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					                                       east los angeles college
                                             Accreditation Self Study 2009




              Start at ELAC…
                       Go Anywhere!

Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 1                                         12/8/08 9:16:42 AM
                         Institutional Self Study 2009 in Support of
                                        Reaffirmation of Accreditation




                      Submitted by
                      East Los Angeles College
                      1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez
                      Monterey Park, California 91754

                      January 2009

                      Submitted to
                      Accrediting Commission for
                      Community and Junior Colleges of the
                      Western Association of Schools and Colleges




              Start at ELAC…
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Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 2                                     12/8/08 9:16:47 AM
                                                    TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION
  College History ................................................................................................................... 1
  College and Community Profile ......................................................................................... 3
  Organizational Structure ..................................................................................................... 9
  Organization of the Self Study.......................................................................................... 18

CERTIFICATION OF ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS ................................................... 23

RESPONSES TO 2003 RECOMMENDATIONS ................................................................ 29

ABSTRACT OF THE SELF STUDY ................................................................................... 41

STANDARD I INSTITUTIONAL MISSION AND EFFECTIVENESS
   Mission............................................................................................................................ 45
   Improving Institutional Effectiveness ............................................................................. 49

STANDARD II STUDENT LEARNING PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
   Instructional Programs ................................................................................................... 59
   Student Support Services.............................................................................................. 107
   Library and Learning Support Services........................................................................ 148

STANDARD III RESOURCES
   Human Resources ......................................................................................................... 177
   Physical Resources ....................................................................................................... 195
   Technology Resources ................................................................................................. 199
   Financial Resources ...................................................................................................... 214

STANDARD IV LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE
   Decision-Making Roles and Processes ......................................................................... 227
   Board and Administrative Organization ....................................................................... 240

PLANNING AGENDA SUMMARY.................................................................................. 263
                                                  introduction




                                           meet elac people
                                           Wendy Vargas
                                           Computer Applications &
                                           Office Technologies




                                           “   If I could change the past, I would have
                                               started ELAC as soon as I graduated
                                               from high school. I felt I had to get a job
                                               as quickly as possible to help my family.
                                               I have learned how important education
                                               is. The academic courses were tough for
                                               me, but I used all the special help the
                                               college provides. The library, writing
                                               center and math lab helped me get
                                               through the academic classes. I liked the
                                               CAOT computer lab so much that I


                                                                                  ”
                                               was able to get a job tutoring there.




                   Start at ELAC…
                            Go Anywhere!
Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 3                                                  12/8/08 9:16:48 AM
                                    INTRODUCTION

College History

East Los Angeles Junior College was established in June 1945 by the Los Angeles City
Board of Education. The college opened its doors for the fall 1945 semester in September in
a wing of Garfield High School boasting 19 faculty members and 380 students, most of
whom were World War II veterans.

The college quickly outgrew the borrowed high school facilities. In 1947, the Board of
Education was able to purchase 82 acres of agricultural land thanks to funding from a bond
issue. Two years later in January 1949, classes began at its present location in wooden
bungalows moved to the campus from the Santa Ana Army Base. More than nineteen
hundred students enrolled that year.

An evening program begun in 1947 was expanded and offered at many locations. By 1954,
the popular program offered classes at 25 different locations. The Civic Center program
alone enrolled 1,927 students that year.

In 1948 a name change was proposed. Angeles Bella Vista College, Ramona Hills College
and Hillview College were considered. The following year “Junior” was dropped and the
name East Los Angeles College (ELAC) was firmly established.

Permanent buildings were constructed to accommodate growing enrollment. In 1951 the
stadium and auditorium were built. More classrooms, an administration building, library,
planetarium, men’s and women’s gyms, a swim stadium, theatre, and art gallery followed.
Today ELAC boasts the Vincent Price Art Museum, which houses the largest and most
valuable art collection in a two-year college thanks to donations and support from actor
Vincent Price.

During the 1960s and 1970s, buildings to house the nursing program, a new library, and later
the automobile technology center were added to the campus. Many of the original bungalows
were still used as classrooms until 2007 when they were finally demolished to make way for
new campus structures.

In 1969 the California State Legislature clearly defined higher education in the state and
separated the (then) eight community colleges of the Los Angeles Unified School District
and formed the Los Angeles Community College District. A seven-member Board of
Trustees was elected to govern the new district. The ELAC service area was defined to
include the communities of Alhambra, Bell, Bell Gardens, City of Commerce, Cudahy, East


Introduction                                                                         Page 1
Los Angeles, Huntington Park, Los Angeles, Maywood, Montebello, Monterey Park,
Rosemead, San Gabriel, South San Gabriel, South Gate and Vernon.

In 1972 the City of Monterey Park annexed the college and surrounding neighborhood,
officially changing the main campus address. ELAC began growing, adding faculty
members, programs and classes as demand for higher education increased.

ELAC hosted swimming and field hockey events during the 1984 Olympics, welcoming
thousands of spectators to campus and increasing the international visibility of the college.
Despite funding challenges that limited growth during the 1980s, ELAC continued to offer a
variety of vocational and transfer programs.

During the 1990s ELAC experienced unprecedented changes. Enrollment grew from 13,000
to approximately 30,000 students and the number of permanent faculty almost doubled.
Outreach programs were located throughout the service area for the convenience of students
who could not easily travel to the main campus. The full-service South Gate Educational
Center was established in the southern part of the service area so students could complete a
transfer program and several career programs without attending the main campus. In 2007, a
third site was opened in Rosemead to serve students in the northeastern portion of ELAC’s
service area.

Growth during the first decade of the 21st century was not limited to increasing enrollment.
An emphasis on student-centered education and providing support that engendered student
success increased ELAC’s graduation numbers. Since 2000, East Los Angeles College has
graduated the highest number of Latinos in California and has consistently been listed as one
of the top 100 colleges nationally for exceptional graduation rates by Community College
Week, a trade paper reporting on community colleges in the United States.

Two bond issues, Propositions A and AA, initiated by the LACCD were approved by voters
at the beginning of 2000. Funding of over $281,000 allowed ELAC to begin the most
ambitious building program in its history to substantially improve the college’s
infrastructure. A state-of-the-art technology building, started with state funds, opened in fall
2004 showcasing the first of many buildings and improvements that are planned or under
construction.

By 2008, completed projects include a renovation of the Helen Miller Bailey Library, a
refurbished stadium, a new baseball diamond and facility, and numerous upgrades to existing
buildings and grounds. Many other projects are underway. The front of campus is undergoing
total renovation. A parking structure that will provide more than 1,800 spaces is scheduled to



Introduction                                                                             Page 2
open spring 2009 followed by a remodeled Student Center, main entrance plaza, the Library,
and Administration Building the following year.

The three-building Visual and Performing Arts Complex was begun in fall 2008. Located at
the east side of the campus, the complex will house the Vincent Price Art Museum as well as
theatres, labs, classrooms and studios for art, music, dance and theatre programs. Completion
is scheduled for 2010.

In November 2008, the voters passed a third bond, Bond J, for additional construction. Plans
for a Math and Science Building, gardens, plazas, and additional classrooms are moving
toward approval and construction. Building is scheduled to continue for the next decade.
When completed, East Los Angeles College will be positioned to provide the education and
services our students and community so richly deserve.

College and Community Profile

East Los Angeles College is a large community college with over 58,000 enrollment each
semester. Our academic, career technical, noncredit, and In-service Training Academies
serve more than 30,000 students representing 22,250 full-time equivalent students. The
communities served by ELAC include those immediately surrounding the college’s main
campus in Monterey Park and surrounding its Rosemead and South Gate Educational
Centers. The college’s service area has a population of over 1.5 million people and is
expected to grow at a rate faster that the District, County, State, and the United States. In
addition, current population estimates report that over 40 percent of the ELAC population is
under the age of 25. The combined growth and age data support a robust population in need
of academic and career technical services.


                                       2008              2015
                                     Estimated         Projected                      %
                                     Population        Population
   East Los Angeles College
                                           1,522,314         1,610,339      88,025        5.8
   (ELAC)

   Los Angeles Community
                                           5,284,641         5,468,068     183,427        3.5
   College District (LACCD)

   Los Angeles County (LA Co.)            10,116,810        10,452,926     336,116        3.3

   California (CA)                        37,338,070        39,109,364    1,771,294       4.7

   United States of America
                                         305,330,264       317,237,948   11,907,684       3.9
   (USA)




Introduction                                                                          Page 3
A cursory investigation of our service area has shown some notable findings, including the
fact that there are more than 50,000 households below the poverty line in our community.
Conditions created by poverty will require the college to increase psychosocial support to
students through ancillary services while they are working toward their educational goals.
This support will include increasing the accessibility of student services such as financial aid.
In addition, it will be necessary to investigate the occupational needs of our community and
work to provide programs that develop well qualified students to fill positions that are in high
demand. The Education Plan seeks to address these issues in a comprehensive manner
through goals to improve educational opportunities and access, student success and planning
accountability and service.
                                                          2008 - Estimated Population
                                    ELAC                            LACCD                             LA Co.
                              N                 %               N            %                    N              %
    African-American         40,680                 2.7          506,955                 9.6      871,692          8.6
    Asian                   219,751                14.4          666,814                12.6    1,341,091         13.3
    Caucasian               100,520                 6.6        1,360,357                25.7    2,863,594         28.3
    Hispanic              1,139,678                74.9        2,640,374                50.0    4,835,012         47.8
    Others                   21,686                 1.4          110,141                 2.1      205,419          2.0
    Total                 1,522,315               100.0        5,284,641               100.0   10,116,808        100.0



Data on Los Angeles County educational attainment further exemplifies the need for higher
education in the ELAC service area. Approximately a quarter of Los Angeles County
residents never received a high school diploma and an additional 38.7% report completing
high school as their highest level of education. These figures are less dramatic in the student
population with only 5.8% of students reporting never having attained a high school diploma.

The student body population is predominantly Hispanic or Latino, with Asian or Asian
Pacific Islanders representing the second largest demographic Group on campus. The ethnic
demographics of the student body have remained relatively unchanged over the past five
years and are representative of the general community in the ELAC service area with a slight
under representation of Caucasian and African American students.


                                             African
                                             -American
                  75%                        Asian
                                                                                   62%
                                             Hispanic
                                                                                                        Female
            20%                   2%         White                                38%
                                                                                                        Male
                             1%              Other
                        2%

                             Demographic data excludes In-service Training Academies



Introduction                                                                                                         Page 4
The college has an over-representation of female students, above national trends. Nearly half
of the student population is under the age of twenty-four representing ages usually
considered to be traditional college students. However, the college also serves a great number
of non-traditional students with sixteen percent of the student body over the age of 35 and an
additional five percent of students concurrently enrolled in local high schools.



                                     Concurrent
                                     High School
                 34%                 Under 20                  39%              Less than 6
         21%             24%
                                                                     26%        6 - 11
            5%     16%               20 - 24             35%
                                                                                12 or More
                                     25 - 34



Enrollment trends also demonstrate that nearly three-quarters of our students are part-time
students. The student survey also indicates that nearly a third of students work at least 40
hours a week, and a quarter have dependent children. These results have led to an increased
concentration on addressing the needs of part-time and/or working students, including issues
related to childcare, employment and complex schedules. These factors were considered in
the creation of the Educational Master Plan and in our efforts to develop programming to
improve student success and basic skills completion rates in our student population.

The ELAC student body has been consistently fed by local high schools. The top ten feeder
high schools for the main campus have remained fairly consistent across the last four years.
The following table lists the top feeder high schools for the main ELAC campus and the
Rosemead and South Gate Educational Center satellite campus. All top feeder schools have a
majority of students who are socioeconomically disadvantaged with some schools having
over ninety percent of their student body fitting this category. The high rates of children who
are socioeconomically disadvantaged are indicative of higher poverty rates in some of the
surrounding communities.




Introduction                                                                             Page 5
                                             Number of
                                                               Socioeconomically
Feeder                                        Students                                2007
                  High School                                    Disadvantaged
 Rank                                      Included in the                          Base API
                                                                  Students (%)
                                              2007 API
           Garfield (James A.)
   1                                             3,201                  93.3          553
           Senior High
   2       Schurr High                           2,127                  64.8          687
           Roosevelt (Theodore)
   3                                             3,276                  88.2          557
           Senior High
           Huntington Park Senior
   4                                             2,915                  93.1          543
           High
    5      Montebello High                       2,348                  71.1          643
    6      Bell Senior High                      2,903                  92.5          580
    7      Alhambra High                         2,258                  67.1          708
    8      Mark Keppel High                      1,705                  60.8          784
    9      South Gate Senior High                2,260                  87.0          565
   10      Bell Gardens High                     2,317                  86.6          622


        * API scores from California Department of Education DataQuest System

There are also indications that students arriving from local feeder schools may need
additional basic skills curriculum in order to succeed at the college level. The API presented
for each school is a numeric index (or scale) based on state standardized scores that range
from a low of 200 to a high of 1000. Any score over 800 is considered passing by the federal
No Child Left Behind Act. None of the ELAC top feeder schools have a passing API score
and the average API score for the top ten main campus feeder schools is 624. These scores
are indicative of the lack of preparation of students entering ELAC and our continued focus
on basic skills programming as a venue to enhance student success.

Low entry level skills are also seen in college assessment data. Over eighty-five percent of
assessed students test into mathematics and English courses that are below transfer. In
addition, more than nineteen percent of assessed students are referred to or placed in ESL
level courses. These results have stimulated a beneficial dialogue on basic skills
improvement that can be seen in the Educational Plan, including goals of improving
remediation, supplemental instruction, and basic skills training.

In spite of the challenges related to low entry-level skills, a third of students intend to transfer
to a four-year university. These reports may even be understated as the student survey
indicates that more than half of ELAC students intend to receive a Bachelor’s or higher
degree.



Introduction                                                                                 Page 6
                                                                     Vocational

                             31%               33%                   Transfer

                                                                     General
                                                      9%             Education
                                   21%         6%
                                                                     Transitional

                                                                     Unknown/
                                                                     Undecided




ELAC has seen an increase in some student outcomes. More students are attaining
certificates, with the majority of the growth taking place in the attainment of certificates that
require fewer than eighteen units. The number of certificates attained has increased more
than one hundred percent, far more than the increase in enrollment. The importance of these
figures plays into the efforts to identify new vocational programs that can address student
needs for improved job preparation in emerging occupational fields.


                  2002 – 2003      2003 – 2004        2004 – 2005      2005 – 2006         2006 – 2007
                   N      %         N      %           N      %         N      %            N      %
Associate of
                 1,046     45.0     989      55.2 1,146       51.8 1,021            39.0 1,055      29.4
Arts
Associate of
                     91     3.9     114       6.4      123     5.6       164         6.3    186       5.2
Science
Certificate        202      8.7     197      11.0      182     8.2       149         5.7    251       7.0
Skills
                   986     42.4     492      27.5      760    34.4 1,284            49.0 2,101      58.5
Certificate
Total            2,325 100.0 1,792 100.0 2,211 100.0 2,618 100.0 3,593 100.0


ELAC has shown steady retention and success rates throughout the college. Over eighty-five
percent of students are retained through the semester and more than two-thirds of students
successfully complete the courses in which they enroll.



                          Fall 2003      Fall 2004     Fall 2005     Fall 2006        Fall 2007
                              %              %             %             %                %
       Retention Rate           85.7           85.1          85.7          86.5             86.7
       Success Rate             65.6           67.4          65.7          68.2             67.1




Introduction                                                                                       Page 7
ELAC has shown excellent outcomes on the District and VTEA core indicators. ELAC has
the higher Fall to Fall persistence rates than most schools in the district and is above the
District average in ARCC measures of Basic Skills improvement rates and rates of students
earning more than 30 units. In addition, the college has made significant gains in rates of
student progress and achievement. ELAC is also the highest rated college in the District in
terms of institutional efficiency. VTEA core indicators demonstrate that ELAC is excelling
beyond the state average on most measures of effectiveness.

                                               2006 – 2007
                       State           Statewide          LACCD                ELAC
                   Performance        Performance       Performance         Performance
                  Level Goal (%)       Level (%)         Level (%)           Level (%)
Skill
                              78.8               76.4              82.1               88.5
Attainment
Completions                   59.8               74.4              81.4               83.1
Placement                     83.2               82.6              81.5               84.4
Retention in
                              82.8               82.9              83.6               86.7
Employment
Non-
Traditional                   29.0               37.9              38.9               33.6
Participation
Non-
Traditional                   27.0               35.8              46.5               46.9
Completer


ELAC serves a diverse community through its academic, career technical and non-credit
programming. State, District and college indicators show many areas in which the college is
currently excelling. College leadership is involved in the review of college data and has
worked to plan for the needs of students, including offering vocational and basic skills
curriculum that meets the needs of the current student body and the general community.




Introduction                                                                         Page 8
    College Organizational Structure

                                           East Los Angeles College
                                                 Ernest H. Moreno, President



 Vice President          Vice President     Vice President        Vice President
Administrative          Academic Affairs   Workforce Edu. &      Student Services
    Services            Richard A. Moyer   Economic Devel.       Oscar Valeriano
Robert Isomoto                             Reneé Martinez


                                                                            President - Functions:
                                                                            College Budget
                                                                            College Governance (Committees, Policies &
                                                                                 Procedures, Structure)
                                                                            College Image
                                                                            College Liaison with Chancellor’s Cabinet
                                                                            College Representation to Governing Board
                                                                                 (including College agenda items)
                                                                            College-Wide Planning
                                                                            Community Relations
                                                                            Educational Facilities Master Plans
                                                                            Personnel
                                                                            Public Information (including coordination with
                                                                                 District)

                                                                            Committee Responsibilities:
                                                                            President’s Cabinet
                                                                            Extended President’s Cabinet
                                                                            Administrative Council
                                                                            Planning & Budget Council
                                                                            Facilities Committee
                                                                            Marketing/Recruitment Committee




    Introduction                                                                                                              Page 9
                             Academic Affairs
                         Dr. Richard A. Moyer, Vice President


                                      Functions:
                                      Academic Master Plans
                                      Accreditation Liaison Officer
                                      Chief Instructional Officer
             Dean,                    College Coordinator for Reassigned Time
          Liberal Arts                Curriculum Articulation within District (JCAC)
          Karen Daar                  Curriculum Oversight (new program development & revision in
                                           conjunction with deans)
                                      Educational Policies and Procedures
                                      Faculty Staffing Recommendations (through deans)
             Dean,                    Faculty (reporting through chairs/coordinators and deans)
          Liberal Arts                Coordination of Prerequisite enforcement (co-responsibility with
             Vi Ly                         VP Student Services)
                                      Oversight and Approval of College Class Schedule and Catalog
                                      Tutoring (through deans)
                                      Faculty Collective Bargaining/Administrative Representative
              Dean,                   Oversight of Faculty Evaluation (through deans)
          Liberal Arts                Instructional Operations: rooms, class schedule, catalog,
        Kerrin McMahan                     curriculum, enrollment data
                                      Monitor educational Policy/Procedure Compliance

                                      Committee Responsibilities:
            Dean,
          South Gate                      Work Environment Committee
            Al Rios                       Student Learning Outcomes
                                          Student Success
                                          Matriculation
                                          Transfer Committee
                                          Department Chairs

                                      District Committee: Vice Presidents Council




Introduction                                                                                             Page 10
       Dean, Liberal Arts                               Dean, Liberal Arts                             Dean, Liberal Arts            Dean, South Gate
         Karen Daar                                           Vi Ly                                    Kerrin McMahan                    Al Rios

Chairs/Coordinators:                             Chairs/Coordinators:                        Chairs/Coordinators:
  Chemistry                                        Art                                         Anthro/Geol/Geog/Int. Trade
  English                                          Music                                       Chicano Studies
  Life Sciences                                    Philosophy                                  Foreign Languages
  Physics                                          Physical Edu. – Men                         Mathematics
  Social Sciences                                  Physical Edu. – Women                       Psychology
                                                   Speech/Theatre
                                                                                             Other:
                                                                                               Learning Assistance Center
                                                                                               Mente Lab
                                                                                               Distance Education
                                                                                               Schedule
                                                                                               Move Liaison




                                                                COMMON DIVISION DEAN FUNCTIONS*
Planning: Development, revision
Faculty, Classified Staffing: Proposal development, recruitment, selection, orientation, assignment, supervision evaluation
Budget: Development, administration
Curriculum: Development, revision, articulation with K-12 and university
Class schedule: Development and administration
External resource development
Discipline labs/centers supervision

*with chairs, faculty and subordinate administrators, as appropriate




Position-specific Functions:                     Position-specific Functions:                     Position-specific Functions:   Position-specific Functions:
  Catalog                                          PACE                                             Distance Education             Off Site Committee
  Curriculum                                       Planning for Art Complex                         Technology Planning
  Educational Planning Com.                                                                            Committee
  Degree Audit
  Matriculation
  Student Learning Outcomes
  Transfer Committee


   Introduction                                                                                                                                                 Page 11
                                Workforce Education & Economic Development
                                                Ms. Reneé Martinez, Vice President



                                   Functions:
                                   Academic Master Plans
                                   Chief Instructional Officer
                                   College Coordinator for Reassigned Time
                Dean,              Curriculum Articulation within District (JCAC)
        Career Technical Edu.      Curriculum Oversight (new program development & revision in conjunction with deans)
          Laura M. Ramirez         Educational Policies and Procedures
                                   Faculty Staffing Recommendations (through deans)
                                   Faculty (reporting through chairs/coordinators and deans)
                                   New full-time faculty orientation
               Dean,               Coordination of Prerequisite enforcement (co-responsibility with VP Student Services)
          Continuing Edu.          Oversight and Approval of College Class Schedule and Catalog
        Adrienne Ann Mullen        Tutoring (reporting through Associate Dean)
                                   Instruction budget development
                                   Faculty Collective Bargaining/Administrative Representative
              Dean,                Oversight of Faculty Evaluation (through deans)
         Academic Affairs &        Instructional Operations: rooms, class schedule, catalog, curriculum, enrollment data
          Economic Devel.          Monitor educational Policy/Procedure Compliance
          Gayle Brosseau           Adjunct faculty professional development

                                   Committee Responsibilities:
                                      Budget Committee                             Career Technical
           Assoc. Dean,               Matriculation                                Work Environment Committee
            CalWORKs                  Title V                                      Transfer Committee
          Angelica Toledo             Planning Committees: Facility, Educational, Off-Site, and Technology
                                      Student Learning Outcomes Student Success

                                   District Committees:
                                        CTE Deans                                     Vice Presidents Council
                                        HR Council                                    Nursing Task Force
                                        Prof. Dev. Task Force

                                   Other Committees:
                                       Beverly Hospital: Board of Directors, Board Governance, Strategic Planning
                                       Crystal Stairs Board

Introduction                                                                                                               Page 12
    Dean, Career Technical                                                                             Dean, Economic Dev.
          Education                                                                                      Gayle Brosseau
      Laura M. Ramirez
                                                    Dean, Continuing Education                   Chairs/Coordinators:
Chairs/Coordinators:                                  Adrienne Ann Mullen                          Architecture
  Admin. of Justice/Fire                                                                           Auto Tech                     Associate Dean, CalWORKs
     Tech/EMT                                   Coordinators:                                      Business/CSIT                      Angelica Toledo
  Journalism                                    Community Services                                 CFES
  Life Sciences: HIT, Elec.                     Non Credit                                         CAOT
     Microscopy, Resp. Therapy                  Basic Skills                                       Electronics
  Nursing                                       Rosemead Center                                    Engineering
  Photography                                   Swap meet                                          Library

Other:                                                                                           Other:
  RCAT                                                                                             Tech Prep
  MESA




                                                          COMMON DIVISION DEAN FUNCTIONS*
 Planning: Development, revision
 Faculty, Classified Staffing: Proposal development, recruitment, selection, orientation, assignment, supervision evaluation
 Budget: Development, administration
 Curriculum: Development, revision, articulation with K-12 and university
 Class schedule: Development and administration
 External resource development
 Discipline labs/centers supervision

 *with chairs, faculty and subordinate administrators, as appropriate



Position-specific Functions:                                                                     Position-specific Functions:
  Liaison with business and                                                                        LA/Orange Deans
     industry                                                                                      State Equipment
  VTEA budget: Development,                                                                        Student Success
     administration, reporting                                                                     Technology Discussion Group
  Joint Hires
  Matriculation
  Student Learning Outcomes
  State Equipment


Introduction                                                                                                                                                Page 13
                                                                 Student Services
                                                 Mr. Oscar Valeriano, Interim Vice President
                                                                                                  Rahmani Vanterpool
                                                                                                 Administrative Secretary




                                                                                                                                                 Vacant
         Jeremy Allred                              Daniel Ornelas                        Paula Palomino          Scholarships
                                                                                                                                                  Dean
             Dean                                       Chair                                Director
     Admissions and Records                          Counseling                          University Center
                                                                                                                              Danelle Fallert
                                                                                                                              Associate Dean
                                                                                                                                  EOPS
                   Suzette M-Guerra
                                                                                            Janet Huang
                      Counselor                Michael Simone
                                                                                             Counselor                         Sonia Lopez
                     Matriculation                 Director
                                                                                         Career/Job Center                   Associate Dean
                                          Child Development Center                                                          Student Activities


                                                                      Student Health Center                                  Grace Hernandez
                                               Vacant                                                                       Disability Specialist
                                           Associate Dean                                                                           DSPS
                 Assessment           Outreach and Recruitment


                                                                                                                               Lindy Fong
                                        International Students                                                                  Manager
                                                                                                                              Financial Aid




Introduction                                                                                                                                  Page 14
                                           Administrative Services
                                          Mr. Robert G. Isomoto, Vice President

                                            Administrative Assistant
                                                                               Senior Office Assistant
                                              Civic Center Permits
                                                                                   Monica De La Parra
                                                 Susan Okawa




                                              Administrative Aide
                                                 April Aragon




 Associate Vice President   Associate Vice President                                                                        Deputy
                                                                Facilitie Manager                 Info Tech Manager
 Administrative Services    Administrative Services                                                                   L. A. County Sherrif
                                                                     Richard Guy                  Gonzalo Mendoza
   Erlinda De Ocampo            Tom Furukawa                                                                              Jose Garcia




                SPOC                  Office Supervisor                Operations Manager                                    Senior Office Asst.
           Norman Cheung              Brundo De Silva                      John Turner                                         Claire Figueroa




Introduction                                                                                                                                       Page 15
                               LOS ANGELES COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT
                                           Board of Trustees
                                        Organizational Structure


            Board of Trustee    Board of Trustees     Board of Trustees      Board of Trustees       Board of Trustees       Board of Trustees        Board of Trustees
               Member               Member                Member                 President            Vice President              Member                   Member
           Ms Georgia Mercer    Ms Nancy Perlman     Ms Angela Reddock       Mr Kelly Candaele        Ms Mona Field          Mr Miguel Santiago      Ms Sylvia Scott-Hayes




                                                                                                        Board of Trustees
                                                                                                         Student Trustee
                                                                                                       Ms Rosemarie Bustos

                                         Personnel
                                        Commission




                                                                                 Chancellor
                                                                          Dr. Marshall E. Drummond


                                                                              (See Org Chart)




                                                                                                                              Prepared by Human Resources – Data Analysis
                                                                                                                              As of 29 August 2008




Introduction                                                                                                                                                                 Page 16
                                     LOS ANGELES COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT
                                               Office of the Chancellor
                                              Organizational Structure
                                                                                                  Chancellor                                                     Counselor on Loan to
                                                                                                                                                                  Dept. of Homeland
                                                                                                Dr. Marshall E.                                                        Security
                                                                                                 Drummond                                                          Mr. F. Quiambao




                                                                                                                                              Deputy Chancellor
                                                                                                                                                Dr. A. Barrera




                                                                    Vice Chancellor for
                   Chief Financial
                                              General Counsel          Educational
                  Officer/Treasurer                                                                                 Executive Secretary
                                               Ms. C. Goulet         Support Services
                   Ms. J. Gordon                                                                                     to the Chancellor
                                                                       Mr. J. Clerx
                                                                                                                    Ms. M. E. Jauregui

                                                        Vice Chancellor for
                              Executive Director                                 Vice Chancellor for                               Assistant Secretary
                                                          Economic and
                              Facilities Planning                                    Institutional                                  to the Chancellor
                                                            Workforce
                              and Development                                       Effectiveness                                  Ms. J. Hughes-Fields
                                                           Development
                               Mr. L. Eisenberg                                   Mr. G. Colombo
                                                         Mr. M. Martinez




                                                                                                                                            Trade-Tech
                                                                                                                        Southwest                              Valley College            West
               City College          East LA College    Harbor College        Mission College      Pierce College                             College
                                                                                                                          College                                President            LA College
                President               President         President              President           President                               President
                                                                                                                         President                             Dr. A. Carleo           President
               Dr. J. Moore           Mr. E. Moreno      Dr. L. Spink           Dr. J.Valles       Mr. R. Garber                               Dr. R.
                                                                                                                     Dr. J. Daniels, III                           (Limited)         Dr. M. Rocha
                                                                                                                                            Chapdelaine



                      = Unit Manager

                      = Supervisor                                                                                                                Prepared by Human Resources – Data Analysis
                                                                                                                                                  As of 29 August 2008




Introduction                                                                                                                                                                                        Page 17
Organization of the Self Study

East Los Angeles College (ELAC) is pleased to submit this Institutional Self Study for
Reaffirmation of Accreditation. Formal planning for this study began in spring 2007 with the
selection of the faculty self study chair by the college president and the Accreditation Liaison
Officer (ALO) and approval by the Academic Senate. The organizational structure for the self
study was developed during summer 2007 for implementation during fall 2007. During fall 2008,
an administrative co-chair assisted in the completion of the self study.

