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					CATALOG
    2010/2011
Notice of Non-Discriminatory Policy
The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences has an
open admission policy and does not discriminate on the
basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, national or
ethnic origin, or marital status in administration of its
educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, or any
other school administered programs.

The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences is a
private, independent, post-secondary University licensed by
the Commission for Independent Education, Florida
Department of Education in Florida and The Bureau for
Private, Post-secondary Education approves the entry-level
DPT expansion program in San Diego, California.

Subject to Change Without Notice

August 2010 (Rev February 2011)
                               University of St. Augustine
                                  for Health Sciences


                                   General Catalog

                                                   2010/2011



                         Clinical Excellence Through Graduate Education




       The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences is a private, independent, post-secondary University
             licensed by the Commission for Independent Education, Florida Department of Education.



Subject to Change without Notice



University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
1 University Boulevard
St. Augustine, Florida 32086-5799
United States of America

General Inquiries:   (904) 826-0084
Fax:                 (904) 826-0085
Registrations:       (800) 241-1027
Website:             www.usa.edu
E-mail:              info@usa.edu
St. Augustine’s 165 foot lighthouse was built between 1871-1874
        and still functions as a working lighthouse today.




                              ii
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT...............................................................................................................VIII

GENERAL INFORMATION ..........................................................................................................................1

Licensure....................................................................................................................................................................................1

Accreditations and Approvals..............................................................................................................................................1

Mission Statement of the University....................................................................................................................................2

Degrees Offered........................................................................................................................................................................2

History of the University........................................................................................................................................................3

The Campuses..........................................................................................................................................................................5

Clinical Sites..............................................................................................................................................................................5

Learning Resource Center ....................................................................................................................................................5

St. Augustine.............................................................................................................................................................................5

San Diego...................................................................................................................................................................................6

BOARD OF TRUSTEES ...............................................................................................................................................16

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS AND STAFF .................................................................................................17

ENROLLMENT SERVICES ......................................................................................................................................18

Admission to the University Degree Programs...............................................................................................................18
   Application for Admission...........................................................................................................................................18
   International Students Applying for Admission ....................................................................................................19

RECORDS AND REGISTRATION...............................................................................................................................19
  Registration.....................................................................................................................................................................19
  Records.............................................................................................................................................................................19
  Graduation......................................................................................................................................................................21

FINANCIAL INFORMATION........................................................................................................................................21
   Tuition and Fees.............................................................................................................................................................21
   Payment ...........................................................................................................................................................................24
   Refund Policy..................................................................................................................................................................24
   Financial Assistance Policy..........................................................................................................................................24
   Scholarship Program....................................................................................................................................................24

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS .......................................................................................................26
  Grading System..............................................................................................................................................................26
  Compliance with University Regulations.................................................................................................................26



                                                                                                 iii
STUDENT SERVICES .......................................................................................................................................................27
   Off-Campus Housing....................................................................................................................................................27
   Veteran’s Benefits..........................................................................................................................................................27
   International Student Services....................................................................................................................................27

DIVISION OF FIRST PROFESSIONAL STUDIES ........................................................................................28

General.....................................................................................................................................................................................28
   Admission ........................................................................................................................................................................28
   Academic Policies and Procedures ............................................................................................................................29

TRANSFER FROM PROGRAM TO PROGRAM ...................................................................................................31

ACADEMIC EVALUATION AND RIGHT OF APPEAL......................................................................................34

DEGREE COMPLETION.................................................................................................................................................35

CONTINUING EDUCATION POLICIES ...................................................................................................................36

TUITION AND FEES..........................................................................................................................................................36
   Tuition ..............................................................................................................................................................................36
   Tuition Refund ...............................................................................................................................................................36
   Audit Policy.....................................................................................................................................................................36

MASTER OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (MOT) ...................................................................................39
       Mission Statement .........................................................................................................................................................39
       Program Prerequisites..................................................................................................................................................39
       Curriculum......................................................................................................................................................................39

DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY (DPT) ....................................................................................................41
       Mission Statement .........................................................................................................................................................41
       Program Prerequisites..................................................................................................................................................41
       Curriculum......................................................................................................................................................................41

DUAL DEGREE OPTION (MOT AND DPT) ....................................................................................................44
       Program Prerequisites..................................................................................................................................................44
       Curriculum......................................................................................................................................................................44

FLEX PART-TIME DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY (DPT).....................................................................47
   Mission Statement .........................................................................................................................................................48
   Program Prerequisites..................................................................................................................................................48
   Curriculum......................................................................................................................................................................48

ORTHOPAEDIC PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT (OPA).................................................................................................51
  Mission Statement .........................................................................................................................................................51
  Program Prerequisites..................................................................................................................................................51
  Curriculum......................................................................................................................................................................51

FIRST PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS.................................................................53



                                                                                                 iv
DOCTOR OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (OTD) ....................................................................................73
       Mission Statement .........................................................................................................................................................73
       Program Objectives ......................................................................................................................................................73
       Admission Requirements.............................................................................................................................................73
       Curriculum......................................................................................................................................................................75
       Tuition and Fees.............................................................................................................................................................77
       Course Descriptions ......................................................................................................................................................78

TRANSITIONAL DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY (DPT) .............................................................84
       Mission Statement .........................................................................................................................................................84
       Program Objectives ......................................................................................................................................................84
       Admission Requirements.............................................................................................................................................84
       Curriculum......................................................................................................................................................................87
           Specialty Tracks – Certifications........................................................................................................................87
           Elective Courses .....................................................................................................................................................88
       Tuition and Fees.............................................................................................................................................................89
       Course Descriptions ......................................................................................................................................................90

2009-2010 OTD ACADEMIC CALENDAR.................................................................................................................99
2009-2010 TRANSITIONAL DPT ACADEMIC CALENDAR ............................................................................100

FACULTY FOR THE DIVISION OF FIRST PROFESSIONAL STUDIES....................................................102

DIVISION OF POST-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES .......................................................................................109

General ..................................................................................................................................................................................109

CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION (CPE).............................................................................109
       Certifications.................................................................................................................................................................109
           Manual Therapy Certification (MTC)...........................................................................................................111
           Primary Care Certification (PCC) ..................................................................................................................111
           Sports Physical Therapy Certification (STC) ...............................................................................................111
           Cranio-mandibular Head, Neck, and Facial Pain (CFC) ..........................................................................112
           Neurology Through the Life Span Certification (NCC).............................................................................112
       Registration Policies and Procedures for CPE and Certifications...................................................................113

ORTHOPAEDIC RESIDENCY ..............................................................................................................................116
       Mission Statement .......................................................................................................................................................116
       Program Objectives ....................................................................................................................................................116
       Admission Requirements...........................................................................................................................................116
       Program Requirements..............................................................................................................................................117
       Program Tuition and Fees.........................................................................................................................................117

ORTHOPAEDIC MANUAL THERAPY FELLOWSHIP .........................................................................118
       Mission Statement .......................................................................................................................................................118
       Program Objectives ....................................................................................................................................................118
       Admission Requirements...........................................................................................................................................118
       Responsibilities and Learning Activities.................................................................................................................119
       Program Tuition and Fees.........................................................................................................................................119



                                                                                                 v
DOCTOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE (DHSC).....................................................................................................121
     Mission Statement .......................................................................................................................................................121
     Program Objectives ....................................................................................................................................................121
     Admission Requirements...........................................................................................................................................121
     Curriculum....................................................................................................................................................................123
     Tuition and Fees...........................................................................................................................................................124
     Course Descriptions ....................................................................................................................................................125

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (EdD) .......................................................................................................................130
     Mission Statement .......................................................................................................................................................130
     Program Objectives ....................................................................................................................................................130
     Admission Requirements...........................................................................................................................................130
     Program Overview......................................................................................................................................................131
     Curriculum....................................................................................................................................................................132
     Tuition and Fees...........................................................................................................................................................132
     Course Descriptions ....................................................................................................................................................133

FACULTY FOR CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION ......................................................136

FACULTY FOR THE DIVISION OF POST PROFESSIONAL STUDIES .......................................138




                                                                                            vi
St. Augustine and one of the two Lions at the Entrance to the Bridge of Lions




                           San Diego sunset




                                   vii
Message from the President


                       Welcome to our University Catalog 2010-2011. This document outlines our
                       admission requirements, academic policies, and educational programs. As you review
                       this document, you will see that we have two divisions: The Division of First
                       Professional Programs and The Division of Advanced Studies with multiple degree
                       and non-degree programs listed. Each of these programs focuses on rehabilitation
                       sciences, our area of excellence.

                       This university prides itself on graduating men and women respected by their peers
                       for their professionalism and clinical skills. Our graduates are skilled in restoration,
                       maintenance, and enhancement of physical function of clients, patient advocacy, and
                       the use of evidence-informed decision-making.

Our core faculty are varied and passionate about their chosen professions. Each faculty member has release
time to practice clinically and is encouraged to pursue scholarship in their respective specialty areas to better
provide evidence in the classroom and influence current practice standards.

We offer flexible approaches to educational delivery that can meet the needs of the adult learner utilizing
classroom, laboratory, and web-based learning activities. We also support achieving dual degrees in the
health sciences as a way to promote holistic patient care.

We are a national and international university, with multiple campuses in the United States and affiliation
agreements in several countries.

The University achieves its values by keeping our attention on student success in meeting expected learning
outcomes, current trends in health care and education, and leadership in our professions. All while achieving
an innovative, compassionate learning environment.

Thank you for taking the time to learn about the University of St. Augustine and all that it has to offer.




Stanley V. Paris, PT, PhD, FAPTA
President




                                                       viii
 St. Augustine, Florida Campus




San Diego, California Campus




                 ix
GENERAL INFORMATION
Licensure
The Commission for Independent Education, Florida Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida, licenses
the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences to offer its degree programs in Florida. This licensure
includes the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT), the Flexible Doctor of Physical Therapy, the Master of
Occupational Therapy (MOT), the Master of Orthopaedic Physician Assistant (OPA), the transitional Doctor
of Physical Therapy (DPT), the Post Professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD), Doctor of
Education (EdD) and Doctor of Health Science (DHSc) degrees.

Additional information regarding this institution may be obtained by contacting the Commission for
Independent Education, Florida Department of Education, 325 West Gaines Street, Suite 1414, Tallahassee,
FL 32399, toll free number 888-224-6684.

The Bureau for Private, Post-secondary Education approves the entry-level DPT expansion program in San
Diego, California. The entry-level MOT program application was submitted for approval in July of 2010.
Information regarding the San Diego programs may be obtained by contacting the Bureau for Private, Post-
secondary Education, 1625 North Market Boulevard, Suite S-202, Sacramento, CA 95834, 916-574-7720 or
www.bppe.ca.gov.

Accreditations and Approvals
The Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) accredited the first professional
Physical Therapy program in October 1996 and re-accredited the program in April 2001. The Flexible
Doctor of Physical Therapy program was accredited by CAPTE in October 2004. The DPT expansion
program in San Diego, CA was approved in April 2007. Additional information regarding this accreditation
is available by contacting the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education, American
Physical Therapy Association, 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, (800) 999-2782 ext.3240.

Complaints about the program can be submitted to CAPTE by requesting the Procedures for Handling
Complaints about an accredited or developing physical therapy physical therapy program. This document
can be obtained by writing CAPTE at 1111 N. Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314, by telephone (703)
706-3245 or by going to www.apta.org.

The entry-level Occupational Therapy program was accredited with no deficiencies by the Accreditation
Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) in April 1999 and re-accredited in April 2009. The
San Diego campus received accreditation from ACOTE in the fall of 2010. Graduates take the certification
examination administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After
successful completion of this exam the individual will be an occupational Therapist (OTR). In addition,
most states require licensure to practice. State licenses are usually based on this NBCOT certification. A
felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT examination or attain state licensure.
For more information about the occupational therapy accreditation process, contact the Accreditation Council
for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE), 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD
20824-1220, (301) 652-2682.

The University is institutionally accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and
Training Council (DETC). The Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and Training Council is
listed by the U.S. Department of Education as a nationally recognized accrediting agency, and is a
recognized member of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). This national accreditation
helps ensure that the school has been carefully evaluated and has met nationally recognized standards of
education. For more information contact The Distance Education and Training Council at 1601 18th Street,
NW, Ste. 2, Washington, DC 20009, 202-234-5100.




                                                     1
The University of St. Augustine has been approved as an Authorized Provider by the International
Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) and is a member institution of the Florida
Association of Postsecondary Schools and Colleges (FAPSC).

Mission Statement of the University
The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences mission is the professional development of health care
providers through innovative and individualized education.

Degrees Offered
The University awards the following graduate degrees:

At the campus in St. Augustine, the University offers the Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) and the
Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degrees. These are entry-level degree programs and consist of six to seven
trimesters of coursework conducted over two to two and a third years. There is also a dual degree option
whereby a student may complete first the MOT degree and then four trimesters later complete the DPT
degree. Online and on weekends we offer a Flexible Doctor of Physical Therapy program. This is achieved
by combining online courses with weekend labs. The program consists of 12 trimesters conducted over four
years.

The Master of Orthopaedic Physician Assistant (OPA) will begin to be offered in May of 2011 at the St.
Augustine campus. The OPA program is two-years in duration that combines one year of classroom/online
learning with one full-year of orthopaedic specific clinical rotations.

At the San Diego, CA campus, the University offers the Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) and the
Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degrees. These are entry-level degree programs and consist of six to seven
trimesters of coursework conducted over two to two and a third years. There is also a dual degree option
whereby a student may complete first the MOT degree and then four trimesters later complete the DPT
degree. The San Diego campus also offers the online and weekends Flexible Doctor of Physical Therapy
program.

There are four distance education degrees offered through a variety of opportunities including nationwide
seminars, campus and online activities.

The transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree is available for those individuals with either a
bachelor’s or master’s degree in physical therapy. The requirements for this degree vary depending upon
previous coursework and interest area. The DPT degree uses a combination seminar/distance education and
online courses.

The transitional Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) degree is for those individuals with either a
bachelor’s or master’s degree in occupational therapy. Once again there are a variety of ways that this
degree may be earned by attending seminars or by going online.

The Doctor of Education (EdD) degree is for health care providers with either a master’s or a clinical
doctorate degree. The EdD degree is offered in an online format with the exception of two weekend clinical
residencies.

The Doctor of Health Science (DHSc) degree is for physical and occupational therapists with either a
master’s or a clinical doctorate degree. The DHSc degree is offered in several formats. Students will take
part in designing a curriculum that is online, seminar coursework plus online, and a combination of both
types of coursework and online format with the exception of two weekend residency courses.




                                                    2
History of the University
Stanley V. Paris, PT, Ph.D., in 1966 began teaching continuing professional education courses to physical
therapists. These courses carry continuing education units (CEUs) which are helpful in both maintaining and
developing professional competency and, in an increasing number of states, for maintaining professional
licensure.

In 1979, the University formally known as the Institute of Graduate Health Sciences was founded. The State
of Georgia granted authority to offer a clinically-based post-professional (advanced) Master of Science in
Physical Therapy (MScPT) degree. Thus, the Institute became the first independent proprietary school in
physical therapy able to confer a graduate degree.

In 1981, the Institute began a certification process in manual therapy wherein candidates, after taking a series
of courses, were examined in their written, oral and practical abilities. Successful candidates were awarded a
Certification of Competency, which is now a necessary step to attaining our clinically oriented post-
professional (advanced) degrees. There are now four certifications; Manual Therapy, Sports Physical
Therapy, Primary Care and Cranio-mandibular, Head, Neck and Facial Pain.

In 1991, the Institute moved to St. Augustine, Florida, and became established at the Flagler Health Park
campus. Soon thereafter, the Institute achieved accreditation for its MScPT degree by distance education
from the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC). The United States Department of Education lists
the independent Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and Training Council as a nationally
recognized accrediting agency. The Accrediting Commission is also a recognized member of the Council for
Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

In 1992, the Institute started an advanced standing (post-professional) Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)
program. This was a nationwide program that enabled therapists to study in a selected clinical area. The first
student graduated from this program in the spring of 1995. (It was replaced in the year 2000 by the Doctor of
Health Sciences (DHSc) degree.)

In 1994, the Institute commenced a first professional degree in physical therapy - the Master of Physical
Therapy (MPT) - for those individuals who have achieved a baccalaureate degree with the necessary
prerequisite natural and social science courses. This MPT degree is the first to be offered by an independent
and proprietary school of physical therapy. This program was accredited by CAPTE in October 1996 and
reaccredited in 2001.

In 1996, the Institute of Occupational Therapy was founded to offer a Master of Occupational Therapy
(MOT) degree. The MOT degree program commenced September 1997. The program provides a series of
entry-level courses for the first professional degree of occupational therapy. The MOT program was
accredited with no deficiencies by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE)
in April 1999 and was reaccredited in April 2009.

On March 4, 1997, the organization formally became the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences.
This was a milestone in the University’s development. Also in 1996-97, the University entered into contracts
to purchase a small private hospital and an adjoining twenty-six acres of land at the Flagler Health Park
Campus in St. Augustine, thus creating the University’s current physical campus.

In July 1999, the University was given authorization by the State Board of Independent Colleges and
Universities (SBICU) to award the transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree, to restructure the
current MScPT degree to a Master of Health Sciences (MHSc) degree, and to implement a Doctor of Health
Sciences (DHSc) degree. These changes were effective January 1, 2000. Also in 1999 we began the dual
degree option whereby a student may earn a Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) in six trimesters and




                                                       3
then add an additional four trimesters to achieve a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT). This is the only such
option in the nation.

In August 2000, the University was successful in sponsoring a non-profit foundation, The Foundation for
Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences, to support faculty and student scholarship.

In 2001, the University was given authorization by the Commission for Independent Education to award the
first professional Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) and Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD), and the
transitional Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD).

In 2003, the university began to offer the manual physical therapy fellowship which was approved by the
American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) as a credentialed fellowship in orthopaedic manual therapy
in 2003 and re-credentialed in 2008.

The University received accreditation and licensure in 2004 to begin a Flexible Doctor of Physical Therapy
program in Boca Raton, Florida. The Flexible Doctor of Physical Therapy program is accredited by the
Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy (CAPTE) and the Distance Education and Training
Council (DETC). It is an expansion of the campus based program in St. Augustine and takes twelve
trimesters consisting of online education and weekend labs. The Flexible Doctor of Physical Therapy
program was moved from Boca Raton to the St. Augustine campus in 2010.

In June 2006 the University broke ground on a 98,000 square foot academic and clinic building at the St.
Augustine campus. The building was completed in August 2007. Amenities include seven classrooms,
Separate Wet & Dry Anatomy Labs, Fitness Center, Occupational Therapy Clinic, Physical Therapy Clinic,
CPE Classroom, and 3rd Floor Heritage Lounge.

The University received approval from the Bureau for Private, Post-secondary and Vocational Education and
Commission for the Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education to begin an expansion DPT program in San
Diego, CA in 2007. This campus officially opened August 29, 2007. The San Diego campus began offering
the Flexible Doctor of Physical Therapy program in September 2008.

Dr. Stanley Paris, Founding President retired on August 4, 2007 and Dr. Michael Hillyard, DPA was
inaugurated in as the 2nd President of the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences. The university
celebrated the opening of the academic and clinic building along with the retirement of Dr. Paris and the
inauguration of Dr. Hillyard. In 2009 Dr. Hillyard resigned and Dr. Paris resumed the Presidency of the
University.

The San Diego campus moved to a 76,000 square foot 3-building corporate center in San Marcos, CA in
January 2009. The university received developing program status from ACOTE for the San Diego OT
program which allowed us to have our Inaugural Class in fall 2009. The dual degree option also began in
fall 2009.

The University received accreditation and licensure in 2009 to begin to offer the Doctor of Education (EdD)
degree. The EdD degree is accredited by the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC) and licensed
by the Commission for Independent Education.

In 2010 the university received approval from the Commission for Independent Education to restructure the
Doctor of Health Science (DHSc) degree. The Distance Education and Training Council approved
accreditation of the DHSc degree in 2010.




                                                    4
The University will begin to offer a Master of Orthopaedic Physician Assistant (OPA) degree in May of
2011. The University received licensure from the Commission of Independent Education and accreditation
from the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC) in 2010 to offer this degree.

In the last several years, the University has been growing at a healthy and rapid pace, adding programs,
faculty, and facilities to meet the needs of rehabilitation in this time of great change and challenge. The
University will continue to be a leader in providing meaningful educational experiences in areas and
directions that both therapists and consumers require. Our program extends to such distance destinations as
Iceland, Japan and Chile.

The Campuses
The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences is located in St. Augustine, on a twenty-six acre campus.
In August 2007 a new academic building that houses the classrooms, labs, clinics and a student health club
was opened. It features 75,000 square feet of educational space eight classrooms and five laboratories.

The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences’ California campus is located at 700 Windy Point Drive,
San Marco, CA 92069. The California campus location is comprised of three buildings, housing over
76,000 square feet of state-of-the-art libraries, laboratories, classrooms, student health club and student areas.

Clinical Sites
The University has affiliations with almost 1,800 clinical sites across the United States, thus providing both a
wide geographic distribution and varied practice settings for the clinical portion of the student’s experience.

Learning Resource Center
The University's Learning Resource Center, comprised of the University Library and the Computer Lab, in
both St. Augustine and San Diego, offers students and faculty convenient access to current health sciences
information through the Library's collection of monographs, periodicals, DVDs/videos, OT assessments,
models, treatment tables and electronic resources. The Learning Resource Center's holdings include 2,400
monographic volumes, 60 journal subscriptions, and hundreds of DVDs/vidoes unique to the fields of
physical therapy, occupational therapy, biomedical sciences, and related areas. The Learning Resource
Center in St. Augustine is open and staffed 98 hours per week and San Diego is open and staffed 70 hours
per week during regular academic sessions. The Learning Resource Center offers many services including:
print reserves, circulation, reference, interlibrary loan, and a copy center. Also, the Librarian is available to
provide formal and informal bibliographic instruction. Each Learning Center's Computer Lab has multiple
workstations, each with Internet access to facilitate students in their research and academic work and printer
access. Students and faculty who have Internet access, whether on campus or off campus, have 24-hour
access to the University’s electronic resources. Bibliographic and full text databases are made available
through the Library tab of the University’s Web pages.

St. Augustine
St. Augustine, the nation’s oldest city, has more than four hundred years of history reflecting occupation by
the French, Spanish, and British. Careful attention to retaining history and archaeological sites reflects the
pride local residents have in the city’s heritage. Over one million visitors each year experience the city’s
history, culture, and charm.

St. Augustine is known for its historic sites, festivals, unspoiled beaches, moderate climate, attractions, and
shopping. Some visitors come to experience Fort Castillo de San Marcos or marvel at the Spanish
architecture, churches and Flagler College with its Tiffany glass. They also enjoy the parks, carriage rides,
boat or walking tours, and one-of-a-kind restaurants. Area attractions include the Alligator Farm, St.
Augustine Lighthouse and Ponce de Leon’s Fountain of Youth. Over 35 antique shops, 20 art galleries, two
outlet malls, and several specialty stores provide a unique shopping experience.



                                                        5
St. Augustine offers extensive outdoor recreational activities such as biking, scuba diving, snorkeling, jet-
skiing, canoeing, kayaking, sailing, and much more. St. Augustine is located on the Intracoastal Waterway
with a nearby opening to the Atlantic Ocean and miles of beaches for swimming or surfing. Boaters can
enjoy the protected and offshore waters, saltwater fishing for game fish, or bass fishing along the waterways.
World-class tennis and golf are also offered in northeast Florida including the World Golf Village which is
located in the St. Augustine area.

St. Augustine is a one-hour drive from Jacksonville or Daytona airports and two hours from Orlando. St.
Augustine is conveniently located for taking advantage of Florida’s many attractions. With diverse
surroundings, St. Augustine offers its visitors and residents a lifestyle that cannot be duplicated.

San Diego
The California campus is located in San Marcos, CA in San Diego County and approximately 40 miles north
of downtown San Diego. Known as the higher education center of North County, San Marcos has a
population of approximately 82,000. Tucked in Twin Oaks Valley along the 78 freeway, it is home to
California State San Marcos and Palomar College. There are over 55 miles of hiking and biking trails, many
parks, and a wide variety of house options. It is located 20 minutes from the Carlsbad beaches.

San Diego is California’s second largest city and the 8th largest city in the United States. San Diego is
known for its Mediterranean climate, a city where the sunlight warms the soul. There are over 320 square
miles of hills to explore, canyons, as well as 70 miles of glistening beaches. Popular attractions include the
world-famous San Diego Zoo and Wild Animal Park, Sea World San Diego and Legoland California. San
Diego offers an expansive variety of things to see and do, appealing to guests of all ages from around the
world. San Diego is considered one of the most desirable year-round vacation spots in the nation.




                                    The City Gate in St. Augustine, Florida.




                                                               6
    ST. AUGUSTINE ENTRY-LEVEL PHYSICAL AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
                     2010 – 2011 ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                      FALL 2010 TRIMESTER
August 31        Appeals committee meets (if needed) Time TBA
September 1      New (Campus-Based) Student Orientation & Registration-Tuition Due 8:30 – 1:00
                 Registration for returning students - 12:00-1:00
                 Practical Exit Exams – Semester VII DPT Students
                 Tuition Due for Fall Term—OT Sem VI
September 2      Fall Trimester Classes Begin
September 3      Fieldwork IIA Ends-MOT-Sem V
September 6      Labor Day-Campus closed
September 9      Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 80% tuition refund
September 13     Fieldwork IIB Begins-MOT-Sem VI
September 16     Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 70% tuition refund
September 22     Job Fair-tentative
September 23     Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 60% tuition refund
September 27     Last day for Semester IV-PT students to Withdraw with grade of “W”
September 30     Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 50% tuition refund
October 1        Applications Due for Summer 2011 term-Entry-Level OT, PT programs for priority
                 processing
                 Campus Based Courses End-MOT-Sem V
                 Final Practical Exams-MOT-Sem V
                 Graduation Applications Due-MOT-Sem V
October 7        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 40% tuition refund
October 11       Fieldwork IIA Begins-MOT-Sem V
October 14       Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 30% tuition refund
October 15       Internship II Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
October 21       Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 20% tuition refund
October 22       Mid-Term Grades due to Progression Committee
                 Classes end –Entry-Level PT – Sem IV
October 25       Internship III Begins-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
October 25-27    Final Exams – Enrtry-Level PT – Sem IV
October 28       All grades to be entered by noon – Entry-level PT – Sem IV
                 Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 10% tuition refund
October 29       Costume Extravaganza-Contest 12:15
November 1       Internship I Begins—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
November 3       Mid-term Academic Appeals Committee meeting
November 4       Last Day to Withdraw with grade of “W”-no refund
November 11      Veterans Day Observed-No Classes; Administrative Offices Open
November 24      Thanksgiving Holiday begins for students-Noon
                 Administrative Office closes at 3:00 p.m.
November 25-26   Thanksgiving Break
                 Administrative Offices Closed
November 29      Classes Resume
December 3       Fieldwork IIB Ends - MOT - Sem VI
                 All grades to be entered for ALL graduating students (entry level and post
                 professional)
December 8       Graduation applications due – Sem V – DPT
December 10      Fall semester classes end
                 Fall Term Commencement Exercises
December 13-15   Final Examinations
                 Practical Exam Retakes
December 15      Applications Due for Fall 2011 for Entry-Level OT, PT, DUAL programs for priority
                 processing
December 16      Faculty Retreat
                 All grades to be entered by 5:00 p.m. for all other students
                 Holiday Break Begins for Students-No Classes
                                               7
December 17        Internship I Ends—Entry-Level PT-Sem IV
                   Internship III Ends-Entry-Level PT Sem VI
December 23        Administrative Offices closed through January 2, 2011
January 3, 2011    Administrative Offices reopen
January 5, 2011    Fieldwork IIA ends-MOT-Sem V

                                      SPRING 2011 TRIMESTER
January 3          Internship II Begins—Entry-Level PT Sem VI
                   Administrative Offices Reopen
January 4          Appeals committee meets (if needed) Time TBA
January 5          New (Campus-based) Student Orientation & Registration –Tuition Due-8:30-1:00
                   Registration for returning students -12:00-1:00
                   Graduation applications and payment due – Sem VI - MOT AND Sem VII – DPT
                   Practical Exit Exams – Semester VII DPT Students
                   Tuition Due for Spring Term—OT Sem VI
                   Fieldwork IIA Ends-MOT-Sem V
January 6          Spring Semester Classes Begin
January 13         Last Day to Withdraw from University with an 80% tuition refund
January 17         Martin Luther King Holiday-No Classes
                   Administrative Offices Closed
                   Fieldwork IIB Begins-MOT-Sem VI
January 20         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 70% tuition refund
January 27         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 60% tuition refund
February 3         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 50% tuition refund
February 4         Campus Based Courses End-MOT-Sem V
                   Final Practical Examinations-MOT-Sem V
                   Graduation Applications Due-MOT-Sem V
February 7         Last day for Semester IV-PT students to Withdraw with grade of “W”
February 10        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 40% tuition refund
February 14        Fieldwork IIA Begins-MOT-Sem V
February 17        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 30% tuition refund
February 24        Last Day to Withdraw from University with an 20% tuition refund
February 25        Interview Day for Fall 2011 Class - tentative
                   Mid-Term Grades due to Progression Committee
                   Internship II Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
                   Campus Based Courses End—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
Feb 28 – March 2   Final Exams—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
March 3            Last Day to Withdraw from University with an 10% tuition refund
                   All grades to be entered by noon – Entry-level PT – Sem IV
March 3-4          Mid Term Break –-No Classes
March 7            Internship III Begins-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
                   Internship I Begins—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
March 9            Mid-term Academic Appeals Committee meeting
March 10           Last Day to Withdraw with grade of “W”-no refund (excluding Semester IV-PT students)
April 8            Fieldwork IIB Ends-MOT-Sem VI
                   All grades to be entered for ALL graduating students (entry level and post
                   professional)
April 15           Spring Semester Classes End
                   Spring Term Commencement Exercises
April 18-20        Final Examinations
                   Practical Exam Retakes
April 21           All grades to be entered by 5:00 p.m. for all other students
                   Faculty Retreat
April 22           Internship I Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem IV
April 29           Internship III Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI

                                     SUMMER 2011 TRIMESTER
May 2              Internship II Begins—Entry-Level PT—Sem VI

                                                 8
May 3          Appeals committee meet (if needed) Time TBA
May 4          New Campus Based Students Orientation & Registration-Tuition Due 8:30-1:00
               Registration for returning students12:00-1:00
               Graduation applications and payment due – Sem VI - MOT AND Sem VII – DPT
               Practical Exit Exams – Semester VII DPT Students
               Tuition Due for Spring Term—OT Sem VI
May 5          Summer Trimester Classes Begin
               Tuition Due for Summer term—MOT-Sem VI
May 6          Fieldwork IIA Ends-MOT-Sem V
May 12         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 80% tuition refund
May 16         Fieldwork IIB Begins-MOT-Sem VI
May 19         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 70% tuition refund
May 26         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 60% tuition refund
May 30         Memorial Day Holiday—No Classes; Administrative Offices Closed
June 2         Last Day to Withdraw from University with an 50% tuition refund
June 3         Campus Based Courses End-MOT-Sem V
               Final Practical Examinations-MOT-Sem V
               Graduation Applications Due-MOT-Sem V
June 9         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 40% tuition refund
               Last day for Semester IV-PT students to Withdraw with grade of “W”
June 13        Fieldwork IIA Begins—MOT-Sem V
June 15        Applications Due for Spring 2012 term- Entry-Level OT, PT programs for priority
               processing
June 16        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 30% tuition refund
June 23        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 20% tuition refund
June 24        Mid-Term Grades due to Progression Committee
               Internship II Ends—Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
               Campus Based Courses End—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
June 27-29     Final Exams—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
June 30        Final grades due – Entry-level PT-Sem IV
July 4         Independence Day Holiday Observed-No Classes; Administrative Offices Closed
July 5         No Classes – Administrative Office Open
               Internship III Begins-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
               Internship I Begins—Entry-Level PT-Sem IV
July 6         Mid-term Academic Appeals Committee meeting
               Last Day to Withdraw with grade of “W”-no refund (excluding Semester IV-PT students)
August 5       Fieldwork IIB Ends-MOT-Sem VI
               Grades Due for ALL graduating students (entry level and post professional)
August 12      Summer Semester Classes End
               Summer Term Commencement Exercises
August 15-17   Final Examinations
               Practical Exam Retakes
August 18      Grades due by 5:00 p.m. to Registrar for all other students
               Faculty Retreat
August 19      Internship I Ends-- Entry-Level PT-Sem IV
August 22      Internship II Begins-- Entry-Level PT—Sem VI (for fall term)
August 26      Internship III Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI

                                    FALL 2011 TRIMESTER
August 30      Appeals committee meets (if needed) Time TBA
August 31      New (Campus-Based) Student Orientation & Registration-Tuition Due 8:30 – 1:00
               Registration for returning students - 12:00-1:00
               Graduation applications and payment due – Sem VI - MOT AND Sem VII – DPT
               Practical Exit Exams – Semester VII DPT Students
               Tuition Due for Fall Term—OT Sem VI
September 1    Fall Trimester Classes Begin
September 2    Fieldwork IIA Ends-MOT-Sem V
September 5    Labor Day-Campus closed

                                             9
September 8       Last day to drop a class without a ‘W’
                  Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 80% tuition refund
September 12      Fieldwork IIB Begins-MOT-Sem VI
September 14      Job Fair-tentative
September 15      Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 70% tuition refund
September 22      Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 60% tuition refund
September 26      Last day for Semester IV-PT students to Withdraw with grade of “W”
September 29      Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 50% tuition refund
September 30      Campus Based Courses End-MOT-Sem V
                  Final Practical Exams-MOT-Sem V
October 1         Applications Due for Summer 2012 term-Entry-Level OT, PT programs for priority
                  processing
October 6         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 40% tuition refund
October 10        Fieldwork IIA Begins-MOT-Sem V
October 13        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 30% tuition refund
October 14        Internship II Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
October 20        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 20% tuition refund
October 21        Mid-Term Grades due to Progression Committee
                  Classes end –Entry-Level PT – Sem IV
October 24        Internship III Begins-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
October 25-27     Final Exams – Entry-Level PT – Sem IV
October 27        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 10% tuition refund
October 28        All grades to be entered by noon – Entry-level PT – Sem IV
October 31        Costume Extravaganza-Contest 12:15 CL 204
                  Internship I Begins—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
November 2        Mid-term Academic Appeals Committee meeting
November 3        Last Day to Withdraw with grade of “W”-no refund
November 11       Veterans Day Observed-No Classes; Administrative Offices Open
November 23       Thanksgiving Holiday begins for students-Noon
                  Administrative Office closes at 3:00 p.m.
November 24-25    Thanksgiving Break
                  Administrative Offices Closed
November 28       Classes Resume
December 2        Fieldwork IIB Ends - MOT - Sem VI
                  All grades to be entered for ALL graduating students (entry level and post
                  professional)
December 9        Fall semester classes end
                  Fall Term Commencement Exercises
December 12-14    Final Examinations
                  Practical Exam Retakes
December 14       Applications Due for Fall 2012 for Entry-Level OT, PT, DUAL programs for priority
                  processing
December 15       Faculty Retreat
                  All grades to be entered by 5:00 p.m. for all other students
                  Holiday Break Begins for Students-No Classes
December 16       Internship I Ends—Entry-Level PT-Sem IV
                  Internship III Ends-Entry-Level PT Sem VI
December 23       Administrative Offices closed through January 2, 2012
January 3, 2012   Administrative Offices reopen
January 4, 2012   Fieldwork IIA ends-MOT-Sem V




                                                10
 2010-2011 SAN DIEGO ENTRY-LEVEL PHYSICAL AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
                          ACADEMIC CALENDAR

                                     FALL 2010 TRIMESTER
August 31        Appeals committee meets (if needed) Time TBA
Sept. 1          New (Campus-Based) Student Orientation & Registration-Tuition Due 8:30 – 1:00
                 Registration for returning students – 2:00 – 3:00
                 Graduation applications and payment due – Sem VI - MOT AND Sem VII – DPT
                 Practical Exit Exams – Semester VII DPT Students
                 Tuition Due for Fall Term—OT Sem VI
September 2      Fall Semester Classes Begin
September 3      Fieldwork IIA Ends-MOT-Sem V
September 6      Labor Day-Campus closed
September 9      Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 80% tuition refund
September 13     Fieldwork IIB Begins-MOT-Sem VI
September 16     Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 70% tuition refund
September 23     Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 60% tuition refund
September 27     Last day for Semester IV-PT students to Withdraw with grade of “W”
September 30     Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 50% tuition refund
October 1        Applications Due for Summer 2010 term-Entry-Level OT, PT programs for priority
                 processing
                 Campus Based Courses End-MOT-Sem V
                 Final Practical Exams-MOT-Sem V
                 Graduation Applications Due-MOT-Sem V
October 7        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 40% tuition refund
October 12       Fieldwork IIA Begins-MOT-Sem V
October 14       Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 30% tuition refund
October 15       Internship II Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
October 22       Mid-Term Grades due to Progression Committee
                 Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 20% tuition refund
                 Classes end –Entry-Level PT – Sem IV
October 25       Internship III Begins-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
October 25-27    Final Exams – Entry-Level PT – Sem IV
October 28       All grades to be entered by noon – Entry-level PT – Sem IV
                 Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 10% tuition refund
November 1       Internship I Begins—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
November 3       Mid-term Academic Appeals Committee meeting
November 4       Last Day to Withdraw with grade of “W”-no refund
November 11      Veterans Day Observed-No Classes; Administrative Offices Open
November 24      Thanksgiving Holiday begins for students-Noon
                 Administrative Office closes at 3:00 p.m.
November 25-26   Thanksgiving Break
                 Administrative Offices Closed
November 29      Classes Resume
December 4       Fieldwork IIB Ends - MOT - Sem VI
                 All grades to be entered for ALL graduating students (entry level and post
                 professional)
December 8       Graduation applications due – Sem V – DPT
December 10      Fall semester classes end
December 11      Fall Term Commencement Exercises
December 15      Applications Due for Fall 2010 for Entry-Level OT, PT, DUAL programs for priority
                 processing
December 13-15   Final Examinations
                 Practical Exam Retakes
December 16      Faculty Retreat



                                               11
                   All grades to be entered by 5:00 p.m. for all other students
                   Holiday Break Begins for Students-No Classes
December 17        Internship I Ends—Entry-Level PT-Sem IV AND Internship III Ends-Entry-Level PT Sem
                   VI
December 24        Administrative Offices closed through January2, 2011

                                      SPRING 2011 TRIMESTER
January 3          Internship II Begins—Entry-Level PT Sem VI
                   Administrative Offices Reopen
January 4          Appeals committee meets (if needed) Time TBA
January 5          New (Campus-based) Student Orientation & Registration –Tuition Due-8:30-1:00
                   Registration for returning students -2:00 – 3:00
                   Graduation applications and payment due – Sem VI - MOT AND Sem VII – DPT
                   Practical Exit Exams – Semester VII DPT Students
                   Tuition Due for Spring Term—OT Sem VI
                   Fieldwork IIA Ends-MOT-Sem V
January 6          Spring Semester Classes Begin
January 13         Last Day to Withdraw from University with an 80% tuition refund
January 17         Martin Luther King Holiday-No Classes
                   Administrative Offices Closed
                   Fieldwork IIB Begins-MOT-Sem VI
January 20         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 70% tuition refund
January 27         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 60% tuition refund
February 3         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 50% tuition refund
February 4         Campus Based Courses End-MOT-Sem V
                   Final Practical Examinations-MOT-Sem V
                   Graduation Applications Due-MOT-Sem V
February 7         Last day for Semester IV-PT students to Withdraw with grade of “W”
February 10        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 40% tuition refund
February 14        Fieldwork IIA Begins-MOT-Sem V
February 17        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 30% tuition refund
February 24        Last Day to Withdraw from University with an 20% tuition refund
February 25        Interview Day for Fall 2011 Class -tentative
                   Mid-Term Grades due to Progression Committee
                   Internship II Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
                   Campus Based Courses End—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
Feb 28 – March 2   Final Exams—- Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
March 3            Last Day to Withdraw from University with an 10% tuition refund
                   All grades to be entered by noon – Entry-level PT – Sem IV
March 3-4          Mid Term Break –-No Classes
March 7            Internship III Begins-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
                   Internship I Begins—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
March 9            Mid-term Academic Appeals Committee meeting
March 10           Last Day to Withdraw with grade of “W”-no refund (excluding Semester IV-PT students)
April 8            Fieldwork IIB Ends-MOT-Sem VI
                   All grades to be entered for ALL graduating students (entry level and post
                   professional)
April 15           Spring Semester Classes End
                   Spring Term Commencement Exercises
April 18-20        Final Examinations
                   Practical Exam Retakes
April 21           All grades to be entered by 5:00 p.m. for all other students
                   Faculty Retreat
April 22           Internship I Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem IV
April 29           Internship III Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI




