SNOWY RIVER SHIRE COUNCIL by hedongchenchen

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									SNOWY RIVER SHIRE COUNCIL


  BUSINESS PAPER FOR THE

 ENVIRONMENT & COMMUNITY
SERVICES COMMITTEE MEETING




          PART 2

  TUESDAY 5 SEPTEMBER 2006
                VISION

       SNOWY RIVER COUNTRY
                   a
         CARING COMMUNITY
                 in a
        UNIQUE ENVIRONMENT
                with a
         PROSPEROUS FUTURE



        ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF
          OWNERS OF LAND

AS A SIGN OF RESPECT TO THE TRADITIONAL
     OWNERS OF THIS LAND, COUNCIL
    ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THIS MEETING
 IS BEING HELD ON LAND TRADITIONALLY
   OWNED BY INDIGENOUS PEOPLE AND
ACCORDINGLY COUNCIL PAYS RESPECT TO
              THESE PEOPLE.
  Business Paper for the Environment & Community Services Committee Meeting
                    to be held on Tuesday 5 September 2006



                               NOTICE OF MEETING

                         SNOWY RIVER SHIRE COUNCIL

             ENVIRONMENT & COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE


 IN ACCORDANCE WITH STANDING COMMITTEE ORDERS YOU ARE HEREBY
 NOTIFIED OF A MEETING OF THE ENVIRONMENT & COMMUNITY SERVICES
    COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL TO BE HELD AT THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS,
      2 MYACK STREET, BERRIDALE ON TUESDAY, 5 SEPTEMBER 2006
                       COMMENCING AT 3.00PM.


                                 AGENDA / INDEX

   1.   OPENING OF THE MEETING
   2.   PUBLIC FORUM (Including Deputations and Presentations)
   3.   APOLOGIES
   4.   DECLARATION OF PECUNIARY INTERESTS/CONFLICT OF INTEREST
   5.   CORPORATE BUSINESS – SENIOR MANAGER’S REPORTS

        PART 1
        5.1 Local Government Inquiry Chapter 7 “Local Government Services          4
        5.2 Section 96 Modification of Consent Application for Berridale Sewerage
           Treatment Scheme                                                       33
        5.3 Application Status Listing                                            56
        5.4 Draft Penalty Infringement Notices (PIN) Policy                       72

        PART 2
        5.5 Briefing Report – Jindabyne Growth Options Discussion Paper           4


EXTERNAL COMMITTEES – COUNCILLOR REPORTS
  6. REPORTS BY MAYOR OR GENERAL MANAGER
  7. QUESTIONS WITH OR WITHOUT NOTICE
  8. CONFIDENTIAL MATTERS (IF ANY)


MEMBERS:         Clrs R Wallace, B Smits, J Buckley, K Burke, P Hansen, (Chair)
                 N Pendergast, A Selden, J Shumack, J Cahill,

NOTICE OF     General Manager and Executive Team
DISTRIBUTION:




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         REPORT BY DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

General Manager
Snowy River Shire Council
BERRIDALE NSW 2628

This report is submitted to you for consideration by the Environment & Community
Services Committee of Council:


5.5 Briefing Report – Jindabyne Growth Options Discussion
Paper
RECORD NO:           ED/06/12180
REPORTING OFFICER:   STRATEGIC PLANNER
RESPONSIBLE MANAGER: DIRECTOR ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Purpose
To advise Council on the status of the Jindabyne Planning Project and in particular to
present the Jindabyne Growth Options discussion paper.
To seek Councils support to release the Jindabyne Growth Options Discussion Paper
as a basis for consultation with the community.

Management Plan Program/Strategy/Activity
Program 8: Strategic Land Use Planning
To provide a planning and policy framework that can be used as a basis for decisions
and actions that result in the sustainable use of land in the Shire.

Summary
The Strategic Planning Unit has continued to progress the Jindabyne Planning
Project. In response to the Community Open Days held in November 2005 a
“Growth Options Discussion Paper” has been prepared. This discussion paper is
accompanied by a “Growth Options Plan” that shows potential areas for future urban
residential (conventional residential), rural residential and small lot rural living
development.

It is intended to use the growth options plan for consultation purposes together with
the growth options discussion paper. These tools will be used to gauge the
community’s views on how growth of Jindabyne ought to be planned and managed.

Recommendation
That Council notes and supports the Jindabyne Growth Options Discussion paper and
accompanying Growth Options Plan as a tool to seek the community’s views on how
growth around Jindabyne ought to be planned and managed.




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Report

Background
The Jindabyne Planning Project commenced early in 2005. An early stage of the
process was the commissioning of a series of background studies relating to the
social and physical environment of the town and its surrounds. The background
studies looked at matters pertaining to population and growth, land supply, flora and
fauna, landscape character, infrastructure and servicing needs as well as water
resource requirements for small lot rural living subdivision.
In terms of planning for the future of Jindabyne it is clear from the background
studies that whilst the Shire as a whole is growing at roughly 1.6%, Jindabyne itself is
growing at 6.7%. This growth translates into approximately 150 persons per year
and a need for approximately 60-70 dwellings per year. Current zoned land (East
Jindabyne and Highview Estate together with some infill development within the town
of Jindabyne) would ensure a supply of residential land for approximately only 5-7
years at current growth rates, (roughly 400 lots).

It is predicted that current growth will continue (possibly adjusted to a higher rate
after this last census). Council needs to plan now for growth in the medium to long
term.

The findings of the background studies were presented to the community at a series
of Open Days in November 2005. At those Open Days the community members who
attended were asked to consider the information presented and to draw on maps
where they thought new residential (urban and rural) development, land for industrial
development and open space ought to be provided.

The Growth Options
The Growth Options Discussion Paper has been drafted as a non-directive document
seeking initial input from the community. It is a document that summarises the
findings of the background studies, a likely growth scenario for the town and finally
some options on where growth may be located.

The options have been determined based on the findings of the studies (and the
constraints and opportunities presented in those), as well as the input from the
community. The vision for Jindabyne as well as a series of planning principles also
underpins the proposed growth options.

To sustain growth and to develop a community with high residential amenity requires
good access, efficient and cost effective water and sewer provision, the provision of
both passive and active open space as well as housing choice (amongst other
matters). All these issues and more have been raised in the discussion paper with a
view to seeking both Council and the community’s input.

The growth options have been presented in a table at the back of the discussion
paper. The table summarises the likely impacts of rezoning the nominated land and
gives some initial thoughts to the likely staging of growth.

Generally speaking based on all the studies and the community’s vision and planning
principles, the most likely location to “grow” the town is southwards down the Barry
Way. This is clearly reflected in the growth options plan.



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The Process
It is hoped to use the discussion paper and accompanying plan to generate
discussion within the community and to ascertain whether the planning unit has
heard correctly. Whilst it is generally accepted that the town will grow southwards
there are issues relating to specific areas of land that need further detailed direction
and management, before the growth options can be finalised. Some of these issues
include:

      The future of the ALA;
      Access to the south via a road (collector, bypass or arterial) linking
       Kosciuszko Road and the Barry Way;
      Location of open space;
      Whether land ought to be set aside for resort or special purpose
       development;
      Industrial estate expansion

The consultation process proposed for this discussion paper will seek comment on
the proposed options as well as seeking specific comments on the above issues.
This will be done through a process combining one-on-one discussions with affected
land owners, public displays at Nuggets Crossing Shopping Centre and through
general distribution of the discussion paper.

Impact on Council Budget
Funds have been allocated in the budget for the preparation and execution of the
Jindabyne Planning Project stage 1.

Impact on Access and Equity
Consultation with landowners and the general community will be undertaken. The
intention of the consultation process is to work collaboratively with the community to
determine growth areas that will be both accessible and equitable to the community.
By adopting a consultative approach to planning it is intended that the planning
process will also be accessible and equitable to the community.