Training for the Self Study Process

   On February 22, 2007, Dr. Barbara Beno and Jack Pond from the Accrediting Commission
   provided an all-day training session for members of the steering committee and standards co-
   chairs from the three Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) colleges (East,
   City, and Trade Tech) entering their self study year.
   A follow-up session for the three colleges, led by Gary Colombo, Vice Chancellor for
   Institutional Effectiveness, was held on February 28, 2007. Representatives from the three
   LACCD colleges that had previously completed their self studies discussed issues that they
   faced and presented tips for developing productive self studies.
   On June 5, 2007, over 50 committee members for the standards attended a half-day workshop
   conducted by the faculty co-chair on the self study process and the timeline for completion of
   the standards drafts. District representative, Gary Colombo, explained the role of the district
   office in the process.

Participation in the Self Study Process

   By the Steering Committee. The Steering Committee, led by the self study co-chair and the
   Accreditation Liaison Officer and comprised of one co-chair from each of the four standards,
   the Dean of Planning, the Associate Dean of Research, and the SLO coordinator, was
   established to oversee the process. The Steering Committee members communicated
   regularly at meetings and via e-mail.
   By Standard Co-Chairs. The co-chairs for the four standards were selected by a campus
   leadership group, including the faculty self study co-chair, the ALO and vice president of
   Academic Affairs, the vice presidents of Workforce Education, and Administrative Services,
   and Student Services, and the Academic Senate president. The co-chairs were selected from
   three campus personnel groups, faculty, classified, and administrative. At least one faculty
   member and one classified employee or administrator was selected to co-chair each standard.
   By Committee Members. Communications inviting participation in the process were
   circulated to all campus personnel via e-mail, the Weekly Bulletin, a newsletter, and flyers.
   The self study co-chair made presentations to the Academic Senate, the department chairs,
   and the East Los Angeles Shared Governance Council (ESGC), the primary shared
   governance body. The Associate Dean of Students assisted in the effort to recruit students.
   Direct invitations were made to the officers and members of the Associated Student Union.
   Standards co-chairs also recruited committee members from faculty, staff, and students.


Introduction                                                                              Page 18
   By the District. The LACCD Office of Institutional Effectiveness under the leadership of
   Vice Chancellor Gary Colombo assisted the college in the preparation of this self study by
   serving as the liaison for the district office. Vice Chancellor Colombo, assisted by Ms.
   Deborah Kaye, conducted a series of meetings (February, April, August, and December 2007
   and September 2008) which were attended by the co-chairs and ALOs for the self studies of
   the three colleges that are currently undergoing reaccreditation. These meetings were
   invaluable as they provided the three colleges with the opportunity to share information,
   speak with representatives from other district colleges who previously underwent
   reaccreditation, and learn more about the operation of the district. The Office was also
   instrumental in the preparation of the functional map and presented the map to the colleges
   for approval.

   The faculty co-chair and the ALO reported the college’s progress in the completion of the
   self study to the Board of Trustees’ Planning and Student Success Committee on September
   19, 2007, and June 11, 2008. The college presented the completed self study to the Board of
   Trustees’ Planning and Student Success Committee for review and formal approval on
   December 17, 2008.

Data Gathering for the Self Study

The college researcher provided regional demographic and economic data, prepared and
administered a faculty/staff/administrator survey, produced a student and faculty profile, and
provided the data from the district-administered student survey. The researcher also assisted the
committees in evaluating the data. Standard committee members interviewed appropriate
individuals and reviewed supporting documents to collect and verify the data presented in this
self study.

Progress Reporting for the Self Study

Accreditation and self study progress are standing agenda items for the bi-monthly meetings of
the East Los Angeles Shared Governance Council and the Academic Senate. All members of the
various standard committees were in constant communication with one another and with the self
study co-chairs via e-mail as well as through meetings of the standards. Some committees chose
to use the SharePoint Portal for reporting progress. Two newsletters were published.

Campus-Wide Review of the Draft of the Self Study

The drafts of the standards were available for review and comment from October 30 to
December 1.
   Announcements about the availability of the self study for review were posted campus wide
   in the Weekly Bulletin, via e-mail and the college Microsoft SharePoint portal, and in


Introduction                                                                             Page 19
   presentations to the Academic Senate, the department chairs, and the Shared Governance
   Council.
   The drafts were posted on the SharePoint portal and distributed in hard copy to the
   department chairs, to the Associated Student Union government, and other campus
   leadership. Hard copy could also be requested directly from the self study co-chairs.
   During the review period, three campus-wide discussion forums, two at midday during the
   college hour and one in the late afternoon before evening classes, were conducted in mid-
   November. The Academic Senate also held discussion at an all-faculty meeting on November
   25.

Ultimately, individuals representing all segments of the college community participated directly
in the self study process, with many others participating by completing surveys related to
accreditation/college issues and reviewing the draft of the self study and participating in forums
before its publication.

This self study report is the outcome of the dialogue that occurred throughout the above
described process. The self study is recognized as an ongoing process and is a significant part of
the college's long-term planning strategy. It will serve to strengthen the institution's directions
and decision-making processes for preparing its students to function efficiently and effectively in
a rapidly changing world. It reflects an open and honest interpretation of the state of health of the
college and the issues that confront the Los Angeles Community College District and
consequently the college.




Introduction                                                                                 Page 20
         ACCREDITATION SELF STUDY 2007-2008 STEERING COMMITTEE
 Brenda K. Baity, Self Study Faculty Co-chair          Reneé Martinez
 Associate Professor, Computer Applications & Office   Vice President, Workforce Education and Economic
 Technologies                                          Development
 Self Study Faculty Co-Chair                           Standard IV Co-chair
 baitybk@elac.edu                 265-8932             martinrd@elac.edu                 265-8973
 Karen Daar                                            Ryan Cornner
 Dean, Academic Affairs (currently)                    Associate Dean, Research
 Associate Professor, Anthropology                     cornnerr@elac.edu                 265-8967
 Former Curriculum Chair & Standard II Co-chair
 daarkl@elac.edu           415-5374
 Evelyn Escatiola                                      Kerrin McMahan, Self Study Admin. Co-chair
 Professional Development Coordinator                  Dean, Academic Affairs
 AFT Chapter Chair 2007-2008                           Standard I Co-chair
 Standard IV Co-chair                                  McMahakm@elac.edu            415-4135
 escatie@elac.edu                 265-8757
 Ran Gust                                              Ernest H. Moreno
 Acquisitions Librarian                                President (since April 2008)
 Standard I Co-chair                                   morenoeh@elac.edu                 265-8662
 gustrg@elac.edu                    265-8628
 Richard Guy                                           Richard A. Moyer,
 Director, College Facilities                          Accreditation Liaison Officer
 Standard III Co-chair                                 Vice President, Academic Affairs
 guyrm@elac.edu                     265-8754           moyerra@elac.edu                 265-8678
 Robert Isomoto                                        Leonor Perez         (currently on sabbatical)
 Interim President (until April 2008)                  Dean, Research and Planning
 Vice President, Administrative Services (current)     Standard I team member
 isomotorg@elac.edu                   415-4110         perezlx@elac.edu                  415-4138
 Veronica Jaramillo                                    Anthony A. Samad
 Assistant Professor, Chemistry                        Associate Professor, Political Science
 SLO Coordinator (2008-2009)                           SLO Coordinator (2006-2007)
 jaramiv@elac.edu                   265-8851           samadaa@elac.edu                    265-8938


                                         Editing and Support Staff
April Aragon, Administrative Services                     Dean Athans, Academic Affairs
Olga Barnes, President’s Office                           Patricia Glover, Graphic Design
Patrick Hauser, Faculty                                   Catalina Medina, President’s Office
Susan Okawa, Administrative Services                      Melissa Rabago, Academic Affairs
Staff, Information Technology Department                  Sharon Tate, Marketing Director


                                             Acknowledgements
      Special thanks to District Office personnel, Gary Colombo, Vice Chancellor for Institutional
             Effectiveness, and Deborah Kaye, Self Study Liaison to the Cityside Schools.




Introduction                                                                                          Page 21
                                       certification of eligibility requirements




                                                               meet elac people
                                                               Christal Hernandez
                                                               Administration of Justice/Forensics




                                                               “   It is fascinating to me that one small
                                                                   piece of evidence can be used to recre-
                                                                   ate a crime scene. When my teacher Ms.
                                                                   Cavannaugh lectures it doesn’t seem like
                                                                   teaching—it’s more of a story and prob-
                                                                   lems that we have to solve. She also helps
                                                                   us to make connections, find information
                                                                   and solve problems, even our personal
                                                                   ones. ELAC has helped me in every
                                                                   way—from financing my education to


                                                                                                     ”
                                                                   helping me find a rewarding career.




                   Start at ELAC…
                            Go Anywhere!
Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 4                                                                    12/8/08 9:16:49 AM
                ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ACCREDITATION

1. AUTHORITY. East Los Angeles College’s authority to operate as a degree granting
   institution is the continuous accreditation by the Accrediting Commission for Community
   and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, an institutional
   accreditation body recognized by the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary
   Accreditation and the United States Department of Education. This authority is noted on the
   inside cover page of the college catalog.

2. MISSION. The mission statement appears in campus publications and is the basis for all
   operational efforts. The previous revision of the current college mission statement occurred
   in 1991; it was reaffirmed by the college in 1997, 2000, and 2003. The most recent revision
   occurred in 2008. It was evaluated by the Office of Institutional Planning and the college's
   Educational Planning Subcommittee with input from all campus constituencies. It has been
   approved by the college Shared Governance Council and will be approved by the Board of
   Trustees in early 2009.

3. GOVERNING BOARD. An eight-member Board of Trustees, seven of whom are elected
   at large plus one student trustee, governs the nine-college Los Angeles Community College
   District. Trustees are elected to the Governing Board for four-year staggered terms from the
   entire district, which includes all of the Los Angeles Unified School District and several of
   the incorporated and unincorporated communities, within and adjoining the city of Los
   Angeles. The student trustee, elected by the student body, serves a one-year term on the
   Board, and acts on District business (except for closed session issues) in an advisory
   capacity. No member of the Board of Trustees shall have any financial interest in any
   contract or purchase order made by the Board (BR 7100.15). The Governing Board holds
   meetings twice a month. They are open to the public, with notices and agenda widely posted
   in advance. In order to be widely accessible to members of the large Los Angeles
   Community College District, the Board holds many of its meetings at the colleges. The
   District Academic Senate and the District’s seven bargaining units report to the Board on a
   regular basis.

4. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER. The Chancellor of the Los Angeles Community College
   District is selected by the Governing Board. Dr. Marshall Drummond, Chancellor, is the
   District’s chief executive officer whose primary responsibility is to the District. The
   President of the college is selected by the Governing Board in consultation with the
   Chancellor. The college’s chief executive officer, President Ernest H. Moreno, has served
   has served in this capacity since 1994, except for a 22-month period from June 2006 to April
   2008 to oversee the operation of another district college.

5. ADMINISTRATIVE CAPACITY. The college administration is adequate in number,
   experience, and qualifications to provide appropriate administrative oversight. The college
   organization charts appear in this Self Study.

6. OPERATIONAL STATUS. East Los Angeles College (ELAC) is a comprehensive college
   that meets the varied educational needs of our community. Students are enrolled in a variety

 Eligibility Requirements                                                              Page 23
   of courses that lead to certificates of completion for non-credit basic skills, certificates of
   competency for non-credit vocational, certificates of achievement for state-approved
   programs of 12 or more units, skills certificates for non-state approved programs of 17.5
   units and under, associate degrees, transfer, and personal development.

 7. DEGREES. The majority of the college’s offerings are in programs that lead to degrees as
    described in the college catalog. ELAC offers 28 Associate in Arts Degrees and 13
    Associate in Science Degrees.

 8. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS. The College’s educational programs are consistent with
    its mission, are based on recognized fields of study, are of sufficient content and length, and
    maintain appropriate levels of quality and rigor for the degrees and programs offered. Basic
    skills courses in reading, writing, and mathematics help students develop the proficiency
    necessary to advance to college-level curricula or to qualify for entry-level employment. The
    college, led by the Student Success Committee, is currently attempting to create an
    identifiable, official program to address the problem of academically underprepared
    students. Those with limited English proficiency may enroll in ESL courses. Community
    Services provides valuable short-term courses for personal development, leisure, recreation,
    and special interest.

 9. ACADEMIC CREDIT. Academic credit is based on Title 5 – 55002 (Standards and
    Criteria for Courses and Classes) of the California Administrative Code.

10. STUDENT LEARNING AND ACHIEVEMENT. East Los Angeles College defines and
    publishes program educational objectives in course outlines, in the college catalog, in
    occupational program brochures, and in instructional planning documents. All are reviewed
    and updated in accordance with Title 5 and district guidelines. The college has adopted
    institutional core competencies that identify expected outcomes in the areas of academic
    skills, personal growth and enrichment, and cultural and global awareness. All units,
    academic disciplines, student services, and administrative, are developing program-level,
    course-level outcomes, and assessments. Currently, student success is measured by faculty,
    based on the successful completion of course objectives and student learning outcomes
    which are stated on the course syllabus. Course objectives are clearly stated on the course
    outline of record. Student learning outcomes appear as an addendum to the course outline of
    record. All courses, regardless of mode of delivery or location, follow the same course
    outline of record.

11. GENERAL EDUCATION. General education at East Los Angeles College is part of every
    degree program and has been structured to ensure breadth of knowledge, promote
    intellectual inquiry, demonstrate competence in writing and computational skills, and serve
    as an introduction to major areas of knowledge. Courses in general education meet the
    quality and rigor appropriate for higher education.

12. ACADEMIC FREEDOM. The college abides by the policy on academic freedom stated in
    LACCD Board Rules (BR 1204.12) adopted in February 2006 and Article 4 of the
    LACCD/Los Angeles College Faculty Guild agreement, which states, “The Faculty shall

   Eligibility Requirements                                                               Page 24
   have the academic freedom to seek the truth and guarantee freedom of learning to the
   students.” The campus maintains an environment of intellectual freedom and independence.

13. FACULTY. As of fall 2007, East Los Angeles College had over 260 full-time faculty
    including nineteen full-time counselors. In addition the college employs over 660 adjunct
    faculty, working in a variety of positions within the academic and career technical
    departments, Child Development Center, and the Counseling office. These full-time and
    adjunct faculty provide teaching and student support services for all of the educational
    programs at the institution in pursuit of the college mission. The college ensures the quality
    of its instructional faculty through a comprehensive evaluative process during hiring and
    regular assessment of teaching effectiveness through faculty evaluations. The names,
    degrees, and year of hire for full-time faculty are listed in the college catalog. Information
    on full-time hires occurring between catalog years and all adjunct are held in the personnel
    office and in the SAP record keeping system. Faculty responsibilities are set forth in the
    Faculty Handbook and Adjunct Faculty Handbook and in the contract between the American
    Federation of Teachers College Guild and the Los Angeles Community College District.
    Included in faculty responsibilities is the development and review of curriculum through the
    college’s curriculum review process and the assessment of student learning within the
    classroom.

14. STUDENT SERVICES. East Los Angeles College provides appropriate services to
    students and develops programs that meet the educational support needs of its diverse
    student population. The college provides services in the following areas: Admissions and
    Records, Articulation, Associated Student Union, Basic Skills/Citizenship/GED, Bookstore,
    CalWorks Program, Campus Food Services, Career/Job Placement Center, Child
    Development Center, College newspaper (Campus News), Community Services (non for
    credit programs), Cooperative Agencies Resources to Education (CARE), Counseling
    Department, Cultural Activities, including The Vincent Price Art Museum, Disabled
    Students Programs & Services, Enrollment Center, Extended Opportunity Program &
    Services, Financial Aid, Fiscal Office, Health Center, Honors Program, Intercollegiate
    Athletics, International Student Program, Learning Assistance Center, Library, Little
    Theater, Los Angeles County Sheriff Services, Matriculation, Mentor Program, MESA
    Program, Puente Program, Scholarships, South Gate Educational Center, Student Center,
    University Center, and Veterans Services.

15. ADMISSIONS. College admissions policies are consistent with its mission and conform to
    the parameters outlined in the state law and college regulations. They are published in the
    college catalog, the schedule of classes, and on the college website. An individual must meet
    the published requirements to enroll at East Los Angeles College.

16. INFORMATION AND LEARNING RESOURCES. East Los Angeles College provides
    information and learning resources and services to support its educational mission. The
    resources are provided by many different programs, departments, centers and labs, but
    primarily by the Helen Miller Bailey Library and the Learning Assistance Center.




   Eligibility Requirements                                                              Page 25
   ELAC’s resources include a library collection of 137,123 items of print and visual materials,
   including 12,966 electronic books, DVDs, 137 periodicals, and microfilm. Within the
   library, 18 subscriptions or free vendor electronic resources are accessed through any of the
   109 computer workstations; remote access is also available for student, faculty, and staff.
   Most ELAC staff and all students and faculty have access to computers, e-mail, and the
   Internet.

   The South Gate Educational Center houses a small library for students, faculty, and staff.
   The collection consists of 3,740 core reference volumes, circulating materials, and DVDs.
   Ten computer workstations are provide full access to all of the library’s electronic resources.

    All Learning Assistance Center services focus on assisting students to become self-regulated
    and responsible for their own learning. The central activity is peer tutoring in various forms:
    one-to-one, small group, class-specific workshops, by appointment and walk-in. Students
    are assisted with basic skills, study and test taking skills, and support in reading, writing,
    mathematics, natural and social science, and other college-level courses. Supplemental
    tutoring and study groups are also available. The Computer Assisted Instruction Lab
    provides services that complement tutoring or serve as an alternative learning mode. Sixty-
    five computer stations and thirty tutoring stations are available for individual and class-
    specific work.

   Many classrooms are equipped with smart workstations, allowing faculty immediate access
   to a computer linked to an overhead projection unit, a DVD player, and a VCR, as well as
   the appropriate software for instructional use. Faculty can check out TV/VCRs for
   instructional use in other classrooms.

17. FINANCIAL RESOURCES. As one of the campuses of the Los Angeles Community
    College District (LACCD), East Los Angeles College participates in the budget planning of
    the entire District. The President and Vice President of Administrative Services are actively
    involved in districtwide budget meetings, which discuss the funding base for the fiscal year
    and the financial resources and revenues made available to LACCD from the State of
    California which becomes the budget allocation for the campuses like East Los Angeles
    College.

    Once the allocation is received from the District Office, ELAC prepares the budget plans in
    consultation with the Vice Presidents of Academic Affairs, Workforce Education,
    Administrative Services, and Student Services. Other funding sources received from the
    federal, state, county, and local governments are carefully planned and distributed
    according to guidelines received from the funding sources.

    All funds received by the college are carefully planned to support the mission of the college
    and all its educational programs and goals for the success of every student at ELAC. Budget
    plans are adhered to, implemented, and monitored on a periodic basis to comply with
    federal, state, county, and local governments’ laws, rules, and regulations and to ensure that
    they are in line with policies and procedures of the District Office and the campus.



   Eligibility Requirements                                                               Page 26
18. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY. East Los Angeles College undergoes an annual audit
    by outside independent auditors hired by the District Office. The results of the audit together
    with its recommendations and exceptions are evaluated by the District and campus
    management and complied with. The audit report can be found in the college President's
    Office and in the District Office.

19. INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING AND EVALUTATION. The college creates a Strategic
    Master Plan, including an Educational, Facilities and Technology Plan, every six years.
    These plans reflect ELAC’s strategic priorities, goals and action plans and are developed
    through an integrated system of research, planning and shared governance subcommittees
    with committee members representing various college constituencies. The Research and
    Planning Office is currently establishing measures for all college goals and objectives in
    order to monitor the progress made in all college planning venues. The results of these
    measures are intended to be a basis for continued college planning and the decision-making
    processes. Course and Program SLOs, College Core Competencies and Institutional SLOs,
    and District-established Core Indicators are also utilized as measures of college progress and
    student success. A six-year cycle of Comprehensive Program Review with annual program
    review updates are also used to evaluate the programmatic progress towards achieving
    departmental goals establishing SLOs and determining areas in need of improvement. All
    recommendations are approved through the ELAC Shared Governance Council and made
    publicly available. The college also has a Viability Review structure in place to assist the
    college in determining whether existing programs and services are meeting their stated
    purpose and the college’s mission and goals. The overall institutional planning structure and
    process is developed, evaluated, and revised as needed on an ongoing basis by the Program
    Review and Viability Committee.

20. PUBLIC INFORMATION. East Los Angeles College displays in writing and in practice
    the model of institutional integrity. The mission statement of the college is clearly
    articulated in the college catalog and college website as well as in the college plans and
    other public documents. The college catalog and class schedule and the website also provide
    the public with current information about degrees and curricular offerings, student fees,
    financial aid, refund policies, admission policies, and information about transfer
    requirements. The names and academic preparation of the faculty and administration are
    listed in the back of the catalog. The names of the Governing Board members are also listed.

21. RELATIONS WITH THE ACCREDITING COMMISSION. The Board of Trustees for
    the Los Angeles Community College District provides assurance that the college adheres to
    the eligibility requirements and accreditation standards and policies of the Commission in its
    policies and actions and in its validation of this Self Study. The college describes itself in
    identical terms to all its accrediting agencies, communicates any changes in its accredited
    status, and agrees to disclose information required by the Commission to carry out
    accrediting responsibilities. All disclosures by the college are complete, accurate, and
    honest.




   Eligibility Requirements                                                               Page 27
                                       responses to 2003 recommendations




                                                           meet elac people
                                                           Tai-Li Lee
                                                           Architecture




                                                          “    Attending East Los Angeles College
                                                               prepared me for the next step. I’m
                                                               going to transfer to Pratt Institute in
                                                               New York to experience an urban
                                                               environment. I won a scholarship at
                                                               ELAC that will help me pay my


                                                                               ”
                                                               university tuition.




                   Start at ELAC…
                            Go Anywhere!
Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 5                                                                 12/8/08 9:16:51 AM
        RESPONSES TO THE 2003 VISITING TEAM’S RECOMMENDATIONS

                         Standard Three - Institutional Effectiveness
                              Recommendations and Response

3.1   The college should integrate planning with decision making and budgeting processes to
      ensure that decisions to allocate staff, equipment, resources, and facilities throughout
      the college are based on identified strategic priorities and to ensure a continuous cycle of
      evaluation and improvement based upon data (Standards 1.3, 3A.3, 3B.2, 3B.3, 9A.1).

Three documents drive the planning process: the Educational Master Plan, the Facilities Master
Plan, and the Technology Master Plan. The Educational Plan and Technology Plan have been
updated. Once the update of the Facilities Plan is completed, all three plans will be incorporated
into the ELAC Strategic Master Plan.

The East Los Angeles College Shared Governance Council (ESGC) reviews matters related to
the implementation of these institutional plans and has made recommendations related to special
one-time state allocations. The ESGC has directed the Educational Plan Subcommittee, which
oversees prioritization and implementation of the Educational Plan, to provide it with a list of
Educational Plan action items that are unfunded or under-funded. Any unfunded or under-funded
action items may be referred to the Budget Committee for review.

The college’s extensive Program Review process assesses progress towards strategic goals. This
information is integrated in planning the college budget.

As evidenced by the college’s positive ending balance and FTES growth, the college has made
tremendous strides in advancing its strategic goal of ensuring student access. Just prior to the
submission of budget requests, Department Chairs are required to submit annual updates of their
progress toward their Program Review goals. Apart from the successful one-time funding
program, the college does not have an ongoing shared governance process for recommending
one-time allocations from its fund balance.

Through the shared governance process, the Student Success Committee develops action plans
for implementing special State funding for basic skills, which is specifically linked to our
strategic goal of student success.

To further its institutional goals and implement the sort of projects previously funded by one-
time funding, the college has secured Title V funds and other grants. In addition, the college has
planned for economic hardship and the long term with a “rainy day” account of $11 million
dollars.




Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                    Page 29
3.2   The college should develop a model to systematically gather and report evidence of
      student learning outcomes at the course, program, certificate, and degree levels in order
      to assess institutional effectiveness at multiple levels of operation (Standards 3A.3, 3A.4,
      3C.1, 4B.3).

Student Learning Outcomes are a collegewide priority. To support the college’s commitment to
SLOs, a faculty coordinator for student learning outcomes receives .6 FTE reassigned time and
two additional faculty each receive .2 FTE reassigned time to assist the departments in the
preparation and assessment of SLOs through workshops and individual meetings with
departments. They have made presentations at opening days on SLO development and
assessment, rubric development, and at workshops on “What are SLOs,” assessment
development, and what to do with assessment results.

The SLO Committee, in operation since fall 2005 and chaired by the SLO coordinator, reflects
the shared governance structure of the college with membership from the faculty, classified staff,
and administrators. The standing SLO Committee meeting is another venue for discussion of
SLOs and their effectiveness. The committee develops annual goals and objectives with
measurable outcomes for each academic year. The committee recently evaluated software that
will assist in the organization of student learning outcomes. The software selected is TracDat and
training for its use should be in place during spring 2009.

The Office of Research and Planning has been expanded to support the institution’s efforts to
enhance student learning and its ability to assess and evaluate the effectiveness of academic and
student services. An Associate Dean of Research was added to the staff in 2008. The office
works closely with the SLO Committee in assisting departments with the development of SLOs
and the analysis of assessment results. However, due to all of the other responsibilities of that
office, the staff cannot fully meet the demand. Currently no researcher in the office is solely
responsible for assisting faculty and staff with the assessment of their SLOs. When the next
researcher position (previously approved but now on hold due to budget constraints) is filled, a
principal responsibility of that individual will be to assist departments in the assessment of their
SLOs.

SLOs and strategies for attaining them are produced by each department or discipline, which has
its own SLO committee meetings to determine what outcomes will be assessed for each course
and how. Each department has a designated SLO facilitator. Yearly SLO reports with SLOs,
assessment methods, and plans of action are submitted to the SLO Coordinator. Beginning spring
2009, the reports will be reviewed by the newly formed (late fall 2008) SLO Assessment
Committee (SLOAC) to ensure that SLOs are assessed regularly for learning with authentic
assessment strategies, tied to college mission and core competencies, and that results of
assessment are used for improvement in courses, programs, and institution-wide planning.
SLOAC will then report back to departments via each department’s designated SLO facilitator.
SLOAC is composed of the SLO Coordinator, SLO Facilitators, Research and Planning
representative, Academic Senate representative (CTE/Academic), Student Services
representative (when appropriate), and an Administrator (CTE/Academic).



Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                      Page 30
Course assessments to date have included lab practicum, embedded assessments, reports, and
performances. Some programs have developed their outcomes with outside guidance such as a
career technical advisory committee, or with program guidelines or goals. Student Services and
administrative units are also engaged in developing SLOs.

Student learning outcomes are assessed in each section with a common assessment tool
developed by each department or discipline SLO committee. Many of the assessment results are
analyzed via committee-agreed-upon rubrics. Some program-level outcomes have been assessed
via surveys to student, as well as aggregation of data from course level SLOs.

The results have led to improvement in courses by increasing problem content area emphasis to
help student learning. They have also led to change in curriculum taught, and in adding new
courses to help student learning.

                     Standard Five - Student Support and Development
                             Recommendation and Response

5.1   Based on the priorities and objectives in the strategic plan, the college should complete a
      master plan for coordinated student services that creates a clear direction for future
      development in programs, services, priorities, positions, and leadership for the future.

In 2005, a vice president of Student Services with sole responsibility for that division was
named. Student Services had previously primarily been managed by a dean who reported to the
vice president overseeing both administrative services and student services. The appointment of
the vice president was driven in large part by the urging of faculty leaders, who saw the need for
a strengthened Student Services division. This structure includes more deans, associate deans,
and directors. Three full-time positions, Dean of Student Services, Associate Dean of
Outreach/Recruitment, and Associate Dean of Extended Opportunity Programs and Services,
were restored after years of vacancy. Unfortunately the vice president passed away in early 2007.
An interim vice president currently oversees Student Services.