                                                12
                                 SUMMER 2011 TRIMESTER
May 2          Internship II Begins—Entry-Level PT—Sem VI
May 3          Appeals committee meet (if needed) Time TBA
May 4          New Campus Based Students Orientation & Registration-Tuition Due 8:30-1:00
               Registration for returning students 2:00 – 3:00
               Graduation applications and payment due – Sem VI - MOT AND Sem VII – DPT
               Practical Exit Exams – Semester VII DPT Students
               Tuition Due for Spring Term—OT Sem VI
May 5          Summer Trimester Classes Begin
               Tuition Due for Summer term—MOT-Sem VI
May 6          Fieldwork IIA Ends-MOT-Sem V
May 12         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 80% tuition refund
May 16         Fieldwork IIB Begins-MOT-Sem VI
May 19         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 70% tuition refund
May 26         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 60% tuition refund
May 30         Memorial Day Holiday—No Classes; Administrative Offices Closed
June 2         Last Day to Withdraw from University with an 50% tuition refund
June 3         Campus Based Courses End-MOT-Sem V
               Final Practical Examinations-MOT-Sem V
               Graduation Applications Due-MOT-Sem V
June 9         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 40% tuition refund
               Last day for Semester IV-PT students to Withdraw with grade of “W”
June 13        Fieldwork IIA Begins—MOT-Sem V
June 15        Applications Due for Spring 2012 term- Entry-Level OT, PT programs for priority
               processing
June 16        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 30% tuition refund
June 23        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 20% tuition refund
June 24        Mid-Term Grades due to Progression Committee
               Internship II Ends—Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
               Campus Based Courses End—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
June 27-29     Final Exams—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
June 30        Final grades due – Entry-level PT-Sem IV
July 4         Independence Day Holiday Observed-No Classes; Administrative Offices Closed
July 5         No Classes – Administrative Office Open
               Internship III Begins-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
               Internship I Begins—Entry-Level PT-Sem IV
July 6         Mid-term Academic Appeals Committee meeting
               Last Day to Withdraw with grade of “W”-no refund (excluding Semester IV-PT students)
August 5       Fieldwork IIB Ends-MOT-Sem VI
August 5       Grades Due for ALL graduating students (entry level and post professional)
August 12      Summer Semester Classes End
               Summer Term Commencement Exercises
August 15-17   Final Examinations
               Practical Exam Retakes
August 18      Grades due by 5:00 p.m. to Registrar for all other students
               Faculty Retreat
August 19      Internship I Ends-- Entry-Level PT-Sem IV
August 22      Internship II Begins-- Entry-Level PT—Sem VI (for fall term)
August 26      Internship III Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI

                                    FALL 2011 TRIMESTER
August 30      Appeals committee meets (if needed) Time TBA
August 31      New (Campus-Based) Student Orientation & Registration-Tuition Due 8:30 – 1:00
               Registration for returning students - 2:00 – 3:00
               Graduation applications and payment due – Sem VI - MOT AND Sem VII – DPT



                                            13
                  Practical Exit Exams – Semester VII DPT Students
                  Tuition Due for Fall Term—OT Sem VI
September 1       Fall Trimester Classes Begin
September 2       Fieldwork IIA Ends-MOT-Sem V
September 5       Labor Day-Campus closed
September 8       Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 80% tuition refund
September 12      Fieldwork IIB Begins-MOT-Sem VI
September 15      Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 70% tuition refund
September 22      Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 60% tuition refund
September 26      Last day for Semester IV-PT students to Withdraw with grade of “W”
September 29      Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 50% tuition refund
September 30      Campus Based Courses End-MOT-Sem V
                  Final Practical Exams-MOT-Sem V
October 1         Applications Due for Summer 2012 term-Entry-Level OT, PT programs for priority
                  processing
October 6         Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 40% tuition refund
October 10        Fieldwork IIA Begins-MOT-Sem V
October 13        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 30% tuition refund
October 14        Internship II Ends-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
October 20        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 20% tuition refund
October 21        Mid-Term Grades due to Progression Committee
                  Classes end –Entry-Level PT – Sem IV
October 24        Internship III Begins-Entry-Level PT-Sem VI
October 24-26     Final Exams – Enrtry-Level PT – Sem IV
October 27        Last Day to Withdraw from University with a 10% tuition refund
October 28        All grades to be entered by noon – Entry-level PT – Sem IV
October 31        Costume Extravaganza-Contest 12:15 CL 204
                  Internship I Begins—Entry-Level PT—Sem IV
November 2        Mid-term Academic Appeals Committee meeting
November 3        Last Day to Withdraw with grade of “W”-no refund
November 10       Veterans Day Observed-No Classes; Administrative Offices Open
November 23       Thanksgiving Holiday begins for students-Noon
                  Administrative Office closes at 3:00 p.m.
November 24-25    Thanksgiving Break
                  Administrative Offices Closed
November 28       Classes Resume
December 2        Fieldwork IIB Ends - MOT - Sem VI
                  All grades to be entered for ALL graduating students (entry level and post
                  professional)
December 9        Fall semester classes end
December 10       Fall Term Commencement Exercises
December 12-14    Final Examinations
                  Practical Exam Retakes
December 14       Applications Due for Fall 2011 for Entry-Level OT, PT, DUAL programs for priority
                  processing
December 15       Faculty Retreat
                  All grades to be entered by 5:00 p.m. for all other students
                  Holiday Break Begins for Students-No Classes
December 16       Internship I Ends—Entry-Level PT-Sem IV
                  Internship III Ends-Entry-Level PT Sem VI
December 23       Administrative Offices closed through January 1, 2012
January 2, 2012   Administrative Offices reopen
January 4, 2012   Fieldwork IIA ends-MOT-Sem V




                                                14
Our Ever Growing Base of Alumni on
  Graduation Day in St. Augustine




               15
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Mr. Joseph Taylor, Chairman
Businessman
St. Augustine, Florida

Mr. Raymond Johnson
Licensed Care Administrator
St. Augustine, Florida

Dr. Stanley Paris
President, University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
St. Augustine, Florida

Ms. Greer Edmiston
Accountant
St. Augustine, Florida

Mr. Tracy Upchurch
Attorney
St. Augustine, Florida




          University of St. Augustine Board of Trustee members, Ms. Greer Edmiston, Mr. Joseph Taylor,
                         Dr. Stanley V. Paris, Mr. Tracy Upchurch, Mr. Raymond Johnson




                                                      16
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS AND STAFF
President
Stanley V. Paris, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Dean, First Professional Studies
Wanda Nitsch, PT, PhD

Dean, Post-Professional Studies
Cindy Mathena, PhD, OTR/L

Chief Development Officer
Alan Paris, MBE

Director of Residency and Fellowship Programs
Catherine E. Patla, PT, DHSc, MMSc, OCS

Program Director, Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at St. Augustine
Margaret Nonnemacher, PT, PhD

Program Director, Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at San Diego
Ellen Lowe, PT, PhD, MHS

Director, Institute of Occupational Therapy
Program Director, Occupational Therapy Program at St. Augustine
Karen S. Howell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Program Director, Occupational Therapy Program at San Diego
Judith Olson, PhD, OTR

Program Director, Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy
Jodi Liphart, PT, DHSc

Program Coordinator – Flex Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at St. Augustine
Debra Gray, PT, DPT, MEd

Director of Residency and Fellowship Programs
Erin Conrad, PT, DPT, MS

Associate Vice President of Student Services
Dian Hartley

Registrar
Diane Rondinelli

Director of Continuing Professional Education
Lori Hankins

Director of Financial Aid
Rhonda James




                                                 17
ENROLLMENT SERVICES
Admission to the University Degree Programs

The Enrollment Services office coordinates the admissions activities for all degree-seeking students on all
campuses in conjunction with the appropriate program director and the entry-level Admissions Committee or
Graduate Admissions Committee. Students who wish to enroll in only the non-credit Continuing Professional
Education Seminars register through CPE Registrations.

Application for Admission
To be considered for admission, a candidate must submit the following:
•   Application for Admission form (signed by the applicant)
•   $50.00 processing fee
•   Official transcripts must be submitted from each college or university previously attended. An official
    transcript is one sent directly to the Enrollment Services office by the Registrar of the issuing institution
    or one forwarded in a sealed envelope from the issuing institution.
•   If the applicant completed his or her education in a foreign country, the applicant must submit an
    original copy of a degree credentialing evaluation from an agency recognized by the National
    Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES). The evaluation must indicate previous
    education at the minimum level of a baccalaureate degree earned at an accredited college or university
    in the United States. The following are among agencies approved for this purpose and additional
    evaluators can be found on the www.naces.org:

     World Education Services, Inc.
     Bowling Green Station
     PO Box 5087
     64 Beaver Street, #146
     New York, NY 10274-5087
     www.wes.org

     AACRAO International Education Services
     One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 520
     Washington, DC 20036-1135
     oies@aacrao.org

     International Education Research Foundation, Inc.
     PO Box 3665
     Culver City, CA 90231-3665
     www.ierf.org

     Joseph Silny & Associates, Inc.
     International Education Consultants
     7101 SW 102 Avenue
     Miami, FL 33173 U.S.A.
     www.jsilny.com




                                                       18
•   Graduate Record Examination scores sent directly to the University by GRE. For those who have
    earned a master’s degree previously, this requirement is waived. Transitional OTD and DPT applicants
    are also exempt from this requirement.
•   TOEFL scores sent directly to the University, if an applicant completed his/her education in a country
    where English is not the primary language or if the applicant is from a non-English speaking country.
•   References as required by the program
•   Autobiography and Statement of Purpose, if required by the program
•   Documentation of observation experience, if required by the program
•   Professional Resume or Curriculum Vita, if required by the program
•   Copy of professional license, if required by the program

NOTE: The University follows a policy of not disclosing reasons for non-acceptance of a candidate.

International Students Applying for Admission
The entry-level physical therapy and occupational therapy programs are approved by the Immigration and
Naturalization Service to admit international students who require an F-1 student visa. Non-US citizens may
participate in all other degree programs if a student visa is not required for attendance. In addition to the
items listed above, the following must be submitted prior to issuance of the I-20:
• Financial Statement/Letter indicating commitment (from parents, government, etc.) to financially support
    tuition and living expenses for the duration of the degree program.

Records and Documents Submitted for Admission Processing
All documents submitted to the University in support of an application for admission become the permanent
possession of the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences and cannot be returned to the applicant
under any circumstances. Students are, therefore, urged to make copies of important documentation and
maintain their own files.

RECORDS AND REGISTRATION
The main registrar office for all degree programs is maintained at the St. Augustine campus. Any inquiries
or requests for information should be sent to Registrar, University of St. Augustine, 1 University Boulevard,
St. Augustine, FL 32086.

Registration
Current students that are not paying tuition by loan are required to attend new student registration the day
before classes begin. Dates and times for new student registration are posted on the Academic Calendar.
Processes may vary for each campus. Registration for the transitional and post-professional credit courses is
conducted on an ongoing basis.

Records
The Enrollment Services office is responsible for maintaining the official academic records for all students
who enroll in academic degree programs. Holds may be placed on students’ records, transcripts, grades, or
registration because of financial or other obligations to the University. Satisfaction of the hold is required
before a release can be given.

Address Changes
A student’s legal home permanent (mailing address) address is taken from the application for admission and
subsequently the student information form completed during registration each term. It is the student’s
responsibility to notify the Enrollment Services office of any changes to their address. Address changes may


                                                     19
be made through the grades/registration link at www.usa.edu, by email to admissions@usa.edu or in person
in the Enrollment Services office (either in St. Augustine or San Diego campuses).

Name Changes
Requests for a change in the name as it appears on the respective student’s academic record must be made in
writing and accompanied by a copy of one of the following: social security card, drivers’ license, marriage
certificate, divorce decree, adoption papers, or other suitable legal document.

Change in Student Status
Students who find it necessary to withdraw from the program or take a leave of absence must notify their
program director in writing and complete the required documentation for the Enrollment Services office.

Enrollment Certifications
To confirm enrollment in the University, students should forward documentation related to the certification
and/or make a written request to the Enrollment Services Office.

Transcripts
To ensure confidentiality of student records, the University issues official transcripts of academic
information only on written authorization by the student or graduate. Each degree-seeking student receives
three official transcripts at no cost. For each additional transcript, a $5.00 processing fee will be assessed
prior to issuance. Transcripts as well as grade reports will not be issued for any student with an outstanding
obligation to the University and may not be issued for any student with a contractual obligation to the
University or its subsidiaries.

Grade Reports
Grades and unofficial transcripts can be obtained online through the university’s student portal.

Transferability of Course Credit
Credit from the University may or may not be transferable to other institutions. The option to accept credit
by a graduate institution lies with that institution. The University actively pursues a policy of requesting
other graduate occupational and physical therapy schools to accept our credits for transfer.

Confidentiality and Release of Student Records
Student educational records at the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences are governed by the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and its implementing regulations. FERPA affords
students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are:

•   The right to inspect and review the student’s educational records within 45 days of the day the
    University receives a request for access.

Students should submit to the Registrar or other appropriate official written requests that identify the
record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the
student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the
University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct
official to whom the request should be addressed.

•   The right to request the amendment of the student’s educational records that the student believes are
    inaccurate or misleading.




                                                      20
Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should
write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want
changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.

If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the
student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for
amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when
notified of the right to a hearing.

•    The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the students
     educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate
educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative,
supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position; a person or company with whom the University
has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agency); a person serving on the Board of Trustees;
or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting
another school official in performing his or her tasks.

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in
order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

Upon request, the University discloses educational records without consent to officials of another school in
which a student seeks or intends to enroll. (Note: FERPA requires that the University make a reasonable
attempt to notify the student of the records request).

•   The right to file a complaint with the United States Department of Education concerning alleged failures
    by the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences to comply with requirements of FERPA.

Graduation
All degree requirements must be complete before approval to graduate is given by the respective program
director. Formal graduation ceremonies take place in St. Augustine three times per year at the conclusion of
each trimester. Confirmation of a degree is posted to the official academic record following commencement
exercises. The graduation fee varies by degree level and is paid at the time the student submits the
Application to Graduate as noted on the Academic Calendar.

Honors designation is given to entry-level and transitional students who have earned a cumulative GPA of a
3.50 – 3.64. High Honors designation is given to entry-level students who have earned a cumulative GPA of
3.65 – 4.0. The cumulative GPA is calculated through final trimester coursework.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Tuition and Fees
The University publishes an official Schedule of Tuition and Fees for each division of the University.
Because the programs within each division vary, the student should carefully study the charges that apply to
them as set forth below. All tuition is due at registration. All charges are subject to change without advance
notice.




                                                      21
Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
St. Augustine Campus: The full-time MOT program is six trimesters in duration consisting of a minimum of
107 credit hours. Tuition for resident coursework is as follows: $10,185 for the 2010-2011 academic year
and $10,695 per trimester for the 2011-2012 academic year. Additional costs and fees (including textbooks)
are estimated at $5,000 for the total program.
• Application fee $50.00
• Campus Access fee $160.00
• Graduation fee $150.00

San Diego Campus: The full-time MOT program is six trimesters in duration consisting of a minimum of
107 credit hours. Tuition for resident coursework is as follows: $12,150 per trimester for the 2010-2011
academic year and $12,755 per trimester for the 2011-2012 academic year. Additional costs and fees
(including textbooks) are estimated at $5,000 for the total program.
• Application fee $50.00
• Campus Access fee $160.00
• Graduation fee $150.00

Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)
St. Augustine Campus: The full-time DPT program is seven trimesters in duration consisting of a minimum
of 128 credit hours. Tuition for resident coursework is as follows: $10,185 for the 2010-2011 academic year
and $10,695 per trimester for the 2011-2012 academic year. Additional costs and fees (including textbooks)
are estimated at $5,000 for the total program.
• Application fee $50.00
• Campus Access fee $160.00
• Graduation fee $150.00

San Diego Campus: The full-time DPT program is seven trimesters in duration consisting of a minimum of
128 credit hours. Tuition for resident coursework is as follows: $12,150 per trimester for the 2010-2011
academic year and $12,755 per trimester for the 2011-2012 academic year. Additional costs and fees
(including textbooks) are estimated at $5,000 for the total program.
• Application fee $50.00
• Campus Access fee $160.00
• Graduation fee $150.00

Dual Degree Option: Master of Occupational Therapy/Doctor of Physical Therapy
(MOT/DPT)
St. Augustine Campus: The full-time dual degree option is ten trimesters in duration consisting of a
minimum of 173 credit hours and allows a student to complete the MOT and DPT programs consecutively.
Tuition for resident coursework is as follows: $10,185 for the 2010-2011 academic year and $10,695 per
trimester for the 2011-2012 academic year. Additional costs and fees (including textbooks) are estimated at
$7,000 for the total program.
• Application fee $50.00
• Campus Access fee $160.00
• Graduation fee $150.00 – first entry-level degree
                    $150.00 – second entry-level degree

San Diego Campus: The full-time dual degree option is ten trimesters in duration consisting of a minimum
of 173 credit hours and allows a student to complete the MOT and DPT programs consecutively. Tuition for
resident coursework is as follows: $12,150 per trimester for the 2010-2011 academic year and $12,755 per



                                                    22
trimester for the 2011-2012 academic year. Additional costs and fees (including textbooks) are estimated at
$5,000 for the total program.
• Application fee $50.00
• Campus Access fee $160.00
• Graduation fee $150.00 – first entry-level degree
                    $150.00 – second entry-level degree

Flexible Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)
St. Augustine Campus: The program is twelve trimesters in duration consisting of a minimum of 128 credit
hours. Tuition is $5,950 per trimester for the 2010-2011 academic year and $6,245 per trimester for the
2011-2012 academic year. Additional costs and fees (including textbooks) estimated at $5,000 for the total
program.
• Application fee $50.00
• Campus access fee $85.00
• Graduation fee $150.00

San Diego Campus: The program is twelve trimesters in duration consisting of a minimum of 128 credit
hours. Tuition is $7,150 per trimester for the 2010-2011 academic year and $7,510 per trimester for the
2011-2012 academic year. Additional costs and fees (including textbooks) estimated at $5,000 for the total
program.
• Application fee $50.00
• Campus Access fee $85.00
• Graduation fee $150.00

Master of Orthopaedic Physician Assistant (OPA)
St. Augustine Campus: The program is six trimesters in duration consisting of a minimum of 99 credit hours.
Tuition is $6,300 per trimester for the 2010-2011 academic year. Additional costs and fees (including
textbooks) estimated at $5,000 - $7,000 for the total program.
• Application fee $50.00
• Campus access fee $85.00
• Graduation fee $150.00

Post- Professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD)
Tuition for all courses not involving a separate seminar will be $443/credit hour. Courses within a
certification (and for which seminar fees are charged separately) will bear a per credit hour charge of $190.
• Application Fee $50
• Graduation Fee $150 if attending commencement; and $25 if not attending commencement
Total: Approximately $13,500 (for 30 credit hour program); Approximately $15,700 (for 35 credit hour
program; Approximately* $26,800 (for 60 credit hour program)

Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)
Tuition for all courses not involving a separate seminar will be $443/credit hour. Courses within a
certification (and for which seminar fees are charged separately) will bear a per credit hour charge of $190.
• Application Fee $50
• Graduation Fee $150 if attending commencement and $25 if not attending commencement
Total: Approximately $11,721 (for 24 credit hour program): Approximately $10,699 (for 60 credit hour
program)
Variable Textbook and Readings cost additional




                                                     23
Doctor of Health Science (DHSc)
Tuition for all courses not involving a separate seminar is $443/credit hour.
• Application Fee $50
• Graduation Fee $150
                     $650 (includes custom regalia)
Total: Approximately $26,600 (for 60 credit hour program)
Variable Textbook and Readings cost additional

Doctor of Education (EdD)
Tuition for all courses is $443/credit hour.
• Application Fee $50
• Graduation Fee $150 (includes stock black regalia)
                     $650 (includes custom regalia)
Total: Approximately $26,600 (for 60 credit hour program)
Variable Textbook and Readings cost additional

Payment
The University accepts MasterCard and VISA payments, personal checks, bank drafts, and cash. Many full-
time students secure student loans through a financial assistance loan program.

Refund Policy
The refund policy is designed in compliance with the State of Florida and California (for San Diego students)
and the several accrediting agencies to which the University is responsible. These policies may vary for each
program and are contained in either the University Catalog or in the Student Handbook for those programs.
A copy of the refund policy is provided to all entry-level students during the admission process.

Student Tuition Recovery Fund – San Diego
California law requires that the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education assess each institution in relation
to the cost of tuition for students. These fees support the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF), a special
fund established by the California legislature to reimburse students who are California residents who might
otherwise experience a financial loss as a result of untimely school closure. Each student will pay a Student
Recovery Fund assessment each term. Student Tuition Recovery Fund fees shall be collected from all San
Diego campus students at the rate of two dollars and fifty cents ($2.50) per thousand dollars of tuition
charged, rounded to the nearest thousand dollars. These fees are collected as part of the campus access fee.

Financial Assistance Programs
University students are admitted on the basis of their academic abilities and their professionalism. The
University’s Financial Aid Coordinator provides assistance to help candidates secure student loans. The
University does not have a preferred lender list and will process any eligible lender’s loan application.
Students should also explore financial assistance programs available from health care providers who employ
therapists.

The University will cooperate completely with all agencies responsible for the collection of loans in order to
preserve the integrity of the loan process for the benefit of future students.

Scholarship Program
The University of St. Augustine offers two types of scholarships to all new students enrolling in the entry-
level programs (full-time DPT, MOT, Dual Degree and Flex DPT) on the St. Augustine and San Diego
campuses: Outstanding Academic Achievement and Leadership Scholarship, and Financial Need. University
of St. Augustine scholarships are to be used for tuition and fees only. Information on each of the scholarships
follows:


                                                      24
    Scholarship Application Deadline Dates
    • February 15th – Summer term
    • June 15th – Fall term
    • October 15th – Spring term

In order to be considered for a University scholarship, a student must complete and sign the Scholarship
Programs form included in each application and acceptance packet, and submit the required supporting
documentation by the applicable due date. The University Scholarship Committee is responsible for
reviewing the applications and awarding scholarships each trimester.

Outstanding Academic Achievement and Leadership Scholarship*
The University awards scholarships in recognition of outstanding academic achievement and leadership potential.
The top applicant that meets the criteria from each of the three full-time, campus-based, entry-level programs -
occupational therapy, physical therapy, and dual degree – will receive a $6,000 (per academic year) scholarship.
The remaining recipients will receive a $2,000 (per academic year) award. The top applicant that meets the
criteria from the Flex DPT program will receive $4,500 (per academic year) and an additional recipient will
receive $1,500 (per academic year). Recipients must remain in good academic standing as outlined in the Student
Handbook each trimester to retain their scholarships. If a student drops below 12 credit hours (7 credit hours for
Flex DPT), or is not in good academic standing, the student will be ineligible for the award. The award may be
reinstated the following trimester if the student resumes taking 12 credit hours (7 credit hours for Flex DPT) or
more, and is in good academic standing by the end of the trimester.

Scholarships are awarded to the entering students who best meet the following criteria:
• Minimum of 3.5 GPA on program prerequisites
• A one-page essay on “My Leadership Experiences” or “My Life Experiences”
• A review of references from their application indicating leadership potential
• Minimum 1000 on the GRE (verbal and quantitative sections scores combined)

Financial Need Scholarship*
These scholarships are awarded based on financial need. The top applicant from each of the three full-time, campus-
based, entry-level programs – occupational therapy, physical therapy, and dual degree - will receive a $4,000 (per
academic year) scholarship. The other recipients, one from each program, will receive a $2,000.00 (per academic year)
award. The top applicant that meets the criteria from the Flex DPT program will receive $3,000 (per academic year) and
an additional recipient will receive $1,500 (per academic year). Recipients must remain in good academic standing as
outlined in the Student Handbook each trimester to retain their scholarships. If a student drops below 12 credit hours (7
credit hours for Flex DPT), or is not in good academic standing, the student will be ineligible for the award. The award
may be reinstated the following trimester if the student resumes taking 12 credit hours (7 credit hours for Flex DPT) or
more, and is in good academic standing by the end of the trimester.

Scholarships are awarded to the entering students who best meet the following criteria:
   • Minimum of 3.0 GPA on program prerequisites
   • A one-page essay on “Why I Feel I Should Be Awarded A Scholarship”
   • Review of references from their application
   • Minimum 1000 GRE score (verbal and quantitative sections scores combined)
   • Evidence of financial need determined by a review of a copy of most recent income tax return and a
        completed Financial Need Estimator form
   •
*University reserves the right to make changes to scholarship awards.




                                                          25
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

Grading System
Academic degree programs use a 4.0 scale to calculate grade point averages (GPA).
              Letter Grade      Quality Points
                 A                   4.00
                 B+                  3.50
                 B                   3.00
                 C+                  2.50
                 C                   2.00
                 D+                  1.50
                 D                   1.00
                 F                   0.00
Credit and quality points are not included in GPA calculations for the following grades:
              AU       Audit
              F        Fail
              I        Incomplete
              NG       No Grade Reported
              P        Pass
              W        Withdraw

Grade Changes
Only the course instructor can initiate grade changes. The grade change must first be submitted by the
instructor to the Program Director for initial approval. The Registrar will post any approved grade change to
the official academic record.

Repetition of Course
On occasion, a student may be required to repeat a course. Under such circumstances, the highest grade
achieved is counted towards the cumulative GPA.

Compliance with University Regulations
The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences seeks resolution of all issues through the process of reason
and expects all members of the University community to be governed by this principle. However, should a
student, faculty member, staff member, visitor, invited guest or other licensee, acting individually or collectively,
while on University property engage in violence, destruction of property, or any act which disrupts or interferes
with the functioning of the University, or disturbs the academic processes of the classroom, and ignore or refuse
to comply with official directives to desist, the University shall eject said violator from the campus or other
University property. In addition, the University may seek to impose such penalties as provided by law. Where
circumstances require, the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences may employ injunctive procedures or
call upon civil authority to maintain order. University students, faculty, or staff engaged in such acts are subject to
immediate suspension and a subsequent hearing, which may lead to expulsion or dismissal.

Proper Conduct
Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner, which upholds the integrity of their
profession and the University.

Suspension or Dismissal
The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, through its faculty or appropriate committees, reserves
the discretionary right to suspend or dismiss any student from the University for failure to maintain:
•        A satisfactory academic record
•        Acceptable personal and professional behavior.



                                                         26
Arbitration
In the event of a decision to dismiss and/or suspend a student from the University, the student has the right to
appeal to the appropriate University committee and to the President of the University. Legal recourse after
these appeals is through binding arbitration conducted by a member of the American Arbitration Association
and the cost will be shared between the student and the University.

STUDENT SERVICES
Off-Campus Housing
All University students reside off campus. The Enrollment Services office provides prospective and current
students with general information about housing in the St. Augustine, San Diego and surrounding areas.
Information about specific rental properties is maintained in the same office.

Veterans’ Benefits
St. Augustine Campus - The entry-level and transitional occupational therapy and physical therapy degree
programs are approved by the State Approving Office for training of veterans and other eligible persons.
Questions regarding benefits, enrollment certification, etc., should be directed to the Certifying Officer in the
Enrollment Services Office.

San Diego Campus – The entry-level physical therapy degree program is approved by the California
approving Office for training of veterans and other eligible persons. Questions regarding benefits,
enrollment certification, etc, should be directed to the Certifying Officer in the Enrollment Services Office on
the San Diego campus.

International Student Services
Students attending the University at the St. Augustine campus on a student visa are assisted with Immigration
and Naturalization Services issues by the Designated School Official located in the Enrollment Services
office. The university has submitted the information to have the San Diego campus approved and is awaiting
a decision.




              San Diego DPT students in Skills and Procedure class learning crutch training at curbside




                                                         27
DIVISION OF FIRST PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)
Flex Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)
Dual Degree Option (MOT and DPT)

General
The Division of First Professional Studies offers entry-level graduate degrees in occupational and physical
therapy. The Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) and the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) curricula
mirror the University’s philosophy that the future professionals in these career fields should be educated in
an interdisciplinary environment to the extent possible. The intent of this philosophy is for graduates in these
majors to gain an understanding and appreciation of each other’s scope of practice. Learning experiences
include campus-based lectures and practical labs as well as clinical internships selected from the
approximately 1,800 approved sites located in the United States and currently sites in Australia and New
Zealand.

The following policies apply to the first-professional campus based programs. Please refer to the student
handbooks for the policies for the Doctor of Occupational Therapy and the transitional Doctor of Physical
Therapy degree programs.

Admission
Applicants for the first professional graduate programs must have completed a baccalaureate degree from an
accredited institution before entering the program. Applicants may apply while still enrolled in an
undergraduate degree program and may be admitted contingent upon successful completion of that degree.
Applicants who have already completed the baccalaureate degree, but lack the required program
prerequisites, may apply and potentially be admitted contingent upon successful completion of the
prerequisites prior to enrollment.

Admission Requirements
      A baccalaureate degree or equivalent from an accredited College or University
      A minimum GPA of 3.0 calculated on the program prerequisites is recommended
      A minimum GRE score of 1,000 (verbal-quantitative sections combined) is recommended
NOTE: In addition to these requirements, the Admissions Committee will consider all submitted supporting
documentation as outlined below.

Supplemental Supporting Documentation
In addition to the application, official transcripts, and GRE scores outlined in the general admission to
graduate study, the following supporting documentation is required:
•       List of required prerequisite coursework in basic sciences and social sciences, and the dates each
        course was or is to be completed for each respective program. Basic science prerequisites completed
        more than five years prior to admission are subject to validation. Applicants may petition the
        Director of Admissions to substitute a similar course or group of courses for a prerequisite. The
        petition should include a catalog course description and, if possible, the course syllabus. Approval
        for substitution depends on course level and content as compared to the prerequisite course. The
        Director of Admissions, in collaboration with the Program Director, will determine if the substitution
        is approved or denied and notify the applicant of the decision.

•       Four reference checklists are required. The forms are included in all application packets sent to
        prospective students and are also available on the University website, www.usa.edu. Two references
        should be provided from therapists (respective to the program for which admission is sought), one

                                                      28
        from a previous or current faculty member/advisor, and one from an individual of the applicant’s
        choice.
•       Statement of Purpose
•       Autobiography
•       Documentation of required observation hours as required by each program
•       Current resume
•       Other supporting information or documents (awards, publications, additional recommendation
        letters, newspaper clippings)

International Students Applying for Admission
Applicants who completed a degree program outside the United States must also provide the following as
part of the application process:
•        Transcripts and a credentialing evaluation from an agency recognized by the National Association of
         Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) that provide evidence of training at a level equivalent to
         that of a bachelor’s degree in the United States.
•        TOEFL score report. The University requires a minimum score of 550 (paper-based testing), 210
         (computer-based testing), or 83 (IBT – Internet based testing).

Application Due Dates
Applications and required supporting documentation should be submitted by the due date outlined below for
priority processing:
•        December 15th      September (Fall Term)
•        June 15th          January (Spring Term)
•        October 1st        May (Summer Term)

Applications received after these due dates will be considered on a space available basis.

Interviews
The Admissions Committee evaluates applicants and issues invitations to selected qualified candidates to
participate in an information exchange and interview session on campus. Qualified applicants have provided
evidence of academic, professional, and/or personal achievement and promise. The personal interview
provides additional information used by the Admissions Committee to determine the final admission status
of these applicants.

Academic Policies and Procedures
Transfer Credits
Transfer of graduate credits previously earned from another accredited degree granting institution is limited
to 15% of the total number of credits for the degree. Transfer of credits within the University is determined
on a case by case basis. Transfer credit will in most cases be approved for undergraduate coursework and
courses awarded by schools, colleges or universities that have recognition from the Council for Higher
Education Accreditation (CHEA) or the US Department of Education.

Acceptance or rejection of transfer credit is subject to the following provisions:
• The course(s) should have been completed within five (5) years preceding admission to the program the
   applicant may petition the Program Director for an exception to this time limit.
• The course should have been completed with a grade of B or better. Courses having a B- or below will
   not be transferred.
• The course must be listed on an official transcript sent directly to the Registrar by the issuing institution.




                                                      29
•   The Program Director, in consultation with the appropriate course instructor(s), will review the transfer
    course syllabus to verify that its contents match those of the program’s course. The Program Director
    will then notify the Registrar of the decision.
•   The course number and name of the course requested for transfer should reflect the content of the course
    it is replacing. Additionally, if the course requested for transfer will replace an elective, the content
    should be closely aligned with that of the curriculum and its potential electives.
•   In cases where a course from a Master’s program is being requested for transfer into a doctoral program,
    consideration should be given to rigor and content and further documentation may be requested.

The process for requesting transfer credits is as follows:
• The student obtains and submits the completed Request for Acceptance of Transfer Credit Form from the
   Registrar.
• Requests for approval of transfer credits may be submitted within the first four (4) months after
   acceptance into the program or at least two (2) months before the start of classes each trimester.
• The Registrar will notify the student if the request for transfer credit is approved and will post any
   transferred credit to the permanent academic record at that time.
• There will be a $75.00 charge for the transfer review process.

Advanced Course Standing by Examination

Based on previous academic coursework earned from another accredited degree granting institution, another
program within the University, and/or work experiences, a student may be granted advanced standing for a
particular course after passing an examination on the contents of the course. The examination may be
written or practical or both and there is a cost associated with each exam. A maximum of 20% of the total
number of credits for the degree program may be granted for advanced standing. The granting of advance
standing by examination is independent of the granting of transfer credit.
Approval for advanced course standing is subject to the following provisions:
• Documentation must be provided which supports the reason for requesting advanced course standing by
    examination. Supporting documentation may include transcripts showing applicable courses for credit,
    course descriptions, syllabi, continuing education courses/seminar descriptions and proof of completion,
    and work experience.
• Passing a challenge examination to verify competency in the particular subject matter. A student has
    only one attempt per course to pass the challenge exam. If the student fails the exam, the student must
    take the course in its entirety. The passing grade will be the same as the passing grade stated in the
    syllabus for the course in which advance standing is being requested.
    The process for requesting Advanced Course Standing by Examination is as follows:
• The student obtains a request form for Approval of Advanced Course Standing by Examination from the
    Registrar and submits it to the respective Program Director with appropriate documentation.
• Requests for approval of Advance Course Standing by Examination must be submitted at least two (2)
    months before the start of classes for the trimester.
• In consultation with course instructor(s), the Program Director will review the request. If approved, the
    Program Director will notify the Registrar and a test time and date will be set up for each challenge
    exam. If the Program Director with consultation of the course instructor(s) concludes that the student’s
    previous coursework and experience are inadequate for passing the challenge exam, they may encourage
    the student not to seek advanced course standing or to take some type of remediation before taking the
    challenge exam.
• The Registrar will notify the student if the challenge exam has been passed and will post the course and
    its credits to the permanent academic record at that time.




                                                     30
TRANSFER FROM PROGRAM TO PROGRAM

Students currently enrolled in a University of St. Augustine entry-level degree program may request transfer
to another USA entry-level degree program. The following policies apply:

    1. Students who want to transfer from one program to another must submit transfer requests to their
       current program director by midterm of the first trimester. Students who do not submit their requests
       by the mid-term deadline will not be considered until the subsequent trimester.

    2. Students who have completed their first trimester must submit transfer requests by midterm of the
       current trimester. Such requests will be considered on an individual basis.

    3. Once a student has completed three trimesters, transfer requests will not be approved. However, a
       student may apply to seek a second entry-level degree upon completion of the first degree.

    4. Students must complete the Transfer Request form and have it signed by each of the Administrators
       listed on the form.

    5. The Director of Admissions will give transfer approval only if the student has successfully
       completed all of the prerequisites for the program to which they are requesting transfer.

    6. If a student does not have the required prerequisites, or an appropriate substitute for a prerequisite
       course, the student must successfully complete the prerequisite course(s) before the transfer request
       is completed.

    7. Transfer requests are contingent on space availability.

    8. Transfer curricular pathways:

    Dual to DPT                        Complete 2nd trimester DPT courses over two consecutive
    MOT to DPT                         trimesters
    Dual to MOT                        Complete the second trimester of the MOT program as
                                       scheduled plus Foundations of OT as an independent
    DPT to Dual
                                       study.
    DPT to MOT
    MOT to Dual                        Complete the second trimester of the MOT program as
                                       scheduled; Therapeutic Massage will be completed
                                       during the first trimester of the DPT program

Dual Degree students who elect not to return to the University to pursue the DPT portion of the program,
after earning the MOT degree, must submit a program withdrawal form to the Enrollment Services office by
mid-term of the last trimester of the MOT program. Dual Degree students who decide to delay beginning the
DPT portion of the program, after receiving the MOT degree, must reenroll in the DPT program within two
calendar years or they may be required to complete additional MOT or DPT program coursework in order to
complete the second degree.

Dual Degree students who want to complete the DPT portion of the program through the Flexible DPT
program must submit a program transfer form to the Enrollment Services office by mid-term of the last
trimester of the MOT program.



                                                     31
TRANSFER FROM CAMPUS TO CAMPUS

Students who want to transfer from one campus to another must submit transfer requests to their current
program director by midterm of the trimester prior to the requested change. Such requests will be considered
on an individual basis and are contingent on space availability.

ACADEMIC PROGRESSION, SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP)

Full time Physical Therapy students have a maximum time frame of 11 trimesters to complete their
graduation requirements, part time students have a maximum of 14 trimesters and flex students have a
maximum of 18 trimesters. Full time Occupational Therapy students have a maximum time frame of 8
trimesters and part time 12 trimesters.

Good Academic Standing Status
Prior to completion of 58 credits it is expected that a student will meet the following minimum criteria to be
considered in good academic standing:

    •   Complete at least 75% of all credits attempted each trimester
        ° At the completion of the 1st trimester (or 17 credit hours) have a GPA of 2.0
        ° At the completion of the 2nd trimester (or 36 credit hours) have a GPA of 2.3
        ° At the completion of the 3rd trimester (or 58 credit hours) have a GPA of 2.5

After 58 credit hours have been completed, all students are expected to maintain a GPA at or above 2.5 and
complete at least 75% of all credits attempted each trimester.

Failure to meet any of the above criteria will result in the following actions
    • Students will be issued an Academic Warning and will be required to meet with their faculty advisor
         to develop a plan to improve their academic study.
    • If a student fails to meet the SAP criteria for two consecutive trimesters, they will be placed on
         Academic Progress Probation and will be required to meet with Academic Progression and Retention
         Committee (APRC).

The role of the Academic Progression and Retention Committee (APRC), in conjunction with the Enrollment
Services office, is to monitor each student’s academic progress throughout the curriculum. Grades from each
faculty member are submitted to the APRC at midterm for their review. At the end of each trimester, grades
are submitted to the Registrar. The Registrar will notify students who are placed on probation or are
dismissed from the respective academic program of their status. The student’s advisor and the respective
Program Director are also notified.

Academic Progression Warning
An emailed letter of academic concern will be issued to any student whose grade in any class at midterm is
below a "C" level. The intent of the concern letter is to notify the student of less than satisfactory academic
progress and the potential for course failure. A student receiving an academic concern letter at midterm must
first contact by phone, email or meet with the instructor(s) for the course(s) within one week of receipt of the
concern letter. The student and course instructor(s) will discuss the student’s performance, and the student
will develop a plan, approved by the instructor, to improve future performance. The student must then
contact his/her advisor of the plan. If a student does not contact his/her course instructor, a note will be
placed in the student’s academic file noting the failure to comply with this policy.