Attachments
1. Jindabyne Growth options discussion paper (ED/06/3554)
2. Jindabyne Growth Options Plan (ED/06/12250)

Note: Hard copy of A3 Growth Options Plan provided to Councillors only,
public may view this on Council’s website as an attachment to the Business
Paper.




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                                     DISCUSSION PAPER
      LAND USE OPTIONS FOR THE FUTURE
                 GROWTH OF JINDABYNE




  PART OF THE JINDABYNE & VILLAGES PLANNING
                                    PROCESS
                                                       Snowy River Shire Council
                                                                    August 2006




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Contents


Contents ......................................................................................... 8
CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION ................................................................. 9
  1.1     The purpose of this paper ....................................................... 9
  1.2     The Project Area ................................................................ 10
  1.3     How will the Jindabyne Plan benefit the Community? ................... 10
  1.4     The process so far ............................................................... 12
  1.5     What Happens Next? ............................................................ 13
CHAPTER 2 – COMMUNITY VISION & PLANNING PRINCIPLES ............................ 14
  2.1     The Community’s Vision ....................................................... 14
  2.2     Principles for guiding development.......................................... 14
CHAPTER 3 – THE GROWTH OF JINDABYNE ............................................... 17
  3.1     Broad Factors Affecting Growth .............................................. 17
  3.2     Population and growth ......................................................... 18
  3.3     Growth Scenarios ................................................................ 19
  3.4     Residential Land Supply / Capacity .......................................... 21
CHAPTER 4 – KEY LAND USE ISSUES ........................................................ 23
CHAPTER 5 – KEY GROWTH RECOMMENDATIONS ......................................... 32




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CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION


1.1    The purpose of this paper

This discussion paper is the next step in the Jindabyne Planning Project. It is a
consultation document to draw out community discussion on future land use and
growth for the town of Jindabyne.

The discussion paper consists of this document and the Jindabyne Growth Options
Plan.

Essentially this paper presents a proposed framework for future residential
development. It identifies potential areas where future urban residential (or
conventional residential), rural residential as well as small lot rural living
development (rural small holdings), may occur. Consideration of the expansion of
the Leesvillle Industrial Estate has also been suggested in this paper.

In determining future growth areas, Council analysed 3 growth scenarios for the
town. The most likely scenario for growth underpins the options presented in this
paper. A number of options for where growth could occur are analysed and the
impacts of each option discussed.

This paper does not provide detailed analyses of what the proposed densities of the
new growth areas might be. The discussion paper looks purely at options for
developing new land for residential uses and is not looking at infill development or
redevelopment opportunities within the existing town boundary. Residential
planning issues within the town boundary will be addressed later in the project. A
detailed assessment of densities will be undertaken during that stage in the
process, as what happens inside the town boundary will impact on how new land
will develop.

This discussion paper will be used to help Council move forward with the
development of an overall plan for Jindabyne.



This discussion paper is on exhibition from .. until..
For public comment.

Submissions will be accepted up until ..




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1.2    The Project Area

This discussion paper applies to the land included in the Jindabyne Growth Options
Plan included at the back of this paper.

This project area contains the town of Jindabyne and all of its outlying
communities and villages, including Tyrolean Village, East Jindabyne, Kalkite, High
Country Estate, Lakewood Estate and Cobbin Creek Estate.

A ring equaling a radius of 10km has been defined from the town centre (water
tank on the top of Gippsland St). This ring was established through the Snowy
River Shire Settlement Strategy 2002 and is a broad strategic ring. Within the rural
areas contained within this ring Council proposes to be able to consider
applications rural living (small lot) subdivisions.

The area within the 10km radius contained within the Eastern Approaches to the
National Park is excluded from this project area for the time being. Council cannot
proceed with the planning of this area without the co-operation of various State
government departments. The Eastern Approaches to the national Park is subject
to the Kosciuszko Regional Environmental Plan (Snowy River) 1998 and Council
cannot amend this document without the full support of the State. A joint state
and local government process to plan for this area will commence in 2007.

1.3    How will the Jindabyne Plan benefit the Community?

The Jindabyne Growth Options discussion paper is just one part of the broader
Jindabyne planning project, which is to develop a new Jindabyne Plan. The
Jindabyne Plan will be a comprehensive plan that will work towards a vision for
public and private lands with a specific focus on residential land needs.

The Plan will benefit the community in a number of ways:

 By working with the community to determine appropriate areas for
  development it is anticipated the Plan will minimise future potential for land-
  use conflict;
 It will protect things of value to the community;
 Proper infrastructure planning will save the Council and community money; and
 The Plan will clearly address community needs as expressed through-out all the
  consultation.

The key criteria the Jindabyne Plan must address include the following:

   To meet population projections for the next 20 years and ensure a diversity of
   housing choices
   Our land supply for residential purposes needs to keep ahead of population
   growth and demand for housing. Within the next 20 years Jindabyne will need
   more land for residential purposes to support expected population growth.
   With careful management, a diversity of housing opportunities can be provided


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   in both rural and urban settings and at a scale to meet the various market
   requirements.


   To manage the future growth of Jindabyne
   In order to manage growth we must determine where growth can occur. The
   plan will looking at phasing growth, setting clear boundaries, and promoting a
   clear pattern for development to provide certainty for residents and to protect
   the integrity of existing settlements. A sound set of design principles for future
   development will be developed which are important for growth management
   planning.

   To ensure that infrastructure is provided in an orderly and efficient manner
   As much as possible we need to maximize our existing infrastructure usage to
   avoid building more, maintaining our existing services through regular
   assessment, and upgrading as required. At the same time we need to carefully
   monitor the appropriateness of the service levels we expect. Council is moving
   to address 20 years of supply with regard to water and sewer services. In
   particular Council needs to upgrade the Jindabyne Sewerage treatment plant if
   the town is to accommodate any more growth.

   To ensure the natural and cultural heritage of Jindabyne is not destroyed by
   inappropriate development
   The landscape setting of Jindabyne is important not just for its scenic values
   but also for its inherent conservation and heritage values. It is important to
   protect or manage development in areas that contribute to the scenic quality
   of the town as well as areas that have natural and heritage value.

   To provide open spaces and natural areas that contribute to the protection of
   scenic and natural values
   Further to the above point, the Jindabyne Plan will work towards
   comprehensive policies and directives aimed at protecting and maintaining
   significant areas for open space and recreation. In particular, it will initiate a
   greenways system that ties together corridors of habitat, parks, trails and land
   reserves.

   To identify adequate land supply for diverse business uses as well as tourism
   The Jindabyne Plan will identify adequate land supply for diverse business uses
   including opportunities for expanding tourism, maximizing proximity to Lake
   Jindabyne and Kosciuszko National Park and other employment opportunities

   To ensure future development meets the expectations of the community for
   social and cultural outcomes
   In order to develop as a community, sufficient land will need to be identified
   for future planned community services. The Jindabyne Plan will complement
   the Snowy River Shire Social Plan and ensure land is nominated for the provision
   of community and cultural infrastructure.

The development of the Jindabyne Plan will also be guided by inputs from other
Council plans. The Social Plan in particular will provide important social and

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community inputs to the land use planning process. It will also form part of
Council‟s Management Plan, and be the basis of new statutory (LEP zoning) controls
as well as a Development Control Plan for Jindabyne.

Identifying new lands for residential development is really just another step in this
overall project.


1.4    The process so far

The Jindabyne Plan is proposed to guide the development of the town for the next
20 years. The task of preparing this plan is a major one.

Developing a Vision
The community of Jindabyne prepared a vision to guide the future growth of
Jindabyne. This was achieved during a series of other planning processes and
workshops with the community. The new Jindabyne Plan will guide that vision on
the ground. The vision is essentially a broad statement about what we want
Jindabyne to be in the future. As well as the vision a set of principles (or rules) for
guiding development were also determined. These principles reflect what the
community has said is important for the continued life of the town.

