How did you learn of the opportunity to work for APS                    %       n      %      n      %       n     %      n
                                                                                         52%     11     38%     8    57%      12    0%      0
                                                                                        Other sources reported were Architect Teams, ?National Publication.

                                                                                           1 - Poor            2           3 - Average          4           5-Outstanding
    B8. Overall, how would you rate APS during the solicitation phase of your
                                                                                          %       n      %          n       %       n      %         n       %       n
                                   contract?
                                                                                          0%      0      0%         0      10%      2     57%        12     33%      7


Notes . Invalid responses were removed prior to calculation on all items.
B9 results can be found in the Open-ended responses section.




                                                                                             4
                                                                                      Aurora Public Schools
                                                                             Division of Accountability and Research
                                                                            Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey




Table 3. Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey: Long Form

Survey Part C: Execution Phase Responses by Item
                                                                                               Yes            No       Don't Know
                                 Questions C1, C7, C10-12
                                                                                           %         n   %         n    %      n
C1. Was APS prompt in completing the necessary contracts, etc. to enable your firm
to start work as scheduled?                                                              100%     21     0%       0    0%       0
C7. Were there change orders during the execution phase of your contract?                90%      19     5%       1    5%       1
C10. Were payments made in accordance with the contract?                                 95%      20     5%       1    0%       0
C11. If no to C10, can you identify a specific issue?                                   Construction Directives were not paid for until 11 months after
                                                                                        completion of the directives.
C12. Were payments made on time?                                                         86%      18    14%       3


                                                                                           1 - Poor            2       3 - Average          4        5-Outstanding
                              Questions C2 - C6, C8, C9, C13
                                                                                          %       n      %         n    %       n      %        n     %       n
C2. How would you rate written communication from APS?                                    0%      0      5%        1   10%      2     62%       13   24%      5
C3. How would you rate verbal communication from APS?                                     0%      0      5%        1   10%      2     48%       10   38%      8
C4. How would you rate APS in its ability to make timely decisions?                       5%      1      0%        0   19%      4     38%       8    38%      8
C5. How would you rate APS in its ability to resolve problems that arose during the
completion of your contract?                                                              5%         1   0%        0    5%      1     48%       10   43%      9
C6. How would you rate the overall professionalism of APS in handling your contract?      0%         0   5%        1    5%      1     38%       8    52%      11

C8. If yes to question C7, how would you rate APS in the handling of change orders?       5%         1   5%        1   16%      3     47%       9    26%      5
C9. How would you rate the APS payment process?                                           0%         0   10%       2   15%      3     25%       5    50%      10
C13. How would you rate APS during the execution phase of your contract?                  0%         0   5%        1   10%      2     45%       9    40%      8


   C16. How would you rate your experience with APS compared to with your                   Better         Same          Poorer       Don't Know
               experience with other school district clients?                              %      n       %     n       %     n        %      n
                                                                                          62%    13      24%    5      10%    2        5%     1

Notes . Invalid responses were removed prior to calculation on all items.
C14 & C15 results can be found in the Open-ended responses section.




                                                                                               5
                                                                                      Aurora Public Schools
                                                                             Division of Accountability and Research
                                                                            Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey




Table 4. Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey: Long Form

Survey Part D: Closeout Phase Responses by Item
                                                                                               Yes             No
                                     Questions D1 - D7
                                                                                           %         n    %         n
D1. Did APS follow the contract requirements in completing the closeout phase of
your contract?                                                                            90%        18   10%       2
D2. If no to D1 can you identify a specific issue?                                       Timely review and approval of changes.
                                                                                         Never completed a punch list.

D3. Did APS do its part to resolve outstanding conflicts in a timely manner during the
closeout phase?                                                                           89%     17    11%     2
D4. If no to D3, can you identify a specific issue?                                      No source data was reported on this item.
D5. Was final payment made by APS in a timely manner?                                     79%     15    21%     4
D6. Was your firm asked to respond to an issue under the warranty?                        63%     12    37%     7
D7. If yes to D6, did APS handle warranty issues with your firm in a professional
manner?                                                                                  100%        13   0%        0


                                                                                           Str. Ag.         Agree          Neutral    Disagree    Str. Dis
     D8. Overall, how would you rate APS during the closeout phase of your
                                                                                           %      n        %     n        %      n    %      n   %       n
                                   contract?
                                                                                          38%     6       38%    6       13%     2   13%     2   0%      0


Notes . Invalid responses were removed prior to calculation on all items.
D9 results can be found in the Open-ended responses section.