Completion of Program Review by all of the units in Student Services and the subsequent
development of a cluster plan led by the interim vice president have been the vehicles by which
the division has developed the master plan for its operation. Program review is a cycle of
continuous self-review and refinement of college programs in support of the college mission and
strategic priorities. This is an effective means for monitoring the quality of student service
programs and units and for setting new goals to improve services. As of spring 2007, all
programs and units in Student Services had completed the program review process by
completing a comprehensive program review questionnaire, which includes an internal and
external scan. Units then use these scans in determining future goals. The questions are aligned
with the college mission and goals and each unit demonstrates the extent to which the unit is
contributing the college mission and enhancing student access, retention and success. The
Program Review process also initiates a campus-wide discussion on these issues and the ability
of the unit to impact student learning.



Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                    Page 31
A Program Review Validation Committee, made up of representatives from the campus at large,
reviewed the units’ responses and then provided suggested commendations and
recommendations. Each unit’s commendations and recommendations were then forwarded for
shared governance approval to the East Los Angeles Shared Governance Council. This process
allows all campus constituencies to be involved in an ongoing discussion student success that
includes both academic and non-academic units.

During the fall 2008 semester, Student Services completed its Cluster Review. This review
encompassed the entire Student Services units and enabled division leadership to analyze and
integrate the results of all previous unit evaluations. The cumulative result of this Cluster Review
is a Cluster Plan, which details action items for the division to accomplish in order to increase
student access, retention, learning and success. The Cluster Review entails the same shared
governance processes as the unit reviews, allowing for a campus discussion on student support
services.

Student Service Outcomes (SSOs) for the units within the Student Services Division are in the
developmental stages. During the fall 2007 semester the goal for the Student Services Division
was to have all programs and units identify appropriate Student Service Outcomes (SSOs). As of
the spring 2008 semester all of the programs and units within Student Services had identified
preliminary Student Service Outcomes (SSOs); however, the means of collecting the data have
not yet been developed. The student services units continue to work with the college SLO
Coordinator in order to refine SSOs and to create appropriate assessment tools for measuring
student outcomes. The goal of the division is utilize SSOs as means for ongoing evaluation of
and discussion on improvement of student learning.

Student Support Services is constantly soliciting input from students, staff, and faculty to
improve their effectiveness of services. Students are encouraged to complete and submit student
comment forms about the quality of service or suggestions for improvement to any student
service department. Staff input occurs at the departmental level during regular office staff
meetings, which provide the opportunity for workers to evaluate and adjust services to better
serve the needs of the students. Office staff meetings often include guest presenters from other
departments and/or programs for announcements.

Student Services continues to face many challenges. The college is in the midst of major
construction campus wide. During fall 2007 and spring 2008, all of the Student Services units
and programs were relocated to various locations throughout the campus as the college remodels
the Student Services building (previously designated as the E-1 building). Due to the relocation
of all student service units and programs, there is a lack of student ease in accessing needed
student service units and programs due to their lack of proximity to one other. As an example,
the Admissions and Records Office and the Counseling Department, both critical student service
units, are located in two separate areas of the campus. This has made referral processes and
integration of services difficult in the current setting. However, changes in the operation of the
Student Services unit that are designed to ensure student success are well underway based on its
cluster plan. 2009 is the target year for moving all student services into one newly renovated
building.



Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                      Page 32
                              Standard Seven – Faculty and Staff
                               Recommendations and Response

7.1. The college should ensure that faculty and staff evaluation is consistent and timely, as
     well as tied to the opportunity for staff development. Individuals who are responsible for
     evaluations should be trained and the evaluation process should be consistently
     implemented and monitored (Standards 7B.1, 7B.2, 7C.1, 7D1).

The guidelines for faculty and staff evaluations are clearly outlined in their respective bargaining
contracts.

Faculty Evaluation. For the most part, faculty evaluations occur on a consistent and timely basis
and are monitored by the dean in charge of a department.

Newly hired full-time faculty members are evaluated through a four-year probation process,
normally culminating in tenure at the end of the fourth year. An evaluation committee is formed
for each probationary hire. The committee is comprised of an academic dean, the department
chair, an Academic Senate representative, a tenured faculty member chosen by the evaluee, and a
tenured faculty member chosen by the department. The dean and Academic Senate
representative are non-voting members of the committee. This committee evaluates the
effectiveness of the faculty member based on classroom observations, student evaluations, and
other data that the department has agreed may be included in an evaluation. The committee
meets with the evaluee to review the process and set up time lines and future meeting dates. The
tenure review process is ongoing during the first four years of a new faculty member’s
employment (with the contract providing for a faculty mentor, and constant guidance from the
department chairperson, faculty and administration). The formal evaluation is conducted yearly
during that time. Whenever possible, the composition of the evaluation committee is unchanged
during the entire four-year process. This maintains consistency for the tenure-track faculty
member and allows the committee members to become familiar with the work habits of the
faculty member. The guidelines for achieving tenure are delineated in the faculty contract and
are available to all faculty members.

Evaluations are also conducted for all tenured faculty. At a minimum, they are conducted on a
three-year cycle during the entire employment of the faculty, and alternate between “basic” and
“comprehensive” evaluations. While the basic evaluation is conducted between the faculty
member and department chairperson, the comprehensive evaluation is conducted by a committee
comprised of the department chair, another tenured faculty member chosen by the department, a
tenured faculty member chosen by the evaluee, and the supervising dean, who is non-voting.
There is no requirement for data gathering during the basic evaluation unless requested by the
chair or faculty member being evaluated. Comprehensive evaluations are conducted by the
similar procedures as used in evaluations of probationary faculty. Suggestions for improvement
are made, and progress towards correcting past deficiencies is evaluated. Evaluation criteria
measure teaching effectiveness by requiring students and committee members to evaluate faculty
members on a number of standardized criteria.


Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                       Page 33
The overall goal of probationary and tenured faculty evaluations is to aid faculty members in
becoming more effective teachers. The evaluation process allows the faculty member under
review and the college to recognize performance improvements and to increase awareness of
current teaching strengths and weaknesses. Noted areas of growth may be addressed through the
many professional development activities offered on campus, faculty dialogue, or other methods
as required.

Faculty evaluations extend beyond the tenure process of the first four years. Adjunct faculty are
also evaluated every three years, with the evaluation provided by the department chairperson or
the chair’s designee. Adjunct faculty are subjected only to basic evaluations, although the
evaluee can request a comprehensive evaluation. Adjunct faculty are expected to receive their
initial evaluation by the end of their second semester of teaching. In the event of an
unsatisfactory evaluation by the chair or designee, an administrative review is initiated.
The office of Academic Affairs maintains records on faculty evaluations and is responsible for
ensuring that all probationary, tenured, and adjunct faculty are regularly evaluated as stipulated
in the faculty contract.

The Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs, Workforce Education, Student Services, and
Administrative Services and the deans receive training in evaluating faculty and staff. There is
no systematic approach to training for department chairs and supervisors other than a procedural
review from the vice presidents or deans in charge of the departments.

Staff Evaluation. With the implementation of the SAP Human Resources system, the district
has taken a number of steps to remedy the problem of staff evaluation and other problems
associated with Human Resources.

The Personnel Commission publishes the Classified Employee Handbook. The handbook
provides comprehensive information about employment policies, procedures, services, and
benefits. Sections on performance evaluation and training and educational opportunities are
included. The Personnel Commission has two service representatives; each is assigned to work
with a specific campus to talk with employees at any time via phone or through regularly
scheduled visits to the college to answer questions about their employment status and related
matters.

The criteria and timeline for the evaluation of classified staff is determined by the collective
bargaining agreement under which that employee works. The criteria for the evaluation of each
classification are listed on a classified evaluation form, which the employee’s direct supervisor
completes during the evaluation process. Evaluations are conducted yearly during the
employee’s month of birth. The District uses an automated system for tracking evaluation
compliance. A computer-generated e-mail reminds supervisors that an evaluation must be
completed one month prior to the evaluation deadline. Continuous notifications are sent to the
supervisor until the completed evaluation is logged into the system. The Single Point of Contact
(SPOC) forwards any delinquent evaluations to a higher supervisor to ensure complete
compliance.




Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                    Page 34
Staff Development Opportunities. The college has an active Professional Development
Committee, led by the Professional Development Coordinator, which seeks to provide faculty
and staff with multiple opportunities to improve their abilities to meet the college mission,
enhance teaching, and improve student learning. The college has monthly workshops and the
Teaching and Learning Center to assist faculty and staff in skills development. The coordinator
posts all opportunities for professional development via e-mail, flyers, and on the Professional
Development website. The Teaching and Learning Center is staffed by a full-time lab manager.
The Center’s principal functions are to provide a drop-in lab for computer and software use and
Internet access by instructors, provide opportunity for consultation on distance learning and
technical issues, and support professional development activities, including video-based and
computer-based training. All classified staff are invited to participate in activities provided by the
Center.

In addition, many committees host workshops to help personnel improve efforts to increase
student learning and student success. The SLO Committee has hosted many workshops on the
development, implementation and use of SLOs to improve student learning. The college has also
developed a new faculty orientation which focuses on student learning and runs the duration of
the entire first semester of employment. A technology grant has been funded to assist faculty in
learning needed technology skills that can be used in the classroom. There is also available
training software to assist faculty in developing skills. The college also encourages personnel to
attend professional conferences and offers reimbursement for those attending these conferences.
Classified staff are also offered training in Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification and
may receive pay increases for successfully completing training. Those wishing to further their
education may also be eligible for tuition reimbursement.

Faculty can fulfill the 32.5 hours of professional development requirement in a number of ways.
The professional development coordinator and the Professional Development Committee, in
collaboration with the Academic Senate and Academic Affairs, develop a full day of activities on
opening day of the fall semester for all full-time faculty, who are required by contract to attend.
Adjunct faculty are encouraged to attend. Opening day activities have been occurring since 2001.
The most recent one featured the theme of student success with a focus on basic skills.

On-campus professional activities are free. Annually, full-time faculty members are entitled to
$450 each in funding on a first-come/first-serve basis to attend conferences. Part-time faculty
members are entitled to pro-rated funding based on the number of their teaching hours per week.
Faculty can also receive tuition reimbursement for completed courses that are job related.


7.2   The college and district should work together to clearly delineate the functions of each in
      the faculty hiring process (Standards 7A.2, 7A.3).

The functions of the college and the district in the faculty hiring process have been clearly
identified. In February 2001, the Board of Trustees adopted a decentralization approach to
recruitment and selection of faculty hiring. In response to this approach, the college developed
the Faculty Hiring Process and Procedures Handbook. The document was reviewed by the
visiting team in 2003. One issue in the college document that remains to be resolved between the

Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                        Page 35
president and the Academic Senate is the Senate’s request that a faculty member be present when
the president interviews the recommended candidates for a position. In all other respects,
however, we are in agreement, and are following the policy strictly in all cases. It has been a
successful policy to date, particularly as it allows us to recruit more broadly, thus providing us
with a much larger and stronger pool of candidates.

By July 1, 2004, the district had the process in place for its role in faculty selection and hiring. In
May 2005, the district’s Office of Human Resources formalized the process in its Recruitment
and Selection Handbook. The manual describes the decentralization changes and includes all
related forms, policies, and procedures. All of the up-to-date Human Resource Guides for
recruitment, selection, and employment are posted on the district website and are accessible from
any computer.

The formation of the District Human Resources Council, composed of representatives from the
colleges and the district office, has led to increased input from the colleges in the creation and
implementation of hiring policies and position classifications.


                              Standard Nine - Financial Resources
                                Recommendation and Response

9.1   The district should strengthen budget accountability and expenditure controls to ensure
      that each site exhibits fiscal integrity and sound management and accounting practices.
      Moreover, the district should ensure that the allocation model is fair, consistently
      implemented and well understood (Standards 9A.4, 9B.1, 9B.2, 10C.6).

In response to ACCJC concerns, in the spring of 2006, the district engaged a third- party
consultant to review the district’s budget allocation and funding mechanisms. Studies were
conducted to find out whether the model contained inherent disadvantages for the smaller
colleges in the district. Among the findings were that the district should move quickly to bring its
internal budget allocation formula into alignment with the provisions of SB 361, adjust the
allocation model to make assessments on a cost per FTES basis, and to consider a different way
of conducting assessments. In October 2006, then-chancellor Rocky Young established a DBC
budget allocation task force, comprised of stakeholder groups, including representatives of both
small and large colleges, to review the district’s allocation model.

The Budget Allocation Task Force thoroughly discussed the findings contained in the
independent studies, and in January 2007, issued its recommendations for a new budget
allocation model, which was adopted by the DBC on January 17, 2007. The new LACCD
allocation model parallels the state budget formula, distributing funds to the colleges on a credit
FTES basis with a two-tiered basis for noncredit. However, it does differ from the state formula
in one critical respect: it increases the foundation grant for the district’s four smaller colleges
(Harbor, Mission, Southwest, and West) by $500,000. This augmentation of the basic $3,000,000
foundation grant was made in acknowledgement of the additional administrative expenses
incurred by the smaller colleges.


Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                         Page 36
The task force also recommended that district-wide assessments be changed from a percentage of
college revenue over total district revenue to a cost per FTES basis, in order to make the system
more equitable. The task force further suggested that the district office budget allocation not be
set at a fixed percentage and that its budget be periodically reviewed.

The allocation of resources is one of the district’s most challenging tasks. However, revisions
made by the DBC to the allocation process in the past few years have created a more equitable
and efficient system. The recent revision allows for flexibility and encourages colleges to live
within their means. It also rewards colleges that practice sound enrollment management
strategies and that shepherd resources wisely.

The new model adopted by the DBC addresses the concerns regarding disparity in the treatment
of the smaller colleges, noted by the ACCJC. Despite these efforts however, as of fall 2008,
several district colleges continue to project potential budget shortfalls. These shortfalls are
expected to be mitigated by future growth funds as they become available. In addition, the
district is working with the colleges on enrollment management strategies for 2008-09 to bring
their budgets under control.


                        Standard Ten - Governance and Administration
                               Recommendation and Response

10.1 Based upon the work begun in developing a functional map, the district and college
     should more specifically delineate operational responsibilities and functions, giving
     particular attention to shared and overlapping areas. The district and college should also
     establish a method and time frame for regular evaluation and revision of the delineation
     based upon changing circumstances (Standards 10C.3, 10C.4, 10C.5).

Operating within the framework of a large multi-college district, it is an ongoing challenge to
delineate our roles. Decentralization is a work in progress that requires periodic review and
alterations. Regular review has been ongoing since the 1999-2000 academic year. Our district
has become partially decentralized, with some decisions made locally and others made by the
district. In curriculum, some characteristics of a course are determined by the college and some
by the district. Some aspects, such as hiring decisions, are totally decentralized.

Chancellor Drummond has made a commitment to redefining decentralization as it impacts the
district’s efficiency and effectiveness. One of the Board's goals for 2008 is to further clarify the
division of roles and responsibilities between the colleges and the district office. In response to
this Board priority, the chancellor has directed district senior staff to engage the colleges in an
ongoing dialogue to further clarify district/college relationships. The initial result of this effort is
the LACCD District/College Functional Map, which offers a concise description of the history
and current state of district/college relations and a detailed accounting of how district committees
and offices interface with their college constituencies. The Functional Map also includes an
extensive set of "functional flow charts" which present visual maps of the district and college
roles in 30 critical administrative processes, ranging from curriculum approval to the
establishment of specially funded programs.

Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                          Page 37
The Functional Map is currently being discussed by college Academic Senates and shared
governance councils across the district. Vice Chancellor Gary Colombo met with members of the
East Los Angeles College Shared Governance Council and Academic Senate executive board in
early December. In winter/spring 2009, it will be evaluated and further refined by the District
Academic Senate and be a focus of the Board of Trustees’ annual retreat. By spring, sections of
the Functional Map—including the listing of all district-wide councils and committees and the
functional flow charts—will be added as links on the District website for the use of faculty and
staff.

The college administration has developed a campus-wide organizational chart delineating
administrative and supervision oversight as well as for each campus division and department. In
addition, each Department Chair was provided an orientation and a Department Chair’s
Handbook for reference to clarify each department’s operational responsibilities and
considerations.




Responses to Previous Recommendations                                                   Page 38
                             ABSTRACT OF THE SELF STUDY

As one reads the self study for East Los Angeles College (ELAC), the focus the college has
placed on student success will be apparent. The college has successfully implemented strategic
planning and is using data-driven processes to determine programmatic needs. Student Learning
Outcomes are being developed in all units, and the college stands prepared to implement newly
revised plans in the areas of facilities, technology, and education, combined into an overall
strategic plan. Student success, particularly in the area of basic skills development, is an over-
arching theme in day-to-day operations.

Standard One: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness. This standard describes the important
role the college mission statement plays in guiding planning and decision-making. The
statement, which was revised in 2007, is written in the catalog, class schedule, and on the college
Web site, as well as in planning and program review documents. The college has a commitment
to review the mission statement at least every six years. The standard further describes how the
college demonstrates effectiveness through an ongoing commitment to improving student
learning and institutional processes. The Program Review process is well established. Shared
governance committees oversee student learning, and implementation of the Student Learning
Outcomes cycle is a top campus priority.
The major issues which emerged as a result of the work on Standard I and warrant further
attention and resolution are
 Student Learning Outcomes Assessments will be linked to the college’s established Core
    Competencies.
 With the leadership of a new Associate Dean for Student Success, the college will implement
    its planning agenda for Student Success and Basic Skills.
 Ties between Program Review and budget allocation will be formalized.

Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services. This extensive standard report deals
with instructional programs, student support services, and library and learning support services.
The college offers a variety of programs to meet the needs of the local community, workforce,
and community-based organizations. A renewed emphasis on basic skills has led to the
establishment of a Student Success Committee charged with making programmatic changes in
the delivery of basic skills instruction. Courses and programs are offered at a variety of outreach
sites as well as on the main campus and the South Gate and Rosemead centers. The college has
embarked on a concerted effort to incorporate Student Learning Outcomes into every unit on
campus. Student support services are designed to meet the widely varying needs of the college’s
student population, including traditional academic counseling as well as job placement, health
services, psychological counseling, child care, basic skills improvement, tutoring, services for
disabled students, and other specialized programming. Library and learning support services are
principally provided by the college libraries (on the main campus and at South Gate) and the
Learning Assistance Center (LAC). In addition, several departments and programs offer
information and learning resources specific to their specialty areas for students. Both libraries
and LAC have increased the availability of technology resources to students.
The major issues which emerged as a result of the work on Standard II and warrant further
attention and resolution are

Abstract of the Self-Study                                                                 Page 41
   The college will implement SLOs in all campus units and complete the assessment cycle.
   The college will select and validate new computerized assessment placement instruments for
    Mathematics, English, and ESL.
   The college will provide comprehensive student services at the Rosemead Center.
   The college will make counseling available to students online.

Standard III: Resources describes how the college has sought to integrate staffing, employee
evaluations, campus technology, facilities development, and budgeting into a comprehensive
system of campus-wide planning. The college’s Facilities, Technology, and Educational
planning committees have created a framework for meeting the college’s goals and established
the process for how physical, fiscal and human resources are used and allocated. Through these
shared governance committees, ELAC has ensured that staffing and the distributions of resources
have met the needs of the campus and its diverse student body. Some achievements include
significant improvements in technological services, including campus-wide wireless Internet,
expansions of online education and the development of an online Academic Computing
Environment (ACE). Through the use of bond measure funds the campus has been able to
dramatically and positively impact facilities improvements and will continue to keep the college
environment in a state of improvement for the next ten years. College fiscal responsibility has
allowed the college to maintain a significant balance with which to buffer the college in times of
economic uncertainty. ELAC plans to continue to improve the process of linking the distribution
of college resources to strategic planning, college needs, and program evaluations. In this manner
the college will continue to develop a cycle of planning and evaluation, ensure that student needs
are met and enhance student learning and outcomes.
The major issues which emerged as a result of the work on Standard III and warrant further
attention and resolution are
 The establishment of a Human Resource Office on campus should be explored.
 Deficiencies in faculty evaluation forms and process should be addressed through the
    collective bargaining process.
 The Academic Senate will revive its Ethics Committee.
 The college will revise and improve the integration of financial and institutional planning.

Standard IV: Leadership and Governance. Since 1993, East Los Angeles College has
operated under a shared governance structure among college constituents including
administrators, faculty, and staff which has continuously evolved over the last 15 years. The East
Los Angeles College Shared Governance Council (ESGC) has become one of the college’s key
committees wherein all constituencies come together and voice their specific concerns.
Operating under a decentralized governance model for the past five years, East Los Angeles
College’s constituencies have taken their shared governance roles very seriously. With the
recognition that concrete data are needed to support the campus decision making process, the
college’s Research and Planning Office is now an integral component of all committee work.
The District’s Functional Map of October 2008 presents information regarding the structure of
the District’s administrative offices and their functional relationship to the colleges. This is an
important document meant to keep an ongoing dialogue among college leadership, District
administration, and the Board of Trustees, thus further strengthening the decentralization
process.

Abstract of the Self-Study                                                                 Page 42
The major issues which emerged as a result of the work on Standard IV and warrant further
attention and resolution are
 The college will educate all campus constituencies about its budget process.
 A committee will be created to prioritize the college’s research agenda.
 Faculty members will be more actively recruited to committee participation.
 The Academic Senate and college President will work to resolve disagreements over the
    faculty hiring policy.




Abstract of the Self-Study                                                        Page 43
                                                                  Standard I:
                                       institutional mission and effectiveness



                                                              meet elac people
                                                              Lorenzo Briceno
                                                              Political Science and English




                                                              “   It takes a lot longer to complete an AA
                                                                  degree at night, but I can get all my
                                                                  classes here at South Gate and that is
                                                                  a big help for me. I’ve got about a year
                                                                  and a half to go and then I can transfer.
                                                                  Meanwhile I am getting great experience
                                                                  working for Councilman Parks.

                                                                                                ”




                   Start at ELAC…
                            Go Anywhere!
Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 7                                                                   12/8/08 9:16:54 AM
          STANDARD I: INSTITUTIONAL MISSION AND EFFECTIVENESS

                                          Committee
             Ran Gust                                            Kerrin McMahan
  Co-        Acquisitions Librarian                              Dean, Academic Affairs
 chairs      gustrg@elac.edu                                     mcmahakm@elac.edu
             265-8628                                            415-4135
             Khetam Dahi                                Leonor Perez (on sabbatical)
             Instructor, ESL/English                    Dean, Research and Planning
             dahik@elac.edu                780-6707     perezlx@elac.edu        415-4138
             Lurelean B. Gaines                         Lakshmi Reddy
             Department Chair, Nursing                  Associate Professor, Life Sciences
             gaineslb@elac.edu             265-8961     reddybl@elac.edu        265-8879
             Gayane Godjoian                            John Rude
Members      Assistant Professor, Chemistry             Associate Dean, Resource Development
             godjoig@elac.edu               265-8645    rudejc@elac.edu         267-3724
             Jose A. Gallegos (Alfred)                  Brigette Thompson
             Assistant Research Analyst                 Associate Professor, C, F, & ES
             gallegja@elac.edu              415-4151    thompsb@elac.edu        415-5312
             Adrienne Ann Mullen                        Maira Cruz
             Dean, Continuing Education                 Student
             mullenaa@elac.edu              265-8594

The institution demonstrates strong commitment to a mission that emphasizes achievement
of student learning and to communicating the mission internally and externally. The
institution uses analyses of quantitative and qualitative data and analysis in an ongoing
and systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning, implementation, and re-evaluation
to verify and improve the effectiveness by which the mission is accomplished.

                                         I.A. Mission

I.A. The institution has a statement of mission that defines the institution’s broad
educational purposes, its intended student population, and its commitment to achieving
student learning.

East Los Angeles College’s Mission Statement

       East Los Angeles College is dedicated to facilitating student learning through
       the highest quality of transfer, career technical, basic skills, and community
       service courses and programs. We serve a culturally diverse community of
       lifelong learners in a dynamic urban setting by supporting student success in
       achieving associate degrees, general education, certificates, and personal
       development. To develop the potential of each student, the college provides
       access to innovative teaching methods, alternative modes of course delivery,
       the latest in educational technology, and comprehensive support services.


Standard I                                                                                   45
I.A.1. The institution establishes student learning programs and services aligned with its
purposes and its student population.

Descriptive Summary

As a comprehensive community college, East Los Angeles College offers multiple learning
paths to serve the varied needs of its students. A demographic profile of ELAC students,
assessment scores, learning outcomes and achievement is conducted regularly and is
published annually in the College Profile. (1.1) The data in this publication serve as a basis
for defining ELAC’s intended population, needs, location, resources and role in higher
education.

For students on their way to Bachelor’s degrees, the general-education transfer curriculum is
articulated with the region’s public and private universities. Students seeking an Associate’s
degree can choose among 32 majors. More than 40 vocational (career and technical
education) certificate programs directly prepare students for employment within a broad
range of occupations. The Noncredit Department offers developmental classes in Basic
English and mathematics skills, including English as a Second Language (ESL). Community
Services serves community members interested in classes for both recreation and personal
development. The college offers credit classes in 10 to15 off-site locations (the number
varies depending on the semester/session) and at the South Gate Educational Center. More
than 100 course sections representing over fifty courses are offered online in a “distance
learning” format.

Self Evaluation

The college’s mission statement guides the development of its strategic goals and plans. The
statement defines the institution’s broad educational purposes, its intended student
population, and its commitment to student learning. Through the Educational Plan
Subcommittee, which is a shared governance committee, ELAC fosters the college-wide
commitment to student learning reflected in the college’s mission statement through dialogue
and action via the implementation of the college’s Educational Master Plan. (1.2)

In the spring 2007 Student Survey, students were asked to respond to 16 questions regarding
how much their college experiences both in and out of class have helped/improved their
ability to function in a number of areas, including the following: thinking clearly; solving
numerical problems; using computers and other technology; working effectively with others;
learning effectively on their own; understanding themselves; understanding people of other
racial, cultural or ethnic backgrounds; developing a personal code of values or ethics;
contributing to the welfare of the community; developing clear career goals; getting a job or
advancing in their career; and setting educational goals and monitoring their progress. In all
16 areas, over 50 percent of the students noted that their college experiences had helped them
to improve. (1.3)




Standard I                                                                                 46
The institution approved college core competencies (1.4) and implemented its Student
Learning Outcome process to more directly measure whether it has been effective in reaching
its commitment to student learning.

Planning Agenda

In consultation with the college’s Academic Senate, the Research and Planning Office will
develop an integrated system of measurement that accounts for Student Learning Outcomes
and their connection to achieving established College Core Competencies. Research and
Planning will then integrate this data along with the ongoing College Profile Data to assess
whether the college is fulfilling its mission to its students and community.

I.A.2. The college’s Mission Statement is approved by the governing board and published.

Descriptive Summary

The college’s previous Mission Statement was approved by the Board of Trustees in
November 2003. The current mission statement was approved by the campus in November
2007. (1.5) It will be approved, along with the college Strategic and Educational Plan, by the
Board of Trustees in early 2009. Following its approval, the updated Mission Statement will
be published (as the previous one was) on the college website, in the catalog, and in various
other campus documents.

Self Evaluation

The Mission Statement is appropriately approved by the Board of Trustees. In the Spring
2008 Faculty/Staff/Administrator Survey, participants responded to a question regarding their
familiarity with the mission. More than 82 percent agreed with this statement. (1.6) However,
it is not published as widely as it could be, especially where students will see it. For example,
it is not included in the schedule of classes nor is it posted in areas frequented by students,
such as classrooms.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

I.A.3. Using the institution’s governance and decision-making processes, the institution
reviews its mission statement on a regular basis and revises it as necessary.

Descriptive Summary

The Mission Statement is reviewed at least every six years during the process of updating the
Strategic Plan. The previous Mission Statement was approved in 2003. During the most
recent revision (2007), an ad hoc committee was formed by the Shared Governance Council
(SGC) which met to consider changes to the campus culture that had occurred since the
approval of the 2003 Mission Statement, and to also consider the incorporation of updated


Standard I                                                                                    47
language. The college’s new Mission Statement was approved by the SGC in November
2007, after campus-wide dialogue centered in the Educational Planning Subcommittee (1.7)
and the Academic Senate. (1.8)

Self Evaluation

The college considers revision of the Mission Statement at minimum every six years. In this
day of changing demographics and a global environment, it might be appropriate to review it
on a more frequent basis.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

I.A.4. The institution’s mission is central to institutional planning and decision making.

Descriptive Summary

The Office of Research and Planning, headed by the Dean of Research and Planning,
oversees the institutional planning process. Many committees or groups influence
institutional planning at the college. The committees most involved in overall planning are
the Shared Governance Council, the Academic Senate, the Educational Planning
Subcommittee, the Facilities Planning Subcommittee, and the Technology Planning
Subcommittee.