                                                      32
An Academic Warning will be given to any student who is not in good academic standing at the conclusion
of any trimester. The intent of the academic warning is to notify the student of less than satisfactory
academic progress. A student receiving an academic warning at the end of the trimester must contact his/her
advisor during the first week of the subsequent trimester and develop a plan, approved by the student’s
advisor, to improve future performance.

Academic Progression Probation
A student who makes a grade of "D" in any course will be placed on academic probation and must undergo
remediation and repeat the course for credit. Such students will be made aware in writing that they are “at
risk” for failure to complete the program.

    •   A student who is no longer in good academic standing must meet with the instructor and their faculty
        advisor to develop a plan for remediation and monitoring. The plan may allow them to take
        additional coursework with the approval of the Program Director.
    •   The student must receive a grade of "C" or better to progress academically.
    •   If the student receives a grade of "C" or better, the student will be taken off Academic Probation.
    •   If the student receives a grade below "C" when retaking a course, the student will be dismissed.

Any student who is on probation may not participate in any work study program unless approved by the
Program Director. Students placed on probation are at risk of not graduating from the university and not
passing the national board exams.

Any student who does not successfully complete the coursework necessary to exit probation may be at risk
of being denied federal financial aid due to not maintaining Satisfactory Academic Progress.

Dismissal and Academic Progression Appeals

A student will be dismissed:
    • If an “F” is received in any course
    • If two grades of “D” are received

A student receiving a failing grade during fieldwork/internship is also subject to this policy.

    •   The Registrar notifies the APRC and the Program Director of any students who are being
        recommended for academic dismissal. The student will be notified of their dismissal by the
        Registrar.

    •   A student may appeal the dismissal to the Academic Appeals Committee. If an appeal is successful,
        a re-admission agreement between the student and the Program Director (or Dean) is made that
        details any conditions for the student’s continuation at the University. Re-admissions agreement can
        only be appealed if there are mitigating circumstances and such appeals can only be made to the
        University President. Please note: a student who is readmitted upon appeal must reapply to the ADA
        Committee for any reasonable accommodations that may have been previously granted.




                                                       33
ACADEMIC EVALUATION AND RIGHT OF APPEAL

All students must sign an Acknowledgement of Appeals form as shown in the appendix of the student
handbook.

The responsibility for academic evaluation will rest with the instructor. For minor appeal issues which are
decisions that would not result in probation or dismissal. The student appeals to the faculty member
involved in the particular issue. If the student is not satisfied with the faculty member’s resolution of the
issue, the student has the right to appeal the issue in writing to the Program Director, within three (3)
working days of the instructor’s decision. The Program Director then has five (5) working days to research
the issue and render a decision.

If the student is not satisfied with the Program Director’s response, the student can appeal the issue to the
President in writing within five (5) working days after the Program Director’s response. After hearing the
issue, the President has two (2) working days to either render a verdict on the issue, or redirect the issue at
that point to the Appeals Committee.

Any student who has been dismissed may formally appeal this decision in writing to the Registrar with a
copy to the respective Program Director within two (2) business days from receipt of the notification. If the
student does not meet the stated deadline, the appeal may not be considered. In extenuating circumstances,
the student may request an extension from their respective Program Director or Program Director Designee
(i.e. Registrar); however, this request must be made within the above stated deadline.

Appeal letters should address:
     - The rationale behind the appeal and why the student believes the appeal is warranted.
     - Future circumstances which will enable the student to rectify previous poor academic performance.

The Registrar will then take the student’s appeal to the Academic Appeals Committee within two (2)
working days. After discussion between the Appeals Committee and the Program Director, a decision is
rendered. The Program Director will convey the Academic Appeals Committee’s decision to the student.

The Academic Appeals Committee (AAC) will meet six (6) scheduled times per calendar year. These
meetings will convene two (2) days prior to the first day of classes of each trimester and at mid term of each
trimester. Procedures for the meetings are as follows:

Prior to Trimester Meetings: The AAC will convene within two (2) days prior to the first day of classes of
the next trimester or at the earliest convenience for both the student and the committee members. The student
must appear personally before the AAC at its convenience. A written decision will be given to the Program
Director within two (2) business days of adjourning the meeting with the student. The entry-level student
will be allowed to attend scheduled classes throughout the entire appeal process.

Mid-Term Meetings: The AAC will convene on or about mid-term of each trimester or at the earliest
convenient time for both the committee and the student. The student must appear personally before AAC
committee. The AAC will give a written decision to the Program Director within two (2) business days of
adjourning the meeting with the student.

In the event of extenuating circumstances, if a student is unable to meet at the University’s designated AAC
meeting times, the student may request an alternate meeting time. This request must be submitted to the
Chair of the AAC committee in writing with detailed rationale supporting their need for an additional time.




                                                      34
Students geographically distant from the University of St. Augustine campus may be allowed to appear
before the AAC meeting via phone conference solely at the discretion of the AAC committee.

Should the student not agree to the decision of the Appeals Committee, the student has the right of an appeal
to the President or his appointed designee. The appeal must be submitted, in writing, within five (5) business
days to the President. Upon request, the President or his designee will review pertinent records, at his
discretion, including a review of the process to ensure that it was correctly followed, and may meet with the
Appeals Committee and the student. The President or his designee will follow the process as established in
the Student Handbook and ensure that the process is followed.

Dismissal policies will be implemented as fairly and equitably as possible considering all extenuating
circumstances.

Following the decision of the President or his designee, the student has the right to request binding
arbitration. This is the only remaining recourse for the student. An arbitrator from the American Arbitrator
Association or equivalent will be contracted with the costs to be shared between the student and the
University.

Once a final appeals decision on academic dismissal has been rendered, the student does not have access to
the appeals process for this same issue again.

Any student enrolled in the St. Augustine campus-based programs who feel a grievance is unresolved may
refer their grievance to Executive Director, Commission for Independent Education, 2650 Apalachee
Parkway, Suite A, Tallahassee, FL 32301, (850) 245-3200 or toll-free 888-224-6684. Students attending the
San Diego campus-based programs may refer their grievance to Executive Director, Bureau for Private,
Postsecondary Education, 1625 North Market Boulevard, Suite S-202, Sacramento, CA 95834.

DEGREE COMPLETION

Acceptance into the University and payment of tuition (on a trimester basis) is not a contract assuring that the
student will graduate with the degree for which they applied. Graduation will depend on satisfactory
academic progression, professional conduct, issues of safety, and the satisfactory completion of clinical
internship/fieldwork experiences and exit exams. Students in the entry level DPT program must also
complete the courses in their final trimester in order to participate in the graduation ceremony. The student
handbook and the course syllabi detail what is considered “satisfactory”. Appeals processes are in place and
the University President is the final point of appeal. Wherein the President finds that the process was
executed in an appropriate manner he is inclined to support the process and its findings.

Dual Degree option students who complete the MOT degree and for any reason choose not to complete the
DPT portion of the program, will be assessed a per credit charge for the DPT courses completed while in the
MOT program.

The following requirements must be met for a student to be eligible for graduation:
 • Each student must satisfactorily complete all academic and clinical courses and be in good academic
     standing.
 • All fiscal obligations to the University or its subsidiaries must be paid in full.
 • The student must make application for graduation one trimester prior to the proposed date of graduation.
 • Should a student be unable to successfully complete part of the final coursework but has successfully
     met all other degree requirements including the exit examination, the student may be allowed to walk at
     commencement with the respective cohort class. The candidate will sign an acknowledgement
     regarding participation in the ceremony. The candidate will be “hooded” during the ceremony, but will


                                                      35
     not receive a signed diploma. The signed diploma will be dated to reflect the subsequent graduate date
     of degree completion as will be denoted on the transcript. The graduate will have the option of
     participating in the commencement ceremony subsequent to degree completion to receive the signed
     diploma.

CONTINUING EDUCATION POLICIES
Students will not be excused from scheduled classes, internship, or fieldwork to attend Continuing Education
courses.

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition
Refer to program-specific Tuition and Fees information in the previous Financial Information section.
Student fees, course note packets, textbooks, professional fees, health insurance, travel to and from clinical
training sites as well as meals and lodging, supplies and lab wear are not included in tuition and fees and will
be extra. These extra additional costs are expected to be approximately $5,000-$7,000 for each program;
these costs are subject to change.

Candidates are required to submit a $500 deposit within thirty (30) days of acceptance into a program. This
deposit is deducted from the first trimester tuition balance. The remaining balance is due on registration day.
Any excess loan proceeds (beyond the first trimester tuition and fees, required course note packet charges,
and student activity fee) will be refunded to the student at the beginning of the first trimester.

After the first trimester, any tuition balance not paid at the time of trimester registration will receive a 10%
late penalty and both tuition and late penalty must be paid in full no later than the close of business on the
last day of the week in which classes begin. Students will be removed from class after this point if not paid
in full. The only exception, are students whose financial aid has been delayed through no fault of their own.

Tuition Refund
This refund policy follows the standards set out by the Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education
and Training Council.

If notification to withdraw from the University is submitted within the one week (seven-day grace period) of
acceptance and submission of the tuition deposit, a full refund of the tuition deposit will be returned to the
student.

A partial refund of the deposit will be given if a student provides notification to withdraw from the
University up to 60 days prior to the start of the trimester courses and after the initial seven-day grace period.
For students attending the Florida campuses, this partial refund will be $300 (the University retains $200 as
an administrative fee). For students attending the San Diego, CA campus, this partial refund will be $400
(the University retains $100 as an administrative fee).

The entire $500 deposit is non-refundable if notification to withdraw from the University is received later
than 60 days prior to the first day of the term.

If a student submits written notification to withdraw from a course (or the program) after the stated term start
date, the following formula will be used to determine the tuition refund.




                                                       36
                   Published Length of Course                    Refundable Tuition Due After-
                   11-15 weeks                               1st week = 80%
                                                             2nd week = 70%
                                                             3rd week = 60%
                                                             4th week = 50%
                                                             5th week = 40%
                                                             6th week = 30%
                                                             7th week = 20%
                                                             8th week = 10%
                                                             9th week = 0%

Trimester fees, sales tax, and Student Activity fees are 100% refundable if said notification is received up to
eight (8) weeks after the first day of a trimester. There is a $200 administrative fee for all course or trimester
withdrawals.

If notification to withdraw is received after the eighth week, there will be no refund of tuition.

For students who receive federal financial aid and who withdraw from all classes on or before 60% of the
term has elapsed. USA will calculate, according to federal regulations, any amounts disbursed that must be
returned to the Title IV programs.

Notice of Cancellation - San Diego
Students at the San Diego campus may cancel their contract for school, without any penalty or obligations on
the fifth business day following the first class session as described in the Notice of Cancellation form. A
Notice of Cancellation form explains the student’s cancellation rights and responsibilities and is available in
the Enrollment Services office.

Emergency Leave:

A student may be granted up to two (2) weeks of emergency leave by the Program Director. After this time
the student can return to classes but is responsible for the material covered in all classes during this leave
time. If the emergency leave extends beyond two (2) weeks, the student will be required to take a leave of
absence (see below). Under such circumstances, the student’s tuition will be applied to the following
trimester.

Leave of Absence:

To request a leave of absence, a student must complete a leave of absence request form and forward to the
Program Director for approval.

    •   An approved Leave of Absence is restricted to a cumulative total time of three trimesters. Leave
        may be taken for one trimester at a time or for an entire calendar year but not more than a total of
        one calendar year. Leave taken at any time during a trimester is considered as an entire trimester of
        leave and students must retake the entire trimester of course work. A year long leave begins from
        the date of the beginning of the trimester of the Leave of Absence. A student must notify the
        Registrar of his/her intention to return to the program at least thirty (30) days before the start of the
        term.




                                                       37
    •   Scholarship students who are granted an approved Leave of Absence for academic reasons forfeit
        any scholarship funds upon their return. For scholarship students who are granted an approved
        Leave of Absence for medical reasons, the scholarship will be suspended and resumes upon their
        return from the Leave of Absence.

    •   Currently enrolled students who are granted an approved Leave of Absence may hold any balance in
        his/her account to be applied toward future tuition only for a period of one year from date of issue
        for non-governmental funds. Governmental funds will be returned per Title IV regulations. Any
        funds on account, which remain after one year from date of issue, are forfeited. Fees and sales tax
        are non-refundable in the event of an approved Leave of Absence.

    •   If a student is approved, for a Leave of Absence within two months of the beginning of a term, a
        credit in the amount of tuition paid for that trimester (no refund) will be applied to their account and
        available for use up to one year from the date of LOA. This credit is forfeited after one year.

    •   Students should be aware that any leave from the institution may have a financial aid impact and
        should consult with the Financial Aid Office. In compliance with federal regulations, for Federal
        financial aid purposes, a Leave of Absence is treated the same as a withdrawal. If you are
        considering taking a leave of absence, please be aware of the following:

            o   In accordance with financial aid regulations, a leave of absence can not exceed 180 days. If
                your leave of absence exceeds 180 days your loan will go into repayment status.
            o   You must make a written request to be granted a leave of absence.
            o   You will be required to complete exit counseling prior to beginning an approved leave of
                absence.
            o   It will be necessary to reapply for loans upon return to school.
            o   You must notify the Financial Aid Office upon your return to school, so that your lender,
                guaranty agency, and National Student Loan Data System, (NSLDS) can be notified.

    •   The University reserves the right to re-assess “The Essential Functions for Occupational Therapy and
        Physical Therapy” of any student returning from any leave of absence and to decline or conditionally
        approve their resumption if they are unable to meet the essential functions with reasonable
        accommodations. If a leave is greater than one year, a student must re-apply as a prospective student
        to the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences in order to return to the program.

Audit Policy
Auditing of a class is permitted, if space permits, with approval of the Program Director and course
instructor. Auditing of a class requires payment of full tuition for that course. The student who is auditing
may not take the practical or written exams in that course.




                                                      38
MASTER OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (MOT)

Mission Statement
The mission of the University’s MOT program is to graduate a diverse population of practitioners who have
the skills necessary to analyze human occupation and to implement science-driven and evidenced-based
interventions that promote quality of life for the clients whom they serve. The graduates will contribute to
their profession and to a global society through their competence, ethical standards and professionalism.

Program Objectives
Through completion of this program, students will:
       • Use standardized and non-standardized procedures to evaluate and assess a variety of clients
          across the age span.
       • Interpret assessment results and plan skilled, cost effective, evidence-based occupational therapy
          intervention with an identified frame of reference.
       • Use the process of clinical reasoning to implement and adapt holistic client intervention
          programs emphasizing the use of purposeful activity.
       • Establish and maintain an ethical and appropriate therapeutic relationship.
       • Demonstrate professional competence, communication and documentation skills.
       • Demonstrate self directed learning skills in preparation to become a life long learner and
          contributor to the profession of occupational therapy.

Program Prerequisites
        Social Sciences (to include psychology,                           15 semester hours
          sociology, anthropology, human growth
          and development, abnormal psychology)
        General College Physics (must include motion/movement)            3 semester hours
        General College Biology                                           3 semester hours
        Anatomy and Physiology                                            6 semester hours
(NOTE: Substitutions can be considered with the approval of the program director)

Recommended Prerequisite: General College Chemistry                        3 semester hours
Recommended Electives: Speech, Statistics, additional Biology and Physics.

CURRICULUM
        TRIMESTER I                                                     Trimester Hours
        HSC 5001  Research I: Scientific Inquiry/Critical Thinking             2
        HSC 5100C Applied Human Anatomy                                        4
        HSC 5213C Skills and Procedures                                        4
        HSC 5741C Applied Medical Physiology                                   4
        OCT 5801  Foundations of OT – Fieldwork Introduction                   3
                  Trimester Total                                             17

        TRIMESTER II
        HSC 5122C Biomechanics                                                 4
        HSC 5416  General Pathology                                            3
        HSC 5700  Wellness and Prevention                                      3
        OCT 5011  Evidence-Based Practice                                      2
        OCT 5100  Professional Forum                                           2
        OCT 5300  Evaluation and Assessment                                    4
        OCT 5802  Fieldwork IA                                                 1
                  Trimester Total                                             19




                                                    39
TRIMESTER III
     HSC 5151C          Clinical Neurosciences                             5
     HSC 5142           Child Development                                  3
     HSC 5800           Gerontology                                        3
     OCT 5031           Evidence Based Research I                          1
     OCT 5125C          Biomechanical Interventions                        4
     OCT 5406C          Psychosocial Interventions                         4
     OCT 5803           Fieldwork IB                                       1
                        Trimester Total                                   21

        TRIMESTER IV                                                 Trimester Hours
        HSC 5351  Pharmacology                                             2
        HSC 5610  Administration and Management in OT and PT               2
        OCT 5041  Evidence Based Research II                               1
        OCT 5216C Physical Modalities for OT                               2
        OCT 5610C Neurorehabilitation Interventions                        4
        OCT 5620C Pediatric Interventions                                  4
        OCT 5630C Assistive Technology & Community Service                 4
                  Trimester Total                                         19

        TRIMESTERS V AND VI
        OCT 5005  Clinical Reasoning                                       1
        OCT 5701C Orthotics and Prosthetics                                3
        OCT 5810  Exit Exam                                                1
        OCT 5811  Fieldwork IC – Mock Clinic                               2
        OCT 5813  Fieldwork IIA                                           12
        OCT 5824  Fieldwork IIB                                           12
                  Trimester Total                                         31

        OTHER/AVAILABLE ELECTIVES
        IDS 5802 Independent Study                                  Variable

Please refer to the Pre-Co-requisite listing of courses.

NOTE: MOT students must complete all Level II fieldwork within twenty-four (24) months following
completion of academic preparation.

For further information about accreditation contact: Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy
Education (ACOTE), 4720 Montgomery Lane, PO Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220, Telephone 301-
652-2682.




                                                           40
DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY (DPT)
Mission Statement
The mission of the University’s DPT program is to graduate competent, versatile, reflective, empathetic and
autonomous practitioners who by virtue of their critical thinking and active learning skills, clinical
experience, diagnostic proficiency, ethical and behavioral standards and commitment to professionalism, will
be prepared to assist and direct the patient or client in achieving optimum function. These practitioners will
contribute to their practice and society through continued professional growth and personal example of a
healthy and productive lifestyle.

Program Prerequisites
        General College Chemistry I and II                                        6 semester hours
        General College Physics I and II (kinesiology or biomechanics             6 semester hours
          can be subsituted for physics II)
        General College Biology I and II (zoology can be substituted
          for biology II)                                                         6 semester hours
        Anatomy and Physiology                                                    6 semester hours
        Social Sciences (psychology, sociology, anthropology)                     9 semester hours

(NOTE: Substitutions can be considered with approval by the program director)

CURRICULUM
        TRIMESTER I                                                               Trimester Hours
        HSC 5001          Research I: Scientific Inquiry/Critical Thinking               2
        HSC 5100C         Applied Human Anatomy                                          4
        HSC 5213C         Skills & Procedures                                            4
        HSC 5741C         Applied Medical Physiology                                     4
        PHT 5802          Practicum I                                                    2
        PHT 5006C         Massage and Soft Tissue Palpation                              1
                          Trimester Total                                               17


        TRIMESTER II
        HSC 5122C         Biomechanics                                                   4
        HSC 5416          General Pathology                                              3
        HSC 5700          Wellness and Prevention                                        3
        PHT 5132C         Musculoskeletal I: Orthopaedics                                4
        PHT 5225C         Physical Modalities/Integumentary                              4
        PHT 5234C         General Therapeutic Exercise I                                 4
                          Trimester Total                                               22




                                                     41
TRIMESTER III                                                   Trimester Hours
HSC 5142     Child Development                                           3
HSC 5151C    Clinical Neuroscience                                      5
HSC 5800     Gerontology                                                3
PHT 5133C    Musculoskeletal II: Mock Clinic                             3
PHT 5143C    Neuromuscular I: Concepts and Evaluation                   3
PHT 5236C    Therapeutic Exercise II                                     3
PHT 5805     Practicum II                                                2
             Trimester Total                                            22

TRIMESTER IV
COM 6100E    Professional Communication                                  2
HSC 5351     Pharmacology                                               2
PHT 5145C    Neuromuscular II: Therapeutic Approaches                   3
PHT 5702C    Prosthetics                                                1
PHT 5713C    Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Rehabilitation                  2
PHT 5813     Internship I                                               7
             Trimester Total                                            17

TRIMESTER V
HSC 5610    Administration and Management in OT and PT                  2
PHT 5103    Critical Thinking II                                        1
PHT 5134C   Musculoskeletal III: Advanced Extremity Examination,
            Evaluation and Manipulation                                 3
PHT 5135C   Musculoskeletal IV: Advanced Spinal Examination,
            Evaluation and Manipulation                                 3
PHT 5140C   Pediatric Physical Therapy                                  2
PHT 5147C   Neuromuscular III – Advanced Evaluation and Interventions
               for the Adult                                            2
PHT 5405    Psychosocial & Ethical Aspects of Physical
            Therapy                                                     3
PHT 5906    Research II: Proposal Development                            3
            Trimester Total                                             19

TRIMESTER VI
PHT 5824     Internship II                                              8
PHT 5828     Internship III                                             8
             Trimester Total                                            16




                                       42
       TRIMESTER VII
       Required Courses:
       HSC 6400E         Differential Diagnosis for the Therapist                         2
       PHT 5809          Exit Exam (DPTEN)                                                1
       PHT 5907          Research III: Patient Case Report                                1
       PHT 6220E         Myofascial Manipulation (MF1)                                    2
       PHT 6403E         Imaging for Physical Therapy                                     2
       Student choose 7 credits from the following electives:
       BSC 6001E         Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                             2
       BSC 6101E         Application of Motor Control and Motor Learning Theory
                         To Neurologic Intervention                                       2
       BSC 6102E         Interventions for the Older Adult with Neurological Impairment   3
       BSC 6103E         Neurologic Dysfunction in the Pediatric Client                   3
       BSC 6301E         Ergonomics                                                       2
       EDF 6201E         Educational Theory for Clinicians                                3
       HSA 6101E         Health Services Administration                                   3
       HSC 6100E         Electrotherapy: Principles & Clinic Applications for             2
                         Orthopaedics
       HSC 6300E         Advancing Hand Therapy Skills                                    2
       HSC 6320E         School Based Practice                                            2
       HSC 6360E         Spinal Instability                                               2
       OCT 5620C         Pediatric Interventions*                                         4
       OCT 5701C         Orthotics and Prosthetics*                                       3
       PHT 5830          Elective Internship IV                                         1-8
       PHT 6202E         Adv. Pelvic Lumbar & Thoracic Spine (S2)                         2
       PHT 6203E         Adv. Cervical & Upper Thoracic Spine (S3)                        2
       PHT 6204E         Functional Analysis: Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex (S4)               1
       PHT 6211E         Extremity Integration (E2)                                       2
       PHT 6331E         Basic Craniofacial                                               2
       PHT 6461E         Musculoskeletal Clinical Integration*                            2
       PSY 6102E         Psychology of Health and Exercise                                2
       PSY 6103E         Applied Psychology                                               3

       Note: Courses are anticipated to be offered through various delivery mechanisms to include
       on-line delivery. Depending on demand, some Trimester VII elective courses may not be
       available.

       OTHER/AVAILABLE ELECTIVES
       IDS 5802    Independent Study                                                  Variable



*These courses are not available for students attending the entry-level DPT expansion program in San Diego,
CA. Please refer to the Pre-Co-requisite listing of courses.




                                                     43
Dual Degree Option (MOT and DPT)

The University offers a “Second Degree” option in its entry-level programs for those who choose to combine
the professional skills of occupational and physical therapy. The Dual Degree Option offers a unique
opportunity to earn both a Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) degree and a Doctor of Physical Therapy
(DPT) degree in three years and four months (ten trimesters total). A student has an opportunity to gain
clinical excellence and may increase the marketability of the entry-level practitioner.

Program Prerequisites
      General College Chemistry I and II                                   6 semester hours
      General College Physics I and II (kinesiology or biomechanics        6 semester hours
        can be substituted for one semester of physics)
      General College Biology I and II (zoology can be substituted         6 semester hours
        for biology II)
      Anatomy and Physiology                                               6 semester hours
      Social Sciences (human growth and development, psychology,          15 semester hours
        sociology, abnormal psychology and anthropology)

(NOTE: Substitutions can be considered with the approval of the program director)

CURRICULUM
     TRIMESTER I                                                      Trimester Hours
     HSC 5001             Research I: Scientific Inquiry/Critical                   2
                          Thinking
       HSC 5100C          Applied Human Anatomy                                      4
       HSC 5213C          Skills and Procedures                                      4
       HSC 5741C          Applied Medical Physiology                                 4
       OCT 5801           Foundations of OT-Fieldwork Intro                          3
       PHT 5006C          Massage and Soft Tissue Palpation                          1
                          Trimester Total                                           18

       TRIMESTER II                                                            Trimester Hours
       HSC 5122C          Biomechanics                                              4
       HSC 5416           General Pathology                                         3
       HSC 5700           Wellness and Prevention                                   3
       OCT 5011           Evidence-Based Practice                                   2
       OCT 5100           Professional Forum                                        2
       OCT 5300           Evaluation and Assessment                                 4
       OCT 5802           Fieldwork IA                                              1
                          Trimester Total                                          19

       TRIMESTER III                                                          Trimester Hours
       HSC 5142           Child Development                                         3
       HSC 5151C          Clinical Neurosciences                                    5
       HSC 5800           Gerontology                                               3
       OCT 5031           Evidence-Based Research I                                 1
       OCT 5125C          Biomechanical Interventions                               4
       OCT 5406C          Psychosocial Interventions                                4
       OCT 5803           Fieldwork IB                                              1
                          Trimester Total                                          21



                                                    44
TRIMESTER IV     Trimester Hours
HSC 5351         Pharmacology                                        2
HSC 5610         Administration and Management                       2
OCT 5041         Evidence-Based Research II                          1
OCT 5610C        Neurorehabilitation Interventions                   4
OCT 5620C        Pediatric Interventions                             4
OCT 5630C        Assistive Technology & Community Service            4
PHT 5225C        Physical Modalities/Integumentary                   4
                 Trimester Total                                    21

TRIMESTER V                                                  Trimester Hours
OCT 5005         Clinical Reasoning                                 1
OCT 5701C        Orthotics and Prosthetics                          3
OCT 5811         Fieldwork 1C – Mock Clinic                         2
OCT 5813         Fieldwork IIA (2/3 in V, 1/3 VI)                  12
PHT 5702C        Prosthetics                                        1
                 Trimester Total                                   19

TRIMESTER VI                                                 Trimester Hours
OCT 5810     Exit Exam (half in V, half in VI)                      1
OCT 5824     Fieldwork IIB                                         12
             Trimester Total                                       13

                            Graduate with MOT Degree

TRIMESTER VII                                                Trimester Hours
PHT 5132C     Musculoskeletal I                                     4
PHT 5234C     Therapeutic Exercise                                  4
PHT 5236C     Therapeutic Exercise II                               3
PHT 5243      Neuromuscular Examination, Evaluation
              And Intervention                                       2
PHT 5713C     Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Rehabilitation              2
PHT 5801      Practicum for Dual Option Students                     1
                                                                    16

TRIMESTER VIII                                                Trimester Hours
PHT 5103     Critical Thinking II                                      1
PHT 5133     Musculoskeletal II (Mock Clinic)                          3
PHT 5134C    Musculoskeletal III (E-1)                                 3
PHT 5135C    Musculoskeletal IV (S1)                                   3
PHT 5147C    Neuromuscular III – Advanced Evaluation and Interventions
                in the Adult                                           2
PHT 5140C    Pediatric Physical Therapy                                2
IDS 5802     Independent Study-Research II                             1
             Trimester Total                                         15




                                          45
       TRIMESTER IX                                                     Trimester Hours
       PHT 5824     PT Internship II                                           8
       PHT 5828     PT Internship III                                          8
                    Trimester Total                                           16

       TRIMESTER X                                                      Trimester Hours
       Required Courses:
       HSC 6400E       Differential Diagnosis for the Therapist                2
       PHT 5809        Exit Exam (DPTEN)                                       1
       PHT 5907        Research III: Patient Case Report                       1
       PHT 6220E       Myofascial Manipulation                                 2
       PHT 6403E       Imaging for Physical Therapy                            2
                       Choose 7 credits from the following electives:
       BSC 6001E       Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                    2
       BSC 6101E       Motor Control and Motor Learning                        2
       BSC 6102E       Older Adult with a Neuro Impairment                     3
       BSC 6103E       Neurologic Dysfunction in the Pediatric Client          3
       BSC 6301E       Ergonomics                                              2
       EDF 6201E       Educational Theory for Clinicians                       3
       HSA 6101E       Health Services Administration                          3
       HSC 6100E       Electrotherapy: Principles & Clinic                     2
                       Applications for Orthopaedics
       HSC 6300E       Advancing Hand Therapy Skills                           2
       HSC 6320E       School Based Practice                                   2
       HSC 6360E       Spinal Instability                                      2
       PHT 6202E       Adv. Pelvic Lumbar & Thoracic Spine (S2)                2
       PHT 6203E       Adv. Cervical & Upper Thoracic Spine (S3)               2
       PHT 6204E       Functional Analysis: Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip                   1
                       Complex (S-4)
       PHT 6211E       Extremity Integration (E-2)                             2
       PHT 6331E       Eval and Treatment Craniomandibular Sys                 2
       PHT 6461E       Musculoskeletal Clinical Integration                    2
       PSY 6102E       Psychology of Health and Exercise                       2
       PSY 6103E       Applied Psychology                                      3

       OTHER
       IDS 5802 Independent Study (entry-level)                          Variable

Bolded Classes are PT classes integrated into OT curriculum.




                                                  46
FLEXIBLE DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY (DPT)
The University of St. Augustine offers a part-time program for working adults seeking to earn the Doctor of
Physical Therapy degree referred to as the Flex Program. This program is a combined distance education
and residency first professional Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) Program designed for the student who
needs flexibly. By substituting asynchronous online education for most standard classroom participation and
holding weekend labs at a convenient facility, an individual can earn a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree in
12 trimesters (4 years).

The model represents an expansion of the on-campus, entry-level DPT Program currently in place at the
University of St. Augustine (USA). The same mission and curriculum used in the full-time Program is
utilized in the Flex Program with the only differences being a reduction in the number of credits taken per
term and the delivery format. The Flex Program pre-requisites, admission requirements, academic calendar,
tuition, and policies are the same as the on-campus program. Students in the Flex program complete 3 full-
time clinical internships that are seven to eight weeks in length in the second half of the program. This
portion of the curriculum will require full time attendance by the Flex DPT student.

As in the on-campus program, there may be up to three cohort groups of students per year, starting in
September, January, and May, with a maximum of 30 students per group and a minimum of 8 students. If
the number of Flex cohort students drops below 8, the university reserves the right to hold the cohort group
back a trimester to combine with the following group.

More than 50% of the coursework is delivered on-line to the student. The online courses consist of web-
based text with extensive graphics, videos, and audio clips. There are opportunities provided for faculty-to-
student and student-to-student synchronous and asynchronous interactive collaboration. Assessment of
online learning outcomes includes a wide variety of evaluation tools depending on the course objectives such
as: 1) regular quizzes completed online, 2) graded bulletin board assignments, 3) case reports, 4) group
projects, 5) research papers, and 6) article critiques.

In courses with a lab component, students come together at a local facility for 16 hours of laboratory classes
per weekend for no more than 8 weekends a trimester. The lab sessions provide an avenue for teaching
activities not well suited for online delivery such as the hands-on learning that is vital to physical therapy
education, in addition to oral presentations, proctored written examinations, lab practical testing, and
socialization activities. Currently these lab activities are located in St. Augustine, Florida and San Diego,
California.

The Florida Commission for Independent Education licenses the St. Augustine, Florida Flexible entry-level
DPT Program. The Commission of Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) and the Distance
Education and Training Council accredit the program.




                                                     47
Mission Statement
The mission of the University’s DPT program is to graduate competent, versatile, reflective, empathetic and
autonomous practitioners who by virtue of their critical thinking and active learning skills, clinical
experience, diagnostic proficiency, ethical and behavioral standards and commitment to professionalism, will
be prepared to assist and direct the patient or client in achieving optimum function. These practitioners will
contribute to their practice and society through continued professional growth and personal example of a
healthy and productive lifestyle.

Program Objectives
Through completion of this program, students will:
       • Demonstrate competent clinical skills in the examination, evaluation, and intervention for
          individuals with neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction.
       • Plan, implement, and assess preventative, evaluative and rehabilitative programs of care.
       • Apply concepts of scientific inquiry in: a) the critical analysis of the literature; b) planning,
          implementing, and reporting investigative projects.
       • Relate to both the medical and managed care models in a manner that will ensure professional
          respect and acceptance as a valuable health team member.
       • Effectively communicate with the patient, patient’s family, other health professionals and the
          community.
       • Demonstrate well-informed, ethical decision-making ability.
       • Demonstrate a commitment to life-long learning.

Program Prerequisites
        General College Chemistry I and II                                        6 semester hours
        General College Physics I and II (kinesiology or biomechanics
            can be substitubed for physics II)                                    6 semester hours
        General College Biology I and II (zoology can be substituted
             for biology II)                                                      6 semester hours
        Anatomy and Physiology                                                    6 semester hours
        Social Sciences (psychology, sociology, anthropology)                     9 semester hours

(NOTE: Substitutions will be considered with approval by the program director)

CURRICULUM
        TRIMESTER I                                                               Trimester Hours
        HSC 5001    Research I: Scientific Inquiry/Critical Thinking                     2
        HSC 5100C   Applied Human Anatomy                                                4
        PHT 5006C   Massage and Soft Tissue Palpation                                    1
                    Trimester Total                                                      7

        TRIMESTER II
        HSC 5213C    Skills & Procedures                                                 4
        HSC 5741C    Applied Medical Physiology                                          4
        PHT 5802     Practicum I                                                         2
                     Trimester Total                                                    10

        TRIMESTER III
        HSC 5122C    Biomechanics                                                         4
        HSC 5416     General Pathology                                                    3
        PHT 5405     Psychosocial & Ethical Aspects of Physical Therapy                   3
                     Trimester Total                                                     10


                                                     48
TRIMESTER IV
HSC 5151C    Clinical Neuroscience                                      5
HSC 5710     Wellness and Prevention                                    3
PHT 5225C    Physical Modalities/Integumentary                          4
             Trimester Total                                           12

TRIMESTER V
HSC 5142    Child Development                                           3
PHT 5132C   Musculoskeletal I: Orthopaedics                             4
PHT 5234C   General Therapeutic Exercise I                              4
            Trimester Total                                            11

TRIMESTER VI
HSC 5800     Gerontology                                               3
PHT 5143C    Neuromuscular I: Concepts and Evaluation                   3
PHT 5236C    Therapeutic Exercise II                                    3
PHT 5805     Practicum II                                               2
             Trimester Total                                           11

TRIMESTER VII
HSC 5351    Pharmacology                                               2
PHT 5133C   Musculoskeletal II: Mock Clinic                            3
PHT 5702C   Prosthetics                                                1
PHT 5713C   Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Rehabilitation                  2
            Trimester Total                                            8

TRIMESTER VIII
COM 6100E   Professional Communications                                 2
PHT 5145C   Neuromuscular II: Therapeutic Approaches                    3
PHT 5813    Internship I                                               7
            Trimester Total                                            12

TRIMESTER IX
HSC 5610     Administration and Management in OT and PT                2
PHT 5103     Critical Thinking II                                      1
PHT 5134C    Musculoskeletal III: Advanced Extremity Examination,
             Evaluation and Manipulation                               3
PHT 5135C    Musculoskeletal IV: Advanced Spinal Examination,
             Evaluation and Manipulation                                3
PHT 6403E    Imaging for Physical and Occupational Therapists           2
             Trimester Total                                           11

TRIMESTER X
HSC 6400E   Differential Diagnosis for the Therapist                   2
PHT 5140C   Pediatric Physical Therapy                                 2
PHT 5147C   Neuromuscular III: Advanced Evaluation and Interventions
                in the Adult                                           2
PHT 5906    Research II: Proposal Development                           3
PHT 6220E   Myofascial Manipulation (MF1)                               2
            Trimester Total                                            11



                                       49
TRIMESTER XI
PHT 5824     Internship II                                                                     8
PHT 5828     Internship III*                                                                   8
             Trimester Total                                                                   16

TRIMESTER XII                                                                Trimester Hours
Required Courses:
PHT 5809          Exit Exam                                                        1
PHT 5907          Research III: Patient Case Report                                1
Student choose 7 credits from the following electives:
BSC 6001E         Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                             2
BSC 6101E         Application of Motor Control and Motor Learning Theory
                  To Neurologic Intervention                                       2
BSC 6102E         Interventions for the Older Adult with Neurological Impairment   3
BSC 6103E         The Pediatric Client with a Neurological Impairment              3
BSC 6301E         Ergonomics                                                       2
EDF 6201E         Educational Theory for Clinicians                                3
HSA 6101E         Health Services Administration                                   3
HSC 6100E         Electrotherapy: Principles & Clinic Applications for             2
                  Orthopaedics
HSC 6300E         Advancing Hand Therapy Skills                                    2
HSC 6360E         Spinal Instability                                               2
PHT 6202E         Adv. Pelvic Lumbar & Thoracic Spine (S2)                         2
PHT 6203E         Adv. Cervical & Upper Thoracic Spine (S3)                        2
PHT 6204E         Functional Analysis: Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex (S4)               1
PHT 6211E         Extremity Integration (E2)                                       2
PHT 6331E         Basic Craniofacial                                               2
PSY 6102E         Psychology of Health and Exercise                                2
PSY 6103E         Applied Performance Psychology                                   3

OPTIONAL TRIMESTER XII
For those students who cannot complete 2 fulltime internships in one trimester

Internship III                                                                                 8




                 Flex students discuss application of electrical stimulation in Modalities l




                                                    50
ORTHOPAEDIC PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT (OPA)

Mission Statement
The mission of this program is to educate highly competent and compassionate Orthopaedic Physician
Assistants who excel in meeting the health care needs of Orthopaedic Physicians across the United States.

Program Objectives
Through completion of this program, students will:
   • Execute the skills necessary to participate in the triage, evaluation and treatment of orthopaedic
       injuries and diseases found in orthopaedic office practice and hospital settings.
   • Perform standardized and non-standardized evaluation and assessment procedures for clients with
       orthopaedic conditions across the lifespan.
       Use the process of clinical reasoning to implement and adapt holistic client intervention programs
       emphasizing the use of purposeful activity.
   • Utilize effective clinical reasoning, judgment, and differential diagnosis skills to determine the
       best approach to comprehensive treatment.
   • Plan evidence-based non-surgical and pharmacologic treatment approaches in consultation with
       an orthopaedic surgeon.
   • Demonstrate technical skills for a wide variety of orthopaedic procedures and ability to assist
       with orthopaedic surgeries.
   • Appropriately order diagnostic imaging studies and communicate with the orthopaedic physician.
   • Establish clear written and verbal communication skills for patient interactions, professional
       communications and documentation purposes.
   • Value ethical, legal, and regulatory responsibilities of this profession.
   • Demonstrate independent and life-long learning skills for future contributions to the profession.