                                                                                               6
                                                                              Aurora Public Schools
                                                                     Division of Accountability and Research
                                                                    Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey




Table 5. CBOC Survey Results: Short Form

Survey Part A: General Information Responses by Item
                                                                                      Eng.             Arch.        Const.        Tech.           Supplier    Other Prof.   Other
                        A1. Type of work performed:                                 %        n       %         n   %       n     %     n          %     n      %      n    %     n
                                                                                   12%       2       0%        0   6%      1    18%    3         24%    4      6%     1   35%    6
Other work types reported include Computer & Consulting Services, Playground & Athletic Equipment, Intercom & Audio/Visual, Moving & Storage, Furniture Installation, Locksmith,
Synthetic Sports Flooring-Gerflor Taraflex Sports Flooring, Installation, Microscope service/sales.


                                                                                                      $10,000 -
                                                                                   $0 – 9,999                      > $50,000
                                                                                                       49,999
                  A2. Dollar amount of services provided:
                                                                                    %        n        %     n       %      n
                                                                                   24%       4       29%     5     47%     8


                                                                                                                                No Designation
                                                                                      MBE              WBE           SBE           Reported
      A3. Does your firm carry any of the following designations?
                                                                                   %         n        %        n    %      n      %      n
                                                                                  25%        1       0%        0   75%     3    100%     13
The following source data was reported on two of three SBE designations: Federal, City of Denver.



                                                                                     Yes               No
A4. Did your firm work for APS prior to the 2002-2008 bond program?                %     n           %    n
                                                                                   82% 14            18% 3


                                                                                                                                 $26 – 100       $101 – 300
                                                                                   $0 – 5 Mil        $6 – 10 Mil $11 – 25 Mil
                                                                                                                                    Mil              Mil
                A5. What is your annual business volume?
                                                                                    %        n       %         n    %      n     %      n         %      n
                                                                                   57%       8       7%        1   29%     4     7%     1         0%     0


                                                                                   0% - 25%          26% - 50%     51% - 75%     76% - 80%
   A6. What percentage of your annual volume is for K-12 Schools?                   %        n        %        n   %       n     %       n
                                                                                   64%       9       14%       2   7%      1    14%      2
Notes. Invalid responses were removed prior to calculation on all items.




                                                                                                 7
                                                                               Aurora Public Schools
                                                                      Division of Accountability and Research
                                                                     Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey




Table 6. Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey: Short Form

Survey Part B: Solicitation Phase Responses by Item
                                                                                   Yes                No       Don't Know
                            Questions B1, B4 - B7
                                                                                 %     n          %        n    %      n
B1. Did your firm compete against other firms?                                  56%    9         0%        0   44%     7
B4. Was the solicitation process handled professionally by APS?                 100% 17          0%        0
B5. If no to B4, can you identify a specific issue?                             No negative response source data was reported on the professionalism of the solicitation process.
B6. Was the requested scope of services clearly identified?                      94%     16      6%        1
B7. If no to B6, can you identify a specific issue?                             Specific issue reported as "Architect was over his head did not understand scope."



                                                                                  Low Bid     Qualif.   Price &    Construction APS P.O. Don't Know
               B2. Was your firm selected on the basis of:                        %   Ttl n  %   Ttl n  %    Ttl n  %     Ttl n  %   Ttl n  %   Ttl n
                                                                                 83%    5   100%    7  91%    11 80%        5   100%   6   100%   4


                                                                                   Public        Solicitation Personal         Other
       B3. How did you learn of the opportunity to work for APS?                  %      n        %       n    %    n         %     n
                                                                                 12%     2       29%      5   47%   8        18%    3
Other sources reported were Customer since 1992, Gerflor Regional Rep lives in CO, Continued work of the company I bought & replaced.