The mission statement underlies institutional planning and decision making and is used to
frame the college plans and the program review processes that guide the college. The mission
statement is prominently printed at the beginning of the program review document, and all
units are guided to conduct their reviews relative to the mission statement. Further, units have
developed their own mission statements that support the college mission statement and guide
them in their planning and decision making. (1.9)

Self Evaluation

In the spring 2008 survey, 63 percent of the faculty and staff indicated that they believe the
mission statement guides all institutional planning and institutional decision making at East.
(1.6)

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.




Standard I                                                                                   48
                        I.B. Improving Institutional Effectiveness

I.B. The institution demonstrates a conscious effort to produce and support student
learning, measures that learning, assesses how well learning is occurring, and makes
changes to improve student learning. The institution also organizes its key processes and
allocates its resources to effectively support student learning. The institution demonstrates
its effectiveness by providing 1) evidence of the achievement of student learning outcomes
and 2) evidence of institution and program performance. The institution uses ongoing and
systematic evaluation and planning to refine its key processes and improve student
learning.

I.B.1. The institution maintains an ongoing, collegial, self-reflective dialogue about the
continuous improvement of student learning and educational processes.

Descriptive Summary

Faculty, staff, and administrators of the East Los Angeles College community work toward
the continuous improvement of student learning and institutional processes through a broad
array of campus-wide programs, services, and activities as determined by the college’s
planning structure, established processes and observable outcomes. The Shared Governance
Council (SGC) meets regularly to oversee college operational and planning policies,
structures, and processes. The SGC also discusses, shares with, and advises stakeholders
about daily operations, upcoming events, and college achievements of plans. (1.10)

The Program Review Process, which includes Academic, Administrative and Student Service
units, works to evaluate the extent to which departments and units are providing quality
services to students and obtaining student learning outcomes. Program review requires the
use of both qualitative and quantitative data as a basis for establishing the department’s
(unit’s) future goals and objectives. (1.11)

Various committees are part of the oversight process that ensures focus on student learning
through substantive dialogue. As part of this oversight process, the ESGC reviews and
approves all program review evaluation results, recommendations and commendations made
by the program review validation committees. The Program Review Validation Committees
are shared-governance committees formed to read and examine completed program reviews
and through dialogue and analysis make recommendations for improvement that will
ultimately be approved by the ESGC.

The Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) Committee formulates policies and coordinates the
efforts of the SLO coordinator and two facilitators, who in turn train and support faculty and
staff in designing, measuring and evaluating student learning outcomes. Additionally, the
college is currently formulating the Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Committee,
which will engage in substantial discussion about the quality and appropriate use of methods
and tools for assessing student learning across departments. The Transfer Committee and
Student Success Committee provide forums for stakeholders and utilize faculty and
administrator expertise in planning to support student achievement.


Standard I                                                                                 49
Self Evaluation

The shared governance process provides a foundation that enables student success by basing
decisions related to appropriate staffing, hiring, and facilities planning on input from a
diverse group of stakeholders. Seventy-three percent of the respondents on the
Faculty/Staff/Administrators survey agree that the college has processes that encourage
dialog on improving student learning. (1.6)

Although the college has made great strides and has widened its inclusion, participation and
college-wide understanding of the program review process, the college is transitioning to a
higher level of sophistication in utilizing existing planning processes to the greatest extent
possible to even further raise the level of understanding, evidence, and accountability
surrounding student learning. The effective achievement of this next step will provide a
greater level of detail regarding the extent to which we meet our mission and commitment to
student learning.

In spring 2009, the “New Faculty Institute” will continue in the form of a series of hands-on
workshops to support faculty in implementing what they learned in the fall series. The focus
will be on effective practices for active “learner-centered” strategies as recommended in the
“Poppy Copy.” The purpose of the Institute, which will be repeated yearly, is to develop a
cohort of faculty equipped to lead their colleagues in a cultural transformation toward more
effective instructional practices. The state has provided funding specifically for Basic Skills,
and there is some pressure to expend the money in a timely fashion. One of the most
important responsibilities of the Associate Dean for Student Success will be to exercise
leadership in consultation with faculty to assure the funds will be spent effectively in support
of a coordinated and holistic vision.

Planning Agenda

It is one thing to create action plans, but another to implement them. Part of the college
planning agenda for Student Success and Basic Skills must be to implement the four newly
created action plan matrices. The Student Success Committee has formed four ad hoc task
forces, one for each matrix, which will identify actions to be taken, implement and supervise
these actions, and determine how they will be budgeted for the next one to two years. This
will depend on the coordinating efforts of the new Associate Dean.

I.B.2. The institution sets goals to improve its effectiveness consistent with its stated
purposes. The institution articulates its goals and states the objectives derived from them in
measurable terms so that the degree to which they are achieved can be determined and
widely discussed. The institutional members understand these goals and work
collaboratively toward their achievement.

Descriptive Summary

The college’s priorities and goals are formally reviewed every six years as part of the
strategic planning process. The Mission Statement guides each unit and department in


Standard I                                                                                   50
formulating their individual priorities and goals. Administration ensures that broad policy
decisions reflect the college community’s shared values as articulated in the Mission
Statement.

The college follows the required procedures for Accountability Reporting for the California
Community Colleges. The district has recently defined measures of institutional effectiveness
that all LACCD colleges must utilize. (1.13) The Educational Plan Subcommittee completed
and approved the ELAC Educational Plan in fall 2008. This plan names the newly formed
educational goals and objectives of the college. Additionally, ELAC is developing new
overarching and comprehensive college-wide goals and objectives that will allow various
planning committees to assess goal attainment as aligned with state, district, and institutional
goals and objectives.

The college as a whole is highly aware of the need to ensure that the goals and objectives for
all levels of planning – ranging from classroom student learning outcomes to broader
benchmarks for overall institutional effectiveness -- are quantifiable, measured, and reported.
The Research and Planning Office is working diligently with the Educational Planning
Committee to establish appropriate measures for all educational goals and objectives, as well
as a process to continually monitor progress toward meeting educational plan goals and
objectives.

College goals and priorities are articulated in the Strategic and Educational Plan Program
Review documents. The Office of Research and Planning provides standards and tools for
departments and units to develop measures.

The program review process is currently being revised by the Program Review and Viability
Committee (PRVC). The PRVC develops program review structures and processes and
modifies them as needed following review or their effectiveness. The latest addition to the
process is an annual review of departments that have already completed a comprehensive
review.

This annual review is overseen by Department Chairs and Academic Deans to ensure that
each unit continually assesses how well learning is occurring, and follows these assessments
by making appropriate and effective changes to improve student learning. Academic Deans
are also working on integrating the annual review process with the budgeting process for
each unit.

The next round of college program reviews will integrate the completion and tracking of all
student learning outcomes by department, which is currently a separate process, and will
establish a method for assessing the achievement of all intended student learning outcomes as
well as the efforts made by units to achieve these outcomes. This comprehensive process will
be made manageable through the purchase of a new electronic software program to aid in the
program review process. This system (TrakDat) is being approved by the district and
purchased by the college.




Standard I                                                                                   51
A variety of professional development activities are scheduled for all faculty and staff to
obtain the skills necessary to develop and measure student learning outcomes for individual
departments. The college is in the process of establishing a Student Learning Outcome
Assessment Committee (SLOAC) to oversee the quality of assessment tools, methods, and
outcomes. Faculty and staff will use the results of their assessments to establish changes in
their departments and units to ensure further progress toward meeting the college’s mission.
The results of program reviews will be one of several information sources used as a basis for
developing future changes in the college’s educational and strategic master plans, and will
inform the college and public at large about institutional effectiveness in fulfilling its
mission.

Self Evaluation

During the last accreditation cycle, the college made great progress in establishing
comprehensive and inclusive planning processes and structures. In this current accreditation
self-study period, it has focused on developing processes that “close the loop” in the
evaluation cycle; assuring not only that planning is taking place, but also that the progress
toward implementation of these plans is made, along with the achievement of student
learning. This work toward “closing the loop” in this cycle is being achieved.

The district’s relatively new Office for Institutional Effectiveness has provided additional
methods of support through the District Planning Committee and Student Learning Outcomes
Committee’s SLOAC to provide cross-institution dialogue and training. The district’s
relatively new infrastructure (approximately a year old) in this important area will serve us
well as we continue to advance in our effort to measure institutional effectiveness in student
learning. The college’s SLOAC is being formed and will contribute significantly to this
effort.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

I.B.3. The institution assesses progress toward achieving its stated goals and makes
decisions regarding the improvement of institutional effectiveness in an ongoing and
systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning, resource allocation, implementation,
and re-evaluation. Evaluation is based on analyses of both quantitative and qualitative
data.

Descriptive Summary

The Shared Governance Council is charged with overseeing the development and integration
of the various master plans for the college. The cycle of evaluation of institutional
effectiveness begins with the program review process, which is overseen by the Office of
Research and Planning. Within this process, overall program effectiveness (as aligned with
institutional goals and objectives), as well as SLOs (as aligned with College Core
Competencies), is assessed. Improvements to this structure and process are currently being


Standard I                                                                                 52
developed, as noted previously in Standard I.B.2. Through the recently revised annual update
process, the Deans work with the department chairs to ensure that systematic, integrated
planning is a source for justifying, requesting, and allocating department budget needs.

At the college level, recommendations for allocation of discretionary funds, when available,
are determined by the ELAC Budget Subcommittee to the ESGC. The Budget Subcommittee
uses proposals by units, departments, or divisions as endorsed by college planning
committees and Department Chairs. These proposals are supplemented with program review
results to best determine the effective allocation of funds.

Self Evaluation

The collaboration between the PRVC and the Vice Presidents of Academic Affairs is well
underway toward adopting structures and processes to formally tie Program Review, Annual
Updates, and budget allocation together. Although the college had a college-wide process for
determining the allocation of college-wide discretionary funds, the current members of the
Budget Subcommittee may need to be re-oriented to this process, used years ago.

Planning Agenda

The PRVC, in collaboration with the Vice Presidents of all divisions, will oversee the
development of structures and processes that will formalize the use of departmental planning
processes and measures of effectiveness through Program Review in budget allocation.

The college Budget Subcommittee will review the college-wide structure and process for the
allocation of discretionary funds established in 2005 to assess its applicability toward current
budget allocation. Upon full assessment and confirmation of these processes, they will be
forwarded to the ESGC for approval.

I.B.4. The institution provides evidence that the planning process is broad-based, offers
opportunities for input by appropriate constituencies, allocates necessary resources, and
leads to improvement of institutional effectiveness.

Descriptive Summary

Each revision of the college’s Strategic and Education Master Plan is conducted by the
Educational Planning Subcommittee, in coordination with the Office of Research and
Planning, with regular reports made to the Shared Governance Council. The Facilities Plan
and the Technology Plans are also revised by Facilities Planning Subcommittee and the
Technology Planning Subcommittee. The membership on all of these committees includes
representatives from across the campus community, who report back to their constituencies
on the issues being discussed and plans being contemplated. The representatives also solicit
feedback from stakeholders and relay it back to the committee.

In June 2007, the President’s Office facilitated a day-long forum on issues pertaining to the
creation of a new Strategic Plan; this off-campus forum included a wide range of


Standard I                                                                                   53
representatives from across the college community. Work completed to date on an updated
Educational Plan (began during spring 2007) has been circulated for comment to the entire
college community.

All stakeholders were invited to an open forum to discuss the proposed goals and objectives
of the pending Strategic Planning document. A taskforce of the Educational Planning
Subcommittee made final revisions to the plan based on this input, and presented it to the
Shared Governance Council for final approval in early May 2008.

The College’s Strategic Plan, as well as its Technology and Facility Plans are being revised
and integrated with the recently approved Educational Master Plan. The Educational Master
Plan has been used to link new building initiatives proposed in the emerging Facilities Plan.
The Technology Plan was completed in September 2008, and was approved by the Academic
Senate on October 14, 2008. (1.18) Upon completion of the Facilities Plan, the college’s
Strategic Plan will integrate Educational, Facilities, and Technology Plans thus forming the
2009-2015 Strategic and Educational Master Plans.

Self Evaluation

The college is using the Educational Master Plan as a basis to develop other plans that will
support the college’s mission. However, the advances in facilities and technology have
moved into a level of technical knowledge and expertise (not to mention funding challenges)
that make it a complex task to develop and execute these plans without additional support.
The college hired experts in Facilities and Technology planning to facilitate the development
of these plans, which have moved to a greater level of complexity. In the last development of
these plans in 2003, the college’s needs were basic and were at that time virtually unmet,
therefore easy to articulate. At this point in the college’s history, we are at various stages of
development of these plans with some facility and technology projects currently in the
construction phase.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

I.B.5. The institution uses documented assessment results to communicate matters of
quality assurance to appropriate constituencies.

Descriptive Summary

The Office of Research and Planning includes a Dean of Research and Planning and an
Associate Dean of Research. These administrators, along with their support staff, access and
analyze data to inform decision makers about student success and institutional effectiveness.
The office publishes several useful documents that assist in measuring student success and
institutional effectiveness: The College Profile; Facts in Brief (between profiles); Academic
Internal Scan; Environmental Scan, and Faculty, Staff, and Administrator Surveys. The
District Research Committee (DRC) conducts a survey of students every two years.


Standard I                                                                                    54
Additionally, the District provides college data on its website as well as tracking district-wide
progress on unified Core Indicators. Additionally, the district has recently completed a
Research and Planning website, providing a useful and accessible resource to communicate
matters of quality assurance to the appropriate constituencies. (1.19)

Information from the state Accountability Reporting for Community Colleges (ARCC) is
used to monitor the progress the college makes in achieving higher levels of student success.
(1.20) This, along with other sources of measurement and program and college effectiveness
will be available on the Research and Planning website.

Self Evaluation

The position of Associate Dean of Research remained unfilled for two years (it was filled in
early 2008). In addition to this position vacancy, the Dean of Planning was granted extended
reassignment to responsibilities falling outside of Research and Planning. As a result, the
extent and availability of research was limited for a time. Now that the Research and
Planning Office is more fully staffed, more attention is being directed toward achieving the
goal of communicating matters of quality assurance to appropriate constituencies.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

I.B.6. The institution assures the effectiveness of its ongoing planning and resource
allocation processes by systematically reviewing and modifying, as appropriate, all parts of
the cycle, including institutional and other research efforts.

Descriptive Summary

Assurance of effective planning and resource allocation processes are systematically
reviewed and modified by various committees at various levels of college-wide assessment.

The Shared Governance Council (SGC), comprised of representatives from administration
and from classified, student, and academic senates, engages in planning efforts and in
identifying areas needing improvement. The various shared governance committees
participate in planning opportunities to guide the college in its efforts to ensure effectiveness
of planning, evaluation, and resource allocation. Discussions also consider the connections
between processes such as accreditation, program review, institutional goals, and other
accountability mechanisms. In these discussions, areas of improvement are identified and
addressed.

The Educational Plan Subcommittee oversees overall educational planning and advocates for
resource allocation. The Program Review and Viability Committee ensures that appropriate
structures and processes are in place for comprehensive evaluation of college units within all
divisions. The Student Learning Outcomes Committee oversees the structure and process for
the development of class, program and department measures of student learning and use of


Standard I                                                                                    55
these outcomes for improving teaching and student learning. The Student Learning Outcomes
Assessment Committee ensures that the appropriate structures and processes are in place to
ensure that all appropriate tools, techniques, and training are available to yield effective
measures of learning.

The college is in the process of establishing a Research Prioritization Committee to ensure
that all efforts to evaluate effectiveness are provided with the appropriate resources and
support. In all of these cases, reflection and dialogue via the use of evidence and input
provide the basis for continual modification and revision to improve all parts of the
evaluation cycle including research efforts.

Self Evaluation

The most effective committees in evaluating and implementing changes in the evaluation
cycle during this accreditation cycle have been the Program Review and Viability Committee
and the Educational Plan Subcommittee. The college is positioned to more effectively launch
the efforts of the SLO Committee for the purpose of modifying structures and processes (if
necessary) for more effective evaluation of progress toward development and implementation
of effective SLO’s, and is looking forward to initiating the SLOAC and Research
Prioritization Committees.

The college Shared Governance Council will ensure that the Educational Plan Subcommittee
(in collaboration with the Academic Senate and the Office of Academic Affairs) will
facilitate modifications in the current SLO structure and process, if necessary, to improve
college effectiveness in measuring student learning. These SLO and PRVC committees will
also oversee the initiation and effective use of the new SLOAC and Research Prioritization
Committees to provide resources and improvement for the college’s cycle of institutional
planning and measurement of effectiveness.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

I.B.7. The institution assesses its evaluation mechanisms through a systematic review of
their effectiveness in improving instructional programs, student support services, and
library and other learning support services.

Descriptive Summary

The college reviews its institution-wide College Planning Process related to Strategic Plan
and Educational Planning every 6 years when it renews or revises these plans. The Program
Review and Viability Committee and SLO Committee have met monthly throughout the
year, and on an ongoing basis to evaluate the mechanism for evaluation of student learning
and meeting the college’s mission and goals. (1.21, 1.22)




Standard I                                                                               56
Both the PRVC and the SLO Committee have planned and printed the methods in which they
will systematically review their effectiveness in improving instructional programs, student
support services, library, and other learning support services. (1.23) The newly formed
SLOAC and Research Prioritization Committees will meet regularly upon inception to
systematically review their contributions to effective measurement and implementation of
strategies for improving student learning.

Career and Technical Education (vocational) departments also use advisory committees to
evaluate their programs and assist in curriculum issues. Membership on these committees,
which are comprised of industry-based professionals, educators, trainers, and representatives
from appropriate public and private-sector entities is evaluated and updated as necessary for
improved effectiveness. The Curriculum Committee also evaluates its process for review and
approval of proposals for new or revised programs and courses. The results of the last review
conducted by the committee members became effective during spring 2007.

Self Evaluation

In response to a question regarding the program review process as providing an effective
evaluation of academic programs, administrative services, and student services, 65 percent of
the college’s faculty, staff and administrators agreed that the program review process
provides an effective evaluation of said programs and services. (1.6)

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.




Standard I                                                                                57
                                                               Standard II:
                                       student learning programs & services



                                                            meet elac people
                                                            Zantika and Yashika Ellis
                                                            Physical Education/Exercise Science




                                                            “   We really like the ethnic diversity at
                                                                East Los Angeles College. We have
                                                                made so many friends from different
                                                                backgrounds. Playing on a team gives
                                                                us lots of opportunity to connect with
                                                                interesting people. Plus the teachers


                                                                             ”
                                                                really help you.




                   Start at ELAC…
                            Go Anywhere!
Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 8                                                                 12/8/08 9:16:56 AM
       STANDARD II: STUDENT LEARNING PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

                                          Committee
              Gayle Brosseau, Dean                        Karen Daar, Dean, Academic Affairs
              Workforce Ed. & Economic Devel.             Professor, Anthropology
              brossegd@elac.edu              260-8198     daarkl@elac.edu         415-5374
Co-chairs
              Suzette Morales, Matriculation Coord.       Laura M. Ramirez, Dean
              Student Services                            Workforce Education
              moralesa@elac.edu              415-5351     ramirelm@elac.edu       265-8640
              Jeremy Allred, Dean                       Cathleen Rozadilla
              Admissions and Records                    Articulation Officer
              allredjp@elac.edu              265-8712   Rozadico@elac.edu              265-8786
              Brenda Baity                              Maribel Soriano
              Professor, Computer App. & Office Tech.   Professor, C, F & ES
              baitybk@elac.edu               265-8932   mreyescds@aol.com              357-7478
              Alison Davis                              Oscar Valeriano, Vice President,
              Chair, Life Science                       Student Services (Interim)
Members
              davisaa@elac.edu               265-8877   valerio@elac.edu               265-8743
              Veronica Jaramillo                        Maria Elena Yepes
              Assistant Professor, Chemistry            Director, Learning Assistance Center
              SLO Coordinator                           Campus Compliance Officer
              jaramiv@elac.edu               265-8851   Yepesme@elac.edu               265-8957
              Choonhee Rhim                             Annette Velasquez
              Chair, Library                            Student
              rhimcl@elac.edu                265-8625

                                 II.A. Instructional Programs

The institution offers high-quality instructional programs in recognized and emerging
fields of study that culminate in identified student outcomes leading to degrees, certificates,
employment, or transfer to other higher education institutions or programs consistent with
its mission. Instructional programs are systematically assessed in order to assure currency,
improve teaching and learning strategies, and achieve stated student learning outcomes.
The provisions of this standard are broadly applicable to all instructional activities offered
in the name of the institution.

II.A.1. The institution demonstrates that all instructional programs, regardless of location
or means of delivery, address and meet the mission of the institution and uphold its
integrity.

Descriptive Summary

The college is committed to providing the highest quality of programs and services in
fulfillment of its mission. All instructional and support programs are part of the Program

Standard II                                                                           Page 59
Review process. The need of both current and incoming students for basic skills
improvement has prompted the college to organize a Student Success Committee to create
programs and develop programmatic changes in the delivery of basic skills instruction. The
college has initiated a program to prepare students who have not passed the California High
School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) and are no longer attending their local high schools. Offsite
and distance education committees are charged with ensuring the quality of instruction
regardless of location or means of delivery. These two committees report to the Educational
Plan Subcommittee.

The college offers a variety of programs to meet the needs of the local community,
workforce, and community-based organizations. The college offers transfer programs along
with associate degrees, certificates, skill certificates, certificates, contract education and not-
for-credit programs in a variety of disciplines. Thirty-nine associate degrees are offered
within a variety of disciplines, including Administration of Justice, Allied Health,
Architecture, Art, Automotive Technology, Business, Child Development, Computer
Science, Journalism, Mathematics, Nursing, and Office Technologies. Forty-four certificates
and 67 skill sets are offered in all vocational programs, and many are cross disciplinary. (2.1)

The college has developed various modes of instructional delivery to meet the needs of the
college, community, and local industry, including offsite programs, contract education,
learning communities (i.e., Adelante, Program for Adult College Education, Escalante), and
distance education. The college has also developed collaborations with local high schools,
including James A. Garfield High School, Franklin D. Roosevelt High School, and Woodrow
Wilson High School, and offers credit and noncredit courses at each site. The college has
also assigned an offsite coordinator to meet the needs of the local high schools more
effectively and develop a strong collaboration.

All instructional programs offered by the college undergo periodic program reviews and may
undergo a viability review if changes in enrollment or college priorities warrant such a
review. The review process includes a Labor Market Information analysis to identify current
and future trends in the respective discipline. New programs developed in the area of career
and technical education include a Labor Market analysis specific to the local community and
statewide trends.

The noncredit program offers certificates of completion in Math, Reading, Writing, English
as a Second Language and Academic Success. Noncredit courses are offered on the main
campus and at offsite locations. The college develops the credit and noncredit options to
meet the needs of the local community. Noncredit course offerings include English as a
Second Language, Basic Writing, Reading and Mathematics courses as well as the Escalante
program, which serves middle school students in basic skills mathematics courses to improve
their success in the pre-algebra through pre-calculus sequence.

The East Los Angeles College South Gate Educational Center is a dedicated offsite
location offering both instructional and support services. The South Gate site has a full-time
administrator, as well as counseling and classified staff to meet the operational needs of the
facility. The site offers classes year-round in various disciplines and has a bookstore, student

Standard II                                                                               Page 60
center, library and an open computer lab. The East Los Angeles College Rosemead
Educational Center offers a small number of credit courses and most of the college’s ESL
and community services programs. An administrator is on site whenever classes are in
session.

The East Los Angeles College Regional Contract Academy of Training (RCAT) offers a
variety of not-for-credit and credit training for incumbent workers to meet the needs of local
business and industry. RCAT was created through a Capacity Building Grant in 2004. RCAT
is self-sustaining and profitable, and works closely with various departments and services on
campus, including Nursing, Health Information Technology, Mathematics, English,
Psychology, and Life Sciences, and Matriculation, to develop customized programs for
incumbent workers. Customized training varies from short workshops in ―soft skills‖ to
degree programs in Nursing and Health Information Technology.

The Adelante First-Year Experience Program is offered to first-year college students who
have transferred from a local high school. The program places students in a cohort for
general education-required classes. Students are provided tutoring and mentorship within this
learning community.

The Program for Adult Education (PACE) offers a five-semester, 60-unit curriculum to
meet general education transfer requirements in liberal arts, teaching or business majors for
California State University, Los Angeles, California State University, Dominguez Hills, and
other universities. Students attend classes one evening per week plus twelve weekend
conferences per semester. Bridge classes are held one evening per week plus fourteen
conferences per semester. Students earn 12 transfer credit units each semester and may
complete an associate’s degree in five semesters. Classes are held on the main campus and
off-campus locations, and may include online instruction.

The Distance Education (DE) program includes courses in Accounting, Business,
Computer Applications and Office Technologies, Computer Science, Family and Consumer
Studies, Foreign Languages, Health, Social Sciences, Library Science, Mathematics, Speech
and Psychology. The college Distance Education Committee (DEC), chaired by the faculty
Distance Education Coordinator, oversees DE course offerings and makes policy in
consultation with administration and the Academic Senate.

Self Evaluation

The department chair is responsible to oversee programs offered in any and all formats.
Staffing for all classes is determined by the department chair. The offsite coordinator works
directly with department chairs in identifying those instructors best suited for off-campus
teaching assignments. Department chairs are responsible for evaluating faculty at all
locations. The PACE Director is charged with staffing PACE classes and works with
department chairs and administration in hiring qualified instructors. The PACE Director
oversees the scheduling of classes and orientation of instructors, and maintains the academic
quality of the program.



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The Office of Research and Planning prepares an internal scan for each department. The
internal scan includes grade distribution, class distribution, classes held/cancelled, and
enrollment data. Departments use this data to evaluate their programs, and make adjustments
if necessary.

The Distance Education Committee provides oversight which assists in maintaining the
quality standards for distance education course and program offerings. This committee, in
conjunction with the distance education coordinator, ensures that faculty members
demonstrate proficiency in distance education instructional delivery methods. The
coordinator is also charged with implementation of student evaluation of online faculty. The
evaluation instrument is provided in an anonymous format for students to complete. The
results are then compiled and provided to the department chair as part of the instructor’s
overall performance evaluation.

The Curriculum Committee is charged with the approval of courses offered as distance
education courses. All courses submitted to the Curriculum Committee must include a
current course outline. When a department proposes to offer an existing course as a distance
education course, it submits an addendum to the existing course outline, addressing how
instruction will be adapted for the new delivery mode. Additionally, the committee evaluates
the following requirements before approving a course to be offered online: 1) It justifies the
need for the course; 2) it ensures that the educational objectives of the course can indeed be
achieved via distance delivery; and, 3) it makes clear how students will be able to
communicate with the instructor. To meet strong student demand, the college has been
increasing the number of online classes offered each successive semester. In efforts to serve
distance education students, the district has implemented an online student enrollment
system. In addition, the college has adopted DegreeWorks, an online degree auditing system.
This software will assist students with college advisement and provide integrated academic
information without their having to come to campus.

Planning Agenda

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) activities will be implemented in all courses. The college
will rely on the program review process to maintain the educational integrity of all programs
regardless of delivery method.

II.A.1.a. The institution identifies and seeks to meet the varied educational needs of its
students through programs consistent with their educational preparation and the diversity,
demographics, and economy of its communities. The institution relies upon research and
analysis to identify student learning needs and to assess progress toward achieving stated
learning outcomes.

Descriptive Summary

The Research and Planning Office provides all department chairs and administration with an
annual College Profile (2.2) including information regarding the student population and the
surrounding community. The data include student characteristics, attendance and enrollment,

Standard II                                                                          Page 62
student outcomes, student services, and faculty characteristics. An annual Internal Scan (2.3)
reports enrollment and student success data including enrollment trends, student retention by
course, grade distribution and degrees and certificates awarded by discipline. This
information is used to determine the needs of the surrounding community and the student
population.

The workforce training needs of local business and industry are identified via the annual
discipline advisory committee meetings convened by career technical education departments
and disciplines. The college is represented at these meetings by administration, faculty, staff
and students from the respective discipline. Advisory groups also include representatives
from the business sector and community-based organizations. The committees identify the
skills and preparation required to meet the needs of the relevant service sector and the role of
the college in providing a variety of services to the community. The committees make
recommendations to the college with respect to the development of new programs,
certificates, current and future labor market conditions, acquisition of equipment, and overall
evaluation of the programs themselves.

Self Evaluation

The college Matriculation Coordinator, who facilitates assessments for math, reading,
English and chemistry, works closely with the Office of Research and Planning as well as
each department in identifying the assessment tools, cutoff scores and the needs of new
students. Recently, the Math Department introduced Math 110 (Introduction to Algebraic
Concepts) to meet the needs of the large number of students with deficiencies in this area.
Assessment is offered at the main campus, South Gate, Rosemead, local high schools, and in
some cases at remote locations possessing significant concentrations of potential students and
significant student interest (examples include the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Academy
and the Twin Towers Correctional Facility).

