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					                Belle Fourche High School Library
                  Policy and Procedures Manual
                           1999-2000
                                     Revised 2001-02

                                     Table of Contents
Documents
                Belle Fourche School District Mission, Philosophy, Vision
          Library Mission
Book Selection
             Library Materials Selection and Adoption Policy
              Selection Commandments
              Censorship
              Instructional Materials and Book Review
              Citizen’s Request for Reconsideration of a Book
Calendar of Events
Five Year Plan
Circulation
               Overdues
               Monthly Circulation Form
               Circulation Graph
Copyright Compliance Policy
South Dakota State Library
Ordering Procedure
               Vendor Abbreviations
 Periodicals
               Periodicals Listing
Supplies
Codes
Central Processing
              Physical Processing Procedure
 Inventory
              Inventory Tags
              Missing In Inventory Form
              Missing in Inventory
`Past Years’ Missing Books
Weeding
              Discarding Procedure
Budgeting
              Capital Outlay
              Belle Fourche School District Purchasing Procedure
              Budgets
              Expenditures Per Student
Use of Computers and Networks
Acceptable Use Policy
Library Position Levels
Annual Library Reports
Miscellaneous
              Special Sections
              Teaching Assistant
              Gift Agreement Form

                                          Documents
                                Belle Fourche School District 9-1
                                      MISSION STATEMENT

 WE, THE MEMBERS OF THE BELLE FOURCHE COMMUNITY, ARE COMMITTED TO BUILDING A
LEARNING COMMUNITY AND ENSURING ALL LEARNERS EQUAL OPPORTUNITY FOR AN
EXCELLENT EDUCATION PROGRAM THAT RESULTS IN LEARNERS WHO ARE RESPONSIBLE AND
ACCOUNTABLE, WHO VALUE LIFELONG LEARNING AND KNOW HOW TO LEARN; AND WHO ARE
CAPABLE OF SUCCEEDING IN A CHANGING SOCIETY.

                                           PHILOSOPHY

  The School Board of Belle Fourche Public Schools subscribes to the thesis that our educational
aspirations for our young have made us free, and it is the intention of the board to help
perpetuate that freedom by providing the best education possible for our children within
monetary resources available to the district.

  Our purpose is to develop individuals with adequate academic preparation as well as the
desirable moral, ethical and spiritual beliefs to assume a role in shaping the future of our nation.

   It is understood that though all children will not learn all things equally well, all should have an
equal opportunity in the pursuit of educational qualifications for the world ahead, and the school
board will attempt to balance its program to provide for the varied interests of the pupils of the
schools. In attempts at balance, school officials must keep in mind quality programs deserve as
much consideration as quantity. The board accepts the premise that the center of the school
curriculum is the child and that the instructional program should be tailored to fit a child-
development pattern of education.

   The board of education accepts the conclusion that the education of children is a
comprehensive program which must be undertaken in cooperation with other institutions of our
society. We will seek to establish and maintain strong ties with parents and community
programs.

                                               VISION

   The ideal Belle Fourche School District is filled with high levels of motivation and expectation
for all. The climate of the district is one of low anxiety and high productivity. Teachers and
learners have the freedom and security to learn from their mistakes.

   The schools are organized to produce the most effective and successful learning for all
individuals. Establishing and maintaining optimum student-teacher ratio is a district priority. The
district cooperates closely with other institutions and human service agencies to ensure that the
physical, emotional, and intellectual needs of all learners are met to the highest possible degree.
The district actively seeks various forms of funding to realize its goals.
  The school district is student centered. Each learner has an advisory team (parent, teacher,
administrator) and an individual education plan to support and guide his/her learning progress.
Learners are taught to take responsibility for their own learning.

   The curriculum of the school is designed by educators of the district with input from parents,
students, and community members. The driving force for curriculum development are the
district's Exit Outcomes. The curriculum promotes active learning and emphasizes thinking skills
in all areas. All learners are allowed appropriate time for successful learning. All teachers are
allowed appropriate time for planning, collaboration, and effective teaching.

   Teaching and learning strategies are as varied as the individuals themselves. Learning takes
place at diverse times and locations. Technology is used to support and enhance quality learning
experiences. There is a high expectation for student success. A variety of assessment strategies
are used to measure learning progress by establishing student performance as the means to
validate learning.




                                      Library Bill of Rights

  The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information
and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.
      1. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest,
information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves.
Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those
contributing to their creation.
      2. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view
on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed
because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.
      3. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of the responsibility to
provide information and enlightenment.
      4. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting
abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.
      5. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of
origin, age, background, or views.
      6. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public
they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the
beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.
                                        Adopted June 18, 1948.
             Amended February 2, 1961, June 27, 1967, and January 23, 1980
                                         by the ALA Council.


                                          LIBRARY MISSION

   At Belle Fourche High School, the library is an integral part of the educational
program. Students and staff must be aware of available sources of information, and
they are entitled to equal access to that information. The library seeks to ensure that
students value lifelong educational and recreational reading.

   In order to be successful in this mission, the library must provide access to
information in all formats, primarily providing media that supports the curriculum and,
secondarily, providing media that supports recreations pursuits.

                                 The Freedom to Read

   The freedom to read is essential to our democracy. It is continuously under attack.
Private groups and public authorities in various parts of the country are working to
remove books from sale, to censor textbooks, to label controversial books, to distribute
lists of objectionable books or authors, and to purge libraries. These actions apparently
rise from a view that our national tradition of free expression is no longer valid; that
censorship and suppression are needed to avoid the subversion of politics and the
corruption of morals. We, as citizens devoted to the use of books and as librarians and
publishers responsible for disseminating them, wish to assert the public interest in the
preservation of the freedom to read.

  We are deeply concerned about these attempts at suppression. Most such attempts
rest on a denial of the fundamental premise of democracy: that the ordinary citizen, by
exercising critical judgment, will accept the good and reject the bad. The censors,
public and private, assume that they should determine what is good and what is bad for
their fellow-citizens.

  We trust Americans to recognize propaganda, and to reject it. We do not believe they
need the help of censors to assist them in this task. We do not believe they are
prepared to sacrifice their heritage of a free press in order to be protected against what
others think may be bad for them. We believe they still favor free enterprise in ideas
and expression.

  We are aware, of course, that books are not alone in being subjected to efforts at
suppression. We are aware that these efforts are related to a larger pattern of pressures
being brought against education, the press, films, radio and television. The problem is
not only one of actual censorship. The shadow of fear cast by these pressures leads, we
suspect, to an even larger voluntary curtailment of expression by those who seek to
avoid controversy.

   Such pressure toward conformity is perhaps natural to a time of uneasy change and
pervading fear. Especially when so many of our apprehensions are directed against an
ideology, the expression of a dissident idea becomes a thing feared in itself, and we ten
to move against it as against a hostile deed, with suppression.

				
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