The Physical and Social Context
An understanding of the project area was gained from a series of technical
background studies. These studies were prepared by expert consultants and the
findings were presented to the community at open days in November 2005. These
background studies include:

   Snowy River Shire Residential Planning Project – An analysis of residential and
   housing needs (SGS Economics);
   Landscape Character Assessment (Inspiring Place);
   Analysis of Infrastructure Capacity & Needs Assessment (Rob Staples &
   Associates);
   Water Resources Study (The Planning Connection);
   Analysis of the Natural & Archaeological Values around Jindabyne, Adaminaby,
   Berridale and Dalgety (NGH Environmental).

A summary of the most relevant findings of these reports is provided in the
discussion on planning issues in Chapter 4 of this paper.

Council took the findings of these studies to the community during a series of Open
Days in November 2005.

Developing the Growth Options
The options for growth as presented in this paper have been developed based on a
comprehensive understanding of both the physical and human aspects of Jindabyne
as learned from the background studies and other work. Input from various key
stakeholders as well as the general community has also been sought and considered
in the development of these options.

This discussion paper will be made publicly available for a period of approximately
1 month within which time Council will be seeking input and comments from the


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community. Some issues may arise from this discussion paper that will require
ongoing dialogue with landowners or affected user groups. Council will make every
opportunity to work with landholders and others who will be directly affected by
any proposed changes.


1.5    What Happens Next?

Council will use the community‟s input on this discussion paper to determine and
/or refine the growth options that are presented in this paper. An Open Space and
Recreational Land Use Strategy is being prepared by Council in parallel with this
options paper. The outcomes of the Open Space Strategy will also assist in refining
the boundaries for residential development. There will be opportunity for the
community to have input into the Open Space and Recreational Land Use Strategy
which is being conducted in co-operation with Sport and Recreation Jindabyne.

Other components of the Jindabyne Planning Project will have an impact on how
the final growth boundaries will be determined. In the latter stages of the project
Council will need to make decisions regarding land use and redevelopment
opportunities within the existing town boundaries. This will have an impact on
such matters as dwelling densities within growth areas.




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CHAPTER 2 – COMMUNITY VISION & PLANNING
PRINCIPLES

2.1    The Community’s Vision

The following vision has evolved through the last few years of planning and
consulting with the Jindabyne community

       Recognition as a linked collection of uniquely different rural residential
       communities, small residential villages and a central township.

       Recognition as a year-round eco-friendly destination in which residential
       amenity is protected from the impacts of short-term visitors

       Recognition as a holiday destination offering a diversity of year-round rural
       lifestyle and alpine recreational opportunities where movement within and
       between localities is facilitated by cycleways, walkways, bridle tracks and
       public transport services.



2.2    Principles for guiding development

A core set of principles have been developed that will help guide the development of
the Jindabyne plan and future decision-making generally. These principles are
reflective of what the community has told Council through its various consultations to
date. To develop in accordance with these principles it is clear that the community
may need to make some trade-offs. The main principles are:


       1. The atmosphere of our ‘mountain town’ should be maintained by
          a good mix of tourists and permanent residents.

       This means we identify ourselves as a mountain town that is both an
       attractive place to live and to visit. The atmosphere of the mountain town
       contributes to the sense of place the community have for Jindabyne. Whilst
       we understand that tourism is the major economic driver of the town we
       need to diversify our economic base while maintaining Jindabyne as an
       attractive place to live. This may mean that we have to provide land for both
       tourist and resident development whilst achieving a degree of separation of
       residential areas from the impacts of tourist activity. It also means we need
       to provide for a range of accommodation type for residents including
       affordable housing.




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       2. The growth of Jindabyne should be supported but it needs to be
          well planned and based on population targets.

       This means we will need to stage growth in accordance with agreed
       population targets and develop within the land’s capability, attributes and
       infrastructure capacity. Well planned development must be based upon good
       information and follow a sound planning process. This will rely upon Council
       resources to continually monitor development and review and update plans.

       3. Tourism is the major economic driver within Jindabyne and this
          needs to be supported by the provision of a range of
          accommodation types.

       This means that we will continue to plan for and provide a range of
       accommodation including a mix of motels, holiday dwellings, small scale bed
       and breakfasts, cabins, guesthouses and lodges. We will need to stay
       abreast of the nature of tourist demands and ensure that planning controls
       permit appropriately designed tourist development.

       4. The unique setting of the town, including the vistas that can be
          enjoyed from many locations and the vegetated backdrops to the
          Lake, need to be protected.

       This means we want to protect the important scenic values of the town. We
       want to protect the lake backdrops from inappropriate development and we
       do not want buildings interrupting important views. This may mean we
       restrict development on the vacant land around the lake and on our heavily
       treed hillsides.

       5. There needs to be integration of recreational facilities and open
          space areas with the township’s commercial and accommodation
          centre.

       This means we need to provide and maintain clear connections between our
       recreational facilities and the township. This can be in the form of open
       space links, bicycle paths, bridal paths, and pedestrian connections between
       residential areas and the town. There is a need to maintain and enhance
       open space areas and access to the Lake Foreshore and increase the level of
       enjoyment of these areas for locals and tourists. For future development,
       this may mean clear open space linkages between any new urban areas and
       the existing town.

       6. The integrity of the rural residential communities, small villages
          and the township needs to be maintained, however there needs
          to be linkages.

       This means we need to maintain the separation of the lakeside communities
       and the rural residential communities. We need to see the integrity of
       Tyrolean Village, East Jindabyne and Kalkite maintained. The community
       does not want to see Jindabyne spread into one big urban complex. At the


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       same time there needs to be linkages (not just roads) but pathways and open
       space where practical.

       7. The sense of community, place and quality of life Jindabyne
          offers needs to be supported and maintained.

       This means we need to ensure that future development does not undermine
       the sense of community and quality of life the town already enjoys. This may
       mean we keep the scale of development low and we plan for safe
       communities. Through our planning processes we need to build on the
       existing community spirit and to look for opportunities to build partnerships to
       achieve outcomes.

       8. Manage the natural features of the catchment area of the lake
          that contribute to the scenery and biodiversity of the town.

       This may mean we have strict limitations on or do not develop in areas that
       have high natural, conservation or visual values. This could mean we do not
       remove important woodlands and grasslands that could contribute to an open
       space network, or are an important part of a landscape or have high natural
       conservation values.




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CHAPTER 3 – THE GROWTH OF JINDABYNE

3.1       Broad Factors Affecting Growth

The SGS Economics Report October 2005 (referred to in part 1.3 of this paper)
provides a detailed analysis of population, migration trends and growth drivers in
the town. The majority of this Chapter is a summary of the findings contained in
the SGS Report1.

The following provides a summary of the factors that will drive the growth of
Jindabyne:

      The demographic progression of the baby boomer generation will result in a
      peak in retirements between 2010 and 2015.
      Population driven economic activity will result from a growing population of
      retired persons in the Shire. This group spends less than working age people,
      but provides a gradually growing year round demand for goods and services that
      will create additional employment opportunities. The rate of growth of the
      retired persons is likely to be driven to a large extent by the relative
      affordability of the area compared to other lifestyle areas. The growing older
      population will also increase the scope of services that will be required locally
      instead of being provided from Cooma or Canberra.
      There is an increase in desire for high amenity landscape areas (sea change/
      tree change phenomena) that is affecting Jindabyne.
      The increasing importance of tourism and life stylists to the town outweighs
      agriculture and this will change the values for the rural and surrounding lands.
      The traditional primary production economic base of the region is supporting
      fewer families and employees over time. This also offers little prospect for
      employment growth.
      Winter tourism is widely regarded as mature. Tourism offers significant
      potential for economic growth if non-winter activity and visitation can be
      increased. This is most likely to take place within KNP and around the south of
      Lake Jindabyne, but also in association with fishing in the lakes and streams
      and other attractions. This is the clear tourism strategy for the region.
      Significant employment growth in other sectors and even within tourism will
      require greater control of the values chain (R&D, design, marketing,
      distribution and sales) or development of services sold outside the region.
      Jindabyne has the greatest prospect to develop export services through its
      strong links with Sydney for those that have specialist skills to offer. This is the
      least predictable sector for growth.