The Office of Research and Planning is working closely with the SLO Committee in assisting
departments with the development of SLOs and the analysis of assessment results. The
Matriculation Advisory Committee meets monthly to review current assessment results.

The Matriculation Advisory Committee is working with the Office of Research and Planning
to implement an online assessment instrument. SLO assessment data/results will be reviewed
by all units, as well as the Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Committee (SLOAC) and
used by all units for program improvements. The Associate Dean of Research is working
with Math, English, and Noncredit faculty members to select computerized assessment
placement instruments.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.




Standard II                                                                            Page 63
II.A.1.b.The institution utilizes delivery systems and modes of instruction compatible with
the objectives of the curriculum and appropriate to the current and future needs of its
students.

Descriptive Summary

Course content and delivery is primarily a faculty and departmental decision. Established and
new courses are developed by faculty, and course outlines are evaluated by the Curriculum
Committee. This committee is composed of faculty from departments representing Sciences,
Social Sciences, Humanities, Arts, Counseling, and Library. The college offers courses and
programs via traditional lecture/lab, hybrid, online, learning communities, accelerated
(PACE) and contract education. The college has undertaken a concerted effort to improve
instructional practices by providing research-based information to faculty. In addition, the
college is implementing technology in many programs. There are 15 fully operational
SMART classrooms at the main campus and four at South Gate. The college has developed
various workshops for faculty in the use of current software and training for online course
delivery and support.

The Distance Education (DE) Committee oversees training and certification of distance
education instructors. The Distance Education Coordinator, a faculty member with a 60%
reassignment for this purpose, assists faculty and staff in the delivery of online courses and
provides instruction and technical support to faculty teaching online courses.

Self Evaluation

As noted under Standard II.A.1. above, the DE committee provides oversight which assists
in maintaining the quality standards for DE offerings.

Short-term classes are offered by various disciplines. The need for and appropriateness of
short term classes are identified by the department chair in consultation with the faculty and
supervising dean.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.1.c. The institution identifies student learning outcomes for courses, programs,
certificates, and degrees; assesses student achievement of those outcomes; and uses
assessment results to make improvements.

Descriptive Summary

The college has developed Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for many courses and campus
units. The process began in 2007 with some departments taking a lead in the development
and implementation of student learning outcome assessments and data analysis. The year-end
report prepared by the outgoing SLO coordinator for the campus shared governance

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committees and the Academic Senate cited the progress of the 28 academic departments (24
departments - 86% - submitted year-end reports) in the development and assessment of their
SLOs and their use of the assessment results. Of the 1,151 courses for which SLOs need to
be prepared, 287 courses (25%) have SLOs; 247 (21%) of the 287 courses have a defined
assessment process; 109 courses (9%) have assessed results; and 70 (6%) courses have seen
change as a result of the assessment. (2.4)

SLOs and strategies for attaining them are produced by faculty. This is a faculty-driven
process. Each department or discipline has its own SLO committee meetings to determine
what outcomes will be assessed for each course and how. Yearly SLO reports with SLOs,
assessment methods, and plans of action are turned in to the SLO Coordinator for review by
SLO Assessment Committee (SLOAC). Course assessments to date have included lab
practicum, embedded assessments, reports and performances. Some programs have
developed their outcomes with outside guidance such as a career technical advisory
committee, or with program guidelines or goals. Student Services and administrative units
are also engaged in developing SLOs. (2.5)

Student learning outcomes are assessed in each section with a common assessment tool
developed by each department or discipline SLO committee. Many of the assessment results
are analyzed via committee-agreed-upon rubrics. Some program-level outcomes have been
assessed via surveys to student, as well as aggregation of data from course level SLOs. (2.5)

The results have led to improvement in courses by increasing problem content area emphasis
to help student learning. They have also led to change in curriculum taught, and in adding
new courses to help student learning. (2.5)

SLO end-of-the-year reports will be analyzed by SLOAC to ensure SLOs are assessed
regularly for learning with authentic assessment strategies, tied to college mission and core
competencies, and that results of assessment are used for improvement in courses, programs,
and institution-wide planning. SLOAC will then report back to departments via each
department’s designated SLO facilitator. SLOAC will be composed of:

        SLO Coordinator
        SLO Facilitators
        Research and Planning representative
        Academic Senate representative (CTE/Academic)
        Student Services representative (when appropriate)
        Administrator (CTE/Academic)

(2.6)

To help with SLO assessment planning, the college has an opening for a research analyst
who will be dedicated to SLOs.

Departments themselves will also critically analyze their assessment tools and make
improvements when needed. The standing SLO Committee meeting is another venue for

Standard II                                                                         Page 65
discussion of SLOs and their effectiveness. The SLO coordinator and facilitators are
involved with educating and helping the campus to be effective with SLO assessment and
development. There have been presentations at opening days on SLO development and
assessment, rubric development, and workshops on ―What are SLOs,‖ assessment
development, and what to do with assessment results. (2.5, 2.6)

Self Evaluation

The college has embarked on a concerted effort to incorporate SLOs into every unit on
campus. The college’s 2007 staff development activities included various workshops related
to SLO development, implementation and assessment in the classroom. The college, in
conjunction with the Academic Senate, created the SLO Committee in an effort to assist
faculty in the SLO development and implementation process. The committee includes a
coordinator with 60% reassignment, and two facilitators with 40% reassignment each.

Discussions about using assessment results to guide improvements have ensued in
departments themselves. SLO workshops have highlighted best-practice examples, which
have also been described in the SLO newsletter. Unfortunately only 6% of our courses have
been assessed to date. The assessment results have led to change in content emphasis,
curriculum changes and establishment of new courses to help students. As a college we are
still struggling to get full faculty buy-in, which has led to slow progress. (2.5, 2.6)

Planning Agenda

The SLO coordinator and facilitators will work with departments and administration to
complete the SLO cycle in every campus unit.

II.A.2. The institution assures the quality and improvement of all instructional courses
and programs offered in the name of the institution, including collegiate, developmental,
and pre-collegiate courses and programs, continuing and community education, study
abroad, short- term training courses and programs, programs for international students,
and contract or other special programs, regardless of type, credit awarded, delivery mode,
or location.

Descriptive Summary

In addition to collegiate course offerings, the college offers the following types of courses:

   Developmental Courses. According to ELAC’s statistics, 82% of the students assessed
   were below transfer level. The college has a wide range of developmental courses
   including noncredit courses that provide adults with skills that are critical to their ability
   to succeed in college or on the job. Noncredit courses help students learn English, learn
   to read and write, prepare for the GED (General Educational Development) test, and
   acquire job skills.




Standard II                                                                             Page 66
   Noncredit courses include Academic Preparation/GED, and English as a Second
   Language. New ―enhanced‖ certificates of completion have been added, for example
   those offered with Health Information Technology, which infuse medical terminology
   into the academic preparatory courses of math and English. These courses lay the
   foundation for additional Health Information Technology credit certificate programs and
   other programs planned for the health-related fields.

   With an active Student Success Committee, the faculty is engaged in identifying methods
   that may prove more effective than the current sequence of developmental courses. The
   college has responded to the Basic Skills Initiative that provides funding for improved
   student success. (2.1, 2.9, 2.10)

   Pre-Collegiate Courses. The college offers a pre-collegiate sequence of courses in
   English (English 21, 57, 60; Reading 20, 29, 82, 84, 85), and Math (Math 105, 110, 112,
   115, 120, 125). Students are placed in pre-collegiate sequences based on their assessment
   scores. The college is reviewing the assessment instruments to determine if there are
   more appropriate instruments for placement in Math, English, ESL, and Reading.
   Continuing and Community Education. An array of not-for-credit classes is offered
   through the college’s ―Community Services‖ program. Fees are charged directly to the
   students attending these classes. The revenue is used to establish, maintain, and pay for
   actual program expenses. Although academic credit is not granted upon class completion,
   programs such as Pharmacy Technician and Real Estate prepare students for state
   certification examinations and licensure required for employment. A Schedule of Classes
   for these programs is published four times each year. This department has online classes
   and classes that offer an award upon completion. (2.11)

   Short-Term Training. ―Short-term training‖ is defined as certificates that can be
   completed in a year or less, and/or classes that are offered in less-than-a-semester format,
   that provide the student a marketable skill upon completion. There are a variety of skills
   certificates, including the Technology & Logistics Skills Certificate, which was designed
   in partnership with a WIA- funded Work Source (OneStop) center; Auto Technology,
   which schedules three five- week sessions with staggered offerings of morning,
   afternoon, and evening sessions; and a ―Trifecta‖ that offers a ―set‖ of three classes from
   the Life Science Department (Anatomy 1, Physiology 1, and Microbiology 20) in five-
   week block. Other departments offer short-term training as described in the college
   catalog. (2.1, 2.14)

   A growing number of courses are offered in a ―short-term‖ format rather than the more
   ―traditional‖ semester-length classes. Typically, the short-term classes are offered in an
   eight-week format, so that two short-term sessions can be offered during the college’s fall
   and spring 16-week semesters. The Winter Intersession is scheduled for classes five
   weeks longs, as are each of the the two Summer Intersessions. (2.1, 2.14)

   International Student Program. The college’s International Student Program (ISP)
   provides Associate Degrees in various majors, as well as transferable university credit
   courses. The primary goal of this program is to provide the first two years of tertiary

Standard II                                                                           Page 67
   education leading to a four-year degree, transferring majority of the students into their
   final two years of study at the University of California (UC), the California State
   University (CSU) or private universities. The ISP has unique transfer relationships with
   prestigious universities throughout the United States including UCLA, UC Berkeley, and
   USC. With the recently adapted SLO core competencies, ―cultural and global
   awareness‖ should be infused throughout the curriculum.
   International Education. An International Trade Certificate program stresses those
   skills most sought by today’s employers in international commerce. The field of
   international trade provides career opportunities for persons with specialized skills in
   import and export documentation, banking, sales marketing, air-sea truck transportation,
   and principles of foreign trade business management. Foreign language and anthropology
   are GE recommendations for Logistics & Technology skills certificates.
   Contract education. Contract education is defined as ―workforce training paid for by a
   business, organization, grants, or employees of a business or organization‖. The contracts
   are developed and administered by the college’s Regional Contract Academy of Training
   (RCAT) for business and industry training utilizing the following formats as appropriate:
   noncredit, credit, and fee-based not-for-credit. Training is provided at the RCAT training
   site or at a business site, if requested. (2.15)
   MESA. The mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program at
   ELAC is a matching-fund special program that enables educationally disadvantaged
   students to prepare for and graduate from a four-year college or university with a math-
   based degree in areas such as engineering, the sciences, computer science, and
   mathematics. Through MESA students develop academic and leadership skills, increase
   educational performance, and gain confidence in their ability to compete professionally.
   MESA has particular interest in and focuses on students from those groups who
   historically have had the lowest levels of attainment to four-year and graduate level
   programs. Furthermore, Excelencia in Education recently named MESA as a semifinalist
   winner in its 2008 Examples of Excelencia. Excelencia in Education, a national program,
   identifies programs and departments that boost Latino enrollment, performance and
   graduation in higher education.

Faculty members initiate the process of adding new education and training programs to the
curricula. Faculty members identify the need to offer new courses and programs and share
this information at the department level meetings. Additionally, Career and Technical
Education (CTE) departments develop new courses and programs in response to their
advisory committees’ suggestions.

Ideas originate from faculty, business contacts, employer surveys, and economic
development reports, such as Industry Scans produced by the Centers of Excellence of the
California Community College System’s Office. Dialogue continues until faculty decides to
create and offer a new course. The program review process is also part of the justification
and identification of new courses. Contract Education courses are developed in response to a
request from business and industry. At times, additional classes are initiated by the
administration.


Standard II                                                                         Page 68
The process involved in the decision to offer courses or programs includes 1) awareness of
the need gathered from faculty input, review of environmental scans, business input and
labor market information for CTE programs, and other reports such as community surveys
when opening new educational centers such as South Gate or Rosemead; 2) documentation
of the need in the annual goal updates and in the Program Review with some departments
creating detailed action plans and cluster studies reports; (2.17, 2.18) 3) evidence from the
data substantiates the need to offer classes, which is shared with department members and
supervising administrators; 4) new curriculum is developed if necessary; and , 5) approved
courses are scheduled and advertised.

Liberal Studies offerings are initiated based on local environmental scans that uncover unmet
needs, and also on changes in articulation agreements with the university system. Student
preparedness, retention and success, changes in industry, or other faculty-identified
needs also drive changes within the Liberal Studies course and program offerings. The Basic
Skills Initiative is an example of the research and studies that prompt change. (2.20)

The following criteria are utilized in initiating CTE offerings: 1) the business advisory
committee identifies a need based on current or future trend; 2) labor market information is
compiled and analyzed to determine whether there are sufficient employment opportunities
upon completion of the courses/programs; 3) a review of neighboring colleges’ programs
shows that there is not destructive competition within the region; 4) if projected enrollment
is adequate, new courses are created; and 5) it is determined whether the course is part of a
program, or else has ―stand-alone‖ status that does not exceeded departmental limits.

Procedures for initiating new programs and handling changes in existing programs are much
the same as those used for individual courses. However, it is recommended that submittals to
the Curriculum Committee for programs with more than 12 units have the State Program
Approval application completed and attached. Programs that complete this process are
formally recorded on students’ transcripts upon completion of required coursework. Smaller
programs (between 12-17 units) requiring only college approval use a shorter version of the
form. CTE programs developed by faculty are presented to the Los Angeles Community
College District Career and Technical Education Deans for dialogue. The program is then
presented to the college’s Curriculum Committee.

Programs with 18 or more units must be reviewed by the region’s CTE Deans at the Los
Angeles/Orange County Workforce Leaders (LOWDL) meeting. (2.21) Once regional
approval is granted, the program is sent for approval by the LACCD Board of Trustees
before being sent to the State Chancellor’s Office and the California Post-Secondary
Commission for final approval.

The ―flip side‖ of the program approval process is Program Viability Process the college
employs when considering the elimination of a program. The viability criteria include items
such as a decline of 30% or more in census enrollment; enrollments of 50% or more below
the class ―fill rate‖; a poor rate of student achievement of program goals; a major shift in
training requirements in the field or decline in industry demand; personnel changes that leave



Standard II                                                                          Page 69
a department without a full-time faculty member; or that program no longer being in line
with current technology. (2.22, 2.23, 2.24)

In the development of new courses, faculty members initially discuss the course concepts
with department members and the department chair to arrive at the proposed appropriate
credit type and delivery mode. Once a need to establish a new course is identified, the faculty
members of the discipline research the course content, identify course objectives, assess the
level of critical thinking, recommend textbooks, determine evaluation methods and complete
all other items listed on the Course Outline of Record.

The Course Outline of Record also has specific student activities that are used to make sure
the course has SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills)
competencies as well as critical thinking activities integrated in the coursework. This ensures
that all courses within the degree or certificate program have all the learning objectives as
well as the instructional modes and evaluation methods identified. These course outlines are
available to anyone who requests them from the Office of Academic Affairs.

Upon completion, the course outline is submitted to the college’s Curriculum
Committee. This committee has primary responsibility for approval of new courses, new
programs, and approval of any course or program changes. The Curriculum Committee is
comprised of faculty as voting members, and ―ex officio‖ representatives from the Office of
Academic Affairs, the AFT, and the Articulation Officer. Members serve for staggered two-
year terms. The committee announces the proposed course, program, or other changes by
circulating memoranda to all departments, to the Academic Senate President, and to the
offices of Academic Affairs and Workforce Education, to enable resolution of conflicts (if
there are any) with other course offerings. The district ensures uniform standards across the
campuses through Administrative Regulation E-64. (2.25)

Following approval by the Curriculum Committee, the proposed new course or program
change is sent to the campus Academic Senate for review and approval, and then to the Vice
President of Academic Affairs for review. The approved documents are then submitted to the
President of the college for signature before they are forwarded to the district office, which
informs the other campuses’ Curriculum chairs, deans, Academic Senate presidents, and Vice
Presidents of Academic Affairs of their existence. Local Curriculum chairs in turn circulate
the announcements to department chairs and Curriculum Committee members on their
campuses. Only new programs and noncredit courses require state Chancellor’s Office
approval.

Notices of submittal are distributed to department chairs by the Curriculum Committee Chair
at each campus for comment. The Board of Trustees gives final approval for all courses. New
programs or courses requiring state approval must then receive approval from the State
Chancellor's Office and the California Postsecondary Education Commission. All courses
and programs, whether taught on or off campus, adhere to the same standards of content,
instructor qualifications, and credit hour requirements. Those new or revised courses or
programs that are not approved are returned to initiators, who may revise and resubmit them
to the Curriculum Committee for reconsideration.

Standard II                                                                           Page 70
Revision of existing courses or implementation of new courses in a discipline is primarily the
responsibility of the department teaching that discipline. The department chair determines
and verifies the need for new or revised courses with input from the department faculty,
advisory groups, and professional accrediting agencies. The decision is based on a needs
assessment of the trends dictated by the surrounding business community, on needs
determined by articulation with four-year institutions and secondary institutions, and on
needs determined by the discipline itself.

Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs are designed to meet the requirements of
industry and other employers. At least once a year, CTE departments and programs meet
with their advisory committees, composed of representatives from businesses, other
educational institutions, and the community, as well as students enrolled in the discipline.
These meetings serve as the basis for modifying and updating curriculum and courses. The
CTE department has created a handbook, entitled, ―Workforce Education and Economic
Development – Advisory Committee Handbook,‖ which suggests the composition of the
committee membership, meeting preparation and structure, and committee
responsibilities. Sample letters of invitation and other forms are included. This handbook has
a two-fold purpose: first, as a guide to new department chairs conducting their first advisory
meetings; and second, as a quality tool or checklist for subsequent meetings.

The responsibility of maintaining the standards for all courses on and off-campus rests with
the faculty, who select a department chair to oversee this process in coordination with the
SLO Committee. The process for evaluating courses and programs is described in the next
paragraphs.

Course Level. The initial course evaluation is conducted by reviewing the student learning
outcomes and administering the related assessment. The assessment data are tabulated and
analyzed. The analysis is shared, and discipline-wide dialogue ensues to determine whether
the desired learning outcome was satisfied. If not, the possible cause is discussed and
corrective actions identified. If students adequately demonstrate competency, additional
student learning outcomes and assessments are identified based on student learning gaps
compared to the identified SLO core competencies. Courses are revised if necessary. This
SLO/Assessment cycle places an emphasis on ongoing assessment and process improvement.

Each year, every department receives a list of courses scheduled for revision from the
Curriculum Committee chair. The department’s faculty members revise the courses and
submit changes to the Curriculum Committee (or possibly recommend that a course be
archived). To archive a course, the department chair completes the form and submits it to the
Curriculum Dean. The Curriculum Committee has an established schedule for the revision of
curriculum within each department. Every year 20% of the courses within the department are
scheduled for revision. The integration of the course revision schedule with the Program
Review process resulted in the establishment of accountability mechanism; the
Program Review Committee receives a report of the progress of course revision for every
department. This report is considered as one factor in the committee’s commendations or
recommendations for improvement noted in the Program Review Committee report. Using
this procedure, the program review committee can track improvement of a department that

Standard II                                                                          Page 71
previously was noncompliant with the course revision schedule. If a department continues to
be noncompliant, the program review document provides further evidence of noncompliance
and appropriate action is taken.

In addition to the above-referenced process to ensure quality of credit and programs, steps
are taken to ensure the quality of contract education and not-for-credit (community services)
classes. The college’s contract education workshops and training (other than credit and
noncredit classes, which are offered and evaluated as outlined per the Agreement between
the LACCD and the LA College Faculty Guild) (2.28) are developed in consultation with
individual companies/agencies and the program’s director. The Contract Education Director
and employer negotiate the cost and services to be provided. Contract education courses and
instructors are evaluated by the contracting institution through surveys and through the
students’ evaluation of the faculty member.

Community Services and not-for-credit classes and activities are reviewed by the dean before
being approved. The criteria include the potential relationship to the college’s regular
curriculum, educational value, and appeal to the college’s community. Classes are monitored
by the dean, and in all classes students are regularly surveyed to determine their perspective
on the quality of the program.

Instructor evaluations are linked to providing quality programs and are conducted utilizing
both peer committees and student input to verify that the curriculum is implemented with
academic rigor and aligned with the course outline of record. Adjunct faculty members
receive a formal evaluation before the end of their second semester of employment and at
least once every six semesters of employment thereafter.

Program Level. The departments conduct Program Reviews every six years with annual
updates. The review begins with a departmental self study that culminates in development of
the Program Review Report, which is submitted to the Dean of Research & Planning. The
report is evaluated and validated by a team that includes a Vice President, Academic Senate-
appointed faculty members from other departments, the Dean of Research and Planning or
designated representative, the department’s supervising dean, and – for departments
employing classified staff – a classified staff member from another department. A report of
this process is prepared and discussed with the department, then submitted to the Vice
Presidents of Academic Affairs (both Liberal Studies and Workforce Education).

A summary report is prepared for the college’s Shared Governance Council, where it is
integrated into the institutional evaluation and planning process. The department follows
through on implementing its self-identified recommendations, as well as those that come out
of the validation phase. During the following program review cycle, the validation committee
evaluates how well the improvements and recommendations were addressed. The Office of
Research and Planning provides workshops and support to departments having difficulty
completing their Program Reviews.

Program evaluation by external agencies occurs in the Nursing, Health Information
Technology, Emergency Medical Technician, and Respiratory Therapy programs. Such

Standard II                                                                          Page 72
programs are accredited after meeting all requirements established by the accrediting
agencies and are authorized to conduct training and certification programs. In other CTE
programs, a certification status may be granted, such as the NATEF Certification in Auto
Technology or the Computer Application and Office Technology’s recognition as an
Authorized Microsoft® Certification Center and Internet and Computing Core Certification
(Ic3). (2.29, 2.30)

The Program Review and Annual Update processes ensure the quality of programs and
courses. These formal and informal mechanisms include Program Reviews, department chair
oversight, Curriculum Committee, instructional evaluations by students, peer monitoring of
student learning outcomes/assessments, and faculty evaluations.

To further ensure quality of all instructional courses and programs offered in the name of the
college, program requirements are communicated publicly to students and the community in
the college catalog. The catalog lists all approved instructional programs and courses,
including major and general education requirements for attaining degrees and certificates of
achievement. Skills Certificates and degree program options are also shown.

Self Evaluation

Utilizing the quality control processes described, the college consistently offers high quality
credit, noncredit and not-for-credit courses and programs. All certificate and degree
programs are evaluated every six years through the program review process. This provides
additional sources of feedback. All certificate and degree programs are also monitored for
Title 5 compliance. All programs are reviewed and revised as needed to ensure quality and
that existing or new programs have coherent design, and are characterized by appropriate
length, breadth, depth, sequencing of courses, synthesis of learning, and use of information
and learning resources.

As ongoing training and faculty dialogue continue around improving student learning, the
importance of integrating the Basic Skills Initiative (BSI) has been embraced. Since 83%
of the college’s students initially assess below transfer level, the Academic Senate’s role in
focusing attention on this issue is critical. The Academic Senate’s commitment to integrating
the BSI was shown during the 2008 faculty ―Opening Day‖ activities, which devoted the
entire day to basic skills and student success. The college’s focus is on improving student
learning systems that incorporate improved quality of instruction and the integration of
student services. As a result of these efforts, a continual quality improvement mentality is
being institutionalized at the college.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.2.a. The institution uses established procedures to design, identify learning outcomes
for, approve, administer, deliver, and evaluate courses and programs. The institution


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recognizes the central role of its faculty for establishing quality and improving
instructional courses and programs.

Descriptive Summary

The college’s Curriculum Committee, in consultation with the Academic Senate and college
administration, has developed and implemented the curriculum approval process for all
instructional programs at the college. The committee consists of faculty members
representing various disciplines and a college administrator. After a course and/or a program
is developed by faculty and endorsed by the department, it is forwarded to the Curriculum
Committee for technical review and approval. The Curriculum Committee evaluates the
course outline for content and maintaining the integrity of the college. Faculty members
within the discipline identify and implement Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for courses
and/or programs within their departments.

Programs are further evaluated periodically via the Program Review Process. The review
process is monitored by the Research and Planning Office. Department chairs are required to
complete the Program Review document in consultation with the faculty of the
department/discipline under review. The document includes information regarding
enrollment, course development, budget, staffing, professional development activities, and
general areas of improvement. The document is reviewed by a committee of faculty,
administrators and, where appropriate, classified staff. The committee identifies
commendations, recommendations and areas for improvement that the department/unit must
address during the program review process. The program can then utilize recommendations
cited in the program review process to initiate programmatic changes. The program review
process may also lead to a Program Viability Review.

Self Evaluation

The Curriculum Committee is an open-forum committee where all concerned faculty may
attend and offer input to the committee related to their discipline, in efforts to facilitate the
curriculum approval process. The committee is represented by faculty members from the
various discipline clusters.

The Program Review Validation teams include the appropriate Vice President, supervising
dean, and three faculty members from related disciplines. The Program Review document
was designed by the Validation Committee with faculty representatives. Program Review
results/recommendations may be taken into account for budget reallocations, designing
departmental goals, and justification of staffing requests. Departmental goals and action
plans are developed from the Program Review annual review process. Annual reviews are
completed by the department chairs with the consultation of the supervising dean.

Faculty members within a discipline are responsible for the development, implementation
and assessment of SLOs and the improvement process. The college’s SLO Committee
provides assistance with the development of outcomes, and also assists with the evaluation of
assessment results. Data are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the program and develop

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improvement strategies by faculty. The department chair and supervising dean evaluate the
progress of the improvement strategies.

The SLO Committee, in conjunction with the Office of Research and Planning, assists all
units on campus with SLO development and implementation. The SLO Committee identified
the core competencies, developed the SLO Philosophy Statement, which describes the role of
faculty and administrators. The committee continuously tracks all phases of SLO progress.
The committee reports to the Educational Planning Subcommittee, which in turn reports to
the Shared Governance Committee.

Planning Agenda

The SLO Committee is in the process of developing the SLO Assessment Committee
(SLOAC), which will validate the assessment tools, review data collected and ensure the core
competencies are addressed.

II.A.2.b. The institution relies on faculty expertise and the assistance of the advisory
committees when appropriate to identify competency levels and measurable students
learning outcomes for courses, certificates, programs including general and vocational
education, and degrees. The institution regularly assesses student progress toward
achieving those outcomes.

Descriptive Summary

The college has many career technical (CTE) and academic programs. All courses are
developed by faculty and include content, objectives, prerequisites, method of evaluation,
and competency requirements. All courses are required to include SLOs. The programs
identified as career technical (occupational/vocational) are required to convene annual
Advisory Committee meetings. Advisory Committee members include faculty (occupational
and academic), student representatives, business/industry leaders, community-based
organizations, K-12 educators/administrators, and in some cases local government
representatives.

Advisory committees recommend to the college the expected outcomes of current programs
and current and future trends/demands within the workplace. Advisory committees also offer
recommendations for acquisition of equipment needed to maintain the program’s
competitiveness within its field. Committee members are involved in development and
changes of curricula and SLOs. Committees and or individual committee members may
recommend changes based on industry standards, accreditation standards and their personal
expertise. Advisory Committee members are involved in the development of new programs
and maintaining current programs within their fields.

The college has developed core competencies for any sequence of learning found campus-
wide, which are published in the college catalog. These core competencies were developed
by the college SLO Committee and were distributed to all faculty and staff for
input/suggestions. The core competencies were then submitted to the Shared Governance

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Council for final approval. The SLO Committee is made up mostly of faculty, but includes
administrative representation. Faculty members are regularly involved with and participate in
various professional development activities and district Discipline Committees, state
advisories, and professional organizations.

Self Evaluation

SLOs are developed by faculty with the assistance of the SLO coordinator and SLO
facilitators. CTE (vocational/occupational) programs are required to hold at minimum one
advisory meeting per year. Advisory committees identify current and future trends in the
workforce. These committees provide recommendations for program improvement,
acquisition of equipment, curriculum changes and long term planning. These
recommendations are part of the programs program review process and are also used in the
development of SLOs.

The college core competencies are identified in the college catalog and course SLOs are
aligned to the core competencies. The course SLOs are identified in the syllabus prepared by
the instructor.

The Respiratory Therapy and Nursing Programs regularly receive data regarding the pass
rates of students participating in the licensing examinations. The departments use this data
for addressing the needs of students and identifying deficiencies in their programs.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.2.c. High quality instruction and appropriate breadth, depth, rigor, sequencing, time
to completion, and synthesis of learning characterize all programs.