Program Prerequisites
        Medical Terminology                                                 2 Semester hours
        General College Chemistry I & II (no labs required)                 6-8 Semester hours
          (may also take organic or inorganic chemistry, biochemistry)
        Cell Biology (no labs required)                                     3 Semester hours
        Microbiology (no labs required)                                     3 Semester hours
        General Physics (may substitute Biomechanics                        6 Semester hours
          or Kinesiology for 1 term (3 credits) of Physics)
        Anatomy & Physiology (may substitute 1 term                         6 Semester hours
          (3 credits) Anatomy and 1 term (3 credits) Exercise Physiology)
        Social Sciences (from among: psychology, sociology,                 9 Semester hours
          anthropology, human growth and development)

CURRICULUM
        TRIMESTER I                                                     Trimester Hours
        HSC 5100C Applied Human Anatomy                                        4
        HSC 5741C Applied Medical Physiology                                   4
        HSC 5700  Wellness and Prevention                                      3
        OPA 5110  OPA Professional Issues I                                    2
        HSC 5001  Research I: Scientific Inquiry/Critical Thinking             2
                  Trimester Total                                             15




                                                   51
                                                     Trimester Hours
TRIMESTER II
HSC 5122C Biomechanics                                        4
HSC 5416  General Pathology                                   3
OPA 5351  OPA Orthopaedic Pharmacology                        3
OPA 5132C OPA Orthopaedics I                                  5
OPA 5125C OPA Lab Procedures                                  2
OPA 5906  Research II                                         2
          Trimester Total                                    19

TRIMESTER III
HSC 5151C Clinical Neuroscience                               2
OPA 5200  OPA Surgery                                         4
OPA 5120  OPA Professional Issues II                          2
OPA 5713C OPA Cardiopulmonary                                 2
OPA 5134C OPA Orthopaedics II                                 4
HSC 6400E Differential Diagnosis                              2
OCT 5803  OPA Imaging                                         3
          Trimester Total                                    19

TRIMESTERS IV - VI
OPA 5810 Clinical Rotation 1: Lower Extremity Orthopaedics    4
OPA 5812 Clinical Rotation 2: Upper Extremity Orthopaedics    4
OPA 5814 Clinical Rotation 3: Spine Orthopaedics/Neurology    4
OPA 5816 Clinical Rotation 4: Sports Medicine                 4
OPA 5818 Clinical Rotation 5: Orthopaedic Trauma              4
OPA 5820 Clinical Rotation 6: Pediatric Orthopaedics          4
OPA 5822 Clinical Rotation 7: Oncology                        4
OPA 5824 Clinical Rotation 8: Hand                            4
OPA 5828 Clinical Rotation 9: Orthopaedic Rehabilitation      4
OPA 5830 Clinical Rotation 10: Elective Content               4
OPA 5831 Clinical Rotation 11: Elective Content               4
OPA 5809 Exit Exam                                            1
OPA 5907 Research III                                         1
         Trimesters Total                                    46




                                       52
FIRST PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

(Course Numbers 5000 – 6499)

BSC 6001E – Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                                         Hours: 2
This is an online self-study course discussing the foundations of orthopaedics and manipulative therapy.
The history and development of orthopaedics and specifically manual therapy are explored. Arthrology
and biomechanics are discussed, with special attention to tissue biomechanics and arthrokinematics.
Emphasis is placed on spinal anatomy and movement. The University's philosophy of examination,
treatment, and pain management is introduced but attention is also given to other diagnostic classification
systems. Classifications and indications for manipulation are reviewed. The course provides an
introduction to the evidence-informed clinical practice paradigm teaching the student to combine various
sources of knowledge in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of orthopaedic dysfunctions.

BSC 6101E – Application of Motor Control and Motor Learning Theory to Neurological
Intervention                                                       Hours: 2
In this course the student will examine current research and theories in motor control and motor learning
and their relationship to examination and intervention in patients with neurologic dysfunction. Students
will examine neuroanatomical structures, functions, and neuroplasticity of the nervous system as they
relate to motor control tasks. Specific motor control issues in balance, gait, and upper extremity are
examined and discussed. Students will identify and explain the influence of impairments on motor
dysfunction and a patient’s motor control. The course is open to both physical and occupational therapy
students or clinicians.

BSC 6102E – Interventions for the Older Adult with a Neurological
Impairment                                                                              Hours: 3
This course will provide students with the advanced knowledge and skills to adapt therapeutic
examinations and interventions to the special needs of the older adult with a neurological impairment.
Special emphasis will be on considering individuals with stroke, Parkinson’s disease, vestibular problems,
subcortical and cortical dementia, and other neurological pathologies that impact on function. This
course is a seminar with an online component.

BSC 6103E – The Pediatric Client with a Neurological Impairment                          Hours: 3
The goal of the seminar is to provide participants with advanced knowledge and application of skilled
observation and intervention for the special needs of the pediatric client with a neurological impairment.
The lecture component will include updates on treatment approaches used in pediatric intervention (motor
learning and control theory, neurodevelopmental principles (NDT), myofascial release treatment
principles, oral motor treatment, positioning, strengthening, and other treatment techniques) with an
emphasis on evidenced based practice. During the lab component, participants will apply NDT,
myofascial release, strengthening, and other techniques to facilitate functional skills in infants and
children with congenital and acquired movement disorders.

BSC 6301E – Ergonomics                                                                   Hours: 2
This online self-study course examines a variety of aspects of work related ergonomics. Participants will
review the history of ergonomics, ergonomic statistics, client centered framework of practice, the
Americans with disabilities act, universal design, posture, standing, sitting and computer work station
evaluation, occupational risks, cumulative trauma disorders/repetitive strain injuries/tendonitis, and low
back pain. Worker assessment and work hardening are reviewed before carrying out a worksite
assessment. Injury prevention, ergonomic equipment, ergonomic resources, and documentation are also
discussed. The course requires students to complete three projects: a posture evaluation, a computer


                                                    53
workstation evaluation and a work site evaluation. Bulletin board (BB) interaction is used to address
subjects and respond to other students comments. Questions are addressed, papers written and projects
written up including a work site evaluation report letter.

COM 6100E – Professional Communication                                                   Hours: 2
This course examines professional communications as it relates to the profession of physical therapy
(PT). Students develop skill in: Professional writing and referencing; professional development;
therapeutic communication; documentation according to the APTA Guidelines of Documentation;
analyzing and presenting research related to PT; and advocating for therapy services.

EDF 6101E – Foundations of Teaching and Learning                                         Hours: 3
Patient care, clinical administrative management, and academic appointments are areas where
practitioners have teaching obligations. Students in this course will acquire a working knowledge of the
mechanisms by which adults learn, understand and remember. Students will apply these mechanisms to
the study of teaching strategies and instructional decision-making. Topics will include cognition
information processing and assessment, theories of motivation, critical thinking and the application of this
knowledge for teaching. Learning outcomes will differ depending on the academic track that the student
is pursuing.

EDF 6201E – Educational Theory for Clinicians                                            Hours: 3
Patient care, clinical administrative management, and academic appointments are areas where
practitioners have teaching obligations. Students in this course will acquire a working knowledge of the
mechanisms by which adults learn, understand and remember. Students will apply these mechanisms to
the study of teaching strategies and instructional decision making. Topics will include cognition,
information processing and assessment, theories of motivation, critical thinking and the application of this
knowledge for teaching. This course is offered through a distance education format.

HSA 6101E – Health Services Administration                                               Hours: 3
This course examines the functions of a rehabilitation manager. Content includes ethical-legal
considerations, applicable state and federal statues, marketing, fiscal resource management, and staff
productivity. Emphasis is placed on decision making, change implementation, and quality control
processes in health care organizations. Students have the opportunity to analyze problems and develop
strategies for change in a variety of hypothetical settings.

HSC 5001 – Research I: Scientific Inquiry/Critical Thinking                              Hours: 2
Although there are many ways of knowing, it is only when we critically evaluate our thoughts,
assumptions and beliefs that can we be confident in the quality of the conclusions that we make about the
world and ourselves. This course is divided into two parts: Part One (Scientific Inquiry) is an introduction
to research methods, psychometric properties of tests and measures as used in the clinical situation for
diagnosis, prognosis, and outcome assessment, sampling, experimental design, and statistics. Part Two
(Critical Thinking) introduces clinical critical thinking through the principles of active reasoning, active
teaching and learning, active questioning and self-assessment. The areas of logic, problem solving,
hypothesis generation, domains of learning, and professional abilities are highlighted. Socratic
questioning is the chief method of student dialogue.

The Scientific Inquiry segment enhances inquiry skills from both multicultural and multi-professional
viewpoints. The main emphasis of the scientific inquiry portion is to allow the students to become critical
consumers of the scientific literature needed to guide evidence-based clinical practice and perhaps set
some on the way to producing such scientific literature for themselves. The Critical Thinking segment
combines instruction in clinical critical thinking through the principles of active reasoning, active
teaching-learning, active questioning and self assessment. The areas of logic, problem solving,



                                                    54
hypothesis generation, domains of learning, professional abilities are highlighted. Socratic questioning is
the chief method of student dialogue. The purpose of this section of this course is to enhance critical
thinking skills from both multicultural and multi professional viewpoints.

HSC 5100C - Applied Human Anatomy                                                         Hours: 4
Applied Human Anatomy consists of three (3) one-hour lectures and three (3) hours of lab per week.
Laboratory sessions primarily involve the study of bones and models. Lectures are designed to
concentrate on the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems, integrating functional and
clinical correlations. In addition, pertinent information on microscopic and developmental anatomy will
be presented. Students will work in assigned lab groups to improve interpersonal, oral and nonverbal
skills.

HSC 5122C - Biomechanics                                                                  Hours: 4
Biomechanics consists of three (3) one-hour lectures and two (2) two-hour labs per week. The course is
subdivided into three topic areas. The first area is general biomechanics during which students will
receive basic information on force, loading, stress, strain, energy, work, elasticity, and basic mechanics as
it applies to biological systems. The second area deals with joint mechanics of the upper extremity, lower
extremity and vertebral column and gait. The third topic area concentrates on tissue mechanics. In this
section, students receive information on the mechanics of bone, cartilage, tendons/ligaments, nerves and
muscle and how these tissues respond to loading and aging. The lab consists of cadaver dissection of the
extremity, back, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, head and neck as well as the viewing of radiographs and MRIs.

HSC 5151C - Clinical Neuroscience                                                         Hours: 5
Clinical neuroscience is a five-credit lecture and lab course in which students receive the neuroanatomical
and neurophysiological foundations for understanding normal function, dysfunction and clinical
interventions. There is an emphasis on the neuroscience related to posture, movement, cognition and
sensory functions. Cadavers and models are used to enhance the students’ three dimensional
understanding of the material. The neuropathology component of the course uses a case study format to
strengthen the students’ knowledge of the etiology and clinical features of the neurological conditions that
they are most likely to treat in clinical practice.

HSC 5142 – Child Development                                                              Hours: 3
The course will include the following: normal development across domains, developmental theories,
reflexes and the role of reflexes in movement development, an overview of abnormal development and its
clinical outcomes, and public laws that affect pediatric practice (schools and early intervention).
Assessment and intervention strategies for pediatrics are introduced. The course will cover medical
conditions specific to the pediatric population and therapy intervention.

HSC 5213C – Skills and Procedures                                                         Hours: 4
This course will introduce the student to basic clinic skills and problem-solving abilities to be built upon
in future course work. It is an introductory course in basic assessment techniques and general patient care
skills such as: principles of body mechanics, positioning, draping, transfer training, gait training,
wheelchair usage, postural assessment, joint range of motion, and goniometric measurements. Students
will also develop communication skills for use with patients, families and other healthcare professionals.




                                                     55
HSC 5351 - Pharmacology                                                                   Hours: 2
This course provides Occupational and Physical Therapy students with the general concepts of
pharmacology as applicable to clinical practice. It describes classes of drugs commonly used by patients
treated by therapists. These descriptions include: a) clinical uses, b) therapeutics effects and mechanisms,
c) side effects, and contraindications. The effects of exercise, aging and other factors on
pharmacodynamics are also included when relevant to clinical practice.

HSC 5416 - General Pathology                                                              Hours: 3
This course is designed to provide the student with basic understanding of the cause of failure of normal
physiological process in the body – the disease process. Emphasis will be on morphologic changes in
cells and tissues that may have resulted in specific diseases identify causes of such changes (etiology), the
mechanism of development of such changes (pathogenesis) and the clinical manifestation of diseases. In
addition, the course will address the issue of how the failure of one organ system may affect the function
of others.

HSC 5610 – Administration and Management in OT and PT                                     Hours: 2
The emphasis of this course is the application of administrative principles to the professions of
occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT). The primary topics of the course are: organizational
and legal structures, supervision and management, quality assurance, fiscal management, human
resources, and marketing. Guidelines for specific practice settings (e.g., skilled nursing facilities, home
health, and outpatient) are also explored. Case scenarios are emphasized and higher level learning is
required.

HSC 5700 – Wellness and Prevention                                                        Hours: 3
This course will present the concept of Wellness as a foundation to rehabilitation services and
interventions. It will allow the students to investigate their own personal wellness and to internalize the
information, to become role models of Wellness in the health care profession. Additionally, the concepts
of Wellness will be applied to the practice of rehabilitation, making relevant the content to the student’s
roles as future professionals. The course will include a health risk appraisal, fitness testing, nutrition
analysis, emotional/mental assessments, self-reflections, identification of barriers to change, goal setting
and problem-solving for applications to real-life clinic/home situations the rehabilitation specialist may
encounter. Further, course will incorporate area professionals for the presentation and integration of
Complementary/Alternative forms of medicine.

HSC 5741C - Applied Medical Physiology                                                    Hours: 4
This course is designed to provide an organ system based overview of human physiology. The course will
emphasize the mechanism of function of the organ systems their feedback controls that help to achieve
and maintain internal bodily homeostasis. While basic concepts will be emphasized, opportunities will be
provided to extrapolate from this foundation to areas of interest and application to the occupational and
physical therapy students. The laboratory component is designed to reinforce physiology lecture topics
through practical application.

HSC 5800 – Gerontology                                                                    Hours: 3
This course allows the student to synthesize the knowledge, skills, and values that are essential to the care
of the elderly person. The interactions of physical, physiological, cognitive, and psychosocial variables
are examined. Use of occupational and/or physical therapy to promote, maintain, and restore health in this
population is emphasized. This course is 3 contact hours per week plus community service.




                                                     56
HSC 6100E – Electrotherapy: Principles and Clinical Applications                          Hours: 2
            For Orthopaedics
This course will provide the clinician with a conceptual understanding of the physiological basis and
rationale for modern techniques in utilization of electrotherapy for improved function and pain
modulation. Selection of appropriate electrotherapy equipment, wave form characteristics, and the latest
treatment techniques used for muscle and nerve stimulation are presented. This course is delivered online
and utilizes the interactive video demonstrations, interactive discussions and recent literature to support
use of electrotherapeutic modalities in your practice.

HSC 6300E – Advancing Hand Therapy                                                        Hours: 2
This course focuses on conditions that you would most typically treat in an outpatient orthopaedic hand
clinic setting. I will be presenting these conditions with a variety of media that will complement the
contextual and facilitate your learning. The purpose of this course is to present the information in a way
that will augment your application of clinical reasoning skills when treating the upper extremity
orthopaedic patient. My goals with this course are first, to add to your existing knowledge base in the area
of upper extremity orthopaedic rehabilitation following trauma, disease process and postsurgical
intervention. Secondly, to enable you to apply this additional evidence based material to challenge you
into creating new clinical reasoning skills that will optimize your effectiveness with patient treatment. If
you have no experience with treating upper extremity orthopaedic patients, or you do not currently work
with this type of patient, or you have limited experience; then this course will be challenging for you. You
will be doing more reading and research than you thought you would. This is a time intensive course and
you should be prepared to devote a minimum of 2 hours a day to asynchronous online discussions and
preparation of assignments. It is my intention, by end of the course; you will feel that you have acquired
skills that will make you a better clinician in more than one area. You will get as much out of this course
as you put into it. Are you up for the challenge?

HSC 6320E – School Based Practice                                                         Hours: 2
This course examines legal and professional aspects of school-based practice for the physical and
occupational therapist. Participants will review the history of school-based practice including the
evolution of related legal requirements and implications to practice. Respective occupational and physical
therapy professional guidelines for the school-based therapist including data collection, documentation
and evidence-based practice will be explored. Use of assessment tools, examination of the individual.
Educational Program (IEP) process, discussion of service intervention models and exploration of the
differences between the school verses medical model of practice are discussed, with an emphasis of the
importance in collaboration throughout the process. Bulletin Board (BB) interaction is used to post
assignments, address unit topics, facilitate interactions between students and instructor, promote learning
between participants and respond to other student’s comments. Assignments follow each course unit that
requires participants to generalize and utilize information presented and use individual reasoning and
acquired knowledge to answer assignments, including case scenarios, in individual units.

HSC 6360E – Spinal Instability                                                            Hours: 2
This is a two (2) credit hour online course presenting concepts of whole spine stabilization Topics
covered include: clinical findings indicating the presence of instability; stabilization instructions for
patient education and utilization of stabilization through the process of rehabilitation. Special attention is
given to clinical decision-making regarding the selection of manipulation and exercises on patients with
instability.




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HSC 6400E – Differential Diagnosis for the Therapist                                      Hours: 2
This course is designed to provide physical therapists with the background necessary to screen patients
for the presence of disease. This information, combined with the therapist's knowledge and skills for
management of neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction, will provide you with a comprehensive examination
scheme. The information provided in the course should facilitate professional communication between the
physical therapist and other health care professionals, as well as communication between the physical
therapist and patient.

IDS 5802- Independent Study                                                       Hours: Variable
This course allows for in-depth study in the student’s area of interest or in an identified weakness. It is
available only by permission of the Program Director. The student and a faculty member assigned by the
Program Director will identify specific objectives. The student must complete all objectives by the end of
the trimester.

OCT 5005 – Clinical Reasoning                                                             Hour: 1
The student is challenged to apply principles of clinical reasoning to occupational therapy practice.
Clinical vignettes and situations from previous fieldwork settings will be used to provide insight into the
evolution of clinical reasoning skills.

OCT 5011 – Evidence-Based Practice                                                        Hours: 2
Students will critique both qualitative and quantitative occupational therapy research designs and develop
a proposal using the research skills that they learned in their first research class. Students will develop an
evidence-based project summarizing the literature on an assigned topic and design a study to test a
hypothesis or answer a research question based on available evidence.

OCT 5031 – Evidence Based Research I                                                      Hour: 1
Faculty/student research team(s) using evidence collected from previous courses, will refine a research
proposal, obtain IRB approval, and implement data collection for their research study. Discussions will
focus on sampling and data collection methods that promote internal and external validity.

OCT 5041 – Evidence Based Research II                                                     Hour: 1
Students will analyze the results of the research study and disseminate these results in a professional
manner. Class discussions include using and interpreting statistics, the development of effective
presentation skills, posters, and the process of submitting for publication, grants, and professional
conferences.

OCT 5100 – Professional Forum                                                             Hours: 2
This course provides the students with the opportunity to investigate ethical, political and social forces
that shape our national health care delivery system and the practice of occupational therapy. The
influence of personal beliefs and values and cultural orientation concerning ethical issues is examined.
Strategies for examining and responding to ethical dilemmas are explored. Professional responsibilities,
including continuing competence, licensure/scope of practice, supervision of therapy assistants and
supporting professional associations are discussed. This course uses class discussions and a debate
format as the primary teaching methods to examine controversial issues.

OCT 5125C – Biomechanical Interventions                                                   Hours: 4
This course presents the theory and rationale of competency-based occupational therapy and evidence-
based interventions for clients with orthopedic deficits. Students will apply biomechanical frames of
reference, evaluation and treatment to the specific problems limiting a client’s independence in basic or
instrumental activities of daily living. These performance limitations may include ROM, strength, pain,
sensory loss, endurance, work conditioning, posture, ergonomics and other physical disabilities.


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OCT 5216C - Physical Modalities for Occupational Therapy                                  Hours: 2
This course is designed to prepare the student in the theory and clinical application of physical modalities.
The physical principles and biophysical effects of cryotherapy, heat, ultrasound, electrical currents, water
and debridement are presented as they relate to treatment for indicated pathological conditions. Emphases
upon the principles of differential diagnosis are to be used in the selection/recommendation and
application of appropriate physical agents.

OCT 5300 – Evaluation and Assessment                                                      Hours: 4
With the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework as a foundation, the students will learn how to
administer and interpret commonly used evaluations and assessments for identified disabilities and
conditions. Based upon evaluation and assessment results the students will plan appropriate treatment
interventions using a case study problem solving approach. Emphasis is given to the development of
therapeutic skills necessary to identify, analyze, design, grade and adapt occupational forms that are
meaningful to clients with varying disabilities that facilitate participation in age appropriate occupations.

OCT 5406C – Psychosocial Interventions                                                    Hours: 4
This course presents the theory and rationale of competency-based OT interventions for psychosocial
dysfunctions across the lifespan (although greater focus is placed upon teenage through senescence
populations.) Students will apply the mental health frames of reference to specific dysfunctional,
occupational issues including but not limited to decreased process skills, poor social integration, failure to
manage emotional and behavioral problems, failure to adapt to environmental situations, poor role and
habit formation, etc. Client-centered interventions, group process, cultural sensitivity, and evidence-based
practice lay the foundations for learning. This course also discusses the role of the OTA in Mental Health.

OCT 5610C – Neurorehabilitation Interventions                                             Hours: 4
This course presents the theory and rationale of competency-based occupational therapy and evidence-
based interventions for clients with neurological deficits. Students will apply neurorehabilitation frames
of reference, evaluation and treatment to the specific problems limiting a clients independence in basic or
instrumental activities of daily living. These limitations may include, tone, balance, strength, motor
planning, sensory loss, dysphagia, cognitive/perceptual deficits, or psych-social/behavioral problems.

OCT 5620C –Pediatric Interventions                                                        Hours: 4
This course presents the theory and rationale of competency-based OT and evidence-based intervention
for physical, developmental, sensory integrative, perceptual/cognitive, and psychosocial dysfunctions as it
applies to pediatrics. Students will apply pediatric frames of reference to specific problems, including
gross, fine and oral-motor skills; behavioral and social issues, handwriting, sensory integrative, visual,
cognitive, and psycho-social problems within the framework of the multicultural family. This course also
discusses the role of the OTA in pediatrics.

OCT 5630C - Assistive Technology and Community Service                                    Hours: 4
This course introduces the student to a variety of assistive technology (AT) devices and resources that
promote independence after disability. Mobility, communication, environment, and activities of daily
living devices are covered. Students participate in numerous community outings that mirror the service
learning model. Students are required to complete an environmental assessment on a patient in the
community and construct an assistive technology device. Funding issues are discussed.

OCT 5701C - Orthotics and Prosthetics                                                     Hours: 3
This course covers the principles of orthotic and upper extremity prosthetics. The skills necessary for the
fabrication and use of splints, slings, and other orthotic devices are emphasized.




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OCT 5801 – Foundations of Occupational Therapy – Fieldwork
          Introduction                                                                    Hours: 3
Students examine the historical foundation and philosophical base of occupational therapy. The roles of
various health care professionals and different service delivery models are discussed in relation to
management of selected case studies. Students are introduced to the occupation paradigm and the major
conceptual models currently used in occupational therapy practice. The use of occupations, purposeful
activity and activity analysis are introduced in relation to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework
and the importance of respecting cultural diversity is emphasized. This course is the first to introduce the
student to the various types of occupational therapy practice settings via site visits. Fieldwork
experiences provide an orientation to occupational therapy and other health care professions through
shadowing experiences emphasizing professional behavior and communication skills.

OCT 5802 – Fieldwork IA                                                                    Hour: 1
This course is the first of two fieldwork courses which emphasizes clinical observation skills,
documentation and community service. Students attend lectures on the importance of accurate and
timely documentation and different documentation methods with an emphasis on SOAP note format.
Students are placed in different OT settings depending on the student’s background and interests.
Students will develop mentoring relationships with OT professionals, observe the entire OT process
at each facility and document a selected individual’s therapy session.

OCT 5803 – Fieldwork IB                                                                   Hour: 1
This is the second of two fieldwork courses which emphasizes clinical observation skills, documentation
and community service. In order to build upon the knowledge gained in Fieldwork IA, students attend
additional lectures on documentation and discuss previous term observation experiences. Students will be
placed in various OT settings depending on the student’s background, interests; Fieldwork IA assigned
settings, and Fieldwork II placements. During community service, students will work with a variety of
professionals to introduce others to the potential roles/benefits of occupational therapy. Students will
document OT services for a selected individual at each facility.

OCT 5811 – Fieldwork IC – Mock Clinic                                                     Hours: 2
This course prepares the student for their Fieldwork II experiences. It integrates occupational therapy
theory and practice with clients in both traditional and non-traditional settings using information gained
from all coursework. Using a “Mock Clinic,” the student will practice history taking and objective
assessments with the client. From the information gathered in the subjective and objective evaluation, the
student will develop problem lists, long term and short term goals, and implement a treatment plan with
appropriate documentation for the setting.

OCT 5810 - Exit Exam                                                                      Hour: 1
This consists of written and practical evaluations to demonstrate competence in all clinical skills.

OCT 5813 - Fieldwork IIA                                                                Hours: 12
Fieldwork IIA is a full-time, off-campus fieldwork experience with emphasis on the evaluation and
treatment of patients/clients in an occupational therapy setting. Students will be supervised by registered
occupational therapists in a clinical setting based on having a contract with the occupational therapy
program, students’ preparation and request. Students will be provided the opportunity to apply the theory
and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. The fieldwork will last twelve
(12) weeks, as it is the first stage in the cumulative process of obtaining competency in clinical skills.

OCT 5824 - Fieldwork IIB                                                                Hours: 12
This is the second full-time clinical experience in which the student will be provided the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This fieldwork


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will last twelve (12) weeks, and is considered a last stage in the cumulative process of obtaining
competency in clinical skills. Placement will be in a different type of setting from Fieldwork IIA. The
objectives are the same for both Fieldwork II experiences.

OCT 6495E – The Science of Occupation                                                    Hours: 4
This course is designed to orient the new student to the Transitional Doctor of Occupational Therapy
Program (t-OTD) and provide an overview of the doctoral studies required at USA all of which are
foundationally based upon the concept of “occupation”. The student will learn to analyze the theoretical
tenets and terminology used in the science of occupational therapy which will prepare the student for
future coursework and success in the t-OTD program. The content in this course will assist the t-OTD
student in analyzing frames of reference that focus on the science of occupation. As the student becomes
familiar with the various ways the profession frames its models and theories the course will further
analyze the concept of occupation both from within and from outside the profession of occupational
therapy. The course provides a basis for analysis of occupation from a scientific perspective and assists
the student in grounding occupation

OCT 6497E – Capstone Project                                                             Hours: 4
This course is an integration of the knowledge and skills appropriate to a student’s specialty area. By
applying theory and practice, students have the opportunity to explore an approach to the delivery of
occupational therapy services. Under advisement of a faculty member, the student will complete a
community service project or a clinical research project. The project will involve designing the
methodology, implementing the project, and collecting the data to measure the project’s effectiveness.
The results will be shared through a publishable article or oral presentation.

OCT 6498 – Clinical Integration Internship Experience                    Hours: Up to 8 credits
This internship is designed to integrate the coursework taken during the OTD program with clinical
experience. By applying theory and practice, students have the opportunity to observe, perform
evaluations and interventions with a client/patient population. Students will demonstrate clinical
reasoning through journaling and documenting their experiences. Under advisement of a faculty advisor,
the student will write and present a case report.

OPA 5110 – OPA Professional Issues I                                                     Hours: 2
This course begins with history of American Society of Orthopedic Physician Assistants and their role in
the health care delivery system. Other topics include HIV/Aids, Medical Errors, Infection Control, and
HIPAA regulations. Professional behaviors, communication skills, interpersonal skills and Patient Care
Models will be presented with emphasis on clinical application. Students will practice taking subjective
patient and family histories, conducting medical record reviews, writing treatment, progress and discharge
notes and a Functional Outcome approach to documentation. In the later half of the course, students will
complete several one-day observations of orthopaedic practice.

OPA 5120 – OPA Professional Issues II                                                    Hours: 2
This course discusses ethical and medico-legal related issues associated with clinical practice. Topics
include ethics and ethical principles, cultural diversity, abuse, and some psychological concepts related to
handling difficult patients and chronic conditions. In addition, risk management, safety, and quality
assurance, functional assessment tools, reimbursement and Medicare are covered. Students will practice
the use of electronic documentation.

OPA 5125C – OPA Lab Procedures                                                           Hours: 2
This lab/lecture course covers the indications, contraindications, preparations, applications and removal of
extremity and trunk casting, bracing, splinting, wrapping, and taping. Lower and upper extremity
amputations and prosthetics are also covered, including types of prosthetics, fitting, patient care,


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utilization, and analysis. In addition, extremity and spinal traction are covered as well as the care of
wounds and post-operative surgical sites through the use of sterile technique, suturing, dressings,
debridement, and patient/family education. Safety is emphasized throughout this course.

OPA 5132C – OPA Orthopaedics I                                                           Hours: 5
This lecture and lab course is a presentation of the foundations of medical orthopaedics. It includes tissue
reactivity, surgical and non-surgical musculoskeletal disorders common through out the life span of the
joints of the upper and lower extremity and spine. These disorders include those resulting from trauma,
joint and soft tissue conditions, infection, neoplasms and neuromuscular, metabolic, vascular and
systemic diseases. Aspects of basic imaging related to these areas are also included. Students learn to do
a through orthopaedic examination and clinical management approaches for different dysfunctions will be
discussed and practiced through a mock clinic format. Patient/family education and safety are
emphasized

OPA 5134C – OPA Orthopaedics II                                                          Hours: 4
This course covers invasive and non-invasive treatment skills associated with musculoskeletal
dysfunctions arising from neurological, orthopaedic or disease conditions. Some areas covered include
treatment for soft tissue and peripheral nerve injuries, spinal disorders, reflex sympathetic dystrophy,
dislocation, fractures, joint – ligament – tendon reconstruction, arthritis, and hyper/hypo mobility.
Students learn to perform foley catherization, phlebotomy/IV insertion, aspirations and injections.
Specific general interventions and exercise methods utilized by occupational and physical therapists are
discussed, as is patient /family education. Safety and appropriate documentation is emphasized
throughout this course.

OPA 5151C – Clinical Neuroscience                                                        Hours: 2
Clinical neuroscience is a lecture and lab course in which students receive an overview of the
neuroanatomical and neurophysiological foundations for understanding normal function, dysfunction and
clinical interventions. The etiology, signs and symptoms, and medical intervention of the more common
neurologic pathologies will also be included.

OPA 5200 – OPA Surgery                                                                   Hours: 4
This course covers indications, contraindications, safety, instrumentation and equipment, and sterile
techniques associated with surgery. In addition, the knowledge and physical skills needed to assist with
orthopaedic surgical procedures as well as pre-operative preparation and pre- and post- operative care and
patient management are covered. The surgical procedures covered involve the upper and lower
extremities and spine and include reduction procedures on bone and joints; reconstruction surgery on
joints and ligaments; repairs of muscles, tendons, and ligaments; transfers of tendons and nerves;
amputations and the removal of foreign bodies; and arthroscopic procedures. Students also learn proper
positioning of the patient for surgery, how to monitor anesthesia and how to close and care for traumatic
wounds and surgical incisions. Student are instructed about potential medical errors that can occur with
surgery and how best to avoid these. Observation of video and live surgeries, along with lab simulations
will augment this course.

OPA 5351 – OPA Orthopaedic Pharmacology                                                  Hours: 3
This course provides a clinical perspective of the general concepts of pharmocokinetics and
pharmacodynamics related to the practice of Orthopaedic medicine. It describes classes and specific drugs
for pain and inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, skeletal muscle, infections, as well as
central nervous system drugs, cholinergic and adrenergic drugs, cardiovascular drugs and endocrine
drugs. Some gastrointestinal and respiratory are also described. These descriptions include: a) clinical



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uses, b) therapeutics effects and mechanisms, c) side effects, and contraindications. The effects of
exercise, aging and other factors on pharmacodynamics are included when relevant to clinical practice.

OPA 5713C – OPA Cardiopulmonary                                                           Hours: 2
This course begins with an overview of the cardiopulmonary system, reviewing cardiopulmonary
anatomy and physiology. It addresses the scientific basis of cardiopulmonary dysfunction, pathologies
and basic pharmacology as related to the orthopaedic patient. Furthermore, acute settings such as ICU,
ER, CCU will be discussed with emphasis on screening, evaluating, pre-operative planning, and treating
patients.

OPA 5809 – OPA Exit Exam                                                                  Hours: 1
At the end of the final clinical rotations, each student takes a comprehensive written, oral and practical
examination in order to determine mastery of the program curriculum and prepare for the OPA
certification examination. The oral/practical exam is based on a single clinical case that can reflect one or
more of the areas experienced during clinical rotations. The written examination is a multiple choice
comprehensive exam covering content of the entire curriculum. The student must pass all parts of the
examination to graduate.

OPA 5810 - OPA Clinical Rotation 1: Lower Extremity Orthopaedics                          Hours: 4
During the second year of study, full-time clinical rotations provide the student with the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This 4-week
rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients with lower extremity orthopaedic conditions.
Student clinical performance will be determined using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. In addition,
students will need to pass a proctored written exam at the end of the rotation that will test their knowledge
relative to that rotation. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of rotations will
vary among individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5812 - OPA Clinical Rotation 2: Upper Extremity Orthopaedics                          Hours: 4
During the second year of study, full-time clinical rotations provide the student with the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This 4-week
rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients with upper extremity orthopaedic conditions.
Student clinical performance will be determined using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. In addition,
students will need to pass a proctored written exam at the end of the rotation that will test their knowledge
relative to that rotation. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of rotations will
vary among individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5814 – OPA Clinical Rotation 3: Spine Orthopaedics/Neurology                          Hours: 4
During the second year of study, full-time clinical rotations provide the student with the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This 4-week
rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients with spine orthopaedic and neurologic
conditions. Student clinical performance will be determined using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. In
addition, students will need to pass a proctored written exam at the end of the rotation that will test their
knowledge relative to that rotation. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of
rotations will vary among individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5816 – OPA Clinical Rotation: 4: Sports Medicine                                      Hours: 4
During the second year of study, full-time clinical rotations provide the student with the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This 4-week
rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients with sports medicine conditions. Student
clinical performance will be determined using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. In addition, students will


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need to pass a proctored written exam at the end of the rotation that will test their knowledge relative to
that rotation. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of rotations will vary among
individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5818 – OPA Clinical Rotation 5: Orthopaedic Trauma                                    Hours: 4
During the second year of study, full-time clinical rotations provide the student with the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This 4-week
rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients with traumatic injuries. Student clinical
performance will be determined using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. In addition, students will need to
pass a proctored written exam at the end of the rotation that will test their knowledge relative to that
rotation. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of rotations will vary among
individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5820 – OPA Clinical Rotation 6: Pediatric Orthopaedics                                Hours: 4
During the second year of study, full-time clinical rotations provide the student with the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This 4-week
rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients with pediatric orthopaedic conditions. Student
clinical performance will be determined using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. In addition, students will
need to pass a proctored written exam at the end of the rotation that will test their knowledge relative to
that rotation. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of rotations will vary among
individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5822 – OPA Clinical Rotation 7: Oncology                                              Hours: 4
During the second year of study, full-time clinical rotations provide the student with the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This 4-week
rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients with orthopaedic oncology conditions. Student
clinical performance will be determined using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. In addition, students will
need to pass a proctored written exam at the end of the rotation that will test their knowledge relative to
that rotation. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of rotations will vary among
individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5824 – OPA Clinical Rotation 8: Hand                                                  Hours: 4
During the second year of study, full-time clinical rotations provide the student with the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This 4-week
rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients with hand injuries and conditions. Student
clinical performance will be determined using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. In addition, students will
need to pass a proctored written exam at the end of the rotation that will test their knowledge relative to
that rotation. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of rotations will vary among
individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5828 – OPA Clinical Rotation 9: Orthopaedic Rehabilitation                            Hours: 4
During the second year of study, full-time clinical rotations provide the student with the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This 4-week
rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients in an orthopaedic rehabilitation setting.
Student clinical performance will be determined using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. In addition,
students will need to pass a proctored written exam at the end of the rotation that will test their knowledge
relative to that rotation. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of rotations will
vary among individual students and will be based mainly on availability.




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OPA 5830 – OPA Clinical Rotation 10: Elective Content                                    Hours: 4
Students will have an opportunity to select the focus of a full-time clinical rotation. This topic may be in
an area not covered in the required rotations or may be an additional four-week in one of the previously
attended rotations. This rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients in the designated
elective area of orthopaedic examination and treatment. Student clinical performance will be determined
using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of
rotations will vary among individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5831 – OPA Clinical Rotation 11: Elective Content                                    Hours: 4
Students will have an opportunity to select the focus of a full-time clinical rotation. This topic may be in
an area not covered in the required rotations or may be an additional four-week in one of the previously
attended rotations. This rotation will focus on the examination and care of patients in the designated
elective area of orthopaedic examination and treatment. Student clinical performance will be determined
using the OPA clinical evaluation tool. As each rotation is independent of the others, the sequencing of
rotations will vary among individual students and will be based mainly on availability.

OPA 5906 – Research II                                                                   Hours: 2
This course is a continuation of the process of scientific inquiry begun in Trimester 1. Concentration is
given to developing a relevant research inquiry and clinical outcome studies. Students have an
opportunity to review relevant articles to examine the use of evidence in clinical decision-making. The
parts and process for presenting a patient case report is presented.

OPA 5907 – Research III                                                                  Hours: 1
This course applies information covered on case reports in Research II. Students are expected to gather
necessary information during the Clinical Rotations to present a clear and professional case report
following the guidelines given in Research II. Students are expected to integrate related scholarly
literature with patient management, knowledge/skills gained in the classroom as it applies to one selected
patient examined and treated on a clinical rotation.

OPA 6403E – OPA Imaging                                                                  Hours: 3
This course provides skills in the ordering and clinical application of diagnostic imaging tests for
commonly occurring skeletal and soft tissue dysfunctions of the spine, pelvis and extremities. The basics
of MRI, CT, ultrasonography, nuclear Imaging, and special diagnostic imaging procedures such as
fluoroscopy, venography, and 3-D reconstruction are covered. Special emphasis is placed on the
communication of diagnostic findings to the supervising orthopaedist and the orthopaedic patient
population.

PHT 5006C – Massage and Soft Tissue Palpation                                            Hour: 1
Course material emphasizes the development of skills necessary to perform massage to the spine and
extremities.    Physiological and psychological effects of massage are discussed.          Indications,
contraindications and medicolegal aspects of massage are also discussed. Students are instructed in the
theoretical basis for use of massage. Relevent research is discussed as well.

PHT 5103 - Critical Thinking II                                                          Hour: 1
This course combines instruction in clinical problem solving and critical thinking through the skills of:
problem synthesis, metacognition clinical reasoning, and decision making. Patient cases are utilized to
develop these skills. These skills are especially needed for the autonomous practitioner who practices in
states with direct access to Physical Therapy. The material in this course builds on the critical thinking
course from first semester




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PHT 5132C - Musculoskeletal I: Orthopaedics                                            Hours: 4
This course will be a presentation of the foundations of medical and physical therapy orthopaedics,
including surgical and non-surgical conditions. This course will emphasize the dysfunction philosophy as
related primarily to extremity conditions and some spinal conditions. Examination and intervention
methods will be introduced in lab session. Intervention approaches for different dysfunctions will be
discussed. This course will be designed to follow the topics discussed in the Biomechanics class and
complement the Therapeutic Exercise course. The material will be integrated and applied in Mock Clinic
the third semester. Examination, evaluation and intervention of the extremities and spine will be further
covered in the fifth semester.

PHT 5133C – Musculoskeletal II: Mock Clinic                                            Hours: 3
This course will integrate the theory and practice of examination of physical therapy patients with a
musculoskeletal diagnosis. Through the use of a "Mock Clinic", the student will learn and practice history
taking during patient interview, as well as practice tests and measurements through the 18 steps of a
musculoskeletal examination. This course will build upon examination techniques learned in Skills &
Procedures, Therapeutic Exercise I and Musculoskeletal I, as well as applying the information instructed
in Anatomy, Biomechanics, Pathology, Massage, and Physical Modalities. From the information gathered
in the interview and physical examination, the student will exercise diagnostic skills, practice prognostic
and intervention prescribing skills, and document impairment lists, long-term and short-term goals, and
intervention plans.

PHT 5134C - Musculoskeletal III: Advanced Extremity Examination,                       Hours: 3
            Evaluation and Treatment
Course emphasizes the interpretation of basic science knowledge and integration with basic clinical skills
needed to complete a differential evaluation of extremity dysfunction and proceed to treatment.
Knowledge and principles of functional anatomy, biomechanics, and pathology are presented as an
integrated concept related to clinical cases. The clinical content of the course includes differential
examination, with special emphasis on palpatory techniques such as end-feel, and joint mobility testing
and treatment. Critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized with specific clinical cases.