The Situation Analysis for the Alpine Region Settlement Strategy 2002, (prepared
by SGS Economics for the Department of Planning) observed that the Jindabyne
area (including adjacent lakeside communities and ski resorts) has two distinct but
related future possibilities:

      As a growing tourist destination offering an increasingly year round range of
      attractions;

1
    For the complete analysis contained in the SGS Report see the Snowy River Shire web site.

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    As a „sea change in the mountains‟ community attracting central Sydney (and
    other) residents that have the ability to work from a relatively remote location
    while pursuing business that reaches beyond the region or that can capitalize
    on the tourist or other locally based industries.


3.2     Population and growth

Jindabyne‟s „estimated resident population‟ (ERP) at the 2001 census was 2775
persons2, which represents 38.5 % of the Shire‟s total population. In 2004 the ERP
was 2961 representing a growth of 6.7% in Jindabyne and its surrounding villages,
compared with a growth in the Shire of 1.6% over this time.

The trend in estimated resident population over time simplifies a complex
situation. There is not one population of the Snowy River Shire but three that are
of interest:

    The permanent population, best captured by the estimated resident population
    figures given above;
    The visitor population strongly driven by the Shire‟s role as a tourism
    destination with a strong winter peak;
    The seasonal resident population, distinguished from visitors in that seasonal
    residents are either employed in the Shire during the peak season or are owners
    of property and stay here regularly at some times of the year.

Each of these requires provision for accommodation, generates employment and
requires local government and other infrastructure and services. Each has
different requirements. The number and distribution of each needs to be known
for effective planning.

Estimated Resident Population
On a Shire wide basis the growth in resident population has been remarkably steady
with an average of 184 persons per year from 1996 to 2001. The growth in
population has been strongest in and around Jindabyne. Based on anecdotal
accounts of recent surges in demand for housing, it is quite likely that the trend
since 2001 will be revised upward at the next census. The SGS report finds that
net inward migration accounted for 75% of the estimated resident population
growth in the Shire in the past decade, while natural increase accounted for the
rest.

Net in-migration is mostly in the ages 35+ with the greatest net in-migration in
ages 45 to 75 plus accompanying children for the younger households. There is a
net loss of young adults aged 20-30. While fewer people move in and out of the
Shire in older age groups, a much higher proportion remains.

For all age groups there is an advantage in housing costs to move to the Shire from
expensive metropolitan and coastal areas. For younger age groups, employment
may affect their ability to remain in the Shire. For older age groups, employment
is not a constraint on moving to or remaining in the Shire.


2
 See the SGS Economics Residential Planning Project October 2005 for a detailed analysis
of population and difficulties in estimating usual residents.

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The report cautions that of all the factors contributing to population growth and
demand for additional development land, migration is the most volatile. There are
significant unpredictable elements of migration.

Visitor & Seasonal Populations
It is not as easy to estimate seasonal and visitor populations. An indication of how
seasonal peaks relate to usual resident numbers is given by examining variations in
the flow through the Jindabyne sewerage treatment plant. Peak monthly average
flows are about four times summer minimums. Based on this we could assess that,
variations aside, at peak times the seasonal and visitor population is 4 times that of
the estimated resident population.

Seasonal population growth has been more variable, according to factors that
affect the affordability of vacation homes and the cost of other options.
Anecdotally many seasonal residents eventually become permanent residents in
retirements.

Winter visitation is essentially mature, but varies according to the quality of the ski
season. Summer visitation is gradually increasing.


3.3       Growth Scenarios

This discussion paper models three growth scenarios based on the findings of the
SGS Report3. Please see the figure at the end of this Section.

Low Growth Scenario
The low growth scenario suggests that very little land would be required to be
rezoned for future residential development. Growth in the low scenario could be
zero or even a drop in population in the short term. However, longer term the low
growth scenario could see rates of about half of what the community is currently
experiencing.

A failure of several winter seasons and an undercutting of the viability and quality
of tourism offerings would result in a low growth scenario. Poor employment
prospects would lead to the loss of young families from the area, at least initially.
In such a scenario the retirement sector would become a larger part of the
economy with tourism reducing. This could reduce the demand for seasonal
accommodation. Population growth in younger age groups would recover slowly as
population driven demand increases employment in the longer term.


High Growth Scenario
The high growth scenario would see summer visitation grow until it is over half of
winter levels. Strong year round employment sustains higher population growth as
retail and services available all year round meet most local needs at lower prices
than at present. A resurgent Sydney housing market and increasing numbers of
baby boomers retiring creates demand for lifestyle residential locations, but
restrictions on coastal development and high prices there open up greater interest
in inland locations. The presence of increasing numbers of people with talent,


3
    See the SGS Economics Report for a more detailed analysis of growth in Jindabyne.

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experience and connections provides a slowly diversifying economic base as
specialist services are exported from the area.
Relatively modest growth in seasonally rented accommodated, as virtually all
growth is in the summer when vacancies are high. However, there is continued
strong growth in seasonal residences occupied by owner-occupiers as the area is
seen as increasingly attractive.

Growth in this scenario is likely to be limited by the availability of land and
building services.

Likely Growth Scenario
The following describes the most likely growth scenario for Jindabyne and the one
the planning staff has based its development options on for discussion in this
paper.

Population growth will moderate in the short term due to falling Sydney and steady
Canberra housing prices. Continued growth is expected in the longer term at
roughly historical rates driven by steady growth in summer tourism, lifestyle
relocation and retirement.

Apart from growth in summer tourism, employment growth will be mostly in
population-based industry (construction, retail, personal services). For tourism and
for many related business like retail, the biggest change will not be major growth
in capacity but greater use of existing capacity year round. This will also be true
for education and health to some extent. However, there will need to be growth
in capacity for sectors serving the elderly and potentially school aged children.

Housing capacity will need to grow to accommodate additional permanent
residents at about the current level or slightly above on average over the long
term. While Council only has a shire-wide figure for growth (150-180 persons per
year and 50-70 households per year), it is clear that the majority of this growth is
in and around Jindabyne. Based on the growth of Jindabyne (6.7%), the majority of
these 70 households will require dwellings in the Jindabyne locality.

The need for seasonal holiday homes would increase in large part based on relative
affordability and the extent to which options to acquire attractive sites are
available. There will continue to be a strong market for renting houses to visitors.
Assuming this is permitted or even encouraged, the numbers of dwellings for
seasonal homes and holiday rentals will probably remain close to the numbers built
for permanent residents, about 50 per year. Seasonal workers accommodation is
unlikely to grow significantly and could even decline slightly as more workers are
employed year round.

This scenario seems the most likely growth scenario for Jindabyne. This scenario
will require additional land supply for residential purposes through rezoning. It is
difficult to estimate the resident projected population of Jindabyne. Based on
current growth figures however it is likely the population of Jindabyne by the year
2020 will be over 5,000 persons. This is almost a doubling of the current
population, and will require a mixture of land rezoned for urban scale residential
development as well as rural residential.