Descriptive Summary

The college ensures high quality instruction through various processes, including program
review and the faculty evaluation process. The program review process assesses the class
offerings, number of students served, currency of curriculum, SLO development,
professional development, and current and future trends in the respective field.

The purpose of formal evaluations is to ―review a faculty member’s performance of his or
her scheduled duties as well as all of his or her other contractual and professional
obligations‖. The evaluation process ―provides an opportunity for professional growth,
recognition and improvement‖. (2.28) Probationary faculty members are evaluated every
year for four years. Tenured faculty members are evaluated every three years with alternating
basic and comprehensive evaluations. This process is overseen by the administration.

Breadth, depth, rigor of courses and programs are determined by faculty in consultation with
deans and the Curriculum Committee. The Curriculum Committee reviews all programs and

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courses to ensure they meet the following criteria: mission, need, quality, feasibility and
compliance. Vocational programs also utilize their advisory committees to review curriculum
and give recommendations for program changes. Advisory Meeting minutes are reviewed by
the Curriculum Committee should departments make changes to courses or programs.
Transferable courses are reviewed by the Curriculum Committee and the Articulation Officer
to determine if they meet the criteria for baccalaureate courses as detailed in LACCD
Administrative Regulation E-7. (2.32)

Sequencing and ―time to completion‖ of courses and programs are determined by the faculty.
Departments must demonstrate in a Proposed New Program Request (PNPR) (2.33) ―how the
required courses should be taken in sequence‖ and how ―a full-time student could complete a
degree program in two years‖. Most associate degree programs listed in the general catalog
are designed to be completed within two years for full-time students and six years for part-
time students. Students who work full-time and wish to complete Associate of Arts degrees
and transfer to a California State University in an accelerated format may enroll in the
Program for Adult College Education (PACE). The program has a set curriculum and can be
completed in five semesters.

The college requires departments to conduct a comprehensive program review every six
years. The Program Review process is invaluable in ―providing for a systematic program
planning process‖ and ―reviewing the quality of instructional programs and courses‖. (2.34,
Sept. 25, 2007) The annual review of all programs evaluates the progress based on
recommendations offered by the Program Review Validation Committee. Vocational
departments must also undergo a biennial review of their programs. (2.34, Oct. 9, 2007) One
aspect of the biennial review is to determine if ―the program is of demonstrated effectiveness
as measured by the employment and/or completion success of its students‖. Vocational
departments also utilize vocational advisory committees to make recommendations for
programs changes based on the needs of industry.

Student learning outcomes (SLOs) and core competencies have been developed by the
college. Students who complete coursework at East Los Angeles College should expect to
have gained competency in the areas of academic skills, personal growth and enrichment,
and cultural and global awareness. (2.36).

Self Evaluation

The college has a defined faculty evaluation process in place to ensure the quality of teaching
faculty. In a spring 2007 student survey (2.37), students were asked whether they agreed with
the statement ―Instructors are up-to-date in their field‖. 38.1% of students marked ―Strongly
Agree‖, and 52.6% of students marked ―Agree‖.

A faculty and staff survey (2.38) asked whether ―The College has processes to ensure the
rigor and integrity of all courses regardless of mode or location‖. 10.5% of faculty/staff
surveyed marked ―Strongly Agree‖, 40.6% marked ―Agree‖ and 24.2% marked neither
―Neither Agree nor Disagree‖. The survey also asked whether ―The College has processes
that ensure that all courses and programs are viable, current, and of appropriate quality‖.

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12.9% of faculty/staff surveyed marked ―Strongly Agree‖, 43.0% marked ―Agree‖ and
24.6% marked neither ―Neither Agree nor Disagree‖.

The same student survey queried students to evaluate whether they feel enough courses are
offered so they are able to complete degrees and certificates in a timely manner. In response
to the question whether enough sections of general education courses are offered each
semester, 26.7% of students marked ―Strongly Agree‖ and 52.4% students marked ―Agree‖.
In response to the question whether advanced courses were offered frequently enough to
allow completion of program without delay, 20.8% of students marked ―Strongly Agree‖ and
51.9% marked ―Agree‖.

The Curriculum Committee chair communicates annually with departments regarding their
responsibility to revise outlines every five years. The Curriculum Committee has three
meetings per month during the fall and spring semester to review all new and revised courses
and programs. Departments are required to have a representative present during the meetings
to answer questions the committee may have regarding a course or program.

At East Los Angeles College, all approved vocational programs must have one advisory
committee meeting per fiscal year to comply with Perkins funding. Program Review is
conducted on a six-year cycle, which allows departments to evaluate the strengths and
weaknesses of their programs. The validation committee is made up of faculty and
administration to develop recommendations of program review committee members is
invaluable to improving the quality of our programs.

Student Learning Outcomes Core Competencies (2.36) have been developed and approved
by the Academic Senate.

SLOs for courses and programs are being developed by the college faculty. SLOs and
assessments will allow the college to conduct a more thorough evaluation of the synthesis of
learning in courses and programs. In the future, the Curriculum Committee will review
courses and programs to determine whether they meet the criteria set by the Student Learning
Outcomes core competencies. The Academic Senate has approved keeping SLOs out of the
course outlines of record, but has endorsed attaching them to the course outline as a separate
document.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.2.d.The institution uses delivery modes and teaching methodologies that reflect the
diverse needs and learning styles of its students.

Descriptive Summary

The college uses a variety of delivery modes and methodologies within the various
disciplines and units. All of our allied health programs offer clinical directed practice. The

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clinical components offer students the ability to develop their skills in the hospital/workplace
setting. Students are evaluated by an instructor of record as well as the workplace staff. The
college offers a variety of online and/or hybrid courses in Business, Child Development,
Computer Applications and Office Technologies, Computer Science, Family and Consumer
Studies, Foreign Languages, Health, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Psychology,
Sociology, Speech, and Theater. The college also has a noncredit program with two full-time
instructors. The noncredit program includes Academic Preparation, GED Preparation,
Citizenship, and ESL courses, and program and noncredit certificates. Noncredit basic skills
courses are also offered to the local community K-12 population via the college Escalante
program. The program is designed to help the local middle school population successfully
advance in mathematics basic skills. Students are enrolled in 4 hours/day 5 days/wk, for 10
weeks. The students enroll during the summer when they are not enrolled in any other
subject. Students are exposed to math concepts before they enroll in math course at the
middle/high school to ensure their successful completion. Their successful participation
promotes self-confidence needed to succeed in math. The courses are free to students and are
offered both on the main campus as well as at the local elementary and middle schools.

The college has established a presence among various high schools offering credit courses
through concurrent enrollment. Courses are offered in the early afternoon, evenings and
weekends at the high schools.

Self Evaluation

Faculty members have participated in a number of workshops, conferences and professional
development activities under the provisions of a Title V grant. A coordinator has been
charged with developing workshops for faculty in the use of technology in the classroom and
for class management. Overall more than 50 different instructors and staff have attended
workshops in using MS Office 2007 and Web 2.0 tools in the classroom. The focus of these
workshops was to assist instructors in using the web to support their face-to-face classes. The
workshops were held in the summer on campus, on Opening Day (August 2008) and in fall
2008 on both the main campus and at South Gate.

The district student success initiative has also offered faculty opportunities for professional
development in the area of student learning styles. SLO assessment tools include essays,
portfolios, and/or research activities. The assessment tools are identified by faculty to
determine the best delivery modes for instruction in the classroom for each discipline.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.2.e. The institution evaluates all courses and programs through an ongoing systematic
review of their relevance, appropriateness, achievement of learning outcomes, currency,
and future needs and plans.

Descriptive Summary

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One of the purposes of the Program Review process at the college is to assess the
effectiveness of a department's programs and courses within a teaching and learning
environment to develop a plan for the future. The appropriate faculty members, working with
the department chair and designated Dean of Academic Affairs, are responsible for
conducting and completing the self-study phase of Program Review. The process requires
formal documentation of the status and performance of the program, sets specific goals and
objectives with a timeline for change, and establishes long-range plans based on the District's
mission and goals, the College's mission and goals, and Title 5 requirements.

Each college unit must complete an in-depth Program Review every six years to coincide
with the development of the Educational Master (Strategic) Plan for the college. College
departments update their plans every year to incorporate changes that might occur within
their area or the greater community they serve. The Program Review process addresses five
areas: 1) external scan; 2) internal scan; 3) analysis of program strengths, weaknesses,
opportunities and threats (S.W.O.T. analysis); 4) projected changes and needs based on the
S.W.O.T. analysis; and 5) Unit Plan: Mission, Goals, Measurable Objectives, and Action.

The ELAC Educational Master (Strategic) Plan 2008-2011 is being developed from the unit
plans and other college and non-college sources, under the direction of the Office of
Research and Planning. Additionally, Board of Governors' policies and Title 5 regulations
require the State Chancellor's Office to evaluate categorical programs such as credit and
noncredit matriculation, DSP&S, and EOP&S. Other state programs such as VTEA and
federal programs such as the Federal Student Financial Aid programs also require ongoing
evaluation with the goal that this evaluation will lead to improvements in programs and
services. Academic programs are evaluated through college program review. For some
academic programs, such as nursing, accrediting boards in areas of specialty require
additional program evaluation.

Several sources, from both within the college and from the community, are used to identify
and develop degree and certificate programs to ensure that their scope and content provides
students with the skills and knowledge necessary to effectively prepare them for career
placement or transfer. This is accomplished at several different levels within the institution.
Sources include broad and diverse advisory committees, District discipline committees, the
college’s Transfer Committee, and both college and District Curriculum Committees.
Revision of existing courses or implementation of new courses in a discipline is primarily the
responsibility of the department teaching that discipline. The department chair determines the
need for new or revised courses with input from the department faculty, advisory groups, and
professional accrediting agencies. The decision is based on a needs assessment of the trends
dictated by the surrounding business community, on needs determined by articulation with
four-year institutions and secondary institutions, and on needs determined by the discipline
itself.

Occupational programs are designed to meet the requirements of industry and other
employers. At least once a year, workforce education departments meet with their advisory
committees, composed of representatives from businesses, other educational institutions, and



Standard II                                                                           Page 80
the community, as well as students enrolled in the discipline. These meetings serve as the
basis for modifying and updating curriculum and courses. (2.40)

Students demonstrate outcomes through a variety of methods, including quizzes, written
exams, research papers, essays, oral statements, problem solving, and presentations. The
college has no specific grading policy and relies on the discipline and faculty for guidance in
the area of evaluation. The Course Outlines of Record clearly state and publish criteria for
student evaluation.

The Annual Update Program Review Questionnaire addresses three areas: 1) external scan;
2) internal scan; and 3) progress, projected changes and the Department/Unit Plan. The
purpose of the review is for the department/unit and its supervising dean to monitor annually
all changes within the unit in staffing, new courses or programs, SLO progress, budget, and
FLEX activities. Changes will reflect in the unit’s monitoring of progress on its action plan.
Also, a status report is compiled on all the specific recommendations from the Validation
Committee given to the unit during the last comprehensive review.

Self Evaluation

Departments use program review to determine whether the class schedule and sequence of
courses enable students to make satisfactory progress. The District Research Office and the
California Community College Chancellor's Office compile information regarding student
completion rates. The curriculum planning process involves coordination with baccalaureate
institutions, particularly with respect to major and general education requirements. The
career/technical programs hold advisory committee meetings at least once annually, which
include experts from the local community and businesses to ensure program relevance.
Improvement in student outcomes, measured through retention and job placement,
demonstrate improvement in the relationship between expected and mastered learning
outcomes. Periodic surveys and reports regarding a program’s curriculum are required by the
national accrediting agencies to determine whether class offerings are meeting job market
needs. Career/technical departments are encouraged to enlist the assistance of their advisory
committees in the development of certificates and skills certificates, to ensure that students
earning these certificates possess the skills and abilities to successfully pursue entry-level
employment within industry. Additionally, the course sequences of many career/technical
certificates are directly linked to state or county certification standards.

The college's Program Review process extends to Academic, Student Services, and
Administrative Services units. The process tends to focus on the effectiveness of the unit in
its entirety to ascertain staffing, facilities, technology/equipment needs and interactions with
the community. Data from the program evaluation also inform the decisions of the college's
Joint Hires (hiring prioritization) Committee and distribution of State Equipment Grants.

The college has created an annual Program Review update process to monitor progress of
each unit on its action plans and to further analyze the sequencing of course offerings for a
particular program. However, implementation of the annual review has been inconsistent.
Although the 2008 Faculty and Staff Survey shows that at least 55.64 % of the respondents

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agree that the college has processes that ensure that all courses and programs are viable,
current, and of appropriate quality, clearly the college would benefit in having an even more
in-depth review of each program to be included in the next comprehensive review cycle.
Although effectiveness of a course or program was evaluated based on traditional methods,
the college's focus on SLO assessment will take the program review process to its next level.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.2.f. The institution engages in ongoing, systematic evaluation and integrated planning
to assure currency and measure achievement of its stated student learning outcomes for
courses, certificates, programs, including general and vocational education, and degrees.
The institution systematically strives to improve those outcomes and makes the results
available to appropriate constituencies.

Descriptive Summary

For the past three years, ELAC faculty and staff have worked together to create Student
Learning Outcomes and assessment tools for courses and services to ensure that the college's
primary mission—student success—is met. At the same time, the college has developed and
refined its program review processes, linking the results to action plans for each college unit
based on a six-year comprehensive review and annual updates.

The unit plans are funneled into the overarching college Educational Master Plan. The
college has developed institutional outcomes, or Core Competencies, which are listed in the
Catalog. (2.1) Assessment endeavors vary from one departmental unit to another. The college
is also establishing a clearer connection between budgetary and planning processes, including
submission to the Budget Committee of all unfunded action items (generally created from
recommendations by educational committees including Transfer, SLO, Distance Education,
Matriculation, etc.) listed in the college’s Educational Plan. The college’s updated annual
program review process includes goals for each unit and identifies the materials/resources
needed to implement that goal. Those program goals requiring budgetary changes are also
listed in the contractually required annual goals submitted to the unit’s dean or supervisor
each year.

Each Program Review is reviewed by a Program Review Validation team made up of faculty
members having experience in similar programs, as well as the supervising dean and/or vice
president. They provide commendations and make recommendations to the department after
the Shared Governance Council has approved the review and passed them to the college
president for his signature. If the unit reviewed has classified staff, then a classified staff
member is also appointed.

The College Catalog Committee reviews each program every two years and meets with
departments to discuss the makeup of their programs. Career/technical (vocational education)
units, due to outside accreditation requirements, also review their programs regularly every

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two years to ensure currency. Each discipline keeps a record of its SLO discussions and
results of course assessments and submits these minutes and assessment results annually to
the SLO Coordinator, who compiles those reports for the college records. Copies of these
reports are distributed to each Vice President, the co-chairs of the Educational Planning Sub-
Committee, the Office of Research and Planning, the Accreditation Liaison Officer, and the
Library.

Self Evaluation

The college has experienced great transition in its Office of Research and Planning, and was
without a college researcher for the past two years until spring 2008, at which time an
Associate Dean of Research was hired. Although planning efforts have been consistent,
permitting the college to develop a useful and viable Educational Plan with listed responsible
entities charged to implement the many action items held within, no move until very recently
had been made in correlating SLOs with institutional planning.

Although assessment procedures are being developed by units for courses and services,
currently those data are not aggregated directly into the college's Core Competencies.
Although a college researcher has now been hired, he is experiencing a backlog of research
activities. The third part of the three-goal Educational Plan is devoted to an array of research
activities related to SLOs, program assessment, etc. With the new researcher and new
research analyst support staff, the college is now well on its way to fulfilling its goal to make
informed decisions based on valid research. However, the college has also acknowledged that
the current staffing in the Research and Planning Office still would be unable to devote time
to aggregating SLO assessment data. The Educational Planning Sub-Committee has
recommended to the East Los Angeles College Shared Governance Council, who in turn
recommended to the President, that we hire another research analyst devoted solely to SLO
assessment. This recommendation was based on a review of best practices regarding SLO
processes at other colleges throughout the state. (2.42)

One of the weaknesses of the Program Review process it that although each Program Review
Validation team member reviews the number of sections offered for each course, currency of
the course outlines of record, and status report on the development of SLOs for that unit,
he/she does not scrutinize the viability of individual state-approved programs. As a response,
the college has recently approved an updated process incorporating further scrutiny of
specific programs into the six-year comprehensive review process. Through this process,
each unit’s Validation Committee will be able to ascertain the currency of and viability of
individual programs. Additionally, the Catalog Committee, in consultation with department
chairs, reviews the course offerings for each program to ensure that the programs continue to
adhere to Title 5 regulations.

In previous years, the Research and Planning Newsletter has been the college's official
method of communicating information about its evaluation and planning activities to the
public. This publication has been discontinued, although the Office of Research and Planning
does have an Internet web page which includes facts and data about the college such as the
college profile, ARCC measures, internal and environmental scans, and college plans. (2.43)

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Commendations and recommendations from each unit's Program Review Validation team are
made available to the public after their approval by the Shared Governance Council and
signature from the president. A question on the program review form asks units/departments
to reveal how each communicates information relating to its program to the public. Some
departments report having their own newsletters; however, most utilize communication
methods such as verbal presentations, video presentations, advisory committees, the college
newspaper, flyers, posters, banners and information sharing across campus committees.
(2.44)

The Educational Plan is considered a "living" document that is updated periodically and
distributed to college constituencies. Data about the college and its students—including
enrollment patterns, demographics, student educational goals, and institutional measures of
success, such as the number of degrees and certificates awarded and the number of students
transferring to four-year colleges—are also readily available on the Office of Research and
Planning web page.

Planning Agenda

The college will ensure that SLOs and assessments are developed for all courses and
programs, and will link them directly into the college's Core Competencies. Results will be
aggregated into institutional information with the expansion of activities by the Research and
Planning Office to continually assess the effectiveness of all programs. The Office of
Research and Planning is also creating a template for a new Internet-based Research and
Planning newsletter.

II.A.2.g. If an institution uses departmental course and/or program examinations, it
validates their effectiveness in measuring student learning and minimizes test biases.

The college does not use departmental course or program examinations.

II.A.2.h.The institution awards credit based on student achievement of the course’s stated
learning outcomes. Units of credit awarded are consistent with institutional policies that
reflect generally accepted norms or equivalencies in higher education.

Descriptive Summary

Students are evaluated based on objectives and outcomes developed in the Course Outlines
of Record. Course outlines and SLOs are prepared by faculty in the given discipline. Students
are assessed by the instructor of record and award credit based on a student’s performance of
the course’s stated objectives.

The faculty evaluation process includes an assessment of the faculty member’s adherence to
the course outline and delivery of course content. The instructor is evaluated by the
evaluation committee which consists of peers and administrative representative. The
instructor is also evaluated by the students via a student evaluation form.


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Department chairs and faculty participate in district-wide discipline committees, professional
development activities, IMPAC meetings, advisory committees. ELAC courses articulate
with California State University, University of California and private institutions.

Self Evaluation

Students are assessed by faculty according to outcomes and objectives identified in the
Course Outline of Record. The college awards credit in transfer, career-technical, and basic
skills courses based on standards accepted in higher education and set forth by the LACCD
Board Rules and California Title 5 regulation.

The SLO Committee has developed a timeline for the completion of SLO development,
assessment, evaluation and program improvement cycle for all college programs. The target
completion date is 2012.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.2.i. The institution awards degrees and certificates based on student achievement of a
program’s stated learning outcomes.

Descriptive Summary

Degrees are awarded upon completion of all degree requirements, including the following:
completion of 60-64 units, a 2.0 cumulative grade point average, completion of competency
requirements in Math and English, and completion of 12 units in residence at the college.
(2.1) Students must also fulfill general education requirements and major requirements as
listed in the college catalog.

Certificates are awarded by the departments upon successful completion of all required
certificate courses with a grade of ―C‖ or better. Students who successfully complete a course
have been determined by the faculty to have met the objectives as stated in each course
outline of record.

Institutional dialogue regarding the learning expected of students to earn a certificate or
degree occurs at several levels. The Curriculum Committee reviews each course’s stated
objectives as listed on the course outline of record to determine if the course fits in with the
stated goals and objectives of a new or existing degree/certificate program. Vocational
programs must consult with an Advisory Committee to ensure courses and programs are
meeting the needs of industry. All changes to courses or programs must receive the
recommendation of the Advisory Committee.

Self Evaluation




Standard II                                                                            Page 85
Student achievement of a program’s stated learning outcomes is demonstrated based on
successful completion of all courses required for a certificate or degree.

Planning Agenda

The college is in the process of developing Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for courses
and for degree/certificate programs. Development of SLO assessment tools will enable
departments to assess a student’s achievement of a programs stated learning outcomes. The
college will more effectively link achievement of programs SLOs with the granting of
degrees and certificates.

II.A.3. The institution requires of all academic and vocational degree programs a
component of general education based on a carefully considered philosophy that is clearly
stated in its catalog. The institution, relying on the expertise of its faculty, determines the
appropriateness of each course for inclusion in the general education curriculum by
examining the stated learning outcomes for the course.

Descriptive Summary

All students seeking an Associate in Arts or an Associate in Sciences degree at the college
must fulfill the general education requirements as noted in the college catalog. Students meet
the general education requirements by taking classes from five different categories: Natural
Science, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Humanities, Language and Rationality, and Health
and Physical Education. A variety in course selection guarantees that students are exposed to
a broad range of knowledge, theories, and methods of inquiry.

Under ―Graduation Requirements‖ in the college catalog, Plan A requires that at least 18
semester units of study be taken in a single discipline or related disciplines. Plan B requires a
minimum of 18 units in general education and 36 units in a single or related field. Plan B is
usually the plan followed by vocational education majors completing certificates along with
the AA or AS degree. The general education requirements of the college are published in its
general catalog.

Many degree programs also show the integration of general education requirements as listed
in the catalog for an associate’s degree and transfer program to a four-year college or
university. Graduation requirements in both Plans A and B leading to an associate in arts or
in science degree include a general education component. A statement of philosophy and
rationale for the general education component is presented in Title 5, Section 55805 of the
California Education Code. The minimum qualifications for the criteria of subject matter that
fall under General Education courses are further delineated in Title 5, Section 55805. The
Board of Trustees has adopted the state language in the Board Rule 6201.14, and further
delegated the responsibility for developing and implementing a more specific philosophy of
General Education to the colleges. Each college has developed its philosophy based on the
unique needs and learning environment of its students. The college’s philosophy and
rationale are published in the college catalog.



Standard II                                                                             Page 86
 It is the responsibility of the college Curriculum Committee, a standing committee of the
Academic Senate with administrative representation, to initially review and approve all
courses, determining those that can be classified as general education under Title 5, Section
55805.

The college mission, emphasizing lifelong association between students and the college, is
reflected in the two general education plans. The educational program provides opportunities
for all students to develop into effective learners in major areas of knowledge. Courses in
Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Humanities, Language and Rationality,
and Health and Physical Education are developed to produce an educated, technologically
sophisticated, and multi-culturally involved citizenry.

Self Evaluation

 The intent of the college in guiding students through their general education requirements is
clearly stated in the college catalog.

The college catalog Committee is made up of faculty (including the chair of the Curriculum
Committee and the Articulation Officer), and administrators who each year review the
associate degree, certificate programs (including skills certificates), and transfer curricula.
Graduation requirements in both Plans A and B are also reviewed. The committee determines
that general education components are published in clear and complete terms in the college
catalog.

 The college catalog, reviewed and revised every year, clearly states the goals to be obtained
by the student upon completing a program, which includes the philosophy of General
Education requirements. Through systematic action, the college’s Academic Senate,
Curriculum Committee, and teaching faculty continue to assess the appropriateness of
coursework and curricula that are offered to ensure that relevance and comprehensiveness are
maintained.

 The college’s Curriculum Committee evaluates new course proposals for inclusion in the
general education requirements in accordance with Title 5 guidelines. Many courses meet the
interests of the multi-ethnic population present at East Los Angeles College to ensure values
of multiculturalism.

Review of General Education courses continue to take place through regular departmental
program review. Each department then appraises the requirements for degrees and
certificates, including review of the quality of General Education courses offered by the
discipline.

The college offers a comprehensive selection of courses that students can take in the areas of
academic, vocational, and basic skills to meet their general education and certificate
requirements. Existing courses have been reviewed based on currency of content, revised
TOP codes, hours and units, introduction or upgrading of technology, and program


Standard II                                                                           Page 87
completion. A concerted effort by administration and faculty is made to achieve a balance in
academic program rigor, articulation, and integrity.

A subcommittee of the Academic Senate has been meeting to revise the college’s listed
philosophy regarding general education to one that more reflects the concerns and issues of
the college’s student body. This revised philosophy statement will reflect the college mission,
core competencies (institutional SLOs) and give guidance to the curriculum committee in
ascertaining the appropriateness of courses to be included under General Education
requirements. Once developed, the philosophy statement will replace the current statement
derived from the LACCD Board Rules in the catalog. (2.34)

Faculty members are continually developing Student Learning Outcomes for a course based
on a review of the objectives listed in the course outline of record. The course outline of
record elaborates on the type of research, writing, reading, and critical thinking assignments
and other activities students are expected to perform in the class. The Curriculum Committee
reviews these assignments and activities during its determination of whether a course should
be included as an option for one of the General Education categories.

The rationale for how a course is selected as general education is primarily communicated to
stakeholders through the catalog and within each course outline of record, which provides a
written explanation of how the course fits into one of the general education categories.
Degree requirements reflect the specifics of the major or area of emphasis while the general
education courses provide the well-rounded background of a college education.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.3.a. General education has comprehensive learning outcomes for the students who
complete it, including the following: An understanding of the basic content and
methodology of the major areas of knowledge: areas include the humanities and fine arts,
the natural sciences, and the social sciences.

Descriptive Summary

The basic content and methodology of traditional areas of knowledge in general education is
determined by the LACCD in Board Rule 6201. (2.32) For the associate degree, students are
required to complete courses under the following categories: Natural Sciences, Social
Science and Behavioral Sciences, Humanities, Language and Rationality, and Health and
Physical Education. A description of the criteria for each category and types of appropriate
courses are also detailed in the Board Rule.

Plans A and B defines the amount of general education courses required by major. Majors
that require 18 to 35 units fall under Plan A, which requires completion of 30 units of general
education. Majors that require 36 or more units fall under Plan B, which requires 18 units of
general education.

Standard II                                                                           Page 88
Development of new general education courses occurs with input from departmental
members and discipline committees. Departments who develop new courses may request a
course to be reviewed by the Curriculum Committee for inclusion in the general education
pattern. Section III of the course outline of record asks the department to provide an
explanation of how the course meets General Education parameters for one of the five
general education areas. The Curriculum Committee reviews the course outline and
determines if it meets the criteria set by the LACCD. (2.32) College faculty actively
participate in curriculum discussions with counterparts from other community colleges,
California State University, the University of California, private colleges through
professional organizations, and Intersegmental Major Preparation Articulated Curriculum
(IMPAC) meetings.

Self Evaluation

Student Learning Outcomes are being developed for courses and programs. However, course
outlines for most General Education courses already list critical thinking assignments and
activities student are expected to perform to show mastery in a specific general education
course’s content and use of methods. Faculty create course SLOs based on course objectives
in the course outline of record. The SLOs are tied into the college’s core competencies (2.36)
which emphasize Global Awareness, Cultural Respect and Tolerance, Enrichment of Life,
Ethical and Moral Development, and Civic Engagement, which in turn directly links to the
basic content and methodology of the humanities and fine arts, the natural sciences and social
sciences.

Planning Agenda

The college will create programmatic SLOs, including creating specific outcomes for
students completing the General Education portion of each program.

II.A.3.b. A capability to be a productive individual and lifelong learner: skills include oral
and written communication, information competency, computer literacy, scientific and
quantitative reasoning, critical analysis/logical thinking, and the ability to acquire
knowledge through a variety of means.

Descriptive Summary

All new and revised courses go through the curriculum approval process, which ensures that
learning objectives are clear and that the course is constructed to be collegiate in content,
instructional methodology, and student learning. The criteria, reflecting Title 5 guidelines for
determining which courses support the standards for the skills-based areas of general
education, are reviewed as they are for other areas of general education. The Curriculum
Committee, a committee of the Academic Senate, is composed of faculty members from
various disciplines. Curriculum is developed by faculty and based on needs assessment of
trends in the surrounding community, and as determined by articulation with four-year and
secondary institutions. In addition, career and technical education programs are also



Standard II                                                                            Page 89
governed by industry needs/requirements, advisory committee recommendations, and
business/industry surveys.