PHT 5135C - Musculoskeletal IV: Advanced Spinal Examination,                           Hours: 3
            Evaluation and Treatment
Course material emphasizes the development of clinical knowledge and skill necessary to complete a
differential spine examination and to plan and carry out effective interventions for spinal impairments.
General principles of spinal functional anatomy, tissue and spinal joint biomechanics and pathology are
presented as well. Spine examination procedures covered in this course include structural assessment,
active range of motion, palpation for position, condition and mobility (PIVM), neurovascular screening,
and history taking and interpretation. This course will focus on the principles and techniques necessary to
perform a competent physical therapy examination and intervention program for all spinal regions (except
upper cervical spine) including thrust and non-thrust manipulations. When you return from your 6th
trimester full-time clinical internships, the 7th trimester curriculum will continue to review and include
more advanced physical therapy manipulation (thrust and non-thrust) technique options

PHT 5140 – Pediatric Physical Therapy                                                   Hour: 2
The normal development of gross motor skills will be reviewed and contrasted with abnormal
development that occurs in the presence of various conditions and pathologies. The etiology and clinical
features of common pediatric disorders not previously covered will be discussed. Basic methods of
evaluation, assessment, clinical decision making, goal setting, and treatment in a variety of settings will
be discussed. This course will include videotape patient analysis and laboratory experiences.




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PHT 5143C - Neuromuscular I: Concepts and Evaluation                                     Hours: 3
This course will examine the theoretical basis for evaluation and treatment of neurologic disorders.
Historical perspectives will be explored with emphasis on current theories of motor control, motor
learning, and skill acquisition. Neurologic evaluation techniques will be taught and practiced as well as
specific assessment techniques for balance, mobility, and gait.

PHT 5145C - Neuromuscular II: Therapeutic Approaches                                     Hours: 3
This course expands on previous knowledge learned in the Neuromuscular I course taught in trimester 3.
Emphasis of this course is on learning treatment techniques for the resulting impairments and disabilities
of the patient with neurologic injury. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary models of motor control,
task analysis, and skill acquisition. Within this framework, specific treatment approaches including
Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF), Neurodevelopmental Treatment (NDT), Motor
Relearning Program, and the Task Oriented approaches will be taught. Management of the patient with
spinal cord injury will also be a focus of this course.

PHT 5147C - Neuromuscular III: Advanced Evaluation and Interventions for the Adult
                                                                  Hours: 2
This course is an advanced assessment and treatment course for the adult neurologic client. This course is
designed to integrate neurologic principles learned in previous courses as well as instruction in advanced
assessment and treatment techniques for the neurologically impaired client. Emphasis will be on lab
experiences consisting of patient or video demonstration and task analysis, prioritizing patient problems,
developing treatment/plans of care (including goal setting, discharge planning and referrals), and practice
of techniques for varied neurologic clients of any age. Specific principles and applications of strength
training, constraint induced movement therapy, body weight supported treadmill training, mental
imagery, orthotics, wheelchair prescription and serial casting will be addressed. In addition, students will
discuss evidence based practice for the patient with a neurologic disorder and critically analyze selected
journal articles.

PHT 5225C - Physical Modalities/Integumentary                                            Hours: 4
This course is designed to prepare the student in the theory and clinical application of physical modalities.
The physical principles and biophysical effects of cryotherapy, heat, ultrasound, electrical currents, water
and debridement are presented as they relate to treatment for indicated pathological conditions. Emphasis
upon the principles of differential diagnosis are to used in the selection/recommendation and application
of appropriate physical agents. In addition, the care and treatment of wounds and burns is included.

PHT 5234C - General Therapeutic Exercise I                                                Hours: 4
This course is an introduction to therapeutic exercises and evaluation skills. The primary focus will be
musculoskeletal dysfunctions arising from neuro, orthopaedic or disease conditions. This course will be
an application of principles covered in Biomechanics and will “dove-tail” into concepts covered in
Orthopaedics.

PHT 5236C - Therapeutic Exercise II                                                       Hours: 3
This course is an continuation of Therapeutic Exercise I. Course content will dove-tail with and build
upon topics previously presented in Therapeutic Exercise I. Pre-requisites include TE I, MS I,
Biomechanics, or dual degree status and completion of all previous coursework. Potential topics to be
covered include Aquatic Physical Therapy, Eccentrics & Plyometrics, Functional Strengthening,
Functional Capacity Evaluations, Spine Stabilization, Patellar/Scapular Taping and Neuromobilization.




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PHT 5243 – Neuromuscular Examination, Evaluation and Intervention                         Hours: 2
This course is designed for the Dual degree student entering the physical therapy component of the
second degree program. This course builds on neurologic examination and treatment skills already
learned in the OT curriculum. The student will explore topics more specific to the physical therapy
profession and ready them for the Neuromuscular III course: Advanced Evaluation and Intervention.
Topic taught include treatment theories including Motor Relearning Program and the Task Oriented
Approach, and examination and treatment of the postural control system and gait. Students will also
perform a mock physical therapy evaluation and practice lab activities specific to concept from PHT
5143C and PHT 5145C not covered in the OT curriculum (i.e. NDT techniques for balance and gait and
PNF patterns and techniques for gait, the trunk and the lower extremities. This course will assist in
transitioning the Dual student from the OT curriculum to the PT curriculum and the role of the physical
therapist in neurologic rehabilitation.

PHT 5405 - Psychosocial and Ethical Aspects of Physical Therapy                           Hours: 3
Students in this course explore how psychosocial and ethical issues are related to and impact the practice
of physical therapy (PT). This course facilitates the students' use of tools to analyze and respond to ethical
dilemmas, and teaches students how to integrate psychological treatments into the practice of PT to
enhance patients' outcomes. Specific issues, including chemical dependency, domestic violence, chronic
conditions and grief, and pain are also addressed and applied to the practice of PT. Prerequisites:
Research I; or permission of the professor.

PHT 5702C - Prosthetics                                                                   Hour: 1
Course focuses on the rehabilitation management of lower extremity amputations and prosthetics. Basic
components include types of prosthetics, fitting, patient care, utilization, exercise programs, gait analysis
and training, as well as psychosocial components, preventive care issues and medical management
considerations.

PHT 5713C – Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Rehabilitation                                     Hours: 2
This course begins with an overview of the cardiopulmonary system, reviewing cardiopulmonary
anatomy and physiology. It addresses the scientific basis of cardiopulmonary dysfunction & pathologies,
following with the relevant clinical implications for treatment. Diagnostic testing, lines, tubes, surgical
procedures and assessment techniques are discussed as they influence Physical Therapy interventions.
Physical Therapy interventions such as exercise testing/prescription, postural drainage, percussion,
inspiratory training and rehabilitation team participation are presented. Furthermore, these inventions are
discussed across the continuum of care including acute (ICU, ER, CCU), rehabilitation, out-patient,
skilled nursing and home health settings with emphasis on screening, evaluating, and treating patients.

PHT 5801 – Practicum for Dual Option Students                                             Hours: 1
This course includes a study of the profession of physical therapy (PT) in the health care delivery system.
Students will examine historical foundations and their professional association. Students will receive an
introduction to the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice and its purpose and use in the practice of PT.
Students will review the Functional Outcome approach to documentation with an integration of SOAP
note format. This course is a component of the clinical education program and abides by all policies and
procedures for clinical internship experiences as outlined in the Clinical Education section of the
University Student Handbook.

PHT 5802 - Practicum I           Hours: 2
This course includes a study of the profession of physical therapy (PT) in the health care delivery system.
Students will examine historical foundations and their professional association. Professional behaviors,
communication skills and interpersonal skills will be presented with emphasis on clinical application.
Students will receive an introduction to the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice and its purpose and use in


                                                     68
the practice of PT. Students will learn the Functional Outcome approach to documentation with an
integration of SOAP note format. This course is a component of the clinical education program and
abides by all policies and procedures for clinical internship experiences as outlined in the Clinical
Education section of the University Student Handbook. In Practicum I, students are oriented to the
practice of PT across various practice settings through clinical education shadowing experiences. These
experiences will emphasize professional behavior, an awareness of PT practice in a variety of practice
settings and basic clinical skill competencies. Students will practice taking subjective patient histories,
conducting medical record reviews.

PHT 5805 - Practicum II                                                                     Hours: 2
This course is a combination of class lecture, lab, and applied clinical education experiences. Class
lecture expands instruction from PHT 5802 Practicum I in the area of PT documentation. The functional
outcome approach to documentation will be emphasized with integration of the SOAP note format,
functional outcomes documentation and the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice in completing various
types of interim notes across practice settings. Reimbursement issues across practice settings and the
impact on PT documentation standards will be presented.

Various clinical shadowing experiences will be offered to the student. Each student will participate in a
one-day, 4 week rotation in an outpatient clinic, acute care hospital, skilled nursing facility/transitional
care unit, or pediatric facility. These experiences will emphasize professional behavior and basic clinical
skill competencies. Students will practice taking patient histories, completing medical record reviews,
and performance of basic clinical skills and procedures. Students will also participate in 3-4, one-day
experiences in podiatry, prosthetics, aquatic therapy, and respiratory therapy. During this clinical
education shadowing experience, the student will be oriented to the roles and responsibilities of other
health care professionals with whom physical therapists frequently interact.

PHT 5809 - Exit Exam                                                                        Hour: 1
This course consists of written, oral and practical examinations to demonstrate competence in didactic
knowledge and clinical skills.

PHT 5813 - Internship I                                                                     Hours: 7
This course is divided into two parts and is the first of a three part series of clinical internships. The first
half of Internship I will consist of a seminar dealing with the course objectives 1-8. During the second
half of Internship I, students will be away from campus and assigned to a clinical facility for seven weeks.
The clinical setting will be either an acute care hospital or an acute care/outpatient mix facility. The
Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI) developed by the APTA is the current grading tool for physical
therapy students during their clinical internships.

PHT 5824 - Internship II                                                                    Hours: 8
This is the second full-time clinical experience in which the student will be provided the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. This internship
will last eight weeks and is considered a second stage in the cumulative process of obtaining competency
in clinical skills. The Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI) developed by the APTA is the current
grading tool for physical therapy students during their clinical internships.

PHT 5828 - Internship III                                                                   Hours: 8
This is the third and final full-time clinical experience in which the student will be provided the
opportunity to apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting.
This internship will last eight weeks and is considered a next stage in the cumulative process of obtaining
competency in clinical skills. The Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI) developed by the APTA is the
current grading tool for physical therapy students during their clinical internships.


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PHT 5830 – Elective Internship IV                                                        Hours: 1-8
This is an elective full-time clinical experience in which the student will be provided the opportunity to
apply the theory and skills acquired in the didactic course work within the clinical setting. Clinical
opportunities may include but are not limited to specialized settings such as women’s health, military or
dance. Traditional settings such as orthopedics, neurorehab, or acute care may also be available. This
internship consists of at least 40 hours per week and is considered the final stage in the cumulative
process of obtaining competency in clinical skills. Students interested in this elective clinical internship
must apply prior to their 6th trimester.

PHT 5906 – Research II: Proposal Development                                               Hours: 3
This course is designed to prepare the students as critical and effective consumers of research. The course
will expose students to a) the analysis of elements of the scientific process namely: processes involved in
the development of the introduction, literature review, methods, results, discussion and the abstract and b)
the application of the scientific process in various categories of scientific reports (the case reports, single
case study experimental design as well as traditional experimental methods). Specific guidelines will be
used to analyze and comment on identified scientific papers. The use of the scientific process in writing
case reports will be emphasized.

PHT 5907 – Research III: Patient Case Report                                               Hours: 1
This course applies information covered on case reports in Research II. Students are expected to gather
necessary information during either Internship II or III to write a clear and professional case report
following the guidelines given in Research II. Students are expected to integrate and critique related
scholarly literature with taught and actual patient management, knowledge/skills gained in the classroom
and on internships.

PHT 6202E – Advanced Evaluation and Manipulation of the Pelvis, Lumbar and Thoracic
Spine (S2)                                                          Hours: 2
Anatomy and biomechanics of the areas are discussed. Review and modification of techniques from S1,
along with the instruction of additional techniques are provided. An in-depth presentation on the
syndromes of the lumbar spine and their treatment is instructed. The utilization of biomechanical and
anatomical principles for the enhancement of patient care through manipulation and exercise is
emphasized, as is the patient’s role in his/her own welfare. Prerequisite for this course is successful
completion of PHT 5135C, Musculoskeletal IV.
PHT 6203E – Advanced Evaluation and Manipulation of the Cranio Facial, Cervical and
Upper Thoracic Spine (S3)                                          Hours: 2
Anatomy and biomechanics of the cranio-facial cervical and upper thoracic spine areas are discussed.
Several techniques from S1 are reviewed along with modifications and instructions of additional
techniques are provided. An in-depth presentation on the syndromes of the cervical spine, sub-cranial and
thoracic outlet is included. The student has the opportunity to explore the classification of headaches and
current treatment approaches. The utilization of biomechanical and anatomical principles for the
enhancement of patient care through manipulation and exercise is emphasized, as is the patient’s role in
his/her own welfare. Prerequisites are completion of PHT 6201, and the CPE Seminar “Advanced
Evaluation and Manipulation of the Cranio-Facial, Cervical and Upper Thoracic Spine (S3)” offered by
the University.

PHT 6204E – Functional Analysis and Management of the
Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex (S4)                                                              Hour: 1
This course emphasizes the application of basic sciences to clinical examination and treatment skills,
management policies, and supportive services for dysfunction of the pelvic region. Instruction in



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advanced technical and decision-making skills for the evaluation and treatment of pelvic dysfunction is
provided. Prerequisites are completion of PHT 6201 and the CPE Seminar “Functional Analysis and
Management of the Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex (S4)” offered by the University.

PHT 6211E – Extremity Evaluation (E2)                                                   Hours: 2
Based on the E-2 Extremity Integration Seminar, this online course for the DPT Program extends the
content of the seminar to the application and analysis level of learning of peripheral and spinal joint and
soft tissue integration for examination, evaluation and intervention. Clinical decision-making strategies
and tactics, based on principles of clinical management, are strengthened through the use of selected
readings for this course. Prerequisites are completion of HSC 6210 and the CPE Seminar “Extremity
Integration (E2)” offered by the University.

PHT 6220E – Myofascial Manipulation (MF1)                                               Hours: 2
This course deals with the evaluation and treatment techniques of myofascial manipulation. The
emphasis is placed on the relationship of the soft tissue structures to the mechanics of the spine.
Principles of functional anatomy, posture, soft tissue anatomy, both normal and pathological,
biomechanics of soft tissue, and treatment principles are presented. A prerequisite is completion of the
CPE seminar “Myofascial Manipulation (MF1)” offered by the University.

PHT 6331E – Evaluation and Treatment of the Craniomandibular System (TMJ) Hour: 2
This is an online course that explores the physical therapist’s role in the evaluation and treatment of the
craniomandibular system. Normal cranial and cervical postural functions contribute significantly to the
function of the temporomandibular articulations and to dental occlusal contacts. The emphasis of the
course is on the relationships of these various components of the craniomandibular system and their
related impairments. Prerequisites are PHT 6201 and HSC 6210.

PHT 6403E – Imaging for Physical and Occupational Therapists                            Hours: 2
This course provides a broad background reading plain film radiographs and in the radiographic
presentation of commonly occurring dysfunctions of the spine, temporomandibular joint, pelvis and
extremities. The basics of MRI, CT and ultrasound scanning will be covered. Special emphasis is placed
on the clinical application of diagnostic imaging findings to orthopaedic physical therapy.

PHT 6461E – Musculoskeletal Clinical Integration                                        Hours: 2
This course is an integration of the knowledge and skills appropriate to orthopaedic/manual physical
therapy practice. By applying theory and practice, students have the opportunity to perform and observe
examination, evaluation and intervention of various orthopaedic conditions in a clinical setting. Students
will participate in discussions with faculty supervisors and fellow students regarding findings,
impressions and management of orthopaedic cases seen in the student clinic, document their experiences
in chart and journal format and demonstrate appropriate clinical behavior/performance as outlined in the
Generic Abilities Criteria. Students will also demonstrate appropriate mastery of psychomotor
learning/skills based on completion of the Basic Competency Checklist. Under advisement of a faculty
member, the student will identify unique and significant problems in clinical treatment and develop one
written patient case report and present a case orally to peers. Students may be able to observe various
procedures, surgeries and consultations performed by physicians in the community.

PSY 6102E – Psychology of Health and Exercise                                           Hours: 2
This on-line course examines the psychological knowledge and skills necessary to develop and facilitate
optimal health and fitness. The course requires the student to demonstrate comprehension of the basic
psychological principles that impact health and exercise, apply the knowledge to case scenarios, and, to a
lesser extent, analyze specific topics and peer-reviewed articles. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DPT or OTD
program.


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PSY 6103E – Applied Performance Psychology                                               Hours: 3
This on-line course examines the psychological knowledge and skills necessary to develop and facilitate peak
performance in athletics, sport, and even business. The course requires the student to demonstrate
comprehension of basic sport psychology principles, apply the knowledge to case scenarios, and, to a lesser
extent, analyze specific topics and peer-reviewed articles.




                                   Students studying at the San Diego campus




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Post Professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy
Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy

POST PROFESSIONAL DOCTOR OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
(OTD)

Mission Statement
The mission of the Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) program is to graduate students with
advanced knowledge in practice excellence who have the leadership, and clinical skills necessary to
promote the profession of occupational therapy. High priority is placed on active inquiry, critical
thinking and reflective practice.

Program Objectives
Through completion of this program, students will:
   • Think logically, critically, creatively, and independently in a manner that will promote advanced
       practice of occupational therapy.
   • Develop leadership in an area of clinical practice that will promote the profession of OT and the
       patients who receive care.
   • Display depth of knowledge and advanced competence in at least one major area of clinical
       theory and practice.
   • Develop effective communication skills in the presentation of occupational therapy theories and
       concepts in order to advance professional goals.
   • Advance competence in the interpretation and application of professional literature promoting
       evidence based practice.
   • Develop a systematic approach to solving problems in patient care, either through clinical
       research, product or program development as part of the culminating Capstone Project.

Admission Requirements
Application to the OTD program is open to all occupational therapists who entered the profession with a
bachelor’s degree or master’s degree in occupational therapy from an accredited institution. It is expected
that all applicants are licensed or eligible for licensure in the United States. Applicants must be currently
employed as an occupational therapist or have a minimum of one year’s experience as an occupational
therapist. For more details on admission, see the Admissions to the University section of this Catalog.

Official transcripts from all previous institutions of higher learning must be submitted directly to the
University in accordance with the Application for Admission instructions.

International Students Applying for Admission
Foreign-trained candidates who do not require a student visa to participate in University courses and/or
degrees can be considered for admission. To enter the OTD program, the following criteria will apply:
    • Be a graduate of a program in a country that is a member of the World Federation of
        Occupational Therapists.
    • Submit transcripts and a credentialing evaluation from an agency recognized by the National
        Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) that provide evidence of training at a
        level equivalent to that of a bachelor’s degree in the United States.
    • A minimum score of 550 (paper-based testing), 210 (computer-based testing) or 83 (IBT –
        Internet based testing) is required on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language).




                                                     73
Notification of Status
The applicant will be notified by letter from the University of his/her admission status after all required
application materials have been reviewed by the Admissions Committee.

Academic Requirement
To remain in the OTD program, the student must:
       Maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA.
       Complete a minimum of one (1) course within three months (12 weeks) and a minimum of 5
       credits within a calendar year.

Program Overview
For candidates entering the program with a master’s degree from the University of St. Augustine (MOT),
they are required to complete a minimum of 30 credits. For candidates who hold a master’s degree* in
occupational therapy, a minimum of 35 credits will be required to earn the OTD degree. The student
should be able to complete this program in two to three years on a part-time basis.

For those who hold a bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy, a minimum of 60 credits will be required.
The student should be able to complete this program in three to four years on a part-time basis.

The OTD program includes several required courses depending on your highest previous degree. For the
student holding a masters degree these include: Science of Occupation (4 credits) and Capstone 1 and 2 (5
credits), Leadership and Policy in Health Care (3 credits), Evidence Based Research for the Health
Professional (3 credits), Health Administration (3 credits), Residency (1 credit) and 6 credits of practice
courses. For the student with a Bachelor’s degree there are two additional courses: Reflective Practice (4
credits) and Professional Communication (2 credits).

In addition to the required courses listed above, the remainder of OTD coursework is comprised of elective
courses and seminars. The University will also consider accepting graduate credits from other accredited
institutions. Please refer to the transfer credit policy in the catalog for further information on transfer credits.

*The master’s degree may be either the first professional degree or a post-professional degree.

Incomplete Coursework
If a student cannot complete the required work within the predetermined timeframe, he/she will receive a
grade of Incomplete (“I”). The student must then complete the work by the new assigned due date to
receive a letter grade. No further extension will be permitted. If the student does not complete the
requirements within the approved time, the “I” grade will automatically become an Incomplete/Fail
(“I/F”) on his/her transcript.




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DOCTOR OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY CURRICULA
Master’s Degree Applicant Coursework                                                                           Semester Hours
          BSC 6200         Evidence Based Research for the Health Professional                                          3
          HSA 6101         Health Administration                                                                        3
          HSA 6201         Organizational Leadership and Policy in Health Care                                          3
          OCT 6100         Capstone 1                                                                                   1
          OCT 6400         Residency                                                                                    1
          OCT 6495         The Science of Occupation                                                                    4
          OCT 6497         Capstone 2                                                                                   4
Electives (USA MOT graduate students select a total 11 credits of which six of the credits are required from the Advanced
Practice Courses; MOT graduate student select a total of 16 credits of which six of the credits are required from the Advanced
Practice Courses):
          Advanced Practice Courses
          BSC 6001         Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                                                         2
          BSC 6101         Application of Motor Control and Motor Learning to Neurologic Intervention                   2
          BSC 6102         Interventions for the Older Adult with a Neurological Impairment                             3
          BSC 6103         The Pediatric Client with a Neurological Impairment                                          3
          BSC 6301         Ergonomics                                                                                   2
          HSC 6100         Electrotherapy: Principles & Clinic Applications for Orthopaedics                            2
          HSC 6210         Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation                                                        2
          HSC 6300         Advancing Your Hand Therapy Skills                                                           2
          HSC 6320         School Based Practice                                                                        2
          HSC 6360         Spinal Instability                                                                           2
          HSC 6402         Pharmacology                                                                                 2
          HSC 6413         Orthopedic Imaging for the Upper Extremity                                                   2
          HSC 6460         Accounting and Finance for the Practice                                                      3
          HSC 6470         Legal and Regulatory Issues                                                                  3
          OCT 6498         Clinical Integration                                                                         1-8
          PHT 5703C        Cardiopulmonary                                                                              2
          PHT 6403         Imaging                                                                                      2
          PSY 6102         Psychology of Health and Exercise                                                            2
          PSY 6103         Applied Performance Psychology                                                               3
          Leadership/Academic Courses
          EDF 6101         Foundations of Teaching and Learning                                                         3
          Independent Study Courses
          IDS 6455         Directed Study                                                                               1-4
          IDS 6460         Directed Readings                                                                            1-4

Bachelor’s Degree Applicant Coursework
          BSC 6200           Evidence Based Research for the Health Professional                                          3
          COM 6100           Selected Topics in Professional Communication                                                2
          HSA 6101           Health Administration                                                                        3
          HSA 6201           Organizational Leadership and Policy in Health Care                                          3
          OCT 6100           Capstone 1                                                                                   1
          OCT 6200           Reflective Practice                                                                          4
          OCT 6400           Residency                                                                                    1
          OCT 6495           The Science of Occupation                                                                    4
          OCT 6497           Capstone 2                                                                                   4
Electives bachelor’s degree graduate student select a total of 35 credits of which six of the credits are required from the
Advanced Practice Courses):
          Advanced Practice Courses
          BSC 6001           Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                                                         2
          BSC 6101           Application of Motor Control and Motor Learning to Neurologic Intervention                   2
          BSC 6102           Interventions for the Older Adult with a Neurological Impairment                             3
          BSC 6103           The Pediatric Client with a Neurological Impairment                                          3
          BSC 6301           Ergonomics                                                                                   2
          HSC 6100           Electrotherapy: Principles & Clinic Applications for Orthopaedics                            2
          HSC 6210           Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation                                                        2
          HSC 6300           Advancing Your Hand Therapy Skills                                                           2



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HSC 6320          School Based Practice                                                  2
HSC 6360          Spinal Instability                                                     2
HSC 6402          Pharmacology                                                           2
HSC 6413          Orthopedic Imaging for the Upper Extremity                             2
HSC 6460          Accounting and Financing for the Practice                              3
HSC 6470          Legal and Regulatory Issues                                            3
OCT 6498          Clinical Integration                                                   1-8
PHT 5703C         Cardiopulmonary                                                        2
PHT 6403          Imaging                                                                2
PSY 6102          Psychology of Health and Exercise                                      2
PSY 6103          Applied Performance Psychology                                         3
Leadership/Academic Courses
EDF 6101          Foundations of Teaching and Learning                                   3
Experiential Credit Courses
OCT 6480          Clinical Practice I                                                    1-5
OCT 6481          Clinical Practice II                                                   1-5
OCT 6482          Clinical Practice III                                                  1-5
Independent Study Courses
IDS 6455          Directed Study                                                         1-4
IDS 6460          Directed Readings                                                      1-4




                    Student studying online in the library at the St. Augustine campus




                                                   76
TUITION AND FEES – DOCTOR OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PROGRAM

Tuition for all courses not involving a separate seminar is $443.00/credit hour. Courses with a seminar
prerequisite for which seminar fees are charged separately the OTD coursework bears a per credit hour
charge of $190.00.

USA Master’s Degree Applicant Estimated Tuition Costs of the OTD Program

The following is presented only as a guide for the student. The estimated costs set forth below cover course tuition and
examination fees. Textbooks and travel and lodging for seminars are additional.

•       Tuition for coursework (includes seminar fees):                 $13,300 (30 hours)
•       Administrative Fees (minimum):                                    $200
•       Estimated total for OTD – USA Master’s Degree Applicant:        $13,500

Master’s Degree Applicant Estimated Tuition Costs of the OTD Program

The following is presented only as a guide for the student. The estimated costs set forth below cover course tuition and
examination fees. Textbooks and travel and lodging for seminars are additional.

•       Tuition for coursework (includes seminar fees):                 $15,500 (35 hours)
•       Administrative Fees (minimum):                                    $200
•       Estimated total for OTD – Master’s Degree Applicant:            $15,700

BSOT Degree Applicant Estimated Tuition Costs of the OTD Program

The following is presented only as a guide for the student. The estimated costs set forth below cover course tuition and
examination fees. Textbooks and readings are additional.

•       Tuition for coursework (includes seminar fees):                 $26,600 (60 hours)
•       Administrative Fees (minimum):                                    $200
•       Estimated Total for OTD – BSOT Degree Applicant:                $26,800




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DOCTOR OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (OTD) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Delivery of OTD Coursework
Courses in the OTD program is offered in a variety of formats. In some cases, as noted in the course
descriptions, a prerequisite for a course may be completion of a continuing education seminar. This learning
experience is then enhanced through completion of assignments in a distance education format. These
assignments are submitted to the University for grading in a specified time frame subsequent to completion
of the seminar.

Other courses are offered strictly through a distance education format. No seminar attendance is required
and all learning activities are completed at a distance. This format is presented through a variety of delivery
methods including assigned readings, videos, CD-ROM, or via the Internet. This format also includes
assignments that must be completed and returned to the University for grading to receive credit for the
course.

In addition, students may choose courses that are part of the regularly scheduled, 14-week, on campus
curriculum.

Course Numbers 6000-6499

Course Descriptions

BSC 6001 - Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                                                Hours: 2
This is an online self-study course discussing the foundations of orthopaedics and manipulative therapy. The
history and development of orthopaedics and specifically manual therapy are explored. Arthrology and
biomechanics are discussed, with special attention to tissue biomechanics and arthrokinematics. Emphasis is
placed on spinal anatomy and movement. The University's philosophy of examination, treatment, and pain
management is introduced. Classifications and indications for manipulation are reviewed.

BSC 6101 - Application of Motor Control and Motor Learning
           Theory to Neurologic Intervention                                                   Hours: 2
In this course the student will examine current research and theories in motor control and motor learning and
their relationship to examination and intervention in patients with neurologic dysfunction. Students will
examine neuroanatomical structures, functions, and neuroplasticity of the nervous system as they relate to
motor control tasks. Specific motor control issues in balance, gait, and upper extremity are examined and
discussed. Students will identify and explain the influence of impairments on motor dysfunction and a
patient’s motor control.

BSC 6102 - Interventions for the Older Adult with a Neurological Impairment                            Hours: 3
This course will provide students with the advanced knowledge and skills to adapt therapeutic examinations
and interventions to the special needs of the older adult with a neurological impairment. Special emphasis
will be on considering individuals with stroke, Parkinson’s disease, vestibular problems, subcortical and
cortical dementia, and other neurological pathologies that impact on function.

BSC 6103 -The Pediatric Client with a Neurological Impairment                                  Hours: 3
The goal of the seminar is to provide participants with advanced knowledge and application of skilled observation
and intervention for the special needs of the pediatric client with a neurological impairment. The lecture component
will include updates on treatment approaches used in pediatric intervention (motor learning and control theory,
neurodevelopmental principles (NDT), myofascial release treatment principles, oral motor treatment, positioning,
strengthening, and other treatment techniques) with an emphasis on evidenced based practice. During the lab
component, participants will apply NDT, myofascial release, strengthening, and other techniques to facilitate
functional skills in infants and children with congenital and acquired movement disorders.

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BSC 6200 – Evidence Based Research for the Health Professional                            Hours: 2
The amount of research available to the physical and occupational therapist upon which to base clinical
decision-making with regard to diagnosis, prognosis, and management has multiplied tremendously over the
last 20 years. Within the currently predominant paradigm of evidence-based practice, every therapist needs
to be able to critically evaluate the evidence available prior to application into clinical practice. The
Scientific Inquiry course is an introduction to research methods, psychometric properties of tests and
measures as used in the clinical situation for diagnosis, prognosis, and outcome assessment, sampling,
experimental design, statistics, literature review, evidence-based practice, and conducting article critiques.

The purpose of this course is to enhance inquiry skills from both multicultural and multi-professional
viewpoints. The main emphasis of this course is to allow the students to become critical consumers of the
scientific literature needed to guide evidence-based OT and PT clinical practice and perhaps set some on the
way to producing such scientific literature themselves.

BSC 6301 – Ergonomics                                                                     Hours: 2
This online self-study course examines a variety of aspects of work related ergonomics. Participants will
review the history of ergonomics, ergonomic statistics, client centered framework of practice, the
Americans with disabilities act, universal design, posture, standing, sitting and computer work station
evaluation, occupational risks, cumulative trauma disorders/repetitive strain injuries/tendonitis, and low
back pain. Worker assessment and work hardening are reviewed before carrying out a worksite assessment.
Injury prevention, ergonomic equipment, ergonomic resources, and documentation are also discussed. The
course requires students to complete three projects: a posture evaluation, a computer workstation evaluation
and a work site evaluation. Bulletin board (BB) interaction is used to address subjects and respond to other
students comments. Questions are addressed, papers written and projects written up including a work site
evaluation report letter.

COM 6100 – Professional Communications                                                    Hours: 2
This on-line course examines professional communications as it relates to the professions of physical therapy
and occupational therapy. Students develop skill in: therapeutic communication; documentation according to
professional standards; professional writing; case presentations; facilitating meetings; analyzing and
presenting research; producing audiovisual presentations; resolving conflicts; and advocating for therapy
services.

EDF 6101 – Foundations of Teaching and Learning                                            Hours: 3
Patient care, clinical administrative management, and academic appointments are areas where practitioners
have teaching obligations. Students in this course will acquire a working knowledge of the mechanisms by
which adults learn, understand and remember. Students will apply these mechanisms to the study of teaching
strategies and instructional decision-making. Topics will include cognition information processing and
assessment, theories of motivation, critical thinking and the application of this knowledge for teaching.
Learning outcomes will differ depending on the academic track that the student is pursuing.

HSA 6101 - Health Service Administration                                                  Hours: 3
This course examines the functions of a rehabilitation manager.               Content includes ethical-legal
considerations, applicable state and federal statues, marketing, fiscal resource management, and staff
productivity. Emphasis is placed on decision making, change implementation, and quality control processes
in health care organizations. Students have the opportunity to analyze problems and develop strategies for
change in a variety of hypothetical physical and occupational therapy situations.




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HSA 6201 – Organizational Leadership and Policy in Health Care                              Hours: 3
Effective leadership in healthcare is critical for developing, implementing, sustaining, and modifying
appropriate policies to address major health concerns including controlling costs, increasing access to
services, improving the quality of health services, and enhancing the effectiveness of program outcomes. A
skilled workforce, ethical and trained leaders, and effective policies are integral to the implementation of
programs and services that successfully promote the public’s health. The goal of this course is to examine the
conceptual, methodological, and ethical foundations of healthcare leadership and administration leading to
the development and analysis of health related policy at all levels. The course will focus on analyzing the
process of policymaking in the formulation, implementation, adoption, and modification phases of current
health policy through effective leadership and administration.

HSC 6100 – Electrotherapy: Principles and Clinical Applications                             Hours: 2
           For Orthopaedics
This course will provide the clinician with a conceptual understanding of the physiological basis and
rationale for modern techniques in utilization of electrotherapy for improved function and pain modulation.
Selection of appropriate electrotherapy equipment, wave form characteristics, and the latest treatment
techniques used for muscle and nerve stimulation are presented. This course is delivered online and utilizes
the interactive video demonstrations, interactive discussions and recent literature to support use of
electrotherapeutic modalities in your practice. This course can be taken as an elective by the entry level
students.

HSC 6210 - Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation                                            Hours: 2
Based on the E-1 Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation Seminar, this level of study extends the content of
the seminar to the application and analysis level of learning of peripheral joint examination and treatment.
Clinical decision-making strategies for peripheral joint examination and treatment are strengthened through
the use of selected readings required for this course. This is a seminar offering with an online component.

HSC 6300 – Advancing Your Hand Therapy Skills                                               Hours: 2
This course focuses on diagnoses found most typically treat in a hand clinic setting. Through the use
pictures, video and presentations, students will be exposed to the most current treatment evidence for
advanced practitioners. The purpose of this course is the application of clinical reasoning skills in the hand
therapy setting and upper extremity orthopaedic rehabilitation following trauma, disease process and post-
surgical intervention. Students should be prepared to devote a minimum of 2 hours a day to online
discussions and preparation of assignments while collaborating, learning and exploring the virtual hand
clinic!

HSC 6320 – School Based Practice                                                          Hours: 2
This course examines legal and professional aspects of school-based practice for the physical and
occupational therapist. Participants will review the history of school-based practice including the evolution
of related legal requirements and implications to practice. Respective OT and PT professional guidelines for
the school-based therapist including data collection, documentation and evidence-based practice will be
explored. Use of assessment tools, examination of the IEP process, discussion of service intervention models
and exploration of the differences between the school verses medical model of practice are discussed, with an
emphasis of the importance in collaboration throughout the process.

HSC 6360 - Spinal Instability                                                               Hours: 2
Concepts of whole spine stabilization are presented in a combined seminar/home study format. Topics
covered include: clinical findings indicating the presence of instability; stabilization instructions for patient
education and utilization of stabilization through the process of rehabilitation. Special attention is given to
clinical decision-making regarding the selection of manipulation and exercises on patients with instability.
This course is offered through a distance education format.

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HSC 6402 – Pharmacology                                                                    Hours: 2
This on-line course covers the basis of drug action as it relates to physical and occupational therapy. Drugs
used in the treatment of muscle spasms and spasticity, cardiac drugs, centrally acting drugs, psychotropics,
and drugs used in the treatment of pain and inflammation are covered. Interactions between therapy and
medications are emphasized.

HSC 6413 – Orthopedic Imaging for the Upper Extremity                                    Hours: 2
This online course provides a broad background reading plain film radiographs and in the radiographic
presentation of commonly occurring dysfunctions of the upper spine and upper extremity, as well as covering
the basics of MRI, CT scanning, and diagnostic ultrasound. The clinical application of diagnostic imaging
findings to upper extremity rehabilitation is highlighted with special emphasis on the imaging of fractures
and the biomechanical consequences of fractures. For each anatomical region, there are numerous online
exercises in radiographic anatomy and advanced imaging anatomy as well as interactive exercises in
description of fractures. Students will have an opportunity to apply the principles of imaging evaluation to
selected cases.

HSC 6460 – Accounting and Financing for the Practice                                       Hours: 3
This course provides accounting methods and traditional financial management concepts for health care
managers using the basic tools of health care financial decision-making. Topics include financial reporting
statements, cost concepts and decision-making, budgeting techniques, cost variance analysis, time valuing of
money procedures, capital acquisition, debt and equity financing, and working capital cash management.

HSC 6470 – Legal and Regulatory Issues                                                     Hours: 3
This course investigates the legal and regulatory environment of the health services industry. Case law,
statutory and regulatory analysis, and trends in health services delivery law will be analyzed in context of
implications among major stakeholder groups (providers, patients, administrators, third-party payers, and
health care organizations). Topics include civil and criminal law, ethics, contract law, antitrust, malpractice,
human resources/personnel laws, managed care laws, professional and corporate liability, information
management/medical records, patient safety and mandatory reporting issues, patients rights and
responsibilities, among others.

IDS 6455 - Directed Study                                                                  Hours: 1-4
Directed study is provided to enable the student to pursue special interests beyond those available in course
offerings. The directed study is planned, implemented, and evaluated by the student with an approved
advisor. Students are encouraged to study in related disciplines and to develop affiliations with other
organizations, especially those whose work could benefit our profession. This course is offered through a
distance education format. Registration for this course must be approved by the Program Director.

IDS 6460 - Directed Readings                                                               Hours 1-4
This course is an independent study tailored for a student’s specific interest in a specialty area. Areas of
concentration and topics are negotiated with the student, and a faculty advisor is assigned. The student
studies and analyzes the literature on agreed upon advanced topics in a content area, reviews the research
methods used, and statistical analysis relevant to the topic of interest. This course is offered through a
distance education format. Registration for this course must be approved by the Program Director.

OCT 6100 – Capstone 1                                                                      Hours: 1
This course represents a preparatory experience for Capstone 2 which is the integration of the knowledge and
skills appropriate to a student’s specialty area. By developing a short proposal, students have an opportunity
to reflect on learning achieved in the t-OTD program and the clinical/educational experiences related to
his/her content learning in the program. The student is expected to summarize the topic and content of the

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Capstone Project. The students will review and apply professional writing skills in the proposal. Based on the
suggested Capstone topic, the student will be assigned a faculty advisor. This course is offered through an
online distance education format. Capstone Project I is a pre-requisite for Capstone II. Prerequisites are
completion of all required and elective t-OTD coursework or, the student may be enrolled in their last course
while simultaneously completing Capstone 1.

OCT 6200 – Reflective Practice                                                             Hours: 4
This is a required course for those students with an entry-level Bachelors degree. The purpose of this course
is to allow a student to broaden and deepen your knowledge an understanding of the value of occupational
therapy in today's changing world. The student will choose four modules and create a learning plan for each.
The modules may include but are not limited to: Theory, Historical Perspective of OT, Creating Evidence
Based Practice, Experiential Learning, Alternative Therapy Exploration, Emerging Practice, International
Health Care, Health Care Policy, Current Trends in Health Care or module proposed by the student based on
experience and current clinical practice area. Each module will entail a literature review and paper/project
that will be reflective of the students current learning goals and will be guided by a tOTD faculty member.

OCT 6400 – Residency                                                                       Hours: 1
Each student is required to make a presentation of their capstone project as well as a summary of their
completed t-OTD learning goals. During the time spent on campus (15 hours) they will work with their
capstone advisor to complete the formal presentation of the Capstone to a group of faculty and/or students.

OCT 6480 – Clinical Practice I                                                         Hours: Variable 1-5
Equivalent of one to five years employment as an occupational therapist demonstrating practical application
of occupational therapy skills and knowledge in a clinical setting. This is only offered to students with a
bachelor’s degree.