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 Low Growth Scenario                            Likely Growth Scenario
A failure of several winter                   Continued growth expected in
          seasons.                              the longer term driven by
Poor employment and loss                        steady growth in summer
    of young families.                        tourism, lifestyle relocation &
Very little land would need                             retirement.
       to be rezoned.                          Apart from summer tourism,
                                               employment growth will be
                                               mostly in population-based
                                                         industry.
                                              Housing capacity will need to
                                                  grow to accommodate
                                             additional permanent residents



                                                          High Growth Scenario
                                                      Summer tourism grows until it is
                                                          over half of winter levels.
                                                         Resurgent Sydney housing
                                                      market and increasing numbers
                                                          of baby boomers retiring.
                                                         Relatively modest growth in
                                                              seasonally rented
                                                              accommodation.
                                                       Growth in this scenario may be
                                                      limited by the availability of land
                                                            and building services.



    3.4     Residential Land Supply / Capacity

    Council‟s records do not allow for an accurate analysis of land supply for
    residential purposes. A discussion of land supply was provided in the SGS
    Economics report where it was recommended that Council update its GIS systems
    to track changes in land availability.

    Urban Land Supply
    A combination of developments in and around Jindabyne could see the release of
    sufficient lots to meet the demand for urban scale development for the next 5
    years. The Highview Estate at the top of Gippsland Street has seen the release of
    its first two stages with a combined total of 26 lots suitable for single dwelling or
    dual occupancy development. At completion the Highview Estate will provide for
    410 ETs (estimated tenements) ranging from medium density housing, single
    dwellings as well as dual occupancies.

    In addition to Highview Estate a combination of developments at Tyrolean Village,
    Alpine Sands and East Jindabyne will see the release of approximately another 100
    lots suitable for single dwellings and limited dual occupancy development only.


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Rural Residential Land Supply
A very crude analysis of land supply suggests that there are limited numbers of
vacant lots available in the existing rural residential zones to meet the expected
demand for this type of development. The SGS report finds that an average of 25
lots per year represents the demand for lots between 1-10 hectares around
Jindabyne. Based on this figure there would not be two years supply of lots for this
type of development within the existing zoned areas.

The current minimum lot size of 800 hectares for a dwelling in rural areas and no
ability to subdivide for dwellings has seen no small lot rural development around
Jindabyne for over 10 years. It is hard to determine what the demand for this style
of development is. The SGS report indicates that the strongest demand for rural
residential development is for smaller properties within a short distance of town or
even at the town edge. Further from town however there is a range of buyers for
larger properties of increasing sizes up to relatively large bush bloc „retreats‟ up to
200 hectares further from the town.

The primary requirement for development of rural residential land is to identify
suitable land that will not have significant adverse environmental effects. The
release of land needs to provide some diversity in sizes, features and location to
meet different need. However, the visual attractiveness of the region is a key
appeal – protecting this should remain a high priority.

For land that is served by reticulated water and sewerage, it is important to
identify the sequence of development to ensure economical development of
infrastructure.




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CHAPTER 4 – KEY LAND USE ISSUES
The following issues will need to be addressed in the process of determining how
and where the growth of Jindabyne should be managed.

    Tourism and its impact;
    Style of settlement;
    Impacts on natural values;
    Landscape character and management;
    Infrastructure (including access)
    Heritage;
    Commercial and industrial land;
    Rural living opportunities

Tourism and its impact

We cannot plan for future residential development around Jindabyne without
considering the future needs of seasonal residents4, seasonal workers5, and visitors
(tourists)6, and the impact these land use types have on residential areas.

In the Jindabyne area, approximately 57% of properties have owners who live
outside of the Shire. The relatively high ownership of property by those outside of
the Shire has a number of implications. For the purposes of considering demand
for property, population and property values, some of the key implications are:

    o   Urban property markets, particularly Sydney, will strongly influence the
        ability and willingness to pay for property in the Shire as the urban markets
        strengthen or decline.
    o   With so many properties used as second or vacation homes, the value of a
        property will be influenced by this use in competition with other uses such
        as housing for permanent residents or even productive agricultural use.
    o   Seasonal housing is usually only occupied for a small portion of the year,
        affecting both the scale and continuity of demand for retail and other
        population driven economic sectors.

Based on the above it is difficult to predict the growth in seasonal populations and
translate this into demand for housing. The SGS Economics Report suggests that
overall about 35% of additional housing appears to accommodate seasonal
residents.

Consideration needs to be given to the following matters in relation to developing
land for seasonal residents and visitors


4
  Seasonal residents are those who own property in Jindabyne and occupy it at weekends or
during the ski or summer seasons.
5
  Seasonal workers are those who come to work, mostly in the winter season.
6
  Visitors are those that stay in hotels, ski lodges, holiday dwellings, bed and breakfast or
with friends



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           Should commercial holiday dwellings and other forms of tourist
           accommodation be permitted in new growth areas, or should they be
           restricted to the existing zoned areas within the current town boundary?
           The SGS Economics Report suggests that approximately 50 dwellings per
           year (Shire wide – but with the majority - probably around 40 -being in
           Jindabyne) would be required for seasonal/holiday style
           accommodation. Given the limited capacity of current zoned areas to
           absorb more of this kind of development, Council will need to consider
           the likelihood of permitting seasonal dwellings in new growth areas.
           Current zonings for rural residential areas do not permit holiday
           dwellings or any other form of tourist accommodation. Should this
           policy be continued into new rural residential areas, or should some
           limited form of tourist development be permitted in the lower density
           residential areas?
           There has been a proposal within the community for many years for a
           golf course / residential / resort development on land immediately
           south of town and straddling both sides of the Barry Way. If the
           community is serious about the proposal then this needs to be identified
           in a plan, otherwise other options for the use of land in this area need
           to be explored.
           In planning future residential areas, Council needs to balance the desire
           to create residential areas for permanent residents free from the
           impacts of tourist development together with the need to provide for
           tourist accommodation. In assessing this matter further, Council will
           need to look carefully at current zoned areas and the ability to develop
           new holiday dwellings and other tourist accommodation within those
           areas. Proximity to services and facilities within the town is an
           important consideration for determining the location of seasonal
           population accommodation.


Style of settlement

Little work has been done on analyzing the style of development in Jindabyne and
whether it is in fact a style that ought to be repeated in proposed new growth
areas.

The current settlement style is very mixed depending on location within or around
the town. Certainly areas such as East Jindabyne and Tyrolean have developed
their own styles. Primarily these areas are dominated by larger single dwellings
with very little medium or higher density style development. In some parts this is
reflected by the zoning but in other parts it is a reflection of the residents who
have chosen to live in those areas. Whilst East Jindabyne is characterised by large
houses on larger blocks, Tyrolean has larger houses on relatively small blocks.
Maintaining the identity of these settlements is an important principle to follow for
the future development of Jindabyne.

In the town of Jindabyne itself the style of settlement is variable. In the original
parts of the new town – for example areas such as Banjo Paterson Crescent, the
Nook, lower parts of Gippsland Street, Clyde Street and Munyang Street, the style
could be described as low-key with low visual impact. These areas are dominated
by the original „snowy‟ homes. Most buildings are two storey or less and there is a
significant leafy or established feel to the areas.

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Other parts of the town have a dominance of flats, lodges and other forms of
medium density housing, whilst newer parts of the town such as Candelbark
Circuit, Plateau Estate and the Jillamatong Street area have each developed a
character of their own.

Council will need to analyse the capacity of existing developed areas to absorb an
increase in settlement density. And further, to determine whether such an
increase is desirable given any possible impacts. Council has already recognized
that better building and design guidelines (Residential standards and DCP) are
required. The development of such standards will be critical to the latter stages of
the Jindabyne Plan.

Current settlement style is largely determined by such controls as a 9 metre height
control, site coverage and floor space ratio controls. For new growth areas better
guidelines will be necessary to determine character and to ensure that all buildings
fit into the character and landscapes of new settlements. Broad guidelines will be
established through the Jindabyne Planning Project and will be further refined in a
DCP for Jindabyne.