                                                                                  1 - Poor            2        3 - Average     4            5-Outstanding
 B8. Overall, how would you rate APS during the solicitation phase of
                                                                                  %      n        %        n     %      n   %    n            %      n
                           your contract?
                                                                                 0%      0       0%        0   13%      2  25%   4           63%     10

Notes. Invalid responses were removed prior to calculation on all items.
B9 results can be found in the Open-ended responses section.




                                                                                             8
                                                                                Aurora Public Schools
                                                                       Division of Accountability and Research
                                                                      Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey




Table 7. Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey: Short Form

Survey Part C: Execution Phase Responses by Item
                                                                                       Yes                No
                               Questions C1, C7
                                                                                   %         n       %         n
C1. Was APS prompt in completing the necessary contracts, etc. to enable
your firm to start work as scheduled?                                    100%                17      0%        0
C7. Were payments made on time?                                           94%                15      6%        1


                                                                                   1 - Poor                2       3 - Average     4       5-Outstanding
                            Questions C2 - C6, C8
                                                                                   %      n           %        n     %      n   %    n      %       n
C2. How would you rate communication with APS?                                    0%      0          12%       2   12%      2  29%   5     47%      8
C3. How would you rate APS in its ability to make timely decisions?               0%      0          0%        0   24%      4  35%   6     41%      7
C4. How would you rate APS in its ability to resolve problems that arose
during the completion of your contract?                                           0%         0       6%        1   6%    1    35%    6     53%      9
your contract?                                                                    0%         0       0%        0   12%   2    41%    7     47%      8
C6. How would you rate the APS payment process?                                   6%         1       0%        0   12%   2    35%    6     47%      8

C8. How would you rate APS during the execution phase of your contract?           0%         0       6%        1   13%   2    19%    3     63%     10


                                                                                    Better             Same          Poorer   Don't Know
 C9. How would you rate your experience with APS compared to with
                                                                                   %     n            %    n        %     n     %     n
         your experience with other school district clients?
                                                                                  81%    13          6%    1       13%    2    0%     0

Note . Invalid responses were removed prior to calculation on all items.




                                                                                                 9
             Addendum




Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey

        Open-ended Responses
                                                     Aurora Public Schools
                                            Division of Accountability and Research
                                           Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey
                                                   Long & Short Form Results

                                               Additional Comments/Suggestions


B. Solicitation Phase Item Responses
B9. Do you have suggestions on how the solicitation phase could have been handled better by APS?
Long Form:
  Negotiate more work with qualified contractors.
 The solicataion was handled very professionally

Short Form:
  Better communication.
  Use more sports flooring.


C. Execution Phase Item Responses
Long Form only:
C14. Do you have suggestions on how the execution phase of your contract could have been handled better by APS? If you identified
“poor” in any of the performance ratings, specific information would be helpful to APS.
  Timely review and approval of changes
  Amy Spatz does a great job!
  Communication & Calaboration were excellent.


C15. Can you provide feedback on anything that was exceptional in your work with APS?
  Staff was understanding during construction
  Communication was excellent,
  Project docomentation and follow up excellent
  APS was great with problem resolution & treated fairly
  Construction staff is well experienced and trained
  Successful design solution for long term benefit to dist.
  We find all aspects in doing business with APS to be professional, clear, fair and timely. We may not always agree with  the
decisions, but they were clear and complete. The scope of work for every project was well put together and easy to understand. APS
representatives were always available to respond to issues and correct situations.




                                                                 11
                                                       Aurora Public Schools
                                              Division of Accountability and Research
                                             Citizens Bond Oversight Committee Survey
                                                     Long & Short Form Results

                                                  Additional Comments/Suggestions

D. Closeout Phase Item Responses
Long Form only:
D9. Do you have suggestions on how the closeout phase of your contract could have been handled better by APS?
   No source data was reported on this item.




Finally, do you have any suggestions for APS on how to improve the handling of contracts with outside vendors in future bond
programs?