OCT 6481 – Clinical Practice II                                                        Hours: Variable 1-5
Equivalent of six to ten years employment as an occupational therapist demonstrating practical application of
occupational therapy skills and knowledge in a clinical setting. Pre-requisite: Clinical Practice I.

OCT 6482 – Clinical Practice III                                                       Hours: Variable 1-5
Equivalent of eleven to fifteen years employment as an occupational therapist demonstrating practical
application of occupational therapy skills and knowledge in a clinical setting. Pre-requisite: Clinical Practice
II.

OCT 6495 – The Science of Occupation                                                       Hours: 4
This course is designed to orient the new student to the Transitional Doctor of Occupational Therapy
Program (t-OTD) and provide an overview of the doctoral studies required at USA all of which are
foundationally based upon the concept of “occupation”. The student will learn to analyze the theoretical
tenets and terminology used in the science of occupational therapy which will prepare the student for future
coursework and success in the t-OTD program. The content in this course will assist the t-OTD student in
analyzing frames of reference that focus on the science of occupation. As the student becomes familiar with
the various ways the profession frames its models and theories the course will further analyze the concept of
occupation both from within and from outside the profession of occupational therapy. The course provides a
basis for analysis of occupation from a scientific perspective and assists the student in grounding occupation
with practice. Finally the course facilitates higher level thinking about the importance of occupationally
based research and its relationship to the students final Capstone Project.




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OCT 6497 - Capstone Project 2                                                             Hours: 4
This course is an integration of the knowledge and skills appropriate to a student’s specialty area. By
applying theory and practice, students have the opportunity to explore an approach to the delivery of
occupational therapy services. Under advisement of a faculty member, the student will complete a
community service project or a clinical research project. The project will involve designing the
methodology, implementing the project, and collecting the data to measure the project’s effectiveness. The
results will be shared through a publishable article or oral presentation.

OCT 6498 – Clinical Integration Internship Experience                    Hours: Variable credit up to 8
This internship is designed to integrate the coursework taken during the OTD program with clinical
experience. By applying theory and practice, students have the opportunity to observe, perform evaluations
and interventions with a client/patient population. Students will demonstrate clinical reasoning through
journaling and documenting their experiences. Under advisement of a faculty advisor, the student will write
and present a case report.

PHT 6403 – Imaging for Physical Therapy                                                   Hours: 2
This course provides an introduction to reading plain film radiographs and diagnostic images in commonly
occurring dysfunctions of the spine, pelvis and extremities. The understanding of when to order X-ray, MRI,
CT and ultrasound scanning will also be covered. Special emphasis is placed on the clinical application to
orthopedic and neurological physical therapy.

PHT 5703C - Cardiopulmonary Dysfunction                                                   Hours: 2
This course covers basic concepts in the management of patients with critical illness and/or trauma as related
to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) interventions and the rehabilitation management of cardiac and pulmonary
patients.

PSY 6102 – Psychology of Health and Exercise                                              Hours: 2
This on-line course examines the psychological knowledge and skills necessary to develop and facilitate
optimal health and fitness. The course requires the student to demonstrate comprehension of the basic
psychological principles that impact health and exercise, apply the knowledge to case scenarios, and, to a
lesser extent, analyze specific topics and peer-reviewed articles.

PSY 6103E – Applied Performance Psychology                                                Hours: 3
This on-line course examines the psychological knowledge and skills necessary to develop and facilitate
peak performance in athletics, sport, and even business. The course requires the student to demonstrate
comprehension of basic sport psychology principles, apply the knowledge to case scenarios, and, to a lesser
extent, analyze specific topics and peer-reviewed articles. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DPT or OTD
program.




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TRANSITIONAL DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY (DPT)

Mission Statement
The mission of the transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) is to develop leaders in physical therapy
patient examination, evaluation, intervention, and case management. Special focus is placed on the
foundational sciences of anatomy and biomechanics, while enhancing the clinical reasoning and treatment
skills of the student. Because this program is designed for physical therapists that work in clinical practice, it
is expected that students will bring about positive improvements to the workplace as they progress through
the program. This program will help to promote the profession by developing experiences that address the
critical issues found in the delivery of health care today.

Program Objectives
Through completion of this program, students will:

•   Enhance one’s personal and professional growth.

•   Be prepared, by academic knowledge to practice in an emerging arena of autonomous practice by
    thinking logically, critically, creatively, and independently.

•   Apply depth of knowledge and competence in selected areas of theory and clinical techniques as it
    relates to patient care and supported by evidence-based practice.

•   Develop effective communication skills in the presentation of clinical patient cases or selected topics in
    health care.

Admission Requirements
Admission to the program is open to all physical therapists who entered the profession with a bachelor’s
degree or master’s in physical therapy from an accredited institution. It is expected that all applicants are
licensed or eligible for licensure in the United States of America. Bachelor’s degree applicants also need to
have five years of clinical experience. For more details on admission, see the Admissions to the University
section of this Catalog.

Official transcripts from all previous institutions of higher learning must be submitted directly to the
University in accordance with the Application for Admission instructions.

International Students Applying for Admission
Foreign-trained candidates who do not require a student visa to participate in university courses and/or
degree programs can be considered for admission. To be considered for admission to the transitional DPT
program, the following criteria will apply:

    •   The candidate must be a graduate of a program in a country that is a member of the World
        Confederation of Physical Therapy.
    •   Submit transcripts and a credentialing evaluation from an agency recognized by the National
        Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) that provide evidence of training at a level
        equivalent to that of a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy in the United States.
    •   The candidate must have five (5) years of documented clinical experience (if holding equivalent of a
        US Bachelor’s degree in physical therapy)




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    •   The candidate must submit an official TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score report
        if their education was completed in a language other than English. A minimum score of 550 (paper-
        based testing), 210 (computer-based testing) or 83 (IBT – Internet based testing) is required
    •   If the student plans to complete a Clinical Residency, he/she must be a licensed physical therapist in
        the state where the residency is located.

Notification of Status
The applicant will be notified by letter from the University of his/her admission status after review of all
required application materials by the Graduate Council Admissions Committee.

Academic Requirements
To remain in the transitional DPT program, the student must:
•      Maintain a minimum of a 2.25 GPA
•      Register for a minimum of one course within twelve (12) weeks of acceptance and a minimum of
       five (5) credits each calendar year

Program Overview
The physical therapist holding a master’s degree* will need to complete the Capstone Project for 5 required
academic credits and 17 elective academic credits. The transitional DPT program is 24 credits for the master
level students. Two credits for experiential learning will be awarded upon completion of the 22 minimum
necessary academic credits for the degree. These experiential learning credits reflect one year of clinical
experience.

*The Master’s may be either the first professional degree or a post-professional degree.

The physical therapist holding a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy will need to complete Pharmacology,
Imaging, Differential Diagnosis, and Capstone Project for 11 required academic requirements and will need
to complete 11 elective academic credits. The transitional DPT program is 60 credits for the bachelor level
students. Thirty-eight credits for experiential learning will be awarded upon completion of the 22 minimum
necessary academic credits for the degree. These experiential learning credits reflect 5 years of required
clinical experience for bachelor level students.

At the end of the educational experience, the graduate will be awarded a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)
degree.

The student has the choice of completing the Capstone Project or a Mentored Clinical Residency with the
primary goal of providing an educational experience that assists the student in focusing his/her ideas and
thoughts. The Capstone Project may take the form of one case report or an article on critical health care
issues prepared in publishable format. The Mentored Clinical Residency is a supervised clinical experience
in the specialty area selected by the student. To earn five credits for a Clinical Residency, the student is
required to complete a minimum of 9-12 months of patient care plus a minimum of 200 educational activity
hours.

Process for Obtaining the Transitional DPT Degree
        Students begin by completing coursework in either a clinical specialty track, leading to a
        Certification, or a non-specialty clinical track of elective coursework. You may begin registering for
        the necessary seminars and coursework as soon as you are accepted into the program. Many credit
        assignments consist of an online course with required short essay assignments, and unit quizzes.




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        For the speciality clinical track, following completion of all Certification seminars and credit
        assignments, the student may attend the Preparation and Certification Examination Week.
        Completion of the certification examination is not required for degree completion.

        For the student with a master’s degree, once you have obtained 17 credits toward your degree
        program you will proceed to Capstone Project I and II. An assigned faculty advisor approves an
        outline of your project and then you complete either one publishable case report or article. The
        advisor will review and assist with revisions as needed until the final drafts are accepted.

       If a Clinical Residency is chosen in lieu of the Capstone Project, the proposed residency site and
       mentor must meet the approval of the Program Director. It is recommended that students need to
       complete at least two specialty-track seminars prior to starting the residency and start the approval
       process early in the program. Contact the department for explanation of the approval process.

        For the students with a BSPT, you will proceed by completing the required courses. Upon
        completion of 17 credits, you may begin work on Capstone Project I and II. An assigned faculty
        advisor approves an outline of your project and then you complete either one publishable case report
        or article. The advisor will review and assist with revisions as needed until the final drafts are
        accepted.

Course Time Limits
There will be a due date for your all course assignments. In most courses, this will be eight to twelve weeks.
Other courses encompass a full 15-week semester with a due date at the end of the semester. The academic
calendar for the University is divided into three semesters: Spring, Summer, and Fall. Semester periods are
denoted on the Academic Calendar.

Transfer Credits
The University will consider accepting graduate credits from other accredited institutions. Please refer to the
transfer credit policy in the catalog for further information on transfer credits.

Incomplete Coursework
If, for reasons acceptable to the instructor, a student cannot complete the required work within the pre-
determined timeframe, he/she will receive the grade of Incomplete ("I"). The student must then complete the
work within 15 weeks of the due date to receive a letter grade. No further extension will be permitted. If the
student does not complete the requirements within the approved time, the "I" grade will automatically
become a Fail ("F") on his/her transcript.

Time Limit
It is required that students complete all requirements within four (4) years. An extension of up to two (2)
years may be requested. If the Program Director approves the extension, there is an extension fee of $333 per
semester.




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TRANSITIONAL DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULA
Master’s Degree Applicant Coursework                                Semester Hours
      Specialization or non-specialization courses                                    17
      Capstone Project I and II                                                       5
      (or Clinical Residency)
                                                                                      22 academic credits

      Clinical Practice (Experiential Learning)                              2*
                               Total Hours                                            24

          *Master’s applicants can earn up to 2 credits of Experiential Learning

Bachelor’s Degree Applicant Coursework
      Differential Diagnosis for the Therapist*                                       2
      Imaging for Physical Therapy*                                                   2
      Pharmacology*                                                                   2

      *The student completing the Primary Care Certification Track will replace these courses with electives.

      Specialization or non-specialization courses                                    11
      Capstone Project I and II                                                       5
      (or Clinical Residency)
                                                                                      22 academic credits

      Clinical Practice (Experiential Learning)                                       38**
                               Total Hours                                            60

          **Bachelor applicants can earn up to 38 credits of Experiential Learning


SPECIALITY TRACKS - CERTIFICATIONS
Manual Therapy Track - Specialty Courses
  Course # Course Title                                            Semester Hours
   BSC 6001        *Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics (FCO)         2
   PHT 6201        Intro. to Spinal Evaluation and Manipulation (S1)   3
   HSC 6210        Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation (E1)          2
   PHT 6211        Extremity Integration (E2)                          2
   PHT 6220        Myofascial Manipulation (MF1)                       2
   PHT 6202        Advanced Pelvic Lumbar and Thoracic Spine (S2)      2
   PHT 6203        Advanced Cervical and Upper Thoracic Spine (S3)     2
   PHT 6204        Functional Analysis: Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex (S4) 2
   PHT 6250        Certification in Manual Therapy                     3
      Total Manual Therapy Certification Track Hours                  20

Primary Care Track - Specialty Courses
   Course #   Course Title                                         Semester Hours
   BSC 6001        *Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics (FCO)                        2
   PHT 6201        Intro. to Spinal Evaluation and Manipulation (S1)3
   HSC 6210        Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation (E1)                         2
   HSC 6400        Differential Diagnosis for the Therapist                           2
   HSC 6402        Pharmacology                                                       2
   PHT 6403        Imaging for Physical Therapy                                       2
   PHT 6404        Managed Care: Success and Survival                                 1
   PHT 6402        Clinical Triage                                                    1
   PHT 6450        Preparation/Certification in Primary Care                          3
      Total Primary Care Certification Track Hours                                   18


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Craniofacial Track - Specialty Courses
   Course #         Course Title                                Semester Hours
     BSC   6001        *Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics (FCO)               2
     PHT   6201        Introduction to Spinal Evaluation Manipulation (S1)       3
     PHT   6203        Advanced Cervical and Upper Thoracic Spine (S3)           2
     PHT   6331        Eval and Treat of the Craniomandibular System             2
     PHT   6332        Intermediate Craniofacial                                 3
     PHT   6333        Advanced Craniofacial                                     3
     IDS   6455        Directed Study: State of the Art Treatment of the
                          Craniomandibular System                                1
     IDS 6455          Directed Study: Preparation/Cerfication in
                          Craniofacial                                           3
                       Total Craniofacial Certification Track Hours             19

Elective Courses
    Course #           Course Title
     BSC 6001          Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics (FCO)              2
     BSC 6101          Application of Motor Control and Motor                  2
                       Learning Theory to Neurologic Interventions
     BSC 6102          Interventions for the older adult with a Neurological   3
                       Impairment
     BSC 6103          The Pediatric Client with a Neurological Impairment     3
     BSC 6200          Evidence Based Research for the Health Professional     3
     BSC 6300          Advancing Hand Therapy                                  2
     BSC 6301          Ergonomics                                              2
     COM 6100          Professional Communications                             2
     EDF 6101          Foundations of Teaching and Learning                    3
     EDF 6201          Educational Theory for Clinicians                       3
     EDF 7170          Motivational Theory in Health Care Education            3
     EDF 7180          Technology in Higher Education                          3
     EDF 7190          Current Issues in Health Sciences Education             3
     HSA 6101          Health Services Administration                          3
     HSA 6201          Organizational Leadership and Policy in Health Care     3
     HSC 6100          Electrotherapy                                          2
     HSC 6320          School Based Practice                                   2
     HSC 6360          Spinal Instability                                      2
     HSC 6400          Differential Diagnosis for the Therapist                2
     HSC 6402          Pharmacology                                            2
     HSC 6450          Fundamentals in Health Care Business                    3
     HSC 6460          Accounting and Financing for the Practice               3
     HSC 6470          Legal and Regulatory Issues                             3
     IDS 6455          Directed Study                                        1-4
     IDS 6460          Directed Readings                                     1-4
     PHT 6115          Introduction to Primary Care                            3
     PHT 6331          Evaluation and Treatment of the
                       Craniomandibular System (TMJ)                           2
     PHT 6403          Imaging for Physical Therapy                            2
     PSY 6102          Psychology of Health & Exercise                         2
     PSY 6103          Applied Performance Psychology                          3

*FCO, while not required for certification is highly recommended

Courses designated as a DPT level course in the post-professional course listing in this Catalog may be taken
as an elective.




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TUITION AND FEES – TRANSITIONAL DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY
PROGRAM

Tuition for all courses not involving a separate seminar is $443.00/credit hour. Courses with a seminar
prerequisite for which seminar fees are charged separately the DPT coursework bears a per credit hour
charge of $190.00.


Master’s Degree Applicant Estimated Tuition Costs of the Transitional DPT Program

The following is presented only as a guide for the student. The estimated costs set forth below cover course
tuition and examination fees. Textbooks and travel and lodging for seminars are additional. The example
below is for the manual therapy certification as a part of the credit hours of the program:


•       Tuition for coursework (includes seminar fees):          $8,501 (17 hours)
•       Tuition for Capstone:                                    $2,215 (5 hours)
•       Administrative Fees (minimum):                             $200
•       Estimated total for DPT – Master’s Degree Applicant:    $10,916


Bachelor’s Degree Applicant Estimated Tuition Costs of the Transitional DPT Program

The following is presented only as a guide for the student. The estimated costs set forth below cover course
tuition and examination fees. Textbooks and readings are additional. The example below is for the manual
therapy certification as a part of the credit hours of the program:


•       Tuition for coursework (includes seminar fees):         $5,626 (11 hours)
•       Tuition for Required Courses:                           $2,658 (6 hours)
•       Capstone (Tuition):                                     $2,215 (5 hours)
•       Administrative Fees (minimum):                            $200
•       Estimated Total for DPT – Bachelor’s Degree Applicant: $10,699




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TRANSITIONAL DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY (DPT) COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
Delivery of Coursework
Courses in the transitional DPT program are offered in a variety of formats. In some cases as noted in the
course description, a prerequisite for a course may be completion of a continuing education seminar. This
learning experience is then enhanced through completion of assignments in a distance education format.
These assignments are submitted to the University for grading in a specified time frame according to the
course syllabus or Academic Calendar.

Other courses are offered strictly through a distance education format. No seminar attendance is required and
all learning activities are completed at a distance. These courses are presented through a variety of delivery
methods including online web-based courses. Each course has a variety of learning activities that must be
completed and returned to the University for grading to receive credit for the course.

Certain courses due to equipment and/or other resource constraints, are offered as block scheduled courses
on the St. Augustine campus.

Course Numbers 6000-7199
        Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy: This program is designed for practitioners who will also
        assume leadership roles in the profession of physical therapy. The program reinforces clinical
        excellence. A variety of course assignments such as multiple choice tests, short essay and problem-
        solving exercises are used to test mastery of the learning objectives. A summary or "capstone"
        project consisting of a case report or literature review integrates content knowledge across program
        coursework. A mentored clinical residency may also be completed.

BSC 6001 - Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                                                 Hours: 2
This is an online self-study course discussing the foundations of orthopaedics and manipulative therapy. The history
and development of orthopaedics and specifically manual therapy are explored. Arthrology and biomechanics are
discussed, with special attention to tissue biomechanics and arthrokinematics. Emphasis is placed on spinal anatomy
and movement. The University's philosophy of examination, treatment, and pain management is introduced but
attention is also given to other diagnostic classification systems. Classifications and indications for manipulation are
reviewed. The course provides an introduction to the evidence-informed clinical practice paradigm teaching the
student to combine various sources of knowledge in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of orthopaedic
dysfunctions.

BSC 6101 - Application of Motor Control and Motor Learning
           Theory to Neurologic Intervention                                                    Hours: 2
In this online course the student will examine current research and theories in motor control and motor
learning and their relationship to examination and intervention in patients with neurologic dysfunction.
Students will examine neuroanatomical structures, functions, and neuroplasticity of the nervous system as
they relate to motor control tasks. Specific motor control issues in balance, gait, and upper extremity are
examined and discussed. Students will identify and explain the influence of impairments on motor
dysfunction and a patient’s motor control.




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BSC 6102 - Interventions for the Older Adult with a Neurological Impairment                         Hours: 3
This course will provide students with the advanced knowledge and skills to adapt therapeutic examinations
and interventions to the special needs of the older adult with a neurological impairment. Special emphasis
will be on considering individuals with stroke, Parkinson’s disease, vestibular problems, subcortical and
cortical dementia, and other neurological pathologies that impact on function.

BSC 6103 -The Pediatric Client with a Neurological Impairment                            Hours: 3
The goal of the seminar is to provide participants with advanced knowledge and application of skilled
observation and intervention for the special needs of the pediatric client with a neurological impairment. The
lecture component will include updates on treatment approaches used in pediatric intervention (motor
learning and control theory, neurodevelopmental principles (NDT), myofascial release treatment principles,
oral motor treatment, positioning, strengthening, and other treatment techniques) with an emphasis on
evidenced based practice. During the lab component, participants will apply NDT, myofascial release,
strengthening, and other techniques to facilitate functional skills in infants and children with congenital and
acquired movement disorders.

BSC 6200 – Evidence Based Research for the Health Professional                           Hours: 3
The amount of research available to the physical and occupational therapist upon which to base clinical
decision-making with regard to diagnosis, prognosis, and management has multiplied tremendously over the
last 20 years. Within the currently predominant paradigm of evidence-based practice, every therapist needs to
be able to critically evaluate the evidence available prior to application into clinical practice. The Evidence-
Based Research course is an introduction to research methods, psychometric properties of tests and measures
as used in the clinical situation for diagnosis, prognosis, and assessment of outcome and risk of harm, clinical
prediction rules and clinical practice guidelines, sampling, experimental design, statistics, literature review,
evidence-based practice, research models, and conducting article critiques.

The purpose of this course is to enhance inquiry skills from both multicultural and multi-professional
viewpoints. The main emphasis of this course is to allow the students to become critical consumers of the
scientific literature needed to guide evidence-based OT and PT clinical practice and perhaps to set some on
the way to producing such scientific literature themselves.

BSC 6301 – Ergonomics                                                                    Hours: 2
This online self-study course examines a variety of aspects of work related ergonomics. Participants will
review the history of ergonomics, ergonomic statistics, client centered framework of practice, the
Americans with disabilities act, universal design, posture, standing, sitting and computer work station
evaluation, occupational risks, cumulative trauma disorders/repetitive strain injuries/tendonitis, and low
back pain. Worker assessment and work hardening are reviewed before carrying out a worksite assessment.
Injury prevention, ergonomic equipment, ergonomic resources, and documentation are also discussed.

The course requires students to complete two projects: a computer workstation evaluation and a work site
evaluation. Bulletin board (BB) interaction is used to address subjects and respond to other students
comments. Questions are addressed, papers written and projects written up including a work site
evaluation report letter.

COM 6100 - Professional Communications                                                   Hours: 2
This on-line course examines professional communications as it relates to the professions of physical therapy
and occupational therapy. Students develop skill in: therapeutic communication; documentation according to
professional standards; professional writing; case presentations; facilitating meetings; analyzing and
presenting research; producing audiovisual presentations; resolving conflicts; advocating for therapy
services; and critiquing marketing.



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EDF 6101 – Foundations of Teaching and Learning                                          Hours: 3
Patient care, clinical administrative management, and academic appointments are areas where practitioners
have teaching obligations. Students in this course will acquire a working knowledge of the mechanisms by
which adults learn, understand and remember. Students will apply these mechanisms to the study of teaching
strategies and instructional decision-making. Topics will include cognition information processing and
assessment, theories of motivation, critical thinking and the application of this knowledge for teaching.
Learning outcomes will differ depending on the academic track that the student is pursuing.

EDF 6201 – Educational Theory for Clinicians                                             Hours: 3
Physical therapists utilize the skills of teaching on an every day basis with their patients/clients and staff.
Increasingly, physical therapists are extending their clinical skills to classroom teaching. To enhance the
physical therapist’s educational framework, this course will cover several components of educational
learning. This course identifies selected educational methods and adult learning theories. To apply these
theories and methods, the learner will analyze and write behavioral objectives. Teaching methodologies and
self-assessments skills will prepare the learner to analyze his/her own performance.

EDF 7170 – Motivational Theory in Health Care Education                                  Hours: 3
This course is designed as an exploration of motivational research in psychology and education. The course
focuses specifically on different theories of motivation, and how classroom, school, work, and social
environments shape and influence individuals' motivation. The connection between teacher efficacy and
student and teacher achievement will be examined.

EDF 7180 – Technology in Higher Education                                                Hours: 3
It is important for educators to understand both the potentials and pitfalls of technology in education. This
course will provide the student with an understanding of learning models and the impact technology can have
towards enhancing and enriching the learning process. The primary focus will be the application of teaching
and learning strategies that integrate technology as a method or tool to enrich the educational process Using
technology tools for solving a variety of problems, teaching presentation, evaluating student performance,
and implementing distance learning systems will also be explored.

EDF 7190 – Current Issues in Health Sciences Education                                   Hours: 3
This course will allow students to research and choose those current issues most prevalent and most useful to
the student in their current learning program. The course will focus on self-guided learning and will drive the
student through a process whereby they will explore relevant issues, debate with classmates and present a
final portfolio useful to the student in future teaching endeavors. Possible topics the student may research
include: ADA, Higher Education Law, Ethics, Health Care Law, Student Retention and Advisement.

HSA 6101 - Health Service Administration                                                 Hours: 3
This online course examines the functions of a rehabilitation manager. Content includes staff resource
management, strategic planning, marketing, and fiscal resources management. Emphasis is placed on
decision-making, change implementation, and quality control processes in health care organizations.
Students have the opportunity to analyze problems and develop strategies for change in a variety of
hypothetical rehabilitation settings.

HSA 6201 – Organizational Leadership and Policy in Health Care                           Hours: 3
Effective leadership in healthcare is critical for developing, implementing, sustaining, and modifying
appropriate policies to address major health concerns including controlling costs, increasing access to
services, improving the quality of health services, and enhancing the effectiveness of program outcomes. A
skilled workforce, ethical and trained leaders, and effective policies are integral to the implementation of
programs and services that successfully promote the public’s health. The goal of this course is to examine the
conceptual, methodological, and ethical foundations of healthcare leadership and administration leading to


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the development and analysis of health related policy at all levels. The course will focus on analyzing the
process of policymaking in the formulation, implementation, adoption, and modification phases of current
health policy through effective leadership and administration.

HSC 6100 - Electrotherapy                                                                    Hours: 2
This online course provides the clinician with a conceptual understanding of the physiological basis and
rationale for modern techniques in utilizing electrotherapy for improved function and pain modulation.
Selection of appropriate electrotherapy equipment, wave form characteristics, and the latest treatment
techniques used for muscle and nerve stimulation are presented. This course is delivered online and utilizes
the interactive video demonstrations, interactive discussions and recent literature to support use of
electrotherapeutic modalities in your practice.

HSC 6210 - Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation (E1)                                        Hours: 2
Based on the E-1 Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation Seminar, this online course for the DPT Program
extends the content of the seminar to the application and analysis level of learning of peripheral joint
examination and treatment. Clinical decision making strategies or peripheral joint examination and treatment
are strengthened through the use of selected readings required for this course. A prerequisite is completion
of the CPE Seminar “Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation (E1)” offered by the University.

HSC 6300 – Advancing Hand Therapy                                                            Hours: 2
This course focuses on diagnoses found most typically treat in a hand clinic setting. Through the use pictures,
video and presentations, students will be exposed to the most current treatment evidence for advanced
practitioners. The purpose of this course is the application of clinical reasoning skills in the hand therapy setting
and upper extremity orthopaedic rehabilitation following trauma, disease process and post-surgical intervention.
Students should be prepared to devote a minimum of 2 hours a day to online discussions and preparation of
assignments while collaborating, learning and exploring the virtual hand clinic!

HSC 6320 – School Based Practice                                                             Hours: 2
This course examines legal and professional aspects of school-based practice for the physical and
occupational therapist. Participants will review the history of school-based practice including the evolution
of related legal requirements and implications to practice. Respective OT and PT professional guidelines for
the school-based therapist including data collection, documentation and evidence-based practice will be
explored. Use of assessment tools, examination of the IEP process, discussion of service intervention models
and exploration of the differences between the school verses medical model of practice are discussed, with an
emphasis of the importance in collaboration throughout the process.

HSC 6360 - Spinal Instability                                                                Hours: 2
This is a 2 credit hour online course presenting concepts of whole spine stabilization. Topics covered
include: clinical findings indicating the presence of instability, stabilization instructions for patient education
and utilization of stabilization through the process of rehabilitation. Special attention is given to clinical
decision-making regarding the selection of manipulation and exercises for patients with instability.

HSC 6400 – Differential Diagnosis for the Therapist                                          Hours: 2
This course is designed to provide physical therapists with the background necessary to screen patients for the
presence of disease. This information, combined with the therapist’s knowledge and skills for management of
neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction, will provide you with a comprehensive examination scheme. The information
provided in the course should facilitate professional communication between the physical therapist and other
health care professionals, as well as communication between the physical therapist and patient.




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HSC 6402 - Pharmacology                                                                       Hours: 2
This on-line course covers the basis of drug action as it relates to physical and occupational therapy. Drugs used in
the treatment of muscle spasms and spasticity, cardiac drugs, centrally acting drugs, psychotropics, and drugs used in
the treatment of pain and inflammation are covered. Interactions between therapy and medications are emphasized.

HSC 6450 – Fundamentals in Health Care Business                                          Hours: 3
This course will provide a pragmatic overview and exploration of basic business skills and principles
necessary for preparing for and starting a healthcare business. A developmental continuum from idea
generation to launch is discussed. Business strategies are examined to provide the learner with critical
thinking skills necessary to become successful in the startup within the health care industry. The advantage
of entrepreneurial thinking and problem solving is reviewed. The course investigates substantive strategic
marketing concepts and the process utilized to analyze, develop, implement and evaluate the
business/practice environment. Emphasis will be placed on objective planning and evaluating metrics for
success. The intricacies of legal considerations, finance and accounting strategies and human resource
management are not the focus of this course. Learners will have the opportunity to develop key components
of a business plan for a startup.

HSC 6460 – Accounting and Financing for the Practice                                     Hours: 3
This course provides accounting methods and traditional financial management concepts for health care
managers using the basic tools of health care financial decision-making. Topics include financial reporting
statements, cost concepts and decision-making, budgeting techniques, cost variance analysis, time valuing of
money procedures, capital acquisition, debt and equity financing, and working capital cash management.

HSC 6470 – Legal and Regulatory Issues                                                          Hours: 3
This course investigates the legal and regulatory environment of the health services industry. Case law,
statutory and regulatory analysis, and trends in health services delivery law will be analyzed in context of
implications among major stakeholder groups (providers, patients, administrators, third-party payers, and
health care organizations). Topics include civil and criminal law, ethics, contract law, antitrust, malpractice,
human resources/personnel laws, managed care laws, professional and corporate liability, information
management/medical records, patient safety and mandatory reporting issues, patients rights and
responsibilities, among others.

IDS 6455 - Directed Study                                                                     Hours: 1-4
Directed study is provided to enable the student to pursue special interests beyond those available in course
offerings. The directed study is planned, implemented, and evaluated by the student with an approved
advisor. Students are encouraged to study in related disciplines and to develop affiliations with other
organizations, especially those whose work could benefit our profession. This course is offered through a
distance education format. Registration for this course must be approved by the Program Director.

IDS 6460 - Directed Readings                                                                  Hours 1-4
This course is an independent study tailored for a student’s specific interest in a specialty area. Areas of
concentration and topics are negotiated with the student, and a faculty advisor is assigned. The student
studies and analyzes the literature on agreed upon advanced topics in a content area, reviews the research
methods used, and statistical analysis relevant to the topic of interest. This course is offered through a
distance education format. Registration for this course must be approved by the Program Director.




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PHT 6050 - Preparation/Certification in Sports Physical Therapy                            Hours: 3
Students review course material covering each area in the prerequisite courses. The instructors also present
any updated information where appropriate. Students will receive preparation and testing on the St.
Augustine campus for basic science and spinal and extremity joint manipulation. Review and testing of
seminar content taught by North American Sports Medicine Institute will occur at a date and time established
by this organization. Written, oral, and practical examinations are given to test retention, comprehension,
and applications of the teaching in each of the required courses.

PHT 6115 – Introduction to Primary Care                                                    Hours: 3
This course explores topics related to the provision of physical therapy services in a variety of direct access
environments. Pharmacology, Imaging, and Differential Diagnosis for the physical therapist are introduced.
Practice management will be examined, including reimbursement issues, marketing, communication, and
ethical and legal considerations.

PHT 6201 - Introduction to Spinal Evaluation and Manipulation (S1)                         Hours: 3
This course discusses basic science principles and develops clinical skills needed to complete a differential
evaluation and proceed to effective treatment of spinal dysfunction. General principles of functional
anatomy, tissue and joint biomechanics, and pathology are presented. Online discussions will encompass
relevant research and clinical application. A prerequisite is completion of the CPE Seminar “Introduction to
Spinal Evaluation and Manipulation (S1)” offered by the University.

PHT 6202 - Advanced Evaluation and Manipulation of the Pelvis, Lumbar and Thoracic
Spine (S2)                                                        Hours: 2
Anatomy and biomechanics of the pelvis, lumbar and thoracic spine are discussed in the online coursework
associated with the live version of this seminar. Review and modification of techniques from S1, along with
the instruction of additional techniques are provided. An in-depth presentation on the syndromes of the
lumbar spine and their treatment is instructed. The utilization of biomechanical and anatomical principles for
the enhancement of patient care through manipulation and exercise is emphasized, as is the patient’s role in
his/her own welfare. Prerequisites are completion of PHT 6201 and the CPE seminar “Advanced Evaluation
and Manipulation of the Pelvis, Lumbar and Thoracic Spine (S2)” offered by the University.

PHT 6203 - Advanced Evaluation and Manipulation of the Cranio Facial, Cervical and Upper
Thoracic Spine (S3)                                                    Hours: 2
This course discusses basic science principles and develops clinical skills needed to complete a differential
examination and proceed to effective intervention of cranial, cervical and upper thoracic spinal impairments.
General principles of functional anatomy, tissue and joint biomechanics, and pathology/syndromes are
presented. Online discussions will encompass relevant research and clinical application. Prerequisites are
completion of PHT 6201 and the CPE seminar “Advanced Evaluation and Manipulation of the Craniofacial,
Cervical and Upper Thoracic Spine (S3),” offered by the University.

PHT 6204 - Functional Analysis and Management of the Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex (S4)
                                                                     Hour: 2
This is an online course that explores the physical therapist’s role in the evaluation and treatment of the lumbo-
pelvic-hip system. The latest research in the biomechanics of the pelvic girdle is presented as well as a
biomechanical and neurophysiological approach to the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex. The discussion of patient
examination has an evidenced-based focus. Topic areas include: functional anatomy, biomechanics of the
sacroiliac and pubic joints, selected pathologies and dysfunctions. Clinical evaluation and treatment methods are
demonstrated through the use of video clips. Prerequisites are completion of PHT 6201 and the CPE seminar,
“Funcational Analysis and Management of the Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex (S4),” offered by the University.




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PHT 6211 - Extremity Integration (E2)                                                      Hours: 2
Based on the E-2 Extremity Integration Seminar, this online course for the DPT program extends the content
of the seminar to the application and analysis level of learning of peripheral and spinal joint and soft tissue
integration for examination, evaluation and intervention. Clinical decision making strategies and tactics,
based on principles of clinical management, are strengthened through the use of selected readings required
for this course and application to patient cases. Prerequisites are completion of HSC 6210 and the CPE
seminar, “Extremity Integration (E2),” offered by the University.

PHT 6220 - Myofascial Manipulation (MF1)                                                   Hours: 2
This course deals with the evaluation and treatment techniques of myofascial manipulation. The emphasis
is placed on the relationship of the soft tissue structures to the mechanics of the extremities and spine.
Principles of functional anatomy, posture, soft tissue anatomy, both normal and pathological, biomechanics
of soft tissue, and treatment principles are presented. A prerequisite is completion of the CPE seminar,
“Myofascial Manipulation (MF1)” offered by the University.

PHT 6250 - Preparation/Certification in Manual Therapy                                     Hours: 3
A six-day lecture and lab review course is conducted on the St. Augustine campus covering each of the
prerequisite courses of basic sciences, spinal and extremity joint evaluation and treatment, and soft tissue
manipulation. The instructors also present an update on information as needed. On the fifth day, a three-hour
multiple-choice examination is conducted. On the sixth day each student receives four to five twenty-minute
oral/practical examinations to test retention, comprehension, and applied skills. A seventh day may be added
for those late registrants the University could not examine on the sixth day. Prerequisites are BSC 6001, PHT
6201, HSC 6210, PHT 6202, PHT 6203, PHT 6204 and PHT 6220, PHT 6211.

PHT 6331 - Evaluation and Treatment of the Craniomandibular System (TMJ) Hours: 2
This is an online course that explores the physical therapist’s role in the evaluation and treatment of the
craniomandibular system. Normal cranial and cervical postural functions contribute significantly to the
function of the temporomandibular articulations and to dental occlusal contacts. The emphasis of the course
is on the relationships of these various components of the craniomandibular system and their impairments.

PHT 6332 – Intermediate Craniofacial                                                       Hours: 3
This is an online course that focuses on the etiology of craniofacial pain and pathology affecting the TMJ
and related structures. Because this is the first of three advanced courses on craniofacial pain, we will review
and expand on the anatomy of the craniomandibular system, as well as explore conventional radiography and
advanced imaging for this area. The emphasis of the course is on understanding the etiological complexities
of craniofacial pain and the role of the physical therapist in treating this patient population. The prerequisites
for this course are PHT 6331, Evaluation and Treatment of the Craniomandibular System (CF1), and
attendance of the continuing education seminar “Intermediate Craniofacial” conducted by the University of
St. Augustine.

PHT 6333 – Advanced Craniofacial                                                           Hours: 3
This is an online course that focuses on the examination and treatment of craniofacial pain. The examination
process, interview, observation, and physical examination, is discussed in detail, with emphasis on reliability
and validity of its various parts. Treatment is discussed, with a focus on the craniocervical junction and on
patient management. Additional topics in this course include an in-depth coverage of headaches and
diagnostic classifications. The prerequisites for this course are PHT 6332 and attendance at the Advanced
Craniofacial (CF3) seminar.




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PHT 6402 - Clinical Triage                                                                   Hour: 1
Clinical Triage offers a 40-hour experience to develop screening and management skills for the neuro-
musculoskeletal patient in a primary care setting. This is an opportunity for physical therapists to shadow the
health care practitioner while observing the integration of history and physical, lab results, radiographs, and
medications in the typical primary care practice. This experience would allow the physical therapist to
practice screening and history taking under the supervision of a physician. It provides the opportunity to
improve communication between physicians, physical therapists, and staff (i.e. physicians assistants, RN’s,
LPN’s, and nurse practitioners). Prerequisites are PHT 6201, HSC 6210, HSC 6400, HSC 6402, PHT 6403,
and University approval of clinical setting.

PHT 6403 – Imaging for Physical Therapy                                                     Hours: 2
This course provides a broad background reading plain film radiographs and in the radiographic presentation
of commonly occurring dysfunctions of the spine, pelvis and extremities. The basics of MRI and CT
scanning will be covered. Special emphasis is placed on the clinical application of diagnostic imaging
findings to orthopaedic physical therapy. Students will have the opportunity to apply the principles of
imaging evaluation to selected cases and special emphasis is placed on clinical application to musculoskeletal
disorders.

PHT 6404 – Application of Managed Care – Success and Survival                               Hour: 1
This course examines the impact of three types of third-party payment methodologies on rehabilitation
profitability. Students have the opportunity to distinguish between reimbursement schemes such as 1) flat
fee-for service, 2) per member per month, and 3) discounted fee for service with incentives. This course also
introduces students to the importance of determining “best practice” and how this influences insurance
reimbursement decisions. A prerequisite is completion of the CPE seminar “Managed Care – Success and
Survival” offered by the University.

PHT 6450 – Preparation/Certification in Primary Care                                        Hours: 3
This is a six-day lab and lecture review course conducted on the St. Augustine Campus. Students complete pre-
course self-directed review of prerequisite material along with attendance of five days of instructor led review of
didactic and laboratory material. On the fifth and sixth days there is a three-hour written examination and
individual oral/practical examinations conducted by faculty members from each prerequisite course. These exams
are a test of retention, comprehension, and application to clinical practice. When all areas of the examination are
passed, the student receives a certificate of competency in the clinical areas tested. Prerequisites are BSC 6001,
PHT 6201, HSC 6210, HSC 6400, HSC 6402, PHT 6403 and PHT 6404.

PHT 6480 – Clinical Practice I                                                              Hours: 6
The equivalent of one year of employment as a physical therapist demonstrating practical application of
physical therapist knowledge and skills in a clinical setting. Pre-requisite: this course is available only to
students whose highest earned degree is at the baccalaureate level.

PHT 6481 – Clinical Practice II                                                             Hours: 8
The equivalent of one year of employment as a physical therapist demonstrating practical application of
physical therapist knowledge and skills in a clinical setting. Pre-requisite: PHT 6480

PHT 6482 – Clinical Practice III                                                            Hours: 8
The equivalent of one year of employment as a physical therapist demonstrating practical application of
physical therapist knowledge and skills in a clinical setting. Pre-requisite: PHT 6481

PHT 6483 – Clinical Practice IV                                                             Hours: 8
The equivalent of one year of employment as a physical therapist demonstrating practical application of
physical therapist knowledge and skills in a clinical setting. Pre-requisite: PHT 6482

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PHT 6484 – Clinical Practice V                                                          Hours: 8
The equivalent of one year of employment as a physical therapist demonstrating practical application of
physical therapist knowledge and skills in a clinical setting. Pre-requisite: PHT 6483

PHT 6485 – Clinical Practice VI                                                         Hours: 2
The equivalent of one year of employment as a physical therapist demonstrating practical application of
physical therapist knowledge and skills in a clinical setting. Pre-requisite: this course is available only to
students whose highest earned degree is at the master’s level.