Infrastructure

Water & Sewer
The “Analysis of Infrastructure Capacity and Needs Analysis” prepared by Rob
Staples & Associates, investigated the existing capacity of infrastructure and the
future needs for infrastructure to accommodate growth in and around Jindabyne.
The report provides Council with information relating to infrastructure capacity
and needs related to water supply, sewerage and road access together with
consideration of air transport infrastructure.

The Eastern parts of Jindabyne (including East Jindabyne, Tyrolean Village,
Rainbow Beach and Alpine Sands) has sufficient sewerage capacity to meet long
term growth within and adjacent to the villages. Some new development will
require the construction of additional sewerage pump stations. Water supply has
sufficient capacity to meet long term growth of the area.

Jindabyne Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) has reached its nominal capacity during
peak winter operations and there is an immediate need to undertake investigation
and design for augmentation of the Jindabyne STP at the earliest possible time.
Some potential growth areas will require either the construction of new sewage
pumping stations or the augmentation of existing pump stations to increase
capacity. The existing sewage pump stations are showing signs of age and are in
need of refurbishment, particularly mechanical and electrical components
(including pumps).

The water supply headworks has sufficient capacity to meet short term growth of
the township, however augmentation investigations for the water supply intake
capacity should be commenced now to facilitate future capital works planning.
Infill development would consolidate the efficient use of both water and sewerage
infrastructure.

The Infrastructure Analysis report identified potential development and expansion
zones around the town. These zones were delineated based upon the following:

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       1.   Consistency of landform or type within an envelope of land;
       2.   Bound by a topographical or physical feature e.g a road or a river;
       3.   Commonality of infrastructure needs;
       4.   Likely broad development parcels;
       5.   Intentional avoidance of specific cadastral boundaries where possible

Based upon the above infrastructure related criteria, 11 potential expansion zones
were identified for the town of Jindabyne.

Stating the obvious it is clearly the case that land in close proximity to existing
services is more likely to be serviced at a lower unit cost than is land further away
from existing services. In the report this became the basis of the analysis and
provides a simple means of comparing serviceability potential of the different
zones.

Appendix A to this report provides a summary of the serviceability of each of the
infrastructure expansion or development zones together with a map illustrating
each.

Aircraft Landing Facility
The Jindabyne airstrip is classified as an Authorised Landing Area (ALA). As such it
permits use by general aviation aircraft and emergency services. As an ALA the
airstrip and its associated facilities do not pose any significant environmental
impacts on adjoining lands and any proposed development on those lands.

There has been some talk within the community with regard to the upgrading of
the facility to enable regular charter operations. A Local Environmental Study
prepared by GHD in 1988 concluded that upgrading the ALA to a Licensed
Aerodrome would double the cost of upgrading and be economically unviable due
to the heavy restrictions which would necessarily be placed on the aerodrome.

Some discussion needs to be had with the community regarding the future of the
Jindabyne ALA as well as the provision of aircraft facilities generally. Upgrading
the existing facility could limit the development capacity of adjoining lands.
Provision of an alternate facility could free up land that is within the path of
growth for the town. Maintaining the existing facility as an ALA will require some
careful consideration of new zone and development boundaries.

Access
A major issue that will impact on the proposed pattern of growth is access to new
growth areas. This discussion paper needs to seek direction from the community
with regard to the need for and status of a road linking Kosciuszko Road with the
Barry Way, (shown on the Growth Options Plan as a “potential bypass road”).
Historically plans of Jindabyne have nominated this parcel as an Arterial Road
Reservation (See LEP 4 of 1981). Whilst this zoning was not carried through in LEP
1997 the route of an arterial road has been nominally shown on the zoning plans.
Construction of such a road including intersections at both the Barry Way and
Kosciuszko Road (Main road 286) has been estimated to be cost prohibitive in the
short term.

Neither Council nor the RTA has any plans to construct a road along this alignment
in the short term. However to service future growth some type of access maybe

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required to reduce pressure on Main Road 286 through Jindabyne, and to provide a
quicker access to proposed new residential areas. The future of this corridor needs
to be considered in the context of the growth options in order for Council to decide
on the status of such a road, whether it is a bypass road, or some sort of collector
road with intersecting access roads. To develop such a road Council will need to
seek Section 94 developer contributions.

Landscape character and management

The landscape setting of Jindabyne is important to its „sense of place‟, quality of
life of the area‟s resident and economy. People come to the area to experience
Lake Jindabyne and the „high country‟ feel of its surrounding rolling terrain and
open spaces backed by forested slopes of the Kosciuszko National Park and the
steep sided valley of the Snowy River.

It is important, therefore, that the regional landscape is managed so that future
generations can enjoy these same visual qualities that are so valued today. The
report “Jindabyne Planning Project – Landscape Character Assessment &
Management” by Inspiring Place, assesses the landscape character of the region
and provides a set of management principles for its protection.

The Inspiring Place assessment concluded that in visual management terms and
specifically in terms of maintaining the landscape character of the region and the
legibility of its settlements, the Jindabyne South landscape character type presents
the best area for future expansion of Jindabyne. This is primarily because this
particular landscape unit could visually accommodate a range of development
types if localized conditions within the unit are considered and well responded to.

There have been repeated suggestions that the land to the west of Jindabyne past
the Snowy Mountains Grammar School and towards the Snowy Hydro sub-station
should be expanded upon. The landscape character of the Lake Jindabyne visual
unit as one of a rural/unsettled landscape is reflected in views to this area with
the exception being the Snowy Hydro sub-station which deviates from this
character. This land is deemed attractive for development purposes because it
generally slopes towards the lake, is north facing, can take advantage of high value
views and is relatively easy to service.

In these terms there is some very limited capacity to expand on land owned by
Snowy Mountains Grammar without compromising the landscape character of the
Lake Jindabyne landscape unit. It is argued however, that in visual management
terms, any further development beyond the school would detract from the
landscape character of the region and the Lake Jindabyne landscape character
type.

A more detailed consideration of how development can be accommodated within
the major visual units around Jindabyne is contained in the Inspiring Place report.


Impacts on natural values

The Jindabyne Project Area contains many important natural values. These values
are documented in a study prepared by NGH Environmental for Council in August
2005. The Study “Analysis of Natural and Archaeological Values” is primarily a

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desktop study that collates previously recorded flora, fauna and archaeological
information for Jindabyne (as well as the other towns of the Shire). The report
identifies areas of high conservation values and discusses indicators of such areas
and land management practices and land uses appropriate to retaining these
values.

The area of most significance and likely to impact on growth options for Jindabyne
is an area of “quality woodland” primarily to the north and west of the Leesville
industrial area. This area is nominated in the NGH report as having potentially
high biodiversity values. Two threatened woodland species, the Squirrel Glider and
Hooded Robin were observed in woodland in the Leesville area. This woodland is
contiguous with larger expanses of woodland to the west and therefore has high
potential for other mobile forest fauna to occur.

Another area nominated as having potentially high biodiversity values is the
Mowamba Riparian corridor. Native vegetation in riparian areas appears to be
under-represented in the locality. Quality areas occur on the Mowamba, off
Mowamba Way and near the confluence of the Snowy River and the Mowamba
River. Revegetation of the Mowamba may reinstate a wildlife corridor that
connects forest fauna on the east and west of Jindabyne.

More detailed investigation of impact on flora and fauna and archaeological values
would be required for areas that are nominated for future residential
development. Such detailed investigation would be required prior to a rezoning of
the land. The NGH report however suggested that more intensive land uses such as
urban and industrial development could be considered in areas that are already
cleared and degraded through loss of native species diversity, loss of habitat
structure and weed invasion. Degraded pastures and cleared areas adjacent to
existing development would be most appropriate.