Every course, regardless of whether it is to be considered for a General Education
requirement, is reviewed to ensure that, if appropriate, concrete critical thinking and writing,
information competency, and computer literacy outcomes are infused. This information is
clearly stated on each course outline of record in addition to the explanation for why a course
should be considered to meet the General Education requirement for communication and
analytical thinking, language and rationality, or written composition. The representative
assignments listed on the course outlines of records are the basis for faculty’s creation of
Student Learning Outcomes, which in turn feed into the college’s Core Competencies
including the Academic Skills of Critical Thought, Communication, Quantifiable Reasoning,
Information Competency and Research, and Technological Literacy and Management.

Student skills are first measured when students enter the college and take the validated
English and math placement exams. Student skills are assessed in individual courses through
a variety of methods, including but not limited to written exams, research papers, oral
presentations, class projects, portfolios, demonstrations, and performances. To graduate,
students must demonstrate competency in reading, written expression and mathematics.
Students completing specific courses with a grade of ―C‖ or better have traditionally been
presumed to demonstrate competency as defined in Board Rule 6201.23 in order to achieve
an Associate degree from the college.

The mathematics competency requirements are completion of a math course with a ―C‖ or
better (which has a prerequisite of Math 115 or higher), or achievement of a score of 15 or
higher on the district Mathematics Competency Examination. The competency requirement
in reading and writing expression for the Associate Degree may be met by completion of one
of the following courses: English 61, 62, 63, 65, 101, or Journalism 101. The competency
may also be met through Credit by Examination.

Departmental program reviews and faculty evaluations by peers and students, including
classroom visits, ensure the quality of instruction and academic rigor. The integration of
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) as an assessment and improvement process is also
incorporated. This SLO assessment cycle places an emphasis on ongoing assessment and
process improvement. Departments use course assessment techniques established by the
department to evaluate student learning.

The quality of course material, instructional methods, and resulting quality of instruction are
analyzed to determine what specific improvements must be incorporated to improve
instructional outcomes. Periodic program review by each department is also a continuing
process used to evaluate educational effectiveness of courses and programs. Measures of
student skills utilized include SLO assessments, completions, certificates, employment,
transfer, internships, state examinations, certifications, and licenses.

Self Evaluation



Standard II                                                                            Page 90
The college participates in state programs (such as CAL-Pass) that follow students through
their education to ensure mastery of skill competencies throughout college. The college’s
Honors and Transfer Directors also follow up on student progress once they transfer into a
four-year institution and report back to the Transfer Committee. Various Career/Technical
departments also track students once they enter into the workforce. However, even with the
above efforts, the college recognizes the need for it to be able to more comprehensively and
accurately track students’ retention and success when they transfer to public and private four-
year institutions or enter an occupational field.

The college has discussed extensively the need to infuse more clearly in the course outline of
record how students are obtaining information competency skills. The college has also
determined that computer literacy should be considered a basic skill for any student, and has
been instrumental in promoting to the district the need to establish another competency
requirement for graduation related directly to computer literacy.

The college is also developing the Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Committee
(SLOAC) to assist the coordinator and facilitators in overseeing departmental assessment
activities. With the acquisition of the new software system, TracDat, which will integrate the
college’s SLO development and assessment with program review, data from course and
program assessments will be more easily aggregated into the college’s Core Competencies.

An action item in the Educational Plan is designed to promote greater consultation between
faculty and librarians in developing information competency SLOs for courses and programs.
Through this effort, the potential implementation of a computer literacy competency
requirement and validated assessments of student learning outcomes in all of the above areas,
the college will be able to further ensure that general education students are achieving these
skills and attaining their goals.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.3.c. A recognition of what it means to be an ethical human being and effective citizen:
qualities include an appreciation of ethical principles; civility and interpersonal skills;
respect for cultural diversity; historical and aesthetic sensitivity; and willingness to assume
civic, political, and social responsibilities locally, nationally, and globally.

Descriptive Summary

The college’s Core Competencies, which were developed jointly by the Academic Senate
and Student Learning Outcomes Committee (a reporting committee to the Educational
Planning Subcommittee made up of both faculty and administration), are distributed to all
faculty each year. They include measures for civic engagement, ethical and moral
development, cultural respect and tolerance and global awareness. (2.36)




Standard II                                                                           Page 91
To ensure that the college’s students are able to meet these expectations, the college offers a
wide variety of courses which cover topics in ethics, interpersonal skills, cultural diversity,
historical and aesthetic sensitivity, and assuming civic, political, and social responsibility.
Specific courses in Anthropology, Art, English, Ethnic Studies, Foreign Languages,
Geography, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology are designed
to address the diversity of cultures and aesthetics that abound in our world. Ethics are also
discussed in each class when students are given the college’s Policy on Academic Honesty.
(2.1)

The diversity of our student population in itself creates an environment for cultivation of
respect for cultural diversity. This is reflected in the many active student clubs at the college,
including the Asian Student Intercultural Association (ASIA), Black Student Union, Eastside
Spirit and Pride, Gay/Straight Alliance, History and Culture Club. Each club has a faculty
sponsor who works with the students to organize events and activities that are open to all
students.

Board Rules state that all Social and Behavioral Sciences general education courses should
promote appreciation of how societies operate. Board Rules also state that each Humanities
general education course should increase the student’s ability to make value judgments. The
course outline of record permits faculty to explain how their courses meet the above
specifications when they request a new course to be considered for general education. The
course outline of record also asks how a course contributes directly to cultural diversity. The
college’s Curriculum Committee carefully reviews these statements before approving new
courses.

Self Evaluation

The college’s Core Competencies express the institution’s commitment to providing a
comprehensive and well-rounded education for our students. Discussions in various
committees, the Academic Senate, departmental meetings, as well as informal faculty
conversations express this commitment. The college is also enthusiastically joining others
within the district on embarking on integrating sustainability issues into classroom curricula
and to further discussion with the classroom on global responsibility. Environmental Science
faculty (including earth scientists, biologists and chemists) are developing programs
associated with Green Science, and there is an expectation that sustainability issues will also
be infused into Humanities courses. The college is committed to the idea that every student’s
experience at the college should contribute to the construction of them being ethical human
beings and effective citizens.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.4. All degree programs include focused study in at least one area of inquiry or in an
established interdisciplinary core.



Standard II                                                                              Page 92
Descriptive Summary

The college catalog lists three types of Associate degrees: those that prepare students for the
workforce (generally 36 semester units in a single or related field); those that prepare
transferring students for a particular major (generally18 semester units in a single discipline
or related disciplines); and those within a specific area of emphasis for students who may
want to obtain a background in a particular area without committing themselves to a specific
major. All three options require 60 to 64 units of work with an overall GPA of 2.0 or better.
The minimum number of units in general education courses and in the student’s major is
clearly described in the catalog. Students are encouraged to explore these options with
counselors. (2.1)

Many degree programs begin with introductory courses and give the student an overview
before he or she begins focused study of the subject. Higher-level courses incorporate
focused study or directed practice in a particular field. Many courses require prerequisites to
ensure that the student has the necessary background to be successful in the subject major.

Self Evaluation

Degree programs at the college are carefully designed to lead the student from the general to
the more specific. The college’s Curriculum Committee evaluates new degree programs for
adherence to a sequence of courses that moves from a broad introduction of the field of study
to a more focused arena. Course sequencing in degree programs is revalidated during catalog
updates by the department and the Curriculum Dean.

East Los Angeles College offers 39 Associate degrees in 27 disciplines, 44 state-approved
Certificates of Achievement, and 67 college-approved short-term Skills Certificates. Each of
these programs has a defined area of focused study or an interdisciplinary core. Many of the
existing Skills Certificates are being submitted to the System Office for approval as
―Certificates of Achievement‖. Faculty in any given department assess course offerings and,
through academic program review, ensure that any given sequence of courses leading to a
degree that reflects either a focused area of inquiry or an interdisciplinary core. Programs
must complete a rigorous review process established through Title 5 and appropriate policy
regulations through the Los Angeles Community College District and the college.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.5. Students completing vocational and occupational certificates and degrees
demonstrate technical and professional competencies that meet employment and other
applicable standards and are prepared for external licensure and certification.

Descriptive Summary




Standard II                                                                           Page 93
Degree and certificate programs are developed by applying curricular standards that ensure
that the scope and content of the course will provide the framework for students to acquire
the necessary knowledge to effectively prepare them for career placement, external licensure,
and certification. Sources that provide oversight and guidance to ensure a quality curriculum
are accrediting agencies, national, state, and local certification agencies, business advisory
committees, district discipline committees and curriculum committees.

All programs are composed of sequences of courses that have specific learning outcomes that
are clearly defined in the Course Outline of Record, and which are designed to provide
educational competencies not only for general knowledge but for ultimate employment.
Career and Technical Education disciplines utilize advisory committees to ensure that new
courses, certificates, or skills certificates are consistent with skills and knowledge required by
industry. Many of the committee members represent entities that employ ELAC graduates
and provide feedback regarding student competency upon entry into the workforce after
completing ELAC programs. The information is then utilized to update, revise, and improve
curricula, skills certificates, and certificates of achievement components.

Following successful completion of required coursework, students are required to file a
formal application for graduation, a certificate, or can file for a skills certificate with
Admissions and Records. The application and student’s transcripts are forwarded to the
appropriate department chair, who scrutinizes them to assure that all requirements have been
successfully completed. Following department chair approval of the degree or certificate of
achievement application, the degree or certificate of achievement is ultimately issued by
Admissions and Records and formally recorded on the student’s official transcript.
Employers can then validate completion of college degrees or certificates of achievement
when students provide them with their official college transcript.

Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs stay current with industry and educational
trends via their advisory committees. Using industry input, the faculty revises, improves, and
develops new curricula; thereby, ensuring that students earning these certificates possess the
skills and abilities outlined by employing agencies and businesses. The course sequences of
many CTE certificates are directly linked to state or county certification standards. For
example, the Administration of Justice Department’s Fingerprint Identification Skill set is
identical to that of the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s
department entry-level equivalencies and qualify them to sit for entry-level employment
examinations; therefore students successfully completing the program meet employment
competencies.

Outside accrediting and licensing agencies mandate requirements and assessment for several
of ELAC’s programs, including Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), Nursing, and
Respiratory Therapy. Reports from accrediting agencies provide ―pass rate‖ data.

Examples of programs meeting employment competencies, external certification, or licensure
requirements include the following:




Standard II                                                                              Page 94
In June of 2008, the Automotive Technology program received a recertification for
National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) in all eight areas. NATEF
works closely with the automotive industry to set training standards for student learning
outcomes. The automotive technology faculty members are Automotive Service Excellence
(ASE) Master Certified Technicians and active members of the Automotive Service Council
(ASC). Faculty members regularly attend training classes and conferences to stay abreast of
current technologies and industry trends. Together, these actions ensure that Automotive
Technology students are prepared for the ASE certification exam. ASE certification is
voluntary and students pay for the exam. The Automotive Technology department makes
referrals to local automotive shops that hire students who successfully pass the courses and
meet their employment standards.

Administration of Justice/Fire Technology’s full-time faculty members have extensive job
experience with local police and fire departments; therefore, all of the skills certificates and
certificates of achievement are developed with the industry’s core competencies at the
forefront. Additionally all the certificates are validated by a diverse advisory committee that
is representative of the industry constituencies. This department has a high number of
placements, which underscores the technical and professional competencies of students that
acquire certificates. The EMT certificate standard is consistent with that of the County
Department of Health Services (DHS) standard, which provides licensure allowing the
college to offer Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) certificate training courses.
Additionally, the DHS director oversees EMT programs county-wide and is a member of the
college’s advisory committee. Applicants for the state EMT licensure exam are not allowed
to sit for it unless they hold an EMT certificate such as one offered by our college. ELAC
students’ ―first-time‖ pass rate on the state licensure examination is 80%.

The Respiratory Therapy (RT) program requires regular reports and evaluation of students
participating in clinical work-study positions related to their field of study. Student and
employer surveys are used to collect information regarding the students’ ability to meet
requirements. The college’s RT students have a pass rate on the board exams higher than the
national average. Students successfully completing the Respiratory Therapy program have a
100% hire rate upon graduation. Often there are bidding wars among hospitals over the
students, and hospitals are offering signing bonuses to the college’s graduating RT students.

Respiratory Therapy distributes student and employer surveys so that information is collected
regarding the students’ ability to meet requirements. In addition reports are received showing
pass rate on state licensure examinations. The college’s Nursing program is similar to RT
because pass rates are also reported to the college. (2.48, 2.49, 2.50)

Internships and job shadowing opportunities in programs enhance and reinforce learned
classroom concepts. Students and faculty relate current trends in the industry, which provides
the catalyst for curricular changes, if appropriate. Cooperative Education is another way to
formally monitor work-based learning and obtain reliable information from employers. This
information is used in two ways; first, to immediately guide students in improving their work
skills, and second, to make improvements to curricula so that students gain current and up-to-
date employment competencies.

Standard II                                                                            Page 95
Annually, Career and Technical Education chairs are required to prepare a VTEA Report and
Proposal that outlines progress against the previous year’s plan/proposal using ―core
measures‖ provided by the State Chancellor’s Office. Each program’s effectiveness in
reaching the state’s minimum performance standard is tracked in several categories,
including skill attainment, rate of course completions, job placement, job retention, as well as
―nontraditional‖ job placement and program completions. The category ―nontraditional‖
contains programs that have been traditionally filled with a preponderance of students of one
gender.

Self Evaluation

The Vice President of Workforce Education and Economic Development, through the
college’s Career and Technical Education (CTE) deans, is responsible for ensuring that the
college’s CTE departments meet the established preparation standards, completions, and
eventual placement of students. This is accomplished through the use of advisory
committees, participation in meetings with District workforce deans, the regional consortium
of deans, chambers of commerce, Work Source Centers, and members of industry. Often,
grant dollars are utilized to fund the various activities that culminate in the successful
training of individuals for demand occupations.

Although the annual VTEA report gives an important indication of how well the college’s
students do in the workforce in general, it is not possible to determine whether they are
working within the field in which they studied. Also, unless they are working for an
employer that pays state unemployment insurance, they are not included in the VTEA report.
Thus, fields that have a preponderance of self-employment, such as real estate and child
development, are under-reported.

Surveys of students who have left the college are one of the few ways to determine actual
success, but expertise and resources have not typically been available to produce these
surveys. However, the college is beginning to leverage the resources of Work Source Centers
to track students after training. One such program is the Technology and Logistics Certificate
program, which collaborates with the Wilshire-Metro Work Source Center that places the
students in industry and tracks their employment retention and wage-gains. This
collaboration has received the attention of the Aspen Institute and was selected as one of six
national demonstration projects that will be studied over a three-year period.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.6. The institution assures that students and prospective students receive clear and
accurate information about educational courses and programs and transfer policies. The
institution describes its degrees and certificates in terms of their purpose, content, course
requirements, and expected student learning outcomes. In every class section students
receive a course syllabus that specifies learning objectives consistent with those in the
institution’s officially approved course outline.

Standard II                                                                            Page 96
Descriptive Summary

Information regarding educational programs offered at the college is widely listed in a
number of different publications: in both the print and web-based versions of the college
catalog; in department-prepared brochures; and in program planning sheets distributed by the
Counseling Department. The college reviews the information in the catalog annually by the
department chairs, the Catalog Committee, and academic administrators to ensure that the
listings of educational programs in the catalog are current and correct and that each
educational program lists its title, if it is a certificate or a degree, and the constituent course
work it requires including credit hours.

It is college policy that all faculty members prepare and submit to students a syllabus at the
first class meeting. Faculty members are also encouraged to post the syllabus on the college’s
Academic Computing Environmental (ACE) system. The Information Technology
Department conducts workshops throughout the semester and on Opening Day to train
faculty on how to post their syllabi online. College policy requires that all faculty members,
both full-time and adjunct, submit copies of their syllabi for all classes they are teaching to
department chairs. Faculty members undergoing evaluation also submit their syllabi to the
evaluation team as part of their review.

Department chairs are responsible to ensure faculty members adhere to the course outline of
record. Adhering to the course learning objectives is measured by in-class observations
conducted during faculty evaluations. Two evaluation items on the official faculty evaluation
form directly relate to this. (2.52) The course evaluations completed by students ask whether
instructors clearly defined the course requirements. There is also a question on the student
course evaluation form asking the students if the instructor provided a syllabus, which clearly
outlined the course objectives and grading criteria, by the second class meeting.

Self Evaluation

Information about degrees and certifications is widely available to students. Degree and
certificate SLOs will further clarify the occupational and educational outcomes as they are
developed, assessed, and continually refined. Course student learning outcomes are derived
directly from the course objectives listed on the course outline of record, which in turn are
reflected by the course descriptions. Faculty evaluations verify that individual sections of
courses adhere to the course objectives and stated student learning outcomes.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.6.a.The institution makes available to its students clearly stated transfer-of-credit
policies in order to facilitate the mobility of students without penalty. In accepting transfer
credits to fulfill degree requirements, the institution certifies that the expected learning
outcomes for transferred courses are comparable to the learning outcomes of its own


Standard II                                                                               Page 97
courses. Where patterns of student enrollment between institutions are identified, the
institution develops articulation agreements as appropriate to its mission.

Descriptive Summary

The college’s transfer-of-credit policy is stated in the college catalog. The policy as
established by the LACCD covers the acceptance of courses at regionally accredited
institutions in the U.S, and acceptance of foreign coursework completed outside the U.S. The
policy also details how courses are to be applied towards general education requirements for
the Associate Degree.

Transferability of the college’s courses is indicated in the college catalog and the schedule of
classes. The IGETC and CSU GE patterns for the college are updated annually and are
published in the catalog in the schedule of classes and are posted online. Additional copies of
the patterns are available in the Counseling Department on the main and South Gate
campuses.

Courses transferred from other institutions are initially reviewed by a counselor to ensure
placement in the correct Associate Degree, IGETC or CSU general education areas. The
―pass-along‖ policy set by the CSU and UC systems is adhered to by counselors and
Admissions evaluators, for courses to be applied towards IGETC and CSU GE requirements.
Courses must be placed in the same area for which they were approved at the originating
campus. Courses used towards Associate Degree major requirements are reviewed for
equivalency by a counselor or admissions evaluator using the originating college’s course
descriptions. Counselors and Admissions evaluators may also consult with the Articulation
Officer or departmental faculty. If further review is necessary, then a petition for equivalency
is sent to the academic department for review.

Articulation agreements are maintained by the Articulation Officer. The college has
articulation agreements with all UC and CSU campuses. They are available online at
www.ASSIST.org. The college also has articulation agreements with many independent
colleges and universities. Hard copies of these agreements are available in the Counseling
Department at the main campus, the South Gate Campus as well as from the offices of other
college programs (EOP&S, DSP&S, and CALWORKS), and they are also online.

 A list of agreements is published in the University Transfer Guide. (2.54) The University
Transfer Guide is distributed by the Counseling Department and is a required text for our
Introduction to College courses. The Articulation Officer enters into agreements with
regionally accredited institutions.

New articulation agreement requests may be initiated by the Articulation Officer or by the
four-year institution. The development of articulation agreements is in keeping with the
college mission to ―provide quality, current, relevant, and comprehensive transfer
curricula…‖ and to ―enable students to matriculate successfully…‖

Self Evaluation

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The website for the Transfer Center has been updated to provide greater access of transfer
information to all students, especially distance education students and students attending the
South Gate campus.

In terms of transfer of credits, most colleges do not have their learning outcomes readily
available in their catalogs; however every effort is made to ensure that courses transferred
from other institutions are equivalent in prerequisites, content and knowledge to courses
offered at the college.

The official evaluation of credit is done manually by the Admissions Evaluators and is
usually done at the end of a student’s academic career. The process is inefficient and does not
give students an official evaluation early in their academic career when it would be most
beneficial to them. The college does not require students to send official transcripts when
they enter the college. This causes delays when students file for graduation or IGETC and
CSU GE certification.

The college is in the process of developing course and program-level student learning
outcomes. When these are developed, the college will discuss the most effective process for
comparing the student learning outcomes between the campus’ courses and courses taken at
other colleges.

LACCD has purchased a degree audit system that will be implemented by all colleges in the
district. The college is one of two campuses piloting the program during the 2007-2008
academic year with a projected ―go live‖ by the end of spring 2008. The evaluation of
courses taken at other colleges will be completed by Admissions evaluators in consultation
with the Articulation Officer and counselors and entered into the degree audit system. The
college plans to require students to send official transcripts to the Admissions Office during
their first semester at the college. This will streamline the transfer of credit process and
enable students to receive an official evaluation of their courses earlier in their academic
careers.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.6.b.When programs are eliminated or program requirements are significantly
changed, the institution makes appropriate arrangements so that enrolled students may
complete their education in a timely manner with a minimum of disruption.

Descriptive Summary

The college now requires that a viability review be conducted prior to program
discontinuance. However, even before adopting the recently approved new viability process,
it was the college’s policy to do everything possible to strengthen an existing program before
resorting to its elimination. For this reason, the college has not eliminated a state-approved
program that has enrollment in many years. However, if a program is to be eliminated, it is

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the policy of the Office of Academic Affairs to ensure that courses within that program will
be offered for a time sufficient to allow students within the program to achieve certificate or
degree completion.

When a required course within a program is deleted, the deleted course is either replaced
with another course that fulfills the same requirement or it continues to be offered for an
appropriate length of time. If neither is possible, students are allowed to substitute
requirements or take the required course at a neighboring college. The college catalog
informs students of their ―catalog rights,‖ wherein they may choose to be evaluated for
graduation under course requirements of any catalog in use since they have been
continuously enrolled. In addition, there is a course waiver and substitution process that a
student may initiate through either counseling or program faculty.

Students are counseled on how to complete their educational requirements. The Counseling
Department invites departments to staff meetings to get updates on changes or information
about their programs when modified. Departments themselves also have significant contact
with their students to discuss curricular changes or issues with course offerings.

A request for a Viability Review may be initiated by a request or motion on the part of any of
the following: the College President, Vice President, or the Academic Senate President on
behalf of the Academic Senate. The Program Review and Viability Committee (PRVC)
reviews a selection of conditions resulting in the request for a viability review and if deemed
warranted, create a Viability Review Committee consisting of the supervising Vice President,
two Deans, three Academic Senate representatives (at least one department chair from a
similar-type of department), the Curriculum Chair, one AFT representative, and one
classified representative if the department employs classified instructional assistants or
laboratory technicians. The Office of Research and Planning provides one facilitator.

The committee reviews the program in terms of its relation to the college mission and
Educational Master Plan. It also reviews information contained in program review, recent
accrediting agency recommendations (if applicable), and measures of student demand, labor-
market demand, and service area demand. The program is evaluated in terms of its overall
effectiveness, particularly its impact on the college’s overall educational program, students,
faculty, college budget, and the community. The committee must evaluate the impact that
discontinuance of the program would have on the comprehensiveness and balance of
offerings across the college curriculum and within the district; how the program’s
discontinuance would impact the college’s educational and budget-planning process; and
how the program’s discontinuance would affect the region, four-year colleges and
universities, local businesses and industries, and faculty and staff.

Program discontinuance can only be recommended if it is clear that further efforts at
remediation are not warranted. Prior to making a recommendation for program
discontinuance, the review committee must consider the effects that program discontinuance
would have on students and student success and propose specific provisions that will ensure
that students who are currently in the program will complete the program in a timely manner.
The Viability Review Committee’s recommendations are discussed at an open forum and

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then a report is made and submitted to the East Los Angeles College Shared Governance
Council, who makes the final recommendations to the College President.

Self Evaluation

The college is committed to assisting students in achieving their educational goals despite
curricular changes that may occur during the student’s tenure at the college. The college’s
Spring 2007 Student Survey indicates that over 79% of students think that there are enough
General Education sections offered so that they can take those courses during the semester of
their choice. Similarly, over 72% of those surveyed think that the advanced courses required
for their programs are offered frequently enough to complete their program without delay.

The Curriculum Chair and department chairs meet with counselors to inform them of
programmatic changes and advise on remedies for students on how to complete educational
requirements when programs are modified. Any changes to a program are reflected in the
Catalog Update (produced in even-numbered years) or the main Catalog edition (produced in
odd-numbered years).

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.6.c. The institution represents itself clearly, accurately, and consistently to prospective
and current students, the public, and its personnel through its catalogs, statements, and
publications, including those presented in electronic formats. It regularly reviews
institutional policies, procedures, and publications to assure integrity in all representations
about its mission, programs, and services.

Descriptive Summary

The college publishes a two-year catalog during the late summer or early fall of odd-
numbered years for distribution and purchase. A Catalog Update noting important and
substantial changes, additions, and deletions is published in even-numbered years. The
catalog provides information on course offerings, degree and program requirements, student
fees, financial aid, refund policies, requirements for admission, program length, and
information on faculty. Much of this information is also published in the class schedules that
accompany each semester or session of classes. This information is also posted on the
campus website.

Schedules of classes are prepared for the fall and spring semesters and winter and summer
sessions. These publications include schedule information for both the main campus and
offsite locations. The college publishes numerous brochures, pamphlets, local newspaper
articles, and newsletters throughout the year and has purchased radio and local cable
television spots to inform the community of its programs and services. Many of these
releases have been intended for wide distribution, while some, such as department


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newsletters, are for in-house use. All types of literature are reviewed for accuracy by their
publishing offices.

Information on Los Angeles Community College District administrators and elected Board
members is placed in most publications and can also be found on the District website.
District administrators, Board members, and college administrators are listed in all official
college publications.

The LACCD General Counsel has oversight responsibilities in ensuring that the Board,
District Office, and colleges are conducting their operational practices in conformance and
compliance with all applicable state and federal laws, regulations, and rules. The college
president and senior administrators have direct access to the District's General Counsel.
District policies are discussed in regularly scheduled meetings of the Council of Vice
Presidents from the nine campuses and of the Chancellor’s Cabinet comprised of the college
presidents.

Self Evaluation

Accuracy within the college catalog and the Catalog Update is maintained through
consultation with department chairs and individual faculty, as well as key personnel who are
knowledgeable about the content. Each Schedule of Classes is reviewed carefully by the
responsible Dean, department chairs, and now the Articulation Officer before publication.
Each publication is checked to ensure accuracy and compliance with state and District
policies and regulations.

The college catalog has achieved a high degree of accuracy in its publication through the
formation of a Catalog Committee comprised of administration, faculty, and staff who work
in the areas of curriculum, articulation, transfer requirements, admissions, and counseling.
The committee puts extensive effort into revising each year’s issue to reflect the latest
changes and current information. All offices, programs, and departments are given reprints of
the current two-year catalog on which to make proposed changes. The changes are returned
to the Academic Affairs Office for inclusion in the new catalog or catalog update. Also, the
committee invites department chairpersons to meet with the committee individually to
discuss their departments’ proposed changes—curricular, faculty and narrative—for the
catalog, and to review the department’s entire proposed catalog entry.

In discussions involving proposed curricular changes to the catalog, the Curriculum
Committee chairperson and curriculum dean coordinate and verify that such changes have
been approved by the Curriculum Committee and are eligible to be reported in the catalog.
Approved curricular items or changes must be submitted to the district and activated in its
Protocol system before items can appear in the Schedules of Classes.

The college website is the responsibility of the Information Technology Department. There is
a move for all individual departments to have Web pages on the college’s website by the end
of 2009. Departmental websites will describe the department, its majors and certificates,
courses, and faculty. In the Spring 2008 Faculty and Staff Survey, 81.3% of respondents

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agreed or strongly agreed that accurate information about programs, graduation requirements,
conduct standards, etc. is accessible to all prospective and currently enrolled students in
official college publications (8.56% neither agreed or disagreed). Furthermore, in the spring
2007 Student Survey, 88.8% of responding students agreed or strongly agreed that the
college publications clearly and adequately reflect the college’s policies and procedures.

Data on a variety of student success factors are available on the college’s website on the
Research and Planning web page. Information is presented on the number of degrees and
certificates issued by the college and other colleges in the Los Angeles Community College
District. Data are also presented on the number of students transferring to the University of
California and California State University.

The Research and Planning web page also includes data on the college’s actual success rates
in six areas: transfer, transfer-prepared, degrees and certificates awarded, successful course
completion, workforce development, and basic skills improvement. The Research Office
prepares paper versions of this same information, including demographic data, and
distributes it to the college community. News stories about these events are prepared by the
college’s Marketing and Public Relations staff, who publish articles in different community
newspapers.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.7. In order to assure the academic integrity of the teaching-learning process, the
institution uses and makes public governing board-adopted policies on academic freedom
and responsibility, student academic honesty, and specific institutional beliefs or
worldviews. These policies make clear the institution’s commitment to the free pursuit and
dissemination of knowledge.

Descriptive Summary

The Board's policy on Academic Freedom is contained in Article 4 of the LACCD's
Agreement with American Federation of Teachers College Guild. This article states, "The
Faculty shall have the academic freedom to seek the truth and guarantee freedom of learning
to the students.‖

Academic freedom at the college is supported and protected by the Board of Trustees for the
Los Angeles Community College District, Academic Senate, and the American Federation of
Teachers (AFT), the faculty bargaining unit. Acknowledgment by the District is included in
the catalog. The AFT-negotiated contract outlines the policies and procedures for protection
of academic freedom. The policy is also included in the Faculty Handbook.