PHT 6496 – Capstone Project I                                                           Hour: 1
This is an integration of the knowledge and skills appropriate to a student’s specialty area. By developing a
short proposal, students have an opportunity to reflect on learning achieved in the DPT program and the
clinical education experiences related to his/her content learning in the program. The student is expected to
summarize the topic and content of the Capstone Project. The students will review and apply professional
writing skills in the proposal. Based on the suggested Capstone topic, the student will be assigned a faculty
advisor. This course is offered through a distance education format. Capstone Project I is a pre-requisite for
Capstone II. Prerequisites are completion of all required and elective DPT coursework (but not including
completion of Preparation/Certification).

PHT 6497 – Capstone Project II                                                          Hour: 4
This is an integration of the knowledge and skills appropriate to a student’s specialty area. By applying
theory and practice, students have the opportunity to explore various approaches in the delivery of
rehabilitation services. Under advisement of a faculty member, the student has two options in completing this
project. One option is to identify unique and significant problems in clinical treatment and develop one
publishable patient case report. The second option is to develop one publishable article related to critical
issues in the delivery of health care today. This course is offered through a distance education format. A
Prerequisite is completion of PHT 6496.

PHT 6498 - Clinical Residency                                                           Hours: 5
The Clinical Residency is a 1500-hour, 9-month patient care experience under the immediate supervision of
an approved Mentor at a University approved clinical residency site. Clinical Residency provides an
opportunity for intimate sharing of knowledge and refinement of the application of clinical skill and
decision-making. It serves as an invaluable step in the process of professional development in the student’s
area of specialty. The student develops residency objectives prior to the experience, attends the residency,
and completes 200 hours of defined educational activities. As a prerequisite, the student is recommended to
attend at least two required seminars toward the selected certification track. Exact requirements are further
described the DPT Student Handbook.

PSY 6102 – Psychology of Health and Exercise                                            Hours: 2
This on-line course examines the psychological knowledge and skills necessary to develop and facilitate
optimal health and fitness. The course requires the student to demonstrate comprehension of the basic
psychological principles that impact health and exercise, apply the knowledge to case scenarios, and, to a
lesser extent, analyze specific topics and peer-reviewed articles.

PSY 6103 – Applied Performance Psychology                                               Hours: 3
This on-line course examines the psychological knowledge and skills necessary to develop and facilitate
peak performance in athletics, sport, and even business. The course requires the student to demonstrate
comprehension of basic sport psychology principles, apply the knowledge to case scenarios, and, to a lesser
extent, analyze specific topics and peer-reviewed articles.


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                                2010-2011 OTD ACADEMIC CALENDAR



                                     Fall 2010 Trimester

September 6                  Labor Day Holiday – University closed
September 7                  Session 1 online courses start
September 7                  Last day to register for Session 2 that starts 9/27/2010
September 27                 Session 2 online courses start
October 10                   Graduation applications due for December Commencement
November 25-26               Thanksgiving Break – University closed
November 29                  University re-opens
December 9                   Fall semester classes end
December 9                   Fall Term Commencement exercises
December 10                  Last day to register for session 1 that starts 1/10/11
December 16                  All grades need to be turned in for this trimester
December 23                  Holiday break – University closed reopen January 3, 2011

                                     Spring 2011 Trimester

January 3                    University re-opens
January 10                   Session 1 online courses start
January 10                   Deadline to register for Session 2
January 17                   Martin Luther King Holiday – University is closed
January 27                   Session 2 online courses start
February 15                  Last day to register for Spring Term commencement
April 15                     Spring Term Commencement Exercises
April 21                     All grades need to be turned in for this trimester

                                     Summer 2011 Trimester

May 9                        Session 1 online courses start
May 9                        Last Day to register for courses that begin May 30th
May 30                       Memorial Day Holiday - University closed
May 31                       Session 2 online courses start
June 12                      Graduation Applications due
July 4                       Independence Day Holiday Observed – University closed
August 12                    Summer Term commencement exercises




* dates subject to change.




                                                        99
                 2010-2011 Transitional DPT ACADEMIC CALENDAR

                                         FALL 2010 TRIMESTER
August 31          Academic Appeals Committee Meets
September 2        Fall Semester Classes Begin
September 6        Labor Day-Campus closed
September 7        Courses that start on September 7th begin today
September 7        Last Day to register for courses that begin on September 29th
September 27       Courses that start on September 27th begin today
October 11         Graduation applications Due for December Commencement
November 3         Mid-Term Academic Appeals Committee Meets
November 11        Veterans Day Observed- Administrative Offices Open
November 24        Thanksgiving Holiday- University Closes at 3PM
November 25-26     Thanksgiving Break
November 29        University Re-opens
November 29        Assignments due for semester based courses (pen and paper, pure online follows course syllabus)
December 9         Last Day to register for courses that begin on January 11th
December 10        Fall semester classes end
December 10        Fall Term Commencement Exercises
December 22        Holiday Break – University Closes at 5PM
                   University Closed through January 2, 2010


                                       SPRING 2011 TRIMESTER
January 3          University Re-opens
January 4          Academic Appeals Committee Meets
January 6          Spring Semester Classes Begin
January 10         Courses that start on January 10th begin today
January 10         Last Day to register for Courses that start on February 1st
January 17         Martin Luther King Holiday-University Closed
January 31         Courses that start on January 31st begin today
February 14        Graduation Applications Due for April Commencement
March 9            Mid-Term Academic Appeals Committee Meets
March 28           Assignments due for semester based courses (pen and paper, pure online follows course syllabus)
April 15           Spring Semester Classes End
April 15           Spring Term Commencement Exercises
April 18           Last Day to register for courses that begin May 11th

                                       SUMMER 2011 TRIMESTER
May 4              Academic Appeals Committee Meets
May 5              Summer Semester Classes Begin
May 9              Courses that start on May 9th begin today
May 9              Last Day to Register for Courses that start on June 1st
May 30             Memorial Day Holiday— University Closed
May 31             Courses that start on May 31st begin today
June 13            Graduation applications due for August Commencement
July 4             Observance of July 4th Holiday –University Closed
July 6             Mid-Term Academic Appeals Committee Meets
July 25            Assignments due for semester based courses (pen and paper, pure online follows course syllabus)
August 12          Summer Semester Classes End
August 12          Summer Term Commencement Exercises
August 15          Last Day to register for courses that begin on September 8th

                                         FALL 2011 TRIMESTER
August 30          Academic Appeals Committee Meets
September 1        Fall Semester Classes Begin
September 5        Labor Day-University closed
September 6        Courses that start on September 6th begin today
September 6        Last Day to register for courses that begin on September 27th
September 26       Courses that start on September 26th begin today
October 10         Graduation applications Due for December Commencement



                                                   100
November 2                 Mid-Term Academic Appeals Committee Meets
November 11                Veterans Day Observed- Administrative Offices Open
November 23                Thanksgiving Holiday- University Closes at 3PM
November 24-25             Thanksgiving Break
November 28                University Re-opens
November 28                Assignments due for semester based courses (pen and paper, pure online follows course syllabus)
December 9                 Last Day to register for courses that begin on January 11th
December 9                 Fall semester classes end
December 9                 Fall Term Commencement Exercises
December 22                Holiday Break – University Closes at 5PM
                           University Closed through January 2, 2012

*Dates subject to change




                                                          101
FACULTY FOR THE DIVISION OF FIRST PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
The faculty of the University are carefully chosen educators and practitioners with proven ability to provide
students with a meaningful and exciting educational experience relevant to clinical practice. All members of the
faculty possess a mastery of their field and a practical hands-on approach to their specialty. The University is
proud of its faculty, their strengths and diversity, as well as their commitment to the mission of the University.
Hilmir Agustsson, PT, Assistant Professor
BS              University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
MHSc            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Tobi Baldwin, PT, Assistant Professor
BS              University of Western Ontario
MPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Kimberly Bell, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BS              University of Maryland, Baltimore County
MS              University of Maryland
DPT             University of Maryland

Turner A. Blackburn, PT, Assistant Professor
BS              University of Virginia
BS              Medical College of Virginia
MEd             University of Virginia
Peter Bowman, OT, Assistant Professor
Dip COT        Salford College of Technology
MHS            Medical University of South Carolina
OTD            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Annie Burke-Doe, PT, Associate Professor
BA            University of the Pacific
MPT           University of California, San Francisco
PhD           University of the Pacific
Laura Cannaday, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BS            Trinity Christian College
DPT           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Eric Chaconas, PT, Instructor
BS              Towson University
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Lisa A. Chase, PT, Associate Professor
BA              Furman University
MPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MA              University of North Carolina
PhD             Arizona State University
Erin Conrad, PT, Clinical Fellowship Program Director/Assistant Professor
BS             Millsaps College
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MS             California University of Pennsylvania
William Conrad, PT, Assistant Professor
BS             Purdue University
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MS             California University of Pennsylvania



                                                      102
Sue Curfman, PT, Associate Professor
BSPT           University of Pittsburgh
MS             Boston University
DHSc           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Bonnie Decker, OTR, Associate Professor
BS              Western Michigan University
MHS             University of Florida
EdD             University of Central Florida
BCP             American Occupational Therapy Association
Linda Eargle, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BSPT            University of Florida
MIN Ed          Clemson University
DPT             Regis University
Anna M. Edwards, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BS            University of California, San Francisco
MA            San Diego State University
MBA           San Diego State University

Thomas Eggleton, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BS             University of Southern California
MS             University of Southern California
DPT            Rocky Mountain University

Cheryl Frame, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BS             Loma Linda University
MPT            Loma Linda University
MA             Webster University

Gary Gorniak, PT, Professor
BS             State University of New York
PhD            State University of New York
Debra Gray, PT, Transitional DPT Program Director/Assistant Professor
BSPT            Wayne State University
MEd             University of Wisconsin
DPT             Simmons College
Maria-Teresa G. Guadagi, MA, Ed, OTR/L, CHT, Assistant Professor
BS              Florida International University
MS              Phoenix University
Rachel Handren, PT, Assistant Professor
BSPT           Northeastern University
MHSc           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Kathy Hastings, PT, Associate Professor
BS              University of Pennsylvania
MPT             Emory University
EdD             University of Sarasota/Argosy University
Kevin Helgeson, PT, Associate Professor
BS              University of Montana
MS              University of Montana
DHSc            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences




                                                103
Jason Highsmith, PT, Assistant Professor
BS              University of South Florida
MSPT            University of South Florida
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Sherri Holt, PT, Assistant Professor
BSPT             University of Wisconsin
MHSs             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
DPT              University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Karen S. Howell, OTR, Director, Institute of Occupational Therapy and MOT Program Director,
St. Augustine Campus /Professor
BS              Virginia Commonwealth University
MHS             Medical University of South Carolina
PhD             University of South Carolina
Kurt Hubbard, OTR/L, Assistant Professor
BA             State University of New York
MA             Farleigh Dickinson
MS             Columbia University
OTD            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Peter Huijbregts, PT, Assistant Professor
Diploma in PT Hogeschool Eindohoven, The Netherlands
MS               Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
DPT              University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MHS              University of Indianapolis
Anne Hull, OT/L, Assistant Professor
BS             Western Michigan University
MS             University of Michigan
MS             Florida International University

Stacie Iken, Associate Professor
BS               University of North Dakota
MS               Colorado State University
PhD              University of North Dakota

Deborah Jackson, PT, Associate Professor
BS             Lock Haven State University
BS             Rockhurst College
MEd            University of Virginia
PhD            University of Kansas

Kristen Johnson, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BSPT            Quinnipiac College
MS              Texas Woman’s University, Houston
NCS             American Physical Therapy Association
Edward Kane, PT, Associate Professor - CA
BS            University of Massachusetts, Amherst
MSPT          Duke University
MS            University of Southern California
PhD           University of Virginia




                                                  104
Erica Kiernan, OT/PT, Assistant Professor
BS              Old Dominion University
MOT             University of St. Augustine for Health Scinces
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Lara Langdon, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BS             University of California, Santa Barbara
BSPT           California State University, Long Beach
DPT            Massachusetts General Hospital

Joanne Laslovich, PT, Associate Professor - CA
BA              California State University, Sacramento
BSPT            California State University, Fresno
MA              California State University, Fresno
DPT             A.T. Stills University

Steven Laslovich, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BS               California State University, Fresno
DPT              Boston University
CPed             Oklahoma State University, Muskogee

Karey Ledbetter, PT, ACCE/Assistant Professor
BSPT            Bradley University
DPT             Boston University

Alan Chong W. Lee, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BS             University of Nevada, Las Vegas
MSPT           Duke University
MA             State University of California, San Diego
DPT            Creighton University

Tammy LeSage, OTR, Academic Fieldwork Coordinator/Assistant Professor
BS            Judson College
MOT           Texas Women’s University
CHT           Hand Therapy Certification Commission, Inc.
Steven G. Lesh, PT, Associate Professor
BHS             University of Missouri-Columbia
MPA             Arkansas State University, Jonesboro
PhD             Capella University

Cornelia Lieb-Lundell, PT, Assistant Professor - CA
BS              University of Southern California
MA              University of Southern California
PCS             American Physical Therapy Association
Jodi Liphart, PT, Transitional DPT Program Director/Associate Professor
BS              Ohio State University
MS              University of Central Florida
DHSc            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
NCS             American PT Association




                                                105
Cheryl Littleton, OT, Assistant Professor
BS                Colorado State University
OTD               University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Dan Lofald, PhD, Associate Professor
BA             University of Minnesota
MS             Rollins College
PhD            University of Florida
Melanie Lomaglio, PT, Assistant Professor
BScPT          McGill University
MSc            University of British Columbia
Elaine Lonnemann, PT, Assistant Professor
BS            University of Louisville
MScPT         University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Ellen Lowe, PT, DPT Program Director, San Diego Campus/Associate Professor - CA
BS              Boston University
MHS             University of Indianapolis
PhD             Touro University International
Heather Mackrell, Associate Professor - CA
BA             University of Colorado
MS             Texas Women’s University
PhD            Texas Women’s University
Kerry Mallini – PT, Instructor
BS                Furman University
MPT               University of Florida

Cynthia Mathena, OTR, Director, On-Line Education/Associate Professor
BS            Medical University of South Carolina
MS            Old Dominion University
PhD           Walden University

Elisabeth McGee, OT/PT, Instructor
BS             University of Florida
MOT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Marilyn Miller, PT, Associate Professor
BS               University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point
MA               University of Arkansas, Little Rock
PhD              University of Southern California
Ulrike Mitchell, PT, Associate Professor
BA                University of Heidelberg
BSPT              Orthopadische Klinik
MScPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
PhD               Brigham Young University




                                                  106
Lisa Nichols, PT, Assistant Professor
BS               Winthrop College
BSPT             Medical University of South Carolina
MHS              Medical University of South Carolina

Wanda B. Nitsch, PT, Dean, Institute of Physical Therapy and DPT Program Director, San Diego
Campus/Associate Professor
BS             State University of New York
MScPT          University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
PhD            Capella University

Margaret Nonnemacher, PT, DPT Program Director, St. Augustine Campus/Associate Professor
BS            University of Alabama, Birmingham
MS            Troy State University
PhD           University of Florida
Jude Nwoga, Associate Professor
BSc            University of Nigeria
PhD            University of Wisconsin
Judith Olson, OT, MOT Program Director, San Diego Campus/Professor - CA
BA              Mundelein College
MOT             Columbia University
Ph.D.           Wayne State University
Stanley V. Paris, PT, President/Professor Emeritus
FNZSP            Diploma Physiotherapy New Zealand School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago
BIM              Diploma, British Institute of Management
PhD              The Union Institute
Catherine E. Patla, PT, Director, Clinical Fellowship Program/Associate Professor
BS                Fairleigh Dickinson University
PTA               Fairleigh Dickinson University
Certificate in PT University of Pennsylvania
MMSc              Orthopaedics, Emory University
DHSc              University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Ellie Pong, OT/PT, Assistant Professor
BA              Louisiana College
MOT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Mary Ann Riopel, PT, ACCE/Assistant Professor
MPT           Hahnemann University
DPT           Regis University

Jeffrey A. Rot, PT, Associate Professor
BS               Illinois State University
MPT              Shenandoah University
DHSc             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
OCS              American PT Association
Judi Schack-Dugre, PT, Assistant Professor
BSPT           Florida International University
MBA            Rollins College
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences




                                                 107
Megann Schooley, PT, Assistant Professor
BA            Lynn University
MPT           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
DPT           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Erin Schwier, OT, Assistant Professor
BS             San Diego State University
MA             University of Southern California
OTD            University of Southern California
Rob Sillevis, PT, Associate Professor
PT                Heerlen Academy, The Netherlands
DPT               University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Danny D. Smith, PT, Associate Professor
BS             University of Tennessee
MA             East Tennessee State University
DHSc           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Jeff Snodgrass, OT, Associate Professor
BSOT             Eastern Kentucky
MPH              East Tennessee State University
PhD              Touro University International
Robert Stanborough, PT, Assistant Professor
BFA            Ball State University
BPT            Hogeschool van Amsterdam
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MHSc           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Dee Stanfield, OT, Assistant Professor
BS              Medical College of Georgia
MHE             Medical College of Georgia
OTD             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Mark Strickland, PT, Instructor
BSPT            University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Nicolaas van den Heever, OT, Assistant Instructor
BS               University of Stellenbosch, South Africa

Tony Varela, PT, Assistant Professor
BS              University of North Florida
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MHSc            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Jim Viti, PT, Assistant Professor
BS               University of Maryland at Baltimore
MScPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
OCS              American PT Association
DPT              University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Julie Watson, OTR/L, Instructor
BS              University of Maryland
MOT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MHS             University of Florida

Diane Wertheimer-Gale, OTR/L, Academic Fieldwork Coordinator – CA/Assistant Professor
BS, OT         Wayne State University
MBA           University of California, Irvine


                                                   108
DIVISION OF POST-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
Continuing Professional Education (CPE)
Manual Therapy Fellowship & Orthopaedic Residency
Post-Professional Doctor of Health Science (DHSc)
Post-Professional Doctor of Education (EdD)
General
The University conducts continuing education programs for graduate physical and occupational therapists
and, when appropriate, physical and occupational therapist assistants. Degree programs are offered for
graduate physical and occupational therapists. Program offerings are listed below.

CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION (CPE)
Certifications
        Manual Therapy Certification (MTC)
        Primary Care Certification (PCC)
        Sports Physical Therapy Certification (STC)
        Cranio-mandibular Head, Neck, and Facial Pain (CFC)
        Neurology Through the Life Span (NCC)

General
The University was founded on, and what was to become the University of St. Augustine for Health
Sciences by conducting continuing professional education seminars in 1966. Admission to continuing
professional education seminars is open to all appropriately licensed health care professionals.

While the University supports clinical specialization, it also supports cross-disciplinary and multi-skilled
practices. The University offers its seminars to multiple professionals - provided their education and
licensure enable them to use the instruction provided.

While every effort is made to allow therapists to attend any seminar of their choosing, certain advanced
seminars require prerequisite seminars. Additionally, seminars are structured to be integrated with
specialty certification, transitional and post-professional advanced degree programs. The University
reserves the right to restrict attendance to only those professionals whom it determines have appropriate
qualifications. Health practitioners other than physical and occupational therapists (e.g., MDs, PTAs,
COTAs) may attend selected seminars, provided their license enables them to practice at least 90% of the
content of the seminar. Professional licensure required for specific seminars is published elsewhere in this
catalog and in seminar brochures.

Continuing education seminars may be taken in a series toward a clinical certification. The University
has long held that continuing education should be structured toward a meaningful goal. Thus, in 1981,
when a group of therapists who had taken manual therapy courses from the school asked to be examined,
the faculty agreed and Certification began.

Certification programs offer a series of seminars, which culminate in a comprehensive examination
(written, oral and practical testing to define competency in the selected clinical area). Certifications are an
integral part of the University’s transitional and post-professional degrees.




                                                     109
Certification Preparation and Exam is a six-day process which provides a review and update of the
contents of each prerequisite seminar. The objective is the safe application and interpretation of advanced
clinical skills. Results are confidential. Only the names of those who pass are published. Some attend the
week purely for the value of review. Some attend more than twice before taking the exams. Those who
fail to satisfactorily complete all of the components of the Certification process may be re-tested.

Seminars leading to Certification may be taken for either CEUs or toward graduate credit. Graduate credit
is earned by completing distance education coursework after attending the seminars. CEUs are awarded
for seminar course attendance unless students enroll for graduate credit. CEUs are invalid once students
enroll in the distance education portion of the seminar course for academic credit. This policy is disclosed
on continuing education certificates. If all of the seminars leading to Certification are taken for graduate
credit, 17 - 19 hours are awarded toward an advanced degree (varies by specialty track).

Certification Week
A candidate may apply to take the Certification Preparation and Examination Week provided he/she has
either taken or will have taken all the prerequisite seminars for the chosen Certification prior to the
Certification Week.

NOTE: Early registration is encouraged, as waiting lists often develop. The special refund policy for
Certifications is designed to discourage late withdrawal.

Opportunities for Occupational Therapists
Occupational therapists, occupational therapist assistants and physical therapist assistants may attend
specified seminars.

Publication
After successful completion of Certification, the therapist gives permission for his/her name to be added
to our Certification Graduate List. This list is made freely available to professional colleagues and for
referrals and is a highly regarded resource. The list is on our website www.usa.edu.

CERTIFICATION CURRICULA
All seminars in bold face type are offered by the University of St. Augustine. Call (800) 241-1027 to
register for these seminars or visit the University’s website at www.usa.edu.

The S1 and E1 seminars are requirements for most Certifications and do not have to be repeated when
obtaining more than one Certification. Each Certification is summarized below, along with who may
attend, applicable CEUs and seminar tuition amounts (additional tuition charges are applied if seminar is
taken for graduate credit).

There are additional Certification track credit requirements for transitional degree students. The
Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics (FCO) (2 credits) is a requirement for all degree seeking students
and Clinical Triage (1-4 credits) is required of students in the Primary Care track.




                                                   110
Manual Therapy Certification (MTC)
Seminars                                            Who Attends     CEU    Tuition
Intro. to Spinal Evaluation and Manipulation (S1)         PT         3.5    $895
Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation (E1)                PT/OT      3.0    $745
Extremity Integration (E2)                                PT         2.1    $595
Myofascial Manipulation (MF1)                             PT         2.0    $595
Advanced Pelvis Lumbar and Thoracic Spine (S2)            PT         2.1    $595
Advanced Cervical and Upper Thoracic Spine (S3)           PT         2.7    $795
Functional Analysis: Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex (S4)        PT         1.5    $545
Certification in Manual Therapy (MTC)                     PT         3.2    $995
                                         Totals                     20.1

Primary Care Certification (PCC)
Seminars
Intro. to Spinal Evaluation and Manipulation (S1)         PT         3.5    $895
Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation (E1)                PT/OT      3.0    $745
Medical Diagnostics                                       PT/OT      2.0    $595
Pharmacology - Online                                     PT/OT      2.0    $195
Applied Musculoskeletal Imaging for Physical Therapists   PT         2.1    $545
Managed Care: Best Practice in Rehabilitation             PT/OT       .8    $245
Certification in Primary Care (PCC)                       PT         3.2    $995
                                         Totals                     16.6

Sports Physical Therapy Certification (STC)
Through an arrangement with the *North American Sports Medicine Institute (NASMI), the University
offers a collaborative Certification in Sports Physical Therapy. Call NASMI for course information and
scheduling at 1-503-642-4432 or visit their website at www.rehabeducation.com.

Seminars                                            Who Attends     CEU    Tuition
Intro. to Spinal Evaluation and Manipulation (S1)         PT         3.5    $825
Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation (E1)                PT/OT      3.0    $745
*Foundations/Competencies in Sports PT                    PT/PTA     3.6    $545
                                                          ATC/OT/
                                                          COTA
*Orthopaedic Management of Upper
Quarter Injuries                                          PT/PTA     2.0    $485
                                                          ATC/OT/
                                                          COTA
*Orthopaedic Management of Lower
Quarter Injuries                                          PT/PTA     2.0    $485
                                                          ATC/OT/
                                                          COTA
*Functional Exercise Training and Rehabilitation          PT/PTA     1.8    $485
                                                          ATC/OT/
                                                          COTA
STC Certification in Sports                               PT         3.2    $995
                                           Totals                   19.1




                                                    111
Cranio-mandibular Head, Neck, and Facial Pain (CFC)
Seminars                                Who Attends                 CEU      Tuition
Intro. to Spinal Evaluation and Manipulation (S1)         PT          3.5      $895
Advanced Cervical and Upper Thoracic Spine (S3)           PT          2.7      $795
Basic Cranio-Facial (CF1)                                 PT          2.0      $595
Intermediate Cranio-Facial (CF2)                          PT          2.0      $595
Advanced Cranio-Facial (CF3)                              PT          2.0      $595
State of the Art Cranio-Facial (CF4)                      PT          2.0      $595
Certification in Cranio-mandibular, Head, Neck
          & Facial Pain (CFC)                             PT          3.2      $995
                                         Totals                      17.4

Certifications Under Development

Neurology Through the Life Span Certification (NCC)
Seminars                                  Who Attends                 CEU      Tuition
Neuroscience/Neuropathology                                Under Development
Motor Control and Motor Learning                     PT/OT        2.1     $545
Musculoskeletal Considerations for
    Neurologic Dysfunction                                  Under Development
The Pediatric Client with Neurological Impairment     PT/OT        2.9     $625
The Adult Client with Neurological Dysfunction              Under Development
The Older Adult with Neurological Impairment          PT/OT        2.9     $625
Certification in Neurology Through the Life Span            Under Development


Additional seminars are available for continuing professional education and elective credits in the degree
program and are described in the "Transitional and Post-Professional Courses" section of this Catalog.




                                                    112
REGISTRATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR CPE AND CERTIFICATIONS

To register for continuing professional education and Certification seminars, write, call, fax or e-mail the
University. On-line registration is available at the University’s Website: www.usa.edu

Write:
University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
1 University Boulevard, St. Augustine, FL 32086

Call: In U.S. and Canada 1-800-241-1027 or (904) 826-0084

Fax: (904) 826-0085

Website: http://www.usa.edu

E-mail: info@usa.edu

A $100 non-refundable deposit is required when registering for continuing education seminars. Seminar
tuition is due 30 days prior to the first day of the class. If you call to register, your place in the seminar
will be held pending receipt of deposit within ten working days. Payment can be made with check, money
order, Visa or MasterCard. In the event of a company-paid registration, purchase order numbers will be
accepted when provided by that company’s authorized personnel.

For CPE seminars, with two weeks notice of cancellation by the student, tuition will be either transferred to
another seminar, put into a "funds on hold" account, or the balance will be refunded. Cancellation up to three
working days prior to the start of the seminar, 50% of the balance will be refunded. With three working days
notice, 100% of the balance can be transferred to another seminar or put into a "funds on hold" account. No
refunds will be issued. Transfer of funds is limited to two seminars. Funds are held in the “funds on hold”
account for two years. After the seminar begins, no refunds are issued or transfers allowed.

In the event of company-paid registration, the company has the right to cancel under the above policy.
The therapist will be contacted, and may be given the option to remain registered for the seminar and be
the responsible party for the tuition.

A 50% non-refundable, non-transferable deposit must accompany Certification seminar registrations.
Balance is due 60 days prior to the start date of the seminar. Refunds requested 90 days or more before
the seminar begins permit a transfer of only 50% of the deposit to another seminar, with any balance paid
being fully refundable. Cancellation and request for transfers for the Certification seminars received less
than 90 days before commencement of the seminar will result in a loss of the deposit. These provisions
were added to assist the University in planning for staff and facilities, and to discourage last minute
changes in plans by seminar registrants since the University is unable to fill vacancies with other
candidates on short notice.

Tuition and Fees
The seminar calendar and the University’s website, www.usa.edu, include current tuition charges.
Calendars are advertised widely in physical therapy and occupational therapy publications. The calendar
can also be obtained by calling the University at 1-800-241-1027.




                                                    113
Advance Payment Program
The Advance Payment Program enables employers or individuals who provide advance deposits of
$3,000 (minimum) to receive a 10% discount for the next twelve months. This discount cannot be
combined with any other discount. This also protects the advance payor from increases in tuition.
Deposit must be received a minimum of three months prior to use of funds.

Retention of Student Records
The University retains CPE student records indefinitely.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs)
Enrolling and attending our continuing education seminars qualifies the therapist for a certificate of
attendance which confers continuing education units. These CEUs are accepted by most state licensing
bodies toward maintaining the professional license.

Seminar Approvals/Accreditation
The University of St. Augustine has been approved as an Authorized Provider by the International
Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET), 1760 Old Meadow Road, Suite 500,
McLean, VA 22102. In obtaining this approval, the University of St. Augustine has demonstrated that it
complies with the ANSI/IACET Standards which are widely recognized as standards of good practice
internationally. As a result of their Authorized Provider membership status, the University of St.
Augustine is authorized to offer IACET CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET
Standards.” All University seminars are recognized by the Florida Physical Therapy Association and
meet licensure requirements for Florida physical therapists and by the Florida Occupational Therapy
Association and meet licensure requirements for Florida occupational therapists.

Seminar Availability
Seminars are held nationwide, according to interest. Schedules are completed a year in advance and are
advertised widely in physical therapy and occupational therapy publications. The schedule can be viewed
on the University’s web site at www.usa.edu. Seminar calendars are also available by calling 1-800-241-
1027. The University seeks to offer each of its listed seminars at least once annually, and usually
eliminates seminars that are not held at least every other year from its regular listing.

Waiting Lists
If the seminar for which you apply is full, you have the option of being placed on a waiting list,
transferring to another seminar or receiving a refund. Graduate students enrolled in any of the
University’s transitional or post-professional programs have priority on the waiting list. Early registration
is recommended.

Cancellation by the University
The University does not wish to cancel advertised seminars. However, it is sometimes necessary.
Registrants are notified a minimum of two weeks prior to the seminar start date. The University is not
responsible for reimbursement of expenses, including non-refundable airline tickets.

Hours of Attendance
Unless otherwise noted, all seminars begin at 9 a.m. on the first day, and run from seven to eight hours
daily, not including the lunch hour. All sessions must be attended. Should more than two hours of any one
seminar be missed, the policy of the University is to exclude the student from further participation in that
seminar, at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor will determine whether missing that particular
part of the seminar compromises the student’s understanding of subsequent sessions, or may place a



                                                    114
fellow student or future patient in jeopardy. The Certificate of Attendance may be withheld as the stated
hours may no longer be valid. (Remedial activity may be required).

Sequencing of Seminars
Some seminars of the University require that a prerequisite seminar be taken first. Contact the CPE
Registration Office for more information.

Seminars from Other Organizations
The University is unable to recognize prerequisite seminars given by instructors outside of the University
for continuing education courses.

Accommodations
Most continuing education seminars outside of St. Augustine are held at hotels or at sponsoring clinical
sites. Securing room accommodations may be accomplished by contacting the hotel directly or through a
travel agent. Please note that the University is not responsible for the standard of your accommodations.
On occasions where securing conference space at a hotel is linked to patronage of guest rooms, those that
elect to stay at the designated hotel will have priority of registration.

Dress
Dress should be appropriate for attending a professional conference. Good judgment is required when
attending seminars held in a hotel that is frequented by other professionals. For the practical sessions, usually
beginning the first day, the registrant must be prepared to expose the area under examination. For extremity
seminars, all peripheral joints with the exception of the hip will need to be exposed. Shorts or loose slacks are
preferred for lab sessions. For spinal seminars, the entire spine from occiput to sacrum must be exposed except
for a narrow bra or bikini top. One-piece bathing suits that do not easily expose the iliac crest and sacrum are
unacceptable as they may interfere with the learning process of other registrants.

Physical Health
Instructors maintain the right to discontinue instruction to any student who is in unsatisfactory health due to
illness.

Students who are pregnant must inform the instructor. At the student’s discretion, and with permission of
the instructor, she may be a full participant with the exception of manipulation techniques that involve
stretching the soft tissues around the pelvis and subcranial regions.

Co-Sponsorship of Seminars
The University welcomes inquiries to co-sponsor seminars. Generally, the University requires the co-
sponsor to provide space and amenities at a convenient and suitable location, as well as to help promote
local and regional attendance. In return, the University will provide for several free seminar registrations
to persons identified by the co-sponsoring hospital, school, clinic or chapter. Further information is
available from the Director of Continuing Professional Education.

Release of Liability
It is required that students registering for a seminar with a laboratory component sign a release of liability
form. The form is distributed at the seminar and completed before commencement of the program.




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ORTHOPAEDIC RESIDENCY AND                                         ORTHOPAEDIC                   MANUAL
THERAPY FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS
The university is offering practicing clinicians the opportunity to enhance their clinical skills through our
Orthopaedic Physical Therapy Residency Program and our Orthopaedic Manual Therapy Fellowship
Program.

ORTHOPAEDIC PHYSICAL THERAPY RESIDENCY
Program Mission
The mission of the Orthopaedic Residency program is to develop advanced practitioners of orthopaedic
physical therapy who demonstrate superior post professional clinical skills, advanced knowledge in an
area of clinical practice, and the ability to function as consultants, advocates, and educators for their peers
and patients.

Program Objectives
Through completion of the Orthopaedic Residency program, the resident will:
       • Apply skills for examination of orthopaedic patient cases as per the Description of Specialty
          Practice (DSP).
       • Analyze the outcomes of the patient examination to formulate an evaluation statement.
       • Apply and modify skills for intervention of orthopaedic patient cases.
       • Utilize evidence-based information to identify patient management.
       • Plan and implement Physical Therapy management strategies, which take into consideration
          aspects of patient psychosocial, medical and functional needs.
       • Plan and implement Physical Therapy management strategies, which relate directly to
          functional improvement.
       • Demonstrate appropriate decision making for patient care.
       • Communicate effectively with patient and patient related services and administrative
          personnel.
       • Identify strengths and weakness in their learning environment through reflective thinking and
          appropriate communications.
       • Apply an ethical standard of clinical practice.
       • Be prepared to apply to take the ABPTS OCS examination

Admission Requirements
The Orthopaedic Residency program is intended for recent graduates, as well as, clinicians who want to
accelerate their current clinical orthopaedic knowledge and skill.

All students who apply to the Orthopaedic Residency program must complete an application/admissions
process. Documents that must be submitted include:
    • Application for Admission
    • $50 processing fee
    • Official transcripts from all previous institutions of higher learning
    • Two references from professional colleagues
    • Copy of professional state license
    • Current resume which lists continuing education involvement and professional publications
    • Current photograph
    • Essay



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Program Requirements

Clinical
    •      160 one-on-one mentoring in the clinic over the duration of the residency.
    •      Additional direct patient care hours (minimum of 1030 hours) including treatment in the
           following body regions: Cervical Spine, Thoracic Spine, Lumbar Spine, Pelvis - SI,
           Craniomandibular, Hip, Knee, Ankle, Foot, Shoulder, Elbow, Wrist and Hand.
Didactic
    •      Post professional training in examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, orthopaedic skills, and
           patient management based upon the practice dimensions described in the Description of Specialty
           Practice for Orthopaedic Physical Therapy.
    •      Post professional training in human anatomy and physiology, movement science,
           pathophysiology, orthopaedic medical/surgical interventions, evidence-based orthopaedic
           physical theory and practice, critical inquiry for evidence-based practice, examination and
           procedural interventions. Body regions covered include cranial/mandibular, cervical spine,
           thoracic spine/ribs, lumbar spine, pelvic girdle/sacroiliac/coccyx/abdomen, shoulder/shoulder
           girdle, arm/elbow, wrist/hand, hip, thigh/knee, leg/ankle/foot.
    •      Participants can also earn academic credit towards the T-DPT, or EdD programs at the University
           of St. Augustine.

Scholarly Activities
   • Participation in journal clubs, poster presentations, case rounds and case report presentations.
   • Opportunity to teach and mentor entry level DPT students.

Program Tuition and Costs
Residencies are available around the United States, based on mentor availability. Residencies are a
minimum of twelve months and a maximum of 36 months. Residents will be mentored in an outpatient
orthopaedic clinic by a qualified mentor while completing didactic components. Mentor fees for
residencies are negotiable between resident and mentor. Seminar and online course fees average between
$2,000.00 to $6,000.00. There is a non refundable $50.00 application processing fee, and an
administrative cost of $1,000.00 per semester ($3,000.00 total). Residents will also attend the APTA's CI
credentialing course, currently offered for $150.00.

Credentialing
The university submitted its application in 2010 to APTA to become a credentialed Orthopaedic
Residency program.




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ORTHOPAEDIC MANUAL THERAPY FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM
The Manual Therapy Fellowship at the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences provides a
focused curriculum with advanced clinical and didactic instruction that is intensive and extensive. The
Fellowship identifies advanced competency in manual therapy learning and practice as the primary
achievement.

Program Mission
The mission of the Orthopaedic Manual Therapy Fellowship program is to identify advanced competency
in manual therapy learning and practice.

Program Objectives
Through completion of this program, the Fellow will:
       • Apply advanced skills for examination of orthopaedic patient cases as per the Description of
          Advanced Specialty Practice (DASP) and AAOMPT Education Standards of Practice.
       • Analyze the outcomes of the patient examination to formulate an evaluation statement.
       • Apply and modify advanced skills for intervention of orthopaedic patient cases.
       • Plan and implement Physical Therapy management strategies which take into consideration
          preventative aspects of patient documentation and employment needs of the patient.
       • Plan and implement Physical Therapy management strategies which relate directly to
          functional improvement.
       • Demonstrate appropriate decision making for patient care.
       • Apply evidence based practice with patient care.
       • Formulate a research investigation.
       • Communicate effectively with patient and patient related services and administrative
          personnel.
       • Identify strengths and weakness in their learning environment through reflective thinking and
          appropriate communications.
       • Apply an ethical standard of clinical practice.
       • Be prepared to apply to become a fellow of American Academy of Orthopeadic Manipulative
          Therapy (AAOMPT).

Admission Requirements
The Orthopaedic Manual Therapy Fellowship program is open to any physical therapist who has a
minimum of two (2) years of clinical practice in orthopaedics or has completed an APTA credentialed
Orthopaedic Residency and has completed the University of St. Augustine E1 and S1 seminars. The
participant must be licensed or eligible for licensure in the state in which mentoring will be provided.

All students who apply to the Orthopaedic Manual Therapy Fellowship program must undergo an
application/admissions process. Documents that must be submitted include:
    • Application for Admission
    • $50 processing fee
    • Official transcripts from all previous institutions of higher learning
    • Two references from professional colleagues
    • Copy of professional state license
    • Current resume which lists continuing education involvement and professional publications
    • Current photograph
    • Essay



                                                 118
Period of Fellowship
The University of St. Augustine offers full time and part time fellowships at our St. Augustine and San
Diego campuses, as well as, off campus sites. The fellowship period is a minimum of 12 months and
maximum of 36 months. Fellowships are available around the United States, based on mentor
availability. Mentors are required to be a Fellow of AAOMPT.

Responsibility and Learning Activities
Participants are responsible for their progress in the fellowship program. The fellowship is a demanding
clinical learning experience designed to bring out the best in each candidate. Expected learning
experiences will be developed at the beginning of the fellowship during discussions between the
participant and the clinical faculty. However, both the faculty and participant must remain flexible to
possible changes that may occur in the schedule.

Clinical
    • The fellow in training will achieve in the program 440 patient care hours, of which 160 are
         mentored hours. A total of 100 spinal hours and 60 extremity hours of didactic work will be in
         manual therapy.