Maintaining connectivity between woodland areas, preserving hollow-bearing trees,
areas with diverse understorey and ground refugia (rocks and fallen timber) are
important considerations in determining future growth areas

Heritage

Aboriginal Heritage
An archaeological study was undertaken as part of the NGH Study “Analysis of
Natural and Archaeological Values”, referred to in the previous section. This
report presented that a relatively large number of archaeological surveys have
been undertaken in the Jindabyne area most of which have been conducted within
a context of environmental impact assessment preceding development impacts.
However, a number of research based studies have also been conducted. Very
little subsurface excavation has been undertaken which limits our understanding in
some respects. However, what is clear is that Aboriginal sites are found within
most survey contexts indicating that Aboriginal occupation and land usage was
widespread across the landscape.

In summary, the Jindabyne area is predicted to contain a widespread distribution
of archaeological material, the majority of which will be stone artifacts present
either on land surfaces or within soil profiles.




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The landforms which are predicted to contain higher relative artifact densities are
flats and gentle slopes situated above the flood zone but in reasonably close
proximity (≤ 200-300 metres) to major streams and rivers. The confluences of
major streams are likely to be archaeologically sensitive. Ridge crests which
possess flat or gentle gradients are predicted to possess some archaeological
potential, while side slopes, especially those with higher gradients, are unlikely to
be archaeologically sensitive except for small scale micro-topographic features of
low gradient.

Given the high likelihood for Aboriginal archaeological sites to be present in the
area an investigation for sites should be conducted in respect of any subdivision
proposal.

European Heritage
Council completed the Snowy River Heritage Study (Tropman and Tropman) in
1998. The Heritage Study analyses the historical documentary and physical
evidence available and contains an inventory of close to 200 items that have
heritage significance. Council will continue to add to this Heritage inventory as
more items are brought to Council attention as having heritage value. Many of the
items on the Heritage Study inventory are included in the Heritage List in the LEP.

Any proposed new LEP and DCP controls will contain protection measures and
development guidelines for heritage listed properties.

Commercial & Industrial Land

The SGS Economics Report (Chapter 7) provides an analysis of the needs for future
land for commercial and industrial purposes. It concluded that growth in land for
tourism is expected to be limited as most growth is likely to be in summer where
there is substantial surplus capacity, (this does not include dwellings for seasonal
residents). Land area for activities that serve the growing permanent population
will grow at rates reflecting that of population growth, but can be supported
within currently provided areas for the foreseeable future. In the medium term,
parts of the Jindabyne centre will need to be redeveloped and eventually
extended. In the long term, a second centre should be established to serve the
local population.


Rural Living

There has been no land developed for small holding rural development for over 10
years around Jindabyne. There is potential for this type of development around
Jindabyne and Council has determined a strategic 10 kilometre ring within which to
develop options for rural living development7.

Rural living means:

         “subdivision of rural land into small rural lots to be occupied by dwellings,
         where the subdivision is close to towns and villages and services are provided
         within the subdivision.”

7
 The Snowy River Shire Settlement Strategy 2002 determined the basis for the 10 kilometre
rural living ring.

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This discussion paper presents the types of matters that wil impact on the
potential for rural living development in different parts of the 10km ring. As with
nominating areas for future urban and rural residential growth, a number of factors
impact on where to site such development. Of the issues discussed in the previous
sections landscape character management and natural values are large factors in
determining areas for future rural living development. In addition consideration
must be given to impact on agricultural land and agricultural production as well as
access, topography and whether the area is bushfire prone.

As this form of subdivision relies upon the on-site provision of water (dams, bores
or rainwater tanks) and the on-site disposal of effluent, Council commissioned a
study to undertake a broad scale review of water resources around Jindabyne.
Jindabyne & Villages Planning Project – Water Resources Study (The Planning
Connection October 2005).

The outcomes of the study were favorable to pursuing rural living development in
terms of being able to adequately provide water to subdivisions. The conclusions
of the study were that the potable water requirements of a rural living household
could possibly be met by utilising rainwater tanks, depending on the size of roof
area and the seasonal rainfall. However an additional water source, either potable
or adequately treated would most likely be required for toilet and laundry
purposes. Bore water could meet this requirement.

The report recommended that:

   Potable water requirements for rural living dwellings should be provided
   initially by rainfall harvesting, and backed up by bores (groundwater). Each
   rural living property should aim for at least 300 m2 of roof area capable of
   being harvested.
   In order to maximize the benefit of rainfall harvesting, each property should
   have a minimum of 20,000 litres of potable water tank storage, and preferably
   30,000 litres. Non potable water for fire fighting, stock and garden use is
   separate to this supply.
   Strong consideration would need to be given to the use of a communal bore for
   each rural living estate. Rigourous testing must be required to establish to a
   high level the life expectancy and available draw down of the bore.
   If groundwater supplies are not of sufficient quality to reliable quantity it may
   be necessary to reticulate town water to the rural living subdivision.

An additional amount of water would be required for non-potable water provision
(domestic and stock purposes), for a rural living property. The combination of
garden, stock and fire fighting requirements, rainfall, evaporation and critical
storage would require a dam size of around 1.1 ML for each rural living property
requiring a catchment area of around 16 hectares.

Council‟s current policy is to provide for a minimum site area of 5 hectares for a
rural living allotment, and a maximum of 7 allotments per existing holding.
Obviously 5 hectares does not provide a sufficient catchment area to supply a farm
dam, and it is quite possible that a suitable dam site may not be available on that
size site.




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However a site area of 5 hectares may be suitable (from a water resources view
only) if the average area of each allotment within the subdivision from which
rainwater run-off could be captured, was 16 hectares, therefore requiring a
minimum of 112 hectares of actual water catchment for a 7 lot subdivision.




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CHAPTER 5 – KEY GROWTH RECOMMENDATIONS
The findings of the background studies as summarized in the previous section were
carefully analysed to nominate areas around Jindabyne for future urban, rural
residential and rural living development. At the community open days in November
2005 participants were asked to complete a mapping exercise to nominate future
growth areas taking into consideration the recommendations of the consultants
reports. The growth options presented in this discussion paper are based on the
consultants reports as well as the options presented to Council during the
consultation.

These future growth areas are shown on the plans accompanying this discussion
paper. The plans nominate areas for future development and in some instances a
couple of different options are given. It is proposed that through consultation with
the community that the most preferred areas for development will be determined
and later in the process thought can be given to issues such a density, character
and style of development, staging and provision of infrastructure.

Refer to the attached Growth Options Map when reading this section.




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Area A (west of Lake Jindabyne, including & adjoining Snowy Mountains
Grammar School)

Three options are put forward for this area.

             Option                          Potential Impacts                   Staging

1 - Do not allow development at      Restricting the development of               N/A
all into this area to maintain the   potentially high amenity high
rural/unsettled landscape as         value and desirable residential
reflected in views to this area.     land.
Retain a similar zoning to that
which currently exists over the
land to protect the Lake
Foreshore from lakeside sprawl.


2 - Allow limited development        Development on this land may         Land in this area
on the land immediately to the       not compromise the landscape         could be rezoned
west of the Snowy Mountains          character of the Lake Jindabyne      immediately as the
Grammar School. Control              landscape character type.            land can be
development through a general        Development on this land would       economically
residential zoning that would        not be seen form the Alpine Way,     serviced and there is
allow single dwellings and some      and is on flatter, north-facing      limited supply of
dual occupancies.                    slopes with lake views of the        land within this
                                     type mentioned as desirable by       market segment.
Careful consideration of access
                                     the community.
and design related matters will
be necessary for this land.