The college created a Student Policy on Academic Honesty, which is published in the
Catalog, and in each Schedule of Classes. The policy is also distributed to individual students
when they receive a class syllabus.

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Self Evaluation

The documents for determining, protecting, and supporting academic freedom are clear,
concise, and readily available. Assistance is available from the Academic Senate, the
bargaining unit, and campus administration for interpretation of the policies and procedures.
Equitable recourse is available through formal procedures provided in the bargaining unit
contract. The bargaining unit representative is familiar with the procedures and can assist any
faculty member who feels he/she is not permitted academic freedom. The documents relating
to academic freedom are available to each bargaining unit member via the contract.
Administrative offices and the library house academic freedom information. Ethical issues,
codes of conduct, and policies concerning academic integrity are well documented and
disseminated.

In the 2007 Student Survey, more than 90% of responding students agreed or strongly agreed
that the policies and penalties for cheating are provided by the college and are followed.
Also, 88.8% of students agreed or strongly agreed that college publications clearly and
adequately reflect the college’s policies and procedures.

The college is embarking on an expansive, semester-long orientation program for new
faculty, their mentors and department chairs. Some seminars will further provide distribution
of and discussion on this information.

Planning Agenda

The District Academic Senate has almost finalized an Academic Freedom policy that is
similar to the one used by the California State University system. When approved, the
college will print that statement in its Catalog.

II.A.7.b. The institution establishes and publishes clear expectations concerning student
academic honesty and the consequences for dishonesty.

Descriptive Summary

The college’s Policy on Academic Honesty is published in the college catalog, available both
in print and on the college’s Website. College policies on academic honesty are
communicated to students through two primary means: the college catalog and faculty who
both announce and present them through course syllabi. The Student Policy on Academic
Honesty can be found on page 39 of the current college catalog. The policy identifies specific
behaviors considered to be dishonest, the consequences of dishonesty, reporting such
violations, and the student’s right of appeal.

The LACCD has a board-approved Student Code of Conduct that includes a statement
promoting a college atmosphere in which students have the right to learn and engage in the
free exchange of ideas. The policy includes a code on student academic honesty, describes
clear consequences for cheating. This policy is referenced along with the East Los Angeles
College Policy on Academic Honesty in each Schedule of Classes and college catalog.

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There has also been a discussion on cheating by the District Academic Senate Task Force on
Academic Integrity. Some departments may have specific professional or licensing
requirements that may apply to students, for example the California Board of Registered
Nursing, Business and Professional Code, codes of ethics in journalism, etc.

Self Evaluation

Faculty members of the college are diligent in their efforts to inform students about academic
honesty. Board rules provide faculty and students with District policies and procedures
concerning principles of academic honesty and associated sanctions. The Academic Senate
has further refined policies on cheating that are outlined in the board rules.

Students' academic responsibilities and sanctions are emphasized in the college catalog,
which is provided to each new student and is available to all continuing students. The campus
cheating policy is available to all faculty and related disciplinary offices. The Academic
Senate’s Academic Integrity Committee produced a statement regarding academic integrity
for students that is annually distributed to faculty with the recommendation for it to be
distributed to each student in classes. Although the practice of disseminating the college’s
Student Policy on Academic Honesty as part of an instructor’s syllabus is encouraged, the
rate of actual implementation cannot be documented. The statement is also listed in the
Catalog and Schedule of Classes.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.7.c. Institutions that require conformity to specific codes of conduct of staff, faculty,
administrators, or students, or that seek to instill specific beliefs or worldviews, give clear
prior notice of such policies, including statements in the catalog and/or appropriate faculty
or student handbooks.

Descriptive Summary

The college has several codes of conduct. The Los Angeles Community College District has
a long-standing Board of Trustees approved Student Code of Conduct that is published in the
college catalog on p. 39. The code endeavors to ensure that the college environment is one in
which there is freedom to learn, to hear dissenting points of view, to exercise critical
judgment, to engage in sustained and independent search for facts and truth, and which
supports free speech in a responsible and non-violent manner.

This code of conduct covers a wide variety of topics including forgery, willful disruption of
classes or the college environment, theft or damage to college and individual property, the
threat or use of force, prohibitions against drugs and alcohol, prohibitions on lethal weapons,
discriminatory behavior, abuse of computer resources, disorderly conduct, various
conspiracies, prohibitions of illegal acts, interference with classes or duties of employees,


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and assault or abuse of instructors, among others. Additionally, there are smoking policies
and drug-free campus policies.

The student discipline procedures and student grievance procedures are clearly defined to
enable students or employees to pursue remedies. Additionally, the college has adopted an
Academic Honesty Policy that covers academic honesty, cheating, unauthorized use of
electronic devices, falsifying identities to assist another student in obtaining grades, and
plagiarism, among others. Again, consequences, rights, and procedures are defined.

The college catalog also lists Board Rules identifying Forms of Free Speech and student
exercise of free speech.

Self Evaluation

The college’s Core Competencies are listed in the Catalog, on the college website, and
distributed to the faculty each year. In addition to being referred to for linkages with course
and program SLOs, they also identify to faculty and students that one of the faculty’s roles as
college educators is to foster in students an appreciation of academic pursuit, civic
engagement, ethical and moral development, and cultural respect and tolerance. As a public
community college, the college does not espouse a specific belief or worldview.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.A.8. Institutions offering curricula in foreign locations to students other than U.S.
nationals operate in conformity with standards and applicable Commission policies.

At this time, the college does not offer curricula in foreign locations.




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                              II.B. Student Support Services

The institution recruits and admits diverse students who are able to benefit from its
programs, consistent with its mission. Student support services address the identified needs
of students and enhance a supportive learning environment. The entire student pathway
through the institutional experience is characterized by a concern for student access,
progress, learning, and success. The institution systematically assesses student support
services using student learning outcomes, faculty and staff input, and other appropriate
measures in order to improve the effectiveness of these services.

Descriptive Summary

The college provides access to a quality educational experience through its numerous college
programs and support services. Programming and services are available to the general
community and include credit academic and career technical courses, noncredit
programming, community service classes, and campus cultural events. The Student Service
Division provides student services through the following departments and units: Counseling
Department, Career/Job Placement Center, Transfer Center, Matriculation Office,
Admissions and Records, International Students, the Health Center, Outreach and
Recruitment, EOPS/CARE, Disabled Student Services, Student Activities, and the Child
Development Center. In addition, Academic Affairs provides student services and specialized
programming through Puente, Adelante, Escalante, MEnTe, the Math Lab, the Learning
Center, and the Writing Center. The goals of these programs and services correspond to the
college mission, and educational goals including the expansion of educational opportunities
and access, student success and improved accountability and customer service.

The college recruits and admits a diverse student population that is supportive of the state’s
Educational Master Plan. The college conducts regular outreach to the general community
and seeks to increase access to traditionally underrepresented populations. The Outreach and
Recruitment Department conducts high school visits to assist local students in their transition
to higher education and their educational pursuits. In addition to the traditional college
student groups that come out of local feeder high schools, ELAC actively recruits non-
traditional students, such as older students, working adults, AB 540 students, international
students and those who attend on a part-time basis. (EOPS)/CARE is a comprehensive
student support program funded by the state for full-time, qualified low-income students who
are educationally and financially disadvantaged. EOPS/CARE services approximately 2,000
students. The goal of the program is to assist and guide low-income students to achieve their
educational goals. CARE is a student-support program for single parents who are heads of
households, are recipients of TANF, and have at least one child under the age of fourteen.
CARE services include child-care grants, book grants, transportation grants, tutoring, transfer
assistance, workshops on study skills, and parenting seminars.

The Jaime Escalante Math and Science Program has as its principal objective the engagement
of inner-city disadvantaged youths in demanding academic regimen of pre-college and
college mathematics in order to foster matriculation into college and college-level math and
science courses. This program operates on the basic principle that given the availability of

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excellent teaching and a commitment to work hard, more time spent by the student working
on the subject will result in improved student outcomes. The International Student Program
provides comprehensive student services and legal documentation to over 400 international
students from around the world. These services and programs enhance the access of
traditionally underrepresented student populations to higher education.

The college has an open admission policy for any individual over the age of 18 or who has
attained a high school diploma or equivalency. Satisfaction of these criteria demonstrates an
ability to benefit from the diverse program and course offerings available at ELAC. High
school students are able to enroll as concurrent students. These students must demonstrate an
ability to benefit from higher education by completing a concurrent enrollment form, which
requires the student’s parents and a high school representative to designate appropriate
courses for the student.

The matriculation process serves to guide students through the college from admission
through graduation or transfer. Matriculation services include admissions and registration,
assessment and placement, orientation, and counseling/advisement and follow-up, and
graduation or transfer services. These services provide all students with critical information
for continued access to student support services needed for retention, persistence and success.
Through the matriculation processes students are made aware of college policies and
procedures, course and program offerings, student support and academic services, and course
prerequisites and co-requisites.

At the college, the enrollment process begins with the submission of an application on which
students identify their educational goal(s) and indicate any special needs they might have.
Admissions applications are available in the college schedule of classes, on the college’s
website, and through CCCApply.

Upon completion of admission, students are provided with a matriculation packet which
contains information on the matriculation process, campus map, sample test questions,
financial aid information, and the assessment placement process calendar. (2.55) Students are
instructed to obtain Matriculation services including the assessment placement process to
determine appropriate course placement in English/ESL and math and to participate in the
orientation. During the assessment placement process, students are provided with a
comprehensive orientation that gives students valuable information on college procedures
and the many college services available to the student body.

In addition to the college orientation, the college has created and regularly updated an
Academic Planner/Student Handbook. (2.56) The Handbook, a schedule of classes, (2.14) a
college catalog, (2.1) the University Transfer Guide, (2.54) and the ―How to Get Good
Grades‖ booklet are provided to students at the completion of orientation. These materials, in
addition to the student’s placement results, are referenced during the orientation as outlined
on the multimedia compact disk (2.57) that is used by the counselor giving the orientation.
An overview of campus resources, college policies and procedures, general education
patterns, and available academic and support services are also provided as part of the
orientation.

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Students are further referred to the Counseling Department to create individual educational
plans that meet their desired educational goals. To better serve students who work late during
the week, Admissions, Assessment/Orientations, Counseling, Financial Aid, and the
Extended Opportunity Program & Services (EOPS) offices are open for service on the first
Saturday of the month and extended hours during the first week of each semester.

Once students are identified as undecided on a major, they are referred to the Career/ Job
Placement Center. They are able to make appointments with the career counselor to decide
the best tools and resources in identifying their career path and goal(s). If appropriate,
students are able to take one of four career assessment to assist in deciding on a major. The
assessments are offered in the electronic format and paper/ pencil version to accommodate all
students. At the center, literature about various majors, career choices, and occupational
information are available. The Career & Job Resource Guide (2.58) is an informative
handbook that provides introductory career and occupational information. Two career
computer programs and selected internet pages provide information on majors and
occupations, in which students can view connection between a major to an occupation, as
well as occupational salary ranges and the respective educational requirements. Career and
undecided workshops are also available on the semester basis for students preferring
information given to them in a group format. These services are provided in the day, evening,
and on the first Saturday of the month to ensure all students are accommodated.

The college maintains a supportive environment for students by providing comprehensive
services to address special needs. The Disabled Student Programs and Services (DSPS)
provides the matriculation process of admissions, assessment, orientation, and
counseling/advisement in addition to the many other services available to students with
special needs. The student’s ability to benefit from these services is identified by disability
specialists using diverse methods to determine the most appropriate educational plan.
Accommodations and services throughout the college have been designed to alleviate the
barriers that may interfere with that opportunity. DSPS provides academic, vocational, and
personal counseling to all students in the program.

The DSPS professional prescribes the appropriate academic accommodations based on the
documented disability. These may include priority registration, on-campus mobility
assistance, adaptive equipment, note-taking assistance, supplemental tutoring, test
facilitation, and access to specialized computer services in the High Tech Center (computer
lab). The DSPS staff also offers an assessment process to identify those students who meet
the state criteria for the Learning Disabilities program. Students can be recommended for this
testing process if they have a history of Special Education, or if referred to the program by
their instructors.

The DSPS professional uses the assessment placement results when placing the students into
appropriate classes. DSPS provides the needed educational accommodations based upon the
specific disability and legal guidelines from Title V Section 504. Students with disabilities
are also encouraged to utilize other campus support resources, such as the Writing Center,
Learning Center, and the Math Lab. They are also referred to programs such as EOPS/CARE
and Noncredit.

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Student support needs are identified by various factors, including low English and math
placement results, non-high-school-graduate status, a high number of undecided majors, high
number of undecided educational goals, and the lack of transfer knowledge and preparation.
The college addresses these factors and needs of the students with its counseling services,
Transfer Center services, Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS), and special
programs such as Adelante and Puente. Student eligibility for the EOPS program is limited to
those who meet specific criteria identified in Title V. The program is responsible for
determining the student’s eligibility and documenting this in the student’s file.

The CARE program has additional eligibility requirements which must be reviewed and
documented to accept students into the program. The programs must monitor student
progress and continued participation. Services are provided to students in good standing with
EOPS: three mandatory contacts per semester, GPA of at least 2.0, completing 9-12 units per
semester. Counseling contacts are mandatory and a Student Educational Plan (SEP) is
developed for each student to assist the students in achieving their educational goal. Students
submit Progress Verification Reports (PVRs) mid-semester to assess their academic progress
and, based on instructor evaluations, make appropriate recommendations (i.e. tutoring,
additional counseling contacts, and workshops).

The college’s International Students Program (ISP) has its own admissions processes and
provides comprehensive student services and legal documentation to over 400 international
students from around the world. The office provides all the pre-admission information,
international application, and documentation required to grant an I-20 for international
student acceptance. The office provides a dedicated counselor, conducts new student
orientation, assists in housing and campus employment, and supports an International
Student Club. The office maintains all legal records on international student enrollment,
academic progress, and SEVIS system monitoring as required by the Federal government for
F-1 student visas. The International Student Office has constant input from English
Department faculty, matriculation assessment placement results, counselors and other
academic supports services on the specific learning support needs of international students.
The International Student office monitors freshman English and Math assessment placement
results each semester to determine if current college English and Math course offerings meet
the academic needs of international students.

Program Review is a cycle of continuous self-review and refinement of college programs in
support of the college mission and strategic priorities. This is an effective means for
monitoring the quality of student service programs and units and for setting new goals to
improve services. As of spring 2007, all programs and units in Student Services had
completed the program review process. The Program Review process requires every unit to
complete a comprehensive program review questionnaire, which includes an internal and
external scan. Units are then asked to use these scans in determining future goals. The
questions are aligned with the college mission and goals and each unit demonstrates the
extent to which the unit is contributing the college mission and enhancing student access,
retention and success. The Program Review process also initiates a campus-wide discussion
on these issues and the ability of the unit to impact student learning.



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A Program Review Validation Committee, made up of representatives from the campus at
large, reviews the unit responses and then provides suggested commendations and
recommendations. Each unit’s commendations and recommendations are then forwarded for
shared governance approval to the ESGC. This process allows all campus constituencies to
be involved in an ongoing discussion student success that includes both academic and non-
academic units.

During the fall 2008 semester, Student Services also completed a Cluster Review. This
review encompasses the entire Student Services divisions and enables division leadership to
analyze and integrate the results of all previous unit evaluations. The cumulative result of this
Cluster Review is a Cluster Plan, which details action items for the division to accomplish in
order to increase student access, retention, learning and success. The Cluster Review entails
the same shared governance processes as the unit reviews, allowing for a campus discussion
on student support services.

Student Service Outcomes (SSOs) for the units within the Student Services Division are in
the developmental stages. During the fall 2007 semester the goal for the Student Services
Division was to have all programs and units identify appropriate Student Service Outcomes
(SSOs). As of the spring 2008 semester all of the programs and units within Student Services
had identified preliminary Student Service Outcomes (SSOs); however, the means of
collecting the data have not yet been developed. The student services units continue to work
with the college SLO Coordinator in order to refine SSOs and to create appropriate
assessment tools for measuring student outcomes. The goal of the division is utilize SSOs as
means for ongoing evaluation of and discussion on improvement of student learning.

Student Support Services is constantly soliciting input from students, staff, and faculty to
improve their effectiveness of services. Students are encouraged to complete and submit
student comment forms about the quality of service or suggestions for improvement to any
student service department. Staff input occurs at the departmental level during regular office
staff meetings, which provide the opportunity for workers to evaluate and adjust services to
better serve the needs of the students. Office staff meetings often include guest presenters
from other departments and/or programs for announcements.

Monthly Student Services Division meetings allow for broader communication, information
sharing, and cross-evaluation from other departments in the division. Regular meetings of top
administrators at the President’s Administrative Council provides more comprehensive
evaluation of all student services programs by academic and administrative units. Other
committees include the Matriculation Advisory Committee, Student Success Committee, and
the Educational Plan Subcommittee, which work to improve student learning by enhancing
student services and academic programming.

The Student Success Committee, established in fall 2005, is one of the most active
committees with faculty, student, student services, and administrative representatives.
Initially, it examined four main areas of emphasis that affect student success: 1)
Assessment/Orientations and Personal Development courses; 2) English pipeline issues –
rethinking the current system; 3) Math pipeline; and, 4) Learning Communities. The areas of

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emphasis have changed to match the Basic Skills Initiative’s four matrices. The college
continues to have an active Student Success Committee, and various faculty and staff have
participated in many district and statewide conferences/meetings which focus on
effectiveness in assisting students to achieve their educational goals. (2.59)

During spring 2008, faculty, staff, and administrators had the opportunity to participate in a
survey for the self study that included questions about student services. This survey was
administered in support of the self study and has been used to aid in the self-evaluation
process.

Self Evaluation

The college recruits and admits students from a variety of backgrounds and skill levels that
are able to benefit from the programs that are guided by the mission of the college. Student
support services are provided throughout their college experience from the admissions
process to the completion of their academic goals. Student Services programs systematically
assess student support services through program review, periodic student and faculty
evaluations, and ongoing staff meetings. Most recently with the introduction of Student
Service Outcomes (SSOs), Student Services programs and units will be able to be more
systematically evaluated and modified to improve the effectiveness of the services provided.
These processes have led to college-wide discussions on student services and their ability to
impact student learning.

The Admissions and Records office has appropriately trained staff that successfully screen
applicants for entry and refer special admits (such as high school students and those under
the age of 13) to the correct office and guide them through the college processes and system.

EOPS/CARE, DSPS, and the International Students Office are able to provide additional
services to special populations that increase the access for traditionally underrepresented
students. The Program Review and self-evaluation processes have noted a need to increase
the faculty and student knowledge of these services and streamline referral processes.

The College is in the midst of major construction campus wide. During fall 2007 and spring
2008, all of the Student Services units and programs were relocated to various locations
throughout the campus, as the college remodels the Student Services building (previously
designated as the E-1 building). Due to the relocation of all student service units and
programs, there is a lack of student ease in accessing needed student service units and
programs due to their lack of proximity to one other. As an example, the Admissions and
Records Office and the Counseling Department, both critical student service units, are
located in two separate areas of the campus. This has made referral processes and integration
of services difficult in the current setting.

Seventy percent of faculty and staff surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that the college
provides Student Support services that meet student educational needs, regardless of the
service location or instructional method. Nearly 52% of respondents to the same survey agree
or strongly agree that the College conducts continual evaluations of student needs that result

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in improved student support services. These results indicate that while a majority of faculty
and staff feel that support services meet student needs, there is a need to improve evaluation
techniques and increase the dissemination of evaluative information.

Planning Agenda

The Student Services Division will annually review and update its cluster plan and develop
strategies to improve student services.

Beginning with the fall 2007 semester and continuing with the spring and fall 2008
semesters, the Student Services Division has continued to reassess the pathways that students
must travel from office to office, given the relocations. As a result, all of the Students
Services units and programs have created goals for 2008 to accommodate the temporary
relocations of their respective units and programs.

II.B.1.The institution assures the quality of student support services and demonstrates that
these services, regardless of location or means of delivery, support student learning and
enhance achievement of the mission of the institution.

Descriptive Summary

The college assures quality of service through the Program Review and annual update
process. All college student services programs have gone through the Program Review
process within the last few years and have provided 2008 annual updates responding to the
program review recommendations and the priorities set by the Student Services Division
Cluster Plan. The program review process for student service units includes the use of a
program review validation committee. Representation on this committee is made up of the
Vice President of Student Services, one student services dean or program director, two to
three senate appointed faculty, two to three classified AFT appointed staff and one Research
and Planning Representative. In addition to the committee, comments from students, faculty
and staff are solicited prior to the initiation of the program review. In this manner, the entire
campus community is involved in the program review process and a campus-wide dialogue is
initiated on how student services can be improved. Some of the issues identified through this
program review cycle included concerns over the quality of service, hours of operation,
accessibility and customer service to students. The student services leadership works with the
student services department managers to ensure corrective actions are planned and
implemented to address these concerns. The recommendations on these areas are then
incorporated into the annual update process which ensures that each unit is working towards
resolution of concerns.

The district conducts an annual student survey for all colleges in the district. The spring 2007
Student Survey sampled over 3,000 students at East Los Angeles College and incorporated
issues related to student services. Specifically, this survey sought to determine the usage,
perceived availability and satisfaction of several student service units. The results indicate
that large portions of the student body are not taking full advantage of the student services



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available on campus. Although those using the services report satisfaction, there is a need to
reach out to a greater number of students.

The most common way for input on quality of service is through direct input from students.
The college has a Student Comment Form which students could use to give positive or
negative comments and concerns related to quality of service in student services. Student
Services leadership reviews and addresses the immediate concerns brought to the attention
through the Student Comment form. Faculty and staff also give input on student quality
service in the student services office in many of the shared governance councils, such as
Administrative Counsel, President’s Cabinet, Student Success Committee, Financial Aid
Committee and the Transfer Committee.

Many programs student service units also comply with external evaluations. Financial Aid,
EOPS, DSPS, Matriculation and the Child Development Center all comply with mandated
external reviews. Each of these units has been found in compliance with State regulations
and guidelines.

The college offers academic instruction at multiple offsite locations, a large satellite location
in South Gate, a new satellite location in Rosemead, and through distance learning. The
college has made great effort to provide equivalent support services regardless of the means
and location of instruction to students compared to on-campus services. All student services
offices have assigned full-time or part-time staff to have service hours at our South Gate
satellite. The hours of service at South Gate are comparable those on the main campus.

The college does provide limited student services service at the Rosemead Center through
cross-trained Academic Affairs staff, such as Admissions, instructor services, ESL
assessment, and general student services information. The college website continues to
improve in providing all standard ELAC student services forms online, updated student
services program information web pages for each student services program and an increasing
use of online services such as Admission application (CC Apply) and financial aid
application.

The SARS data management system was implemented in 2005. This system allows the
Counseling Office to schedule and track academic advisement appointments. The system has
improved the division’s ability to determine student need and staffing demands in the
Counseling Office. The benefit of summative data that describes the number of scheduled
and attended advisement meetings has been used as a measure of efficacy and efficiency
within the Counseling Office.

The college is also developing its Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) and Student Services
Outcomes (SSOs) during the fall 2008 semester. Each Student Services program has
identified multiple SSOs that can be measured for their program, and each program is
working with the SLO Coordinator and the Research and Planning Office to develop
effective measures of student services for each student service unit.




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In addition, the Student Services Division has conducted staff training days that have focused
on assessment of student service units, identification of issues and the creation of action plan
to address deficiencies. The Vice President of Student Services oversees the implementation
of these plans and regular department and division meetings are used to follow-up and
continue dialogue on student learning and the impact of student services.

Self Evaluation

The process to determine quality of service in the student services areas is limited to oral or
paper and pencil Student Comment form. The college needs to provide multiple options to
obtain student feedback on quality of service at each student service office. The District’s
annual evaluation is not frequent enough nor does it provide enough campus-specific
questions to focus clearly on the quality of service provided to students at the college. The
college needs to develop a Point of Service Survey in cooperation with the college Research
Department by the fall 2008 semester. This has been a common recommendation in the
Program Review and evaluation process. The college should conduct the survey in each
student service office and collect enough data to review and address any quality of service
concerns, issues regarding student learning and availability of student services to all
populations.

The faculty and staff survey has indicated that more than 70% of employees surveyed agree
or strongly agree that services meet student need regardless of location or modality.
However, student service units have noted need for improved services at some locations. The
staffing and service level at Southgate is comparable to the main campus. The population of
students at the Rosemead Center is growing, and the college needs to increase its student
services staffing at that particular satellite.

The college’s web-based Student Services can be expanded to include more options to serve
distance learning students and students at the various offsite locations. Some possible future
web-based services include online fee waiver application, online International student
application, Spanish bilingual online application, online enrollment verification and online
transcript requesting process. The college is also developing an online orientation and
counseling services. The college needs to finalize the assessment measures of the identified
and approved student learning outcomes for student services program and publish the results.

Planning Agenda

The college needs to hire regular staff that can be trained in all aspects of student services
programs to provide direct information and service in the morning and evening at the
Rosemead Center.

The college also needs to hire a Student Services Specialist and cross-train him or her in the
diverse student services programs and services provided to students for the Rosemead Center
by the spring 2009 semester.




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The college needs to work with off campus vendors to investigate the feasibility of increasing
web-based student services in the areas of Admissions, Counseling and Financial Aid. The
college will also investigate the feasibility of an online counseling system to increase access
to services for online and general student populations.

II.B.2. The institution provides a catalog for its constituencies with precise, accurate, and
current information concerning the following:

       a. General Information
                Official Name, Address(es), Telephone Number(s), and Website
                Address of the Institution
                Educational Mission
                Course, Program, and Degree Offerings
                Academic Calendar and Program Length
                Academic Freedom Statement
                Available Student Financial Aid
                Available Learning Resources
                Names and Degrees of Administrators and Faculty
                Names of Governing Board Members
       b. Requirements
                Admissions
                Student Fees and Other Financial Obligations
                Degree, Certificates, Graduation and Transfer
       c. Major Policies Affecting Students
                Academic Regulations, including Academic Honesty
                Nondiscrimination
                Acceptance of Transfer Credits
                Grievance and Complaint Procedures
                Sexual Harassment
                Refund of Fees

Descriptive Summary

The college prepares and provides current information to students, prospective students, staff
and the community through four main sources: the college catalog; the college Schedule of
Classes and Student Services Handbook; informational brochures; and the college website.
The college catalog and Schedules of Classes are in compliance with the requirements set by
the California Education Code, and District and college-level guidelines.

The information focuses on identified needs and interests, which include general information
about the college, admissions policies and procedures, availability of courses, professional
and academic disciplines, career and academic paths, college programs and services, student
and college responsibilities and other detailed information. Information is designed to help
students become successful as they journey through and out of the college. Faculty and staff
use these tools to guide students to success. The college Mission Statement is developed with



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input from faculty and staff. The Mission Statement is published in the college catalog, but
not yet in the Schedule of Classes.

The college catalog (2.1) is published every two years, with a catalog update in- between
published catalogs, with the intent to provide consistent and current information.
Communication is maintained among each department/discipline, counselors, student
services personnel, and college programs to ensure that accurate information is included for
all areas. Both the current college catalog and the current catalog updates are photocopied
and circulated by Academic Affairs to all departments and college offices. Any updates made
by departments and college offices are then circulated back to the Dean of Academic Affairs
to ensure that all curriculum and policy approvals are updated in the catalog. (2.60) The
catalog is user-friendly, as it includes a ―How to Use This Catalog‖ section, tabs, and other
easy-to-use features. The catalog provides detailed information about policies, regulations,
graduation/certificate requirements for specific majors, transfer requirements, and student
services.

The college catalog is reviewed and revised for accuracy and quality prior to publication by
the Catalog Committee, composed of the Dean of Academic Affairs, Articulation Officer,
Curriculum Committee Chair, Matriculation Coordinator, and support staff, such as the
graphic designer. The Dean of Academic Affairs oversees the college catalog as part of her
work responsibilities. Department chairs are invited to be a part of the process and are
included in updating the faculty list (names and titles).

The college Schedule of Classes and Student Services Handbook (2.14) is published for
spring, fall, summer, and winter sessions. It features four main sections: how to apply and
register; schedule of classes; student services; and transfer and graduation information. It
incorporates general information, academic calendar, policies, procedures, and worksheets
that assist students in their short- and long-term academic planning.

Matriculation provides a Schedule of Classes/Student Services Handbook and college catalog
to all new students who participate in the assessment and orientation process. They are also
available to students in the college’s bookstore, Counseling Department, Admissions Office,