Didactic
   • Advanced training in examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, in orthopaedic manual therapy
        skills, and patient management based upon the practice dimensions described in the Advanced
        Description of Specialty Practice for Orthopaedic Physical Therapy and the AAOMPT Education
        Standards of Practice. Body regions covered include cranial/mandibular, cervical spine, thoracic
        spine/ribs, lumbar spine, pelvic girdle/sacroiliac/coccyx/abdomen, shoulder/shoulder girdle,
        arm/elbow, wrist/hand, hip, thigh/knee, leg/ankle/foot.
   • Courses include: Evidence Based Research, Medical Diagnostics, Foundations of Clinical
        Orthopaedics, Professional Communications, Educational Theory, Basic Craniofascial,
        Pharmacology, Imaging, Clinical Instructor Credentialing, E1: Extremity Evaluation and
        Manipulation, E2: Extremity Integration, S1: Intro to spinal evaluation and Manipulation, S2:
        Advanced Evaluation and Manipulation of Lumbar Thoracic Spine, S3: Advanced Evaluation and
        Manipulation of CranioFacial, Cervical and Upper Thoracic Spine, S4: Functional Analysis and
        Management of Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex, MF1: Myofacial Manipulation, Manual Therapy
        Certification or Review, Thrust, and Imaging Seminar.
   • Participants can also earn academic credit towards the T-DPT, or EdD programs at the University
        of St. Augustine.

Scholarly Activities
   • Produce a scholarly product which is disseminated to the professional community, e.g poster
        and/or platform presentation, publication in peer reviewed journal
   • Participation in journal clubs and case rounds
   • Opportunity to teach and mentor entry level DPT students
   • Attendance at AAOMPT annual conference

Program Tuition and Costs
Mentor fees for fellowships are negotiable between fellow and mentor. The cost of the fellowship is
variable depending on the background of didactic work of the applicant. Seminar and online course fees
could average between $2,000.00 to $6,000.00. There is a non refundable $50.00 application processing
fee, and an administrative cost of $1,000.00 per semester ($3,000.00 total). Fellows will also attend the
APTA's CI credentialing course, currently offered for $150.00, (included in the range of total).




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Credentialing
The university received approval from APTA to become a credentialed orthopaedic manual therapy
program in 2003 and was re-credentialed in 2008.




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Doctor of Health Sciences (DHSc)
Mission Statement
The Doctor of Health Sciences Degree is focused on teaching students to comprehend and adapt scientific
knowledge and apply it in a manner that exemplifies clinical excellence. The Doctor of Health Science
degree shall prepare occupational and physical therapists to become leaders in the areas of clinical
practice and academia through the development of advanced and concentrated practice skills. The degree
will assist students in making meaningful contributions in their respective professions.

Accreditation
The Doctor of Health Sciences is accredited by the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC).
The Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and Training Council is listed by the U.S.
Department of Education as a nationally recognized accrediting agency, and is a recognized member of
the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). It is your responsibility to ensure that the
institution at which you work/teach will accept any credit or degree earned through a nationally
accredited program.

Program Objectives
Upon completion of the DHSc program, student will:
   • Demonstrate scholarly writing skills.
   • Demonstrate pedagogically sound presentation skills.
   • Demonstrate advanced research skills directed toward the understanding of the current
       body of research and knowledge in a given field of health and clinical sciences.
   • Demostrate the ability to think logically, critically, creatively and independently.
   • Develop proficiency in assembling, synthesizing and presenting knowledge through the use
       of technological and other information services.
   • Comprehend the critical elements in the role and scope of health sciences and clinical
       eduation.
   • Develop knowledge of fundamental concepts from which one can develop a rational and
       systematic approach to solving problems in health sciences and clinical education.
   • Demostrate the ability to conceptualize individual activities with a sense of independence
       in discovering information, fostering new ideas and solving health sciences and clinical
       education problems.
   • Synthesize and apply knowledge in the form of a Scholarly Project.

Admission Requirements
Admission is open to physical and occupational therapists that have a master's degree or a clinical
doctoral degree (DPT, OTD, etc) and are currently licensed and/or practicing in their profession.
Applicants must also have a minimum of three years of clinical experience.

All students entering the Doctor of Health Science program must undergo an application/admissions
process. Documents that must be submitted include:
    • Application for Admission
    • $50 processing fee
    • Official transcripts from all previous institutions of higher learning
    • Two recommendations from professional colleagues
    • Writing assessment
    • Current resume or CV
    • Copy of professional license, if applicable




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International Students Applying for Admission
Foreign-trained candidates who do not require a student visa can be considered for admission. To apply
for admission, foreign-trained candidates must submit the following, in addition to the items listed above:
    • A credentialing evaluation from an agency recognized by the National Association of Credential
        Evaluation Services (NACES) that provides evidence of training at a level equivalent to that of a
        Masters Degree earned at an accredited institution in the United States.
    • An official TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score report, if education was
        completed in a language other than English. A minimum score of 550 (paper-based testing), 210
        (computer-based testing) or 83 (IBT–Internet based testing) is required.

Notification of Status
Each applicant will be notified by email or letter from the Enrollment Services office of his/her admission
status after all required application materials have been reviewed by the Admissions Committee.
Qualified candidates may be invited to participate in an interview.

Each student who is admitted to the program must successfully complete the *Introduction to Doctoral
Studies in order to fully matriculate in the DHSc program

Program Overview
Students must complete a total of 60 credits. There are 49 required credits of core courses included in the
curriculum. Of these 49 credits, fifteen credits are based on clinical coursework and credit can be obtained
for certifications, residency or fellowship programs. The additional 11 credits are completed through
electives, independent studies, teaching internships or a combination of all three.

Courses in the DHSc program are offered in several formats. Students will take part in designing a
curriculum that can be online, in weekend seminar format or a combination of both. There are two
required residencies.

Transfer Credits
The University will consider accepting graduate credits from other accredited institutions. Please refer to the
transfer credit policy in the catalog for further information on transfer credits.

Academic Requirement
To remain in the DHSc program, the student must:
    • Maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA.
    • Complete a minimum of one (1) course within three months (12 weeks) of acceptance and a
       minimum of 6 credits within a calendar year.

Time Limit
Students must complete all DHSc program requirements within five years. An extension of up to two and
a half years may be requested. If the Program Director approves the extension, there is an extension fee of
$333 per semester.

Incomplete Coursework
If a student cannot complete the required work within the predetermined timeframe, he/she will receive a
grade of Incomplete (“I”). The student must then complete the work by the new assigned due date to
receive a letter grade. No further extension will be permitted. If the student does not complete the
requirements within the approved time, the “I” grade will automatically become an Incomplete/Fail
(“I/F”) on his/her transcript.




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DOCTOR OF HEALTH SCIENCES (DHSc) Curricula
Required Courses                                                     Semester Hours
EDF 7000     Introduction to Doctoral Studies                               3
EDF 7100     Research Methods and Statistics                                6
EDF 7125     Organizational Leadership and Policy in Health Care            3
EDF 7150     Foundations of Teaching and Learning                           3
EDF 7200     Residency I                                                    2
EDF 7225     Residency II                                                   2
EDF 7300     Oral and Written Comprehensive Exam                            3
EDF 7195     Scholarship Project                                           12
             Total Required Credits                                        34
Clinical Courses (each student will choose 15 credits, course examples are included below, other
courses available include the manual therapy series, cranio-mandibular series, gerontology,
pediatrics and other advanced clinical options)
                                                                     Semester Hours
HSC 7300       Imaging                                                         2
HSC 7400       Differential Diagnosis                                          2
HSC 7401       Pharmacology                                                    2
HSC 7360       Spinal Instability                                              2
BSC 7001       Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                            2
BSC 7301       Ergonomics                                                      2
HSC 7320       Advancing Your Hand Therapy Skills                              2
HSC 7413       Upper Extremity Imaging                                         2
HSC 7210       Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation                           2
PHT 7220       Myofascial Manipulation                                         2
TBA            Application of Motor Control                                    2
TBA            Electrotherapy                                                  2

Elective Courses (each student will choose 11 credits from the following)
EDF 7160       Curriculum Development in Health Sciences Education            3
EDF 7170       Motivational Theory in Health Care Education                   3
EDF 7180       Technology in Higher Education                                 3
EDF 7190       Current Issues in Health Sciences Education                    3
EDF 7250       Teaching Internship                                     Variable
IDS 7455       Independent Study                                            1-4
               Total Credits                                                 60




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TUITION AND FEES – Doctor of Health Sciences (DHSc)
Tuition for online courses is $443.00 per credit hour. Seminar attendance and associated coursework
varies by location and length of course. See www.usa.edu for more information on seminar availability,
location and topic.

Estimated Cost of the Program
The following is presented only as a guide for the student. The estimated costs set forth below cover course tuition
and examination fees. Textbooks, travel and lodging are additional.

    •   Tuition for coursework                                            $443.00 /credit (60 hours)
    •   Application Fee                                                     $50.00
    •   Graduation Fee (includes stock black regalia)                     $150.00*
    •   Estimated total for DHSc                                        $26,600.00
        *If the graduate wishes to purchase custom regalia, the Graduation Fee is $650.00
This figure may be slightly less if credits are transferred from another university. Students must purchase their
reading materials from an outside source. An estimated cost of textbooks and journals for the program is $2,000.00.




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DOCTOR OF HEALTH SCIENCES (DHSc) Course Descriptions:
Delivery of Doctor of Health Sciences (DHSc) coursework
Courses in the Doctor of Health Sciences program are offered in a distance format (excluding seminar
attendance). The online courses consist of web-based text with extensive graphics, videos, and audio
clips. There are opportunities provided for faculty-to-student and student-to-student synchronous and
asynchronous interactive collaboration via Bulletin Board assignments, chat rooms, and email.

Course Numbers 7000-7499

BSC 7001 - Foundations of Clinical Orthopaedics                                           Hours: 2
This is an online self-study course discussing the foundations of orthopaedics and manipulative therapy.
The history and development of orthopaedics and specifically manual therapy are explored. Arthrology
and biomechanics are discussed, with special attention to tissue biomechanics and arthrokinematics.
Emphasis is placed on spinal anatomy and movement. The University's philosophy of examination,
treatment, and pain management is introduced but attention is also given to other diagnostic classification
systems. Classifications and indications for manipulation are reviewed. The course provides an
introduction to the evidence-informed clinical practice paradigm teaching the student to combine various
sources of knowledge in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of orthopaedic dysfunctions.
Analysis, synthesis and evaluation will be demonstrated through a final portfolio of evidence based
research and a student’s critique of the current literature and design of a hypothetical study.

BSC 7301 - Ergonomics                                                                     Hours: 2
This online course examines a variety of aspects of work related ergonomics. Participants will review the
history of ergonomics, ergonomic statistics, client centered framework of practice, the Americans with
disabilities act, universal design, posture, standing, sitting and computer work station evaluation,
occupational risks, cumulative trauma disorders/repetitive strain injuries/tendonitis, and low back pain.
Worker assessment and work hardening are reviewed before carrying out a worksite assessment. Injury
prevention, ergonomic equipment, ergonomic resources, and documentation are also discussed.

The course requires students to complete two projects: a computer workstation evaluation and a work site
evaluation. Bulletin board (BB) interaction is used to address subjects and respond to other students
comments.

Questions are addressed, papers written and projects written up including a work site evaluation report
letter. DHSc students will have an additional project demonstrating analysis, synthesis and evaluation
through a final portfolio of evidence based research and a student’s critique of the current literature and
design of a hypothetical study.

EDF 7000 - Introduction to Doctoral Studies-Cornerstone Course                            Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to knowledge and skills needed to be a successful doctoral student
including learning theory, learning styles, evidenced based decision making, and ethics in rehabilitation
sciences. Students will also acquire basic skills needed for online learning. Self assessment and personal
goal setting are integrated into the course content. Prerequisite: none




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EDF 7100 - Research Methods and Statistics                                                      Hours: 6
Although there are many ways of knowing, it is only through the rigor and systematic methods of science
that we can be confident in the quality of our empirical claims and conclusions that we make about the
world. This course is a graduate level introduction to research methods, sampling, experimental design
and statistics. The focus of the course is the conduct of educational research. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of Philosophy of Knowledge

EDF 7125 - Organizational Leadership and Policy in Health Care                                  Hours: 3
Effective organizational leadership in healthcare is critical for developing, implementing, sustaining, and
modifying appropriate policies to address major health concerns including controlling costs, increasing
access to services, improving the quality of health services, and enhancing the effectiveness of program
outcomes. A skilled workforce, ethical and trained leaders, and effective policies are integral to the
implementation of programs and services that successfully promote the public’s health. The goal of this
course is to examine the conceptual, methodological, and ethical foundations of healthcare leadership and
administration leading to the development and analysis of health related policy at all levels. The course
will focus on analyzing the process of policymaking in the formulation, implementation, adoption, and
modification phases of current health policy through effective leadership and administration. Prerequisite:
Successful completion of Foundations of Teaching and Learning

EDF 7150 - Foundations of Teaching and Learning                                                 Hours: 3
Patient care, clinical administrative management, and academic appointments are areas where
practitioners have teaching obligations. Students in this course will acquire a working knowledge of the
mechanisms by which adults learn, understand and remember. Students will apply these mechanisms to
the study of teaching strategies and instructional decision-making. Topics will include cognition,
information processing and assessment, critical thinking and the application of this knowledge for
teaching. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Research Methods and Statistics

EDF 7160 - Curriculum Development in Health Sciences Education                                  Hours: 3
Through application of sound educational principles, theories, and research evidence, the student will
demonstrate knowledge of learner-centered curriculum development and program assessment for academic,
clinical, and staff development settings. Curriculum development will include identifying program philosophy
and outcomes, developing competency statements, writing course objectives, and selecting appropriate learning
activities and evaluation methods. Problem-based learning will be explored for its application to health sciences
education. Both initial curriculum development and strategic plans for change will occur in collaboration with
external constituencies and within the context of current and future trends in health care, community and societal
needs, and the health care environment. Prerequisite: Successful completion of core coursework

EDF 7170 - Motivational Theory in Health Care Education                                         Hours: 3
This course is designed as an exploration of motivational research in psychology and education. The
course focuses specifically on different theories of motivation, and how classroom, school, work, and
social environments shape and influence individuals’ motivation. The connection between teacher
efficacy and student and teacher achievement will be examined. Prerequisite: Successful completion of
core coursework.

EDF 7180 - Technology in Higher Education                                                       Hours: 3
It is important for educators to understand both the potentials and pitfalls of technology in education. This
course will provide the student with an understanding of learning models and the impact technology can
have towards enhancing and enriching the learning process. The primary focus will be the application of
teaching and learning strategies that integrate technology as a method or tool to enrich the educational
process using technology tools for solving a variety of problems, teaching presentation, evaluating


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student performance, and implementing distance learning systems will also be explored. Prerequisite:
Successful completion of core coursework.

EDF 7190 - Current Issues in Health Sciences Education                                      Hours: 3
This course will allow students to research and choose those current issues most prevalent and most
useful to the student in their current learning program. The course will focus on self-guided learning and
will drive the student through a process whereby they will explore relevant issues, debate with classmates
and present a final portfolio useful to the student in future teaching endeavors. Possible topics the student
may research include: ADA, Higher Education Law, Ethics, Health Care Law, Student Retention and
Advisement. Prerequisite: Successful completion of core coursework.

EDF 7200 - Residency I                                                                    Hours: 2
This course will serve as an introduction to a variety of topics and will occur over the course of one
weekend on the St. Augustine Campus. There will be didactic classroom sessions with invited guest
speakers, as well as debates, presentations and Q and A sessions. Students will also have the opportunity
to meet with faculty and to interact with other students in a f2f manner. There will be written and
interactive online assignments to align with the topics presented on campus. It is expected these activities
would be completed in 2-3 days. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Doctoral Studies

EDF 7225 - Residency II                                                                     Hours: 2
This course will serve as an advanced presentation of topics that will build upon Residency I. There will
be didactic classroom sessions with invited guest speakers. Students will spend time focused on
developing a dissertation topic, working with advisors, and completing their final preparations for
beginning their dissertation work. There will be interactive and online assignments to align with their
topics. Students will be asked to make a teaching presentation and will be evaluated by peers and faculty
during this time. The focus of this residency will be moving the student from coursework to the more
independent work required in the latter portion of the curriculum. Prerequisite: Residency I

EDF 7250 - Teaching Internship                                                     Hours: Variable
Students in the DHSc program will be required to participate in a teaching internship that may be
arranged in a variety of differing formats. Students may teach a continuing education course, an online
course or a course for academic credit along with a mentor who will work closely in the development of
course materials, content and presentation. Teaching may be done in a traditional f2f environment or as
part of an online delivery method. Prerequisite: Successful completion of core coursework.

EDF 7300 - Oral and Written Comprehensive Exam                                          Hours: 3
This on-campus time will be spent meeting with key advisors, completing a written defense of studies and
making an oral presentation of the student’s studies. It is expected that students would complete these
culminating activities over a period of 4-5 days.

HSC 7210 - Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation                                            Hours: 2
Based on the E-1 Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation Seminar, this online course for the DPT
Program extends the content of the seminar to the application and analysis level of learning of peripheral
joint examination and treatment. Clinical decision making strategies or peripheral joint examination and
treatment are strengthened through the use of selected readings required for this course. A prerequisite is
completion of the CPE seminar “Extremity Evaluation and Manipulation (E1)” offered by the University.
The DHSc student will be responsible for additional assignments that may include a review of the
evidence, case report, portfolio or project at the discrimination of the instructor and student.




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HSC 7300 - Imaging                                                                          Hours: 2
This course provides a background reading plain film radiographs and in the radiographic presentation of
commonly occurring dysfunctions of the spine, pelvis and extremities. The basic tenets of MRI, CT
scanning, and diagnostic ultrasound will be covered with imaging examples. Special emphasis is placed
on the clinical application of diagnostic imaging findings to musculoskeletal injury and dysfunction.
Students will have the opportunity to apply the principles of imaging evaluation to selected cases and
special emphasis is placed on clinical application to musculoskeletal disorders. Analysis, synthesis and
evaluation will be demonstrated through a final portfolio displaying best practice imaging application in a
student’s desired area of study.

HSC 7320 - Advancing Hand Therapy Skills                                                    Hours: 2
This course focuses on diagnoses that you would most typically treat in an outpatient orthopaedic hand
clinic setting. These diagnoses will be presented with a variety of media that will complement the
contextual and facilitate your learning.
The purpose of this course is the application of quality clinical reasoning skills.
Learning goals of this course include expanding the student’s existing knowledge base in the area of
upper extremity orthopaedic rehabilitation following trauma, disease process and post-surgical
intervention. Secondly, students will apply this additional evidence based material to new clinical
reasoning skills that will optimize the student’s effectiveness with patient treatment. DHSc students will
have an additional project demonstrating analysis, synthesis and evaluation through a final portfolio of
evidence based research and a student’s critique of the current literature and design of a hypothetical
study.

HSC 7360 - Spinal Instability                                                               Hours: 2
This is a 2 credit hour online course presenting concepts of whole spine stabilization. Topics covered
include: clinical findings indicating the presence of instability, stabilization instructions for patient
education, and utilization of stabilization through the process of rehabilitation. Special attention is given
to clinical decision-making regarding the selection of manipulation and exercises for patients with
instability. Analysis, synthesis and evaluation will be demonstrated through a final portfolio of evidence
based research and a student’s critique of the current literature and design of a hypothetical study.

HSC 7400 - Differential Diagnosis                                                           Hours: 2
This course is designed to provide physical therapists with the background necessary to screen patients
for the presence of disease. This information, combined with the therapist's knowledge and skills for
management of neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction, will provide you with a comprehensive examination
scheme. The information provided in the course should facilitate professional communication between the
physical therapist and other health care professionals, as well as communication between the physical
therapy and patient. Analysis, synthesis and evaluation will be demonstrated through a final portfolio
displaying best practice imaging application in a student’s desired area of study.

HSC 7401 - Pharmacology                                                                     Hours: 3
This on-line course covers the basics of drug action as it relates to physical and occupational therapy.
Drugs used in the treatment of muscle spasms and spasticity, cardiac drugs, centrally acting drugs,
psychological medications, and drugs used in the treatment of pain and inflammation are covered.
Interactions between therapy and medications are emphasized. Analysis, synthesis and evaluation will be
demonstrated through a final portfolio of evidence based research and a student’s critique of the current
literature and design of a hypothetical study.




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HSC 7413 - Imaging for the Upper Extremity                                                  Hours: 2
This online course provides a broad background reading plain film radiographs and in the radiographic
presentation of commonly occurring dysfunctions of the upper spine and upper extremity, as well as
covering the basics of MRI, CT scanning, and diagnostic ultrasound. The clinical application of
diagnostic imaging findings to upper extremity rehabilitation is highlighted with special emphasis on the
imaging of fractures and the biomechanical consequences of fractures. For each anatomical region, there
are numerous online exercises in radiographic anatomy and advanced imaging anatomy as well as
interactive exercises in description of fractures. Students will have an opportunity to apply the principles
of imaging evaluation to selected cases. Analysis, synthesis and evaluation will be demonstrated through
a final portfolio displaying best practice imaging application in a student’s desired area of study.

HSC 7860 - Final Scholarship Project                                                        12 credits
The Scholarship Project (SP) involves either a research project that will result in a publishable article for
a peer reviewed professional journal or involves the development of an item of equipment or educational
product tested for professional use. The SP complements the DHSc program by demonstrating integration
of course work and must be approved in advance by the University Graduate Council. The Scholarship
Project is the culmination of the student's doctoral studies. Formal presentation of the SP to University
faculty is scheduled as the final element of the program. The course is offered through a distance
education format.

IDS 7455 - Independent Study                                                                Hours: 1-4
To receive DHSc academic credit for a University course, you attend the seminar (if there is one) and
then do an assignment that is developed and proposed for approval by your committee and any course
advisor to obtain the number of credits listed in the catalog. The format for an independent study proposal
may be used for University course assignment proposals. The assignments for DHSc learners are thus
largely self-directed. You have one semester (15 weeks) to complete each approved assignment.




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DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (EdD)

Mission Statement
The University of St. Augustine EdD program provides a multidisciplinary environment to build skills in
leadership, academic preparation and enhancement of health sciences education provision, through
innovative and individualized education.

Accreditation
The Doctor of Education (EdD) is accredited by the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC).
The Accrediting Commission of the Distance Education and Training Council is listed by the U.S.
Department of Education as a nationally recognized accrediting agency, and is a recognized member of
the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). It is your responsibility to ensure that the
institution at which you work/teach will accept any credit or degree earned through a nationally
accredited program.

Program Objectives
Through completion of this program, students will:
     •   Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of theories in education and their applications to
         specific areas of the health sciences.

     •   Demonstrate scholarly writing skills.

     •   Demonstrate pedagogically sound teaching and learning skills.

     •   Demonstrate the ability to function in professorial track teaching or at high levels of
         organizational administration.
     •   Utilize advanced research skills directed toward the analysis of knowledge in a given field of
         health sciences.

     •   Develop skills in professional leadership and health policy.

     •   Produce new knowledge in the areas of teaching and learning specific to the health sciences.

Admission Requirements
To be considered for admission to the Doctor of Education program, a candidate must have completed a
master’s degree (MS, MA, MOT, MPT) or a clinical doctorate (OTD, DPT, etc.), and must be currently
licensed or practicing, or teaching in an academic setting. A candidate must also have a minimum of
three years of clinical experience.

All students entering the Doctor of Education program must undergo an application/admissions process.
Documents that must be submitted include:
            • Application for Admission
            • $50 processing fee
            • Official transcripts from all previous institutions of higher learning
            • Two recommendations from professional colleagues
            • Writing assessment
            • Current resume or CV
            • Copy of professional license, if applicable



                                                   130
International Students Applying for Admission
Foreign-trained candidates who do not require a student visa can be considered for admission. To apply
for admission, foreign-trained candidates must submit the following, in addition to the items listed above:
    • A credentialing evaluation from an agency recognized by the National Association of Credential
        Evaluation Services (NACES) that provides evidence of training at a level equivalent to that of a
        master’s degree earned at an accredited institution in the United States.
    • An official TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score report, if education was
        completed in a language other than English. A minimum score of 550 (paper-based testing), 210
        (computer-based testing) or 83 (IBT–Internet based testing) is required.

Notification of Status
Each applicant will be notified by email or letter from the Enrollment Services office of his/her admission
status after all required application materials have been reviewed by the Admissions Committee.
Qualified candidates may be invited to participate in an interview.

Each student who is admitted to the program must successfully complete the Introduction to Doctoral
Studies course in order to fully matriculate in the EdD program.

Program Overview
The EdD program consists of 60 credit hours and it is estimated that students will complete the program in 3
to 5 years. Thirty seven credits of the total 60 are considered “core” coursework and are required. From
there, each student is provided the opportunity to complete elective courses with emphasis on education and
teaching.

Transfer Credits
The University will consider accepting graduate credits from other accredited institutions. Please refer to the
transfer credit policy in the catalog for further information on transfer credits.

Academic Requirement
To remain in the EdD program, the student must:
    • Maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA.
    • Complete a minimum of one (1) course within three months (12 weeks) of acceptance and a
       minimum of 6 credits within a calendar year.

Time Limit
Students must complete all EdD program requirements within five years. An extension of up to two and a
half years may be requested. If the Program Director approves the extension, there is an extension fee of $333
per semester.

Incomplete Coursework
If a student cannot complete the required work within the predetermined timeframe, he/she will receive a grade of
Incomplete (“I”). The student must then complete the work by the new assigned due date to receive a letter
grade. No further extension will be permitted. If the student does not complete the requirements within the
approved time, the “I” grade will automatically become an Incomplete/Fail (“I/F”) on his/her transcript.




                                                      131
DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (EdD) CURRICULA

Required Core Courses                                                           Semester Hours

EDF 7000         Introduction to Doctoral Studies                                        3
EDF 7140         Philosophy of Knowledge                                                 3
EDF 7100         Research Methods and Statistics                                         6
EDF 7150         Foundations of Teaching and Learning                                    3
EDF 7125         Organizational Leadership and Policy in Health Care                     3
EDF 7200         Residency I                                                             2
EDF 7225         Residency II                                                            2
EDF 7300         Oral and Written Comprehensive Exam                                     3
EDF 7850         Dissertation/Oral Defense                                              12

                 Total Required Credits                                                 37

Non-Core Courses (students choose 23 credits from the following courses)

                                                                                Semester Hours

EDF 7160         Curriculum Development in Health Sciences Education                      3
EDF 7170         Motivational Theory in Health Care Education                             3
EDF 7180         Technology in Higher Education                                           3
EDF 7190         Current Issues in Health Sciences Education                              3
EDF 7250         Teaching Internship                                                    3-8
IDS 7455         Independent Study I                                                    1-4
IDS 7460         Independent Study II                                                   1-4

                 Total Credits                                                          60

TUITION AND FEES – DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (EdD)

Tuition for all courses not involving a separate seminar is $443.00 per credit hour.

Estimated Cost of the Doctor of Education Program

The following is presented only as a guide for the student. The estimated costs set forth below cover course tuition and
examination fees. Textbooks and travel and lodging for seminars are additional.

•       Tuition for coursework                                            $443.00 /credit (60 hours)
•       Application Fee                                                    $50.00
•       Graduation Fee (includes stock black regalia)                    $150.00*
•       Estimated total for EdD                                        $26,600.00

        *If the graduate wishes to purchase custom regalia, the Graduation Fee is $650.00

This figure may be slightly less if credits are transferred from another university. The students must buy their reading
materials from an outside source. An estimated cost of textbooks and journals for the program is $2,000.00.




                                                         132
DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (EdD) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Delivery of Doctor of Education (EdD) coursework
Courses in the Doctor of Education program are offered in an online format. The online courses consist of
web-based text with extensive graphics, videos, and audio clips. There are opportunities provided for
faculty-to-student and student-to-student synchronous and asynchronous interactive collaboration via
Bulletin Board assignments, chat rooms, and email.

Course Numbers 7000-7499

Course Descriptions

EDF 7000 – Introduction to Doctoral Studies                                             Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to knowledge and skills needed to be a successful doctoral student
including learning theory, learning styles, evidenced based decision making, and ethics in rehabilitation
sciences. Students will also acquire basic skills needed for online learning. Self assessment and personal
goal setting are integrated into the course content.

EDF 7100 – Research Methods and Statistics                                              Hours: 6
Although there are many ways of knowing, it is only through the rigor and systematic methods of science
that we can be confident in the quality of our empirical claims and conclusions that we make about the
world. This course is a graduate level introduction to research methods, sampling, experimental design and
statistics. The focus of the course is the conduct of educational research. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of Philosophy of Knowledge.

EDF 7125 – Organizational Leadership and Policy in Health Care                            Hours: 3
Effective organizational leadership in healthcare is critical for developing, implementing, sustaining, and
modifying appropriate policies to address major health concerns including controlling costs, increasing
access to services, improving the quality of health services, and enhancing the effectiveness of program
outcomes. A skilled workforce, ethical and trained leaders, and effective policies are integral to the
implementation of programs and services that successfully promote the public’s health. The goal of this
course is to examine the conceptual, methodological, and ethical foundations of healthcare leadership and
administration leading to the development and analysis of health related policy at all levels. The course will
focus on analyzing the process of policymaking in the formulation, implementation, adoption, and
modification phases of current health policy through effective leadership and administration. Prerequisite:
Successful completion of Foundations of Teaching and Leaning.

EDF 7140 – Philosophy of Knowledge                                                    Hours: 3
Philosophy of knowledge is concerned most fundamentally with epistemology, or in other words, the nature
and scope of knowledge – what we know, how we know it and how we organize what we know into systems
such as academic and professional knowledge communities. This course examines how such systems of
knowledge have developed in the contemporary world and investigates our beliefs about what can be known.
Moreover, the course analyzes and evaluates the effectiveness and consequences to knowledge of dividing
the pursuit and practices of knowing into academic and professional disciplines. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of Introduction to Doctoral Studies

EDF 7150 – Foundations of Teaching and Learning                                        Hours: 3
Patient care, clinical administrative management, and academic appointments are areas where practitioners
have teaching obligations. Students in this course will acquire a working knowledge of the mechanisms by
which adults learn, understand and remember. Students will apply these mechanisms to the study of teaching
strategies and instructional decision-making. Topics will include cognition, information processing and
assessment, theories of motivation, critical thinking and the application of this knowledge for teaching.

                                                    133
Learning outcomes will differ depending on the academic track that the student is pursuing. Prerequisite:
Successful completion of Research Methods and Statistics.

EDF 7160 - Curriculum Development in Health Sciences Education                                   Hours: 3
Through application of sound educational principles, theories, and research evidence, the student will demonstrate
knowledge of learner-centered curriculum development and program assessment for academic, clinical, and staff
development settings. Curriculum development will include identifying program philosophy and outcomes,
developing competency statements, writing course objectives, and selecting appropriate learning activities and
evaluation methods. Problem-based learning will be explored for its application to health sciences education. Both
initial curriculum development and strategic plans for change will occur in collaboration with external constituencies
and within the context of current and future trends in health care, community and societal needs, and the health care
environment.

EDF 7170 - Motivational Theory in Health Care Education                                Hours: 3
This course is designed as an exploration of motivational research in psychology and education. The course
focuses specifically on different theories of motivation, and how classroom, school, work, and social
environments shape and influence individuals’ motivation. The connection between teacher efficacy and
student and teacher achievement will be examined.

EDF 7180 - Technology in Higher Education                                                 Hours: 3
It is important for educators to understand both the potentials and pitfalls of technology in education. This
course will provide the student with an understanding of learning models and the impact technology can have
towards enhancing and enriching the learning process. The primary focus will be the application of teaching
and learning strategies that integrate technology as a method or tool to enrich the educational process using
technology tools for solving a variety of problems, teaching presentation, evaluating student performance,
and implementing distance learning systems will also be explored.

EDF 7190 – Current Issues in Health Sciences Education                                     Hours: 3
This course will allow students to research and choose those current issues most prevalent and most useful to
the student in their current learning program. The course will focus on self-guided learning and will drive the
student through a process whereby they will explore relevant issues, debate with classmates and present a
final portfolio useful to the student in future teaching endeavors. Possible topics the student may research
include: ADA, Higher Education Law, Ethics, Health Care Law, Student Retention and Advisement.

EDF 7200 – Residency I                                                                      Hours: 2
This course will serve as an introduction to a variety of topics and will occur over the course of one weekend
on the St. Augustine Campus. There will be didactic classroom sessions with invited guest speakers, as well
as debates, presentations and Q and A sessions. Students will also have the opportunity to meet with faculty
and to interact with other students in an f2f manner. There will be written and interactive online assignments
to align with the topics presented on campus. It is expected these activities would be completed in 2-3 days.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Doctoral Studies




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EDF 7225 – Residency II                                                                   Hours: 2
This course will serve as an advanced presentation of topics that will build upon residency I. The course will
occur over one weekend on the St. Augustine campus. There will be didactic classroom sessions with invited
guest speakers. Students will spend time focused on developing a dissertation topic, working with advisors,
and completing their final preparations for beginning their dissertation work. There will be interactive and
online assignments to align with the topics. Students will be asked to make a teaching presentation and will
be evaluated by peers and faculty during this time. The focus of this residency will be moving the student
from coursework to the more independent work required in the latter portion of the curriculum. Prerequisite:
Residency I.

EDF 7250 – Teaching Internship                                                    Hours: Variable
Students in the EdD program will be required to participate in a teaching internship that may be arranged in a
variety of differing formats. Students may teach a continuing education course, an online course or a course
for academic credit along with a mentor who will work closely in the development of course materials,
content and presentation. Teaching may be done in a traditional f2f environment or as part of an online
delivery method.

EDF 7300 – Oral and Written Comprehensive Exam                                       Hours: 3
This on-campus time will be spent meeting with key advisors, completing a written defense of studies and
making an oral presentation of the student’s studies. It is expected that students would complete these
culminating activities over a period of 4-5 days.

EDF 7850 – Dissertation                                                                  Hours: 12
The dissertation will be a project or research that exemplifies a body of knowledge that significantly
contributes new ideas to the health care professionals and one’s own professional endeavors. The project
should be of publishable quality and should be submitted for presentation at a national conference. The
outcome of this project should demonstrate “scholarship of discovery, integration, application and teaching.
This includes an oral defense of the dissertation (by video conference or f2f).

IDS 7455 – Independent Study                                                      Hours: Variable
To receive EdD academic credit for a University course, you attend the seminar (if there is one) and then do
an assignment that is developed and proposed for approval by your committee and any course advisor to
obtain the number of credits listed in the catalog. The format for an independent study proposal may be used
for University course assignment proposals. The assignments for EdD learners are thus largely self-directed.
You have one semester (15 weeks) to complete each approved assignment.




                                                    135
FACULTY FOR CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
Tobi Baldwin, PT, Assistant Professor
BS              University of Western Ontario
MPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

William G. Boissonnault, PT, Associate Professor
BS              University of Wisconsin
MScPT           Institute of Graduate Health Sciences (University of St. Augustine)
DHSc            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Cathy E. Busby, PT, Assistant Professor
BS              Appalachian State University
MAT             University of North Carolina
MS              Duke University

Robert I. Cantu, PT, Assistant Professor
BS               University of Texas
MBA              Kennesaw State College
MMSc             Emory University

Bonnie Decker, OTR/L, Associate Professor
BS              Western Michigan University
MHS             University of Florida
EdD             University of Central Florida

Eric Furto, PT, Instructor
BSPT             Northern Illinois University
DPT              University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Alan J. Grodin, PT, Instructor
BA              SUNY at Binghamton
BS              SUNY Downstate Medical Center

Michael Irwin, PT, Instructor
BA              Slippery Rock College
BS              Georgia State University
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MHSc            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Michael Koopmeiners, MD, Assistant Professor
BA            St. Cloud State University
MD            University of Minnesota

Tammy LeSage, OTR, Academic Fieldwork Coordinator/Assistant Professor
BS            Judson College
MOT           Texas Women’s University
CHT           Hand Therapy Certification Commission, Inc.

Jodi Liphart, PT, Transitional DPT Program Director/Associate Professor
BS              Ohio State University
MS              University of Central Florida
DHSc            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

                                                   136
Andy Naas, PT, Assistant Professor
BS             Mercyhurst College
MPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MHSc           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Richard E. Nyberg, PT, Assistant Professor
BA             Gettysburg College
BS             SUNY Downstate Medical Center
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MMSc           Emory University

Stanley V. Paris, PT, Professor, President
FNZSP            Diploma Physiotherapy New Zealand School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago
BIM              Diploma, British Institute of Management
PhD              The Union Institute

Mariano Rocabado, PT, Professor
PT             University of Chile
Full Professor School of Dentistry, University of Chile
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Jeffrey A. Rot, PT, Assistant Professor
BS               Illinois State University
MPT              Shenandoah University
DHSc             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

A. Russell Smith Jr., PT, Assistant Professor
BS              University of Maryland at Baltimore
MMSc            Emory University
EdD             University of North Florida

Robert Stanborough, PT, Instructor
BFA            Ball State University
BPT            Hoge School Van Amsterdam
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MHSc           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Michael Turner, PT, Assistant Professor
BS              University of Florida
MScPT           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

James A. Viti, PT, Assistant Professor
BS               University of Maryland at Baltimore
DPT              University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MScPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Lawrence Yack, PT, Instructor
BS             C. W. Post College, Long Island University
BS             University of Colorado
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences




                                                   137
FACULTY FOR POST PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS

Hilmir Agustsson, PT, Assistant Professor
BS              University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
MHSc            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Gary Gorniak, PT, Professor, Director, Physical Therapy Program
BS             State University of New York
PhD            State University of New York

Kathy Hastings, PT, Associate Professor
BS              Indiana University of Pennsylvania
MPT             Emory University
EdD             University of Sarasota/Argosy University

Kevin Helgeson, PT, Associate Professor
BS              University of Montana
MS              University of Montana
DHSc            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences

Karen Howell, OTR/L, MOT Program Director/Professor
BS             Virginia Commonwealth University
MHS            Medical University of South Carolina
PhD            University of South Carolina

Peter Huijbregts, PT, Assistant Professor
Diploma in PT Hogeschool Eindhoven, The Netherlands
MS              Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
DPT             University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MHS             University of Indianapolis

Stacie Iken, OT, Associate Professor
BS               Colorado State University
MS               Colorado State University
PhD              University of North Dakota

Steven G. Lesh, PT, Associate Professor
BHS             University of Missouri-Columbia
MPA             Arkansas State University, Jonesboro
PhD             Capella University

Dan Lofald, PhD, Associate Professor
BA             University of Minnesota
MS             Rollins College
PhD            University of Florida

Elaine Lonnemann, PT, Assistant Professor
BS            University of Louisville
MScPT         University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences




                                                  138
Nelson Marquez, PT, Associate Professor
BS             University of the Philippines
MS             Nova Southeastern University
EdD            Nova Southeastern University
Cynthia Mathena, OTR, Dean, Post Professional Studies/Associate Professor
BS             Medical University of South Carolina
MS             Old Dominion University
PhD            Walden University

Marilyn Miller, PT, Associate Professor
BS               University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point
MA               University of Arkansas, Little Rock
PhD              University of Southern California

Isao Naro, PT, Associate Professor
BA              Kagoshima University
BSPT            Loma Linda University
PhD             Kanazawa University

Wanda B. Nitsch, PT, PhD, MTC, Dean, First Professional Studies/Associate Professor
BSPT           State University of New York at Stony Brook
MScPT          University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
PhD            Capella University

Catherine E. Patla, PT, Director, Clinical Fellowship Program/Associate Professor
BS                Fairleigh Dickinson University
PTA               Fairleigh Dickinson University
Certificate in PT University of Pennsylvania
MMSc              Emory University
DHSc              University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
Chad Redwing, Associate Professor
BA             Arizona State University
MA             University of Chicago
PhD           University of Chicago

Barbara Salice, Associate Professor
BA               University of Minnesota
MS               Rollins College
PhD              University of Florida

Jeff Snodgrass, Associate Professor
BS               Eastern Kentucky University
MPH              East Tennessee State University
PhD              Touro University International

Tony Varela, PT, Assistant Professor
BS             University of North Florida
DPT            University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
MHSc           University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences




                                                   139
140
               Clinical Excellence
           Through Graduate Education




  1 University Boulevard, St. Augustine, Florida 32086
Tel.: 904-826-0084 • (800) 241-1027 • Fax: 904-826-0085
      Website: www.usa.edu • E-mail: info@usa.edu

				
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