Long Form:
  We would request to received solicittions on the larger(5m) opportunities
  I believe that they have a professional relationship with consultants. All work was done in an ethical and quality manner.
  Timely review and approval of changes
  No
  Pre qualify with ability to exclude poor performing firms
  Establish "one" punch list don't try to schedule so much work during one summer break

Short Form:
  Identify the purchasing agents.
  Payment made within 30 days.
  Use more sports flooring.




                                                                    12
                                                                      Division of Support Services
                                                                       15701 E. 1st Ave. Suite 206
                                                                                 Aurora, CO 80011
                                                                   Phone: 303-365-7812, ext. 28464
                                                                                FAX: 303-326-1947



DATE:          October 14, 2008

TO:            Anthony Sturges, Chief Operating Officer

FROM:          Dick Huwa, Third Party Bond Consultant

SUBJECT:       Final Report on Services Associated with 2002 Bond Program


This report is presented as the final report on the work done by RLH Engineering, Inc. as the Third Party
Bond Consultant for the 2002 bond program for Aurora Public Schools. RLH Engineering was hired in
March 2003 to serve in this role, to provide independent review, support and analysis of the
implementation of the bond program. Some of the major tasks completed in this role include the
following:
       - Design and construction phase review of major construction projects including those at
           Murphy Creek K-8, Aurora Frontier K-8, South MS, West MS, and Gateway HS.
       - Programming phase review of new HS #5.
       - Evaluations for land acquisition at Fletcher ES and the Facilities Complex.
       - Evaluations and preparation of easements at several sites.
       - Completion of negotiations of Intergovernmental Agreement with the City for joint use of
           fields at Murphy Creek K-8.
       - Reviewed and provided recommendations for changes to APS standard contract documents
           used in the bond program.
       - Initial budget evaluations for the Hinkley HS and West MS whole building remodels.
       - Negotiations completed with the City’s Historic Preservation Commission for William Smith
           for incorporation into the West MS whole building remodel.
       - New development proposal review in conjunction with support services planning staff.
       - Provided periodic review of the District’s in-house monthly bond program financial reports.
       - Participation on the Long Range Facilities Advisory Committee for projects anticipated in
           the 2008 bond program.
       - Participation on Citizen’s Bond Oversight Committee.
       - Completion of the CBOC survey of contractors, architects, and vendors who provided
           services to the District over the course of the 2002 bond program.
       - Provided evaluation and analysis on numerous issues as requested by the Chief Operating
           Officer.

While our role provided opportunities for evaluation and critique of the District’s project administration
procedures, we found very little to criticize throughout the 5.5 years of our involvement. We believe the
program was well conceived from the beginning and the execution of projects was handled with a high
degree of professionalism and integrity. The recently completed CBOC survey results confirm these
statements.

RLH Engineering as a firm, and I personally, thank you for the opportunity to serve APS in this role.
      Attachment IV-E-1

Instructional Materials Adoption
                                                             Aurora Public Schools
                                                      Proposed Basic Instructional Materials
                                                             For Adoption Fall 2008


          Title/Series                                       Author                 Publisher   Copyright    Grade(s) or Course
HIGH SCHOOL

International Baccalaureate
Social Studies
Western Civilization Since 1300, 7th                 Spielvogel              McDougal Littell   2009        11-12 IB History of
Edition, Student Text and Teacher                                                                           Europe and the Middle
Resources                                                                                                   East




C:\DOCUME~1\staff\LOCALS~1\Temp\Proposed Basic.doc
                                                             Aurora Public Schools
                                                   Proposed Supplemental Instructional Materials
                                                             For Adoption Fall 2008

                 Title/Series                               Author          Publisher         Copyright         Grade(s) or Course

ELEMENTARY
Music
Music Ace Maestro, Music Educator’s                                  Harmonic Vision          2008        K-5
Professional Edition
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Music
Music Ace Maestro, Music Educator’s                                  Harmonic Vision          2008        6-8
Professional Edition
HIGH SCHOOL
Music
Music Ace Maestro, Music Educator’s                                  Harmonic Vision          2008        9-12 All Music Courses
Professional Edition




C:\DOCUME~1\staff\LOCALS~1\Temp\Proposed Supplemental.doc

								
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