3- Allow development to extend       Development beyond the               Part of this area
in a westerly direction to the       Grammar School land would            could be released
boundary of the Eastern              detract from the landscape           immediately while
Approaches and south to the          character of the region and the      some consideration
alignment of the nominally           Lake Jindabyne landscape             of servicing costs
shown road.                          character type.                      and provision would
                                                                          need to be given
Development in this area will        See the Landscape Character
                                                                          depending on the
require strict development           Assessment, PG 81, (Inspiring
                                                                          extent of the area
controls to manage sharing of        Place 2005) for a detailed
                                                                          proposed to be
views, impact on views from the      discussion on the visual impact of
                                                                          developed.
Lake, density etc. Only a            development on this land.
general residential zoning
should be considered in this
area. Some consideration may
need to be given to how land
above the 1000m contour ought
to be managed.




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Area B (Eastern side of Barry Way, south of Highview Estate, including Sport &
Rec land

One option is presented for this large area.

             Option                         Potential Impacts                  Staging

The land immediately adjoining      Minimal impacts if this land were   This land could be
to the south of the proposed        to be developed.                    rezoned
Highview Estate could be easily                                         immediately.
developed for urban scale
development.                        Consideration of the future of an
                                    access running north along the
The Sport and Recreation land is
                                    boundary of the Sport and
recognised for its existing use.
                                    Recreation land would need to
The Sport and Recreation
                                    be resolved prior to the
facility is well established and
                                    development of this land.
future growth areas should
include good linkages to the
facility.
Some potential to develop some
of the Sport and Recreation land
for residential purposes could be
considered in negotiation with
the NSW Department of Sport
and Recreation.




Area C (Western side of Barry Way, south of the Jindabyne Cemetery /
proposed by pass road to Tinworth Drive. Area generally below the 1000
contour level – The Airport)

Two options are suggested for this area.

           Option                         Potential Impacts                    Staging

Option 1                        Land in this area has been previously   Should the
                                nominated as a potential site for       community wish to
Part residential part special
                                some sort of resort development,        see this area of land
purposes (e.g a tourist
                                (incorporating a golf course). This     set aside for special
resort, golf course or some
                                development may straddle the Barry      purposes
other special purpose).
                                Way.                                    development then
The extent of development                                               this would need to
                                Special purposes development in this
will be dictated by the                                                 be reflected in a
                                area would take up land that would
future of the existing ALA                                              statutory plan to
                                otherwise be readily serviced and
(Jindabyne Airstrip).                                                   provide certainty for
                                suitable for residential development.
                                                                        the future growth of
                                Regardless, development in this area    the town.
                                should be contained so that buildings
                                do not breach the surrounding
                                ridgelines and so that the treed
                                slopes around the perimeter are
                                retained.
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Option 2                           The ALA land has value for              Rezoning of this land
                                   residential development in that the     would follow
Urban scale residential.
                                   hollow within which it sits is          development of the
This option will depend on
                                   topographically suited to residential   land in Area B, that
the future of the ALA.
                                   development and is unseen from          is more readily
                                   many viewpoints. Development in         serviced.
                                   this area should be contained so that
                                   housing does not breach the
                                   surrounding ridgelines and so that
                                   the treed slopes around the
                                   perimeter are retained.
                                   Should the ALA be upgraded then the
                                   facility would impose severe
                                   constraints on the development
                                   capacity of the land immediately
                                   adjoining and generally surrounding
                                   the airstrip.
                                   Should the ALA be retained as an ALA
                                   then the current facility would not
                                   severely constrain development on
                                   adjoining or adjacent land.
                                   Given the attractiveness of this land
                                   for residential development the
                                   community will need to weigh up the
                                   options for this land carefully.


Area D (Area extending west and south of Tinworth Drive including land
containing the Old Leesville Inn).

             Option                            Potential Impacts                  Staging

This land is highly constrained.       The majority of this land was       This land can be
                                       identified as having potentially    serviced but it is not
Some rural residential
                                       high biodiversity values, and a     the most readily
development might be able to
                                       further flora and fauna study       serviced land.
be considered on this land in the
                                       would need to be undertaken         Depending on the
north eastern section. A buffer
                                       before any land was considered      outcomes of the
to the industrial estate would be
                                       suitable for residential            appropriate studies
required if residential
                                       development.                        the land could be
development were to be
                                                                           considered for rural
considered.                            Consideration would also need to
                                                                           residential in the
                                       be given to appropriate
An environmental protection                                                long term.
                                       screening from the Barry Way,
zoning would be necessary on
                                       and the proximity of the land to
the land identified as having
                                       the industrial estate, as well as
high biodiversity values.
                                       impact on the heritage
                                       significance of the old Leesville
                                       Inn.




Area E (Leesville Estate – current Industrial Zone).


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             Option                       Potential Impacts                    Staging

Development of the Estate is        There are potential impacts        There is an immediate
highly constrained by recent        on threatened species with         and future need for
discovery of sugar glider habitat   the extension of the               more land for industrial
to the west. An option is to        Industrial Estate in either the    purposes for the town of
extend the industrial estate as     easterly or westerly               Jindabyne. Due to the
far as is practical to the east     direction. The future              constraints on the
towards the Barry Way, as well      expansion of the estate is         existing estate, Council
as southwards onto adjoining        contingent on flora and            could look to extend the
land.                               fauna studies.                     industrial zoning
                                                                       southwards or
Consideration would need to be
                                                                       alternately look long
given to the provision of a
                                    Screening vegetation would         term for a new location
buffer either within the existing
                                    be necessary with the              for industrial
zoned land or on adjoining land.
                                    expansion of the estate to         development.
                                    the Barry Way.


Area F (Land directly adjoining and surrounding existing rural residential
estates)

             Option                         Potential Impacts                    Staging

Potential for rural residential     This land can be serviced,            Development of this
style development across all        however will require some             Area will depend on
areas within F.                     upgraded or amplified works to        ability of a
                                    connect to existing services.         developer to provide
The southern most part of the
                                                                          services, however
Station Resort land if              Impacts on the riparian corridor
                                                                          some parts should be
redeveloped should be low           of Cobbin Creek and the
                                                                          zoned immediately
density (rural residential)         Mowamba River will need to be
                                                                          to provide a supply
development in recognition of       considered.
                                                                          of land at this
the character of the area, and
                                    Development in this area should       density.
proximity to High Country
                                    be contained so that housing
Estate. Consequently rural
                                    does not breach the ridgeline
residential (or low density)
                                    running in a north easterly
development is preferred for
                                    direction through the area.
this and the land immediately
adjoining to the south.             The northern part of Area F
                                    provides a transition between
                                    more truly rural areas and urban
                                    scale development.




Area G (Land to the south of Sport and Rec land, immediately adjoining to the
east of the Barry Way and includes land occupied by part of the Station Resort)

             Option                         Potential Impacts                    Staging

The land in Area G is the most      Area G has the most potential for     Timing of the
readily suited for urban scale      urban development. It is              development of this
residential development.            topographically suited to             land will be
                                    residential development. Whilst       contingent on the
The land is easily serviced, and

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the topography is well suited.    the majority of the land has          resolution of
                                  potential to be serviced there        servicing issues.
The land accommodated by the
                                  are some capacity issues.             Investigation of the
northern half of the Station
                                                                        servicing issues
Resort has water and sewer        There is a pattern of existing
                                                                        should commence
infrastructure available to it.   development and open spaces
                                                                        immediately as this
There is scope for urban scale    that it can integrate with in a
                                                                        area is considered
development of this land.         visually legible manner.
                                                                        the core area for
                                  In developing this area, care         residential
                                  would need to be taken to retain      development.
                                  the minor hill form in close
                                  proximity to the Barry Way in
                                  open space as a visual boundary.




Area I (Copper Tom point)

             Option                       Potential Impacts                    Staging

Copper Tom point is a             Development of this land will
constrained parcel of land.       need to consider access, visibility
                                  as well as open space issues,
It has been nominally shown as
                                  amongst others.
special purposes in this
discussion paper.                 The land is readily serviced by
                                  water and sewer.




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Appendix A
Serviceability Assessment.




                     MURRAY BLACKBURN-SMITH
                 DIRECTOR ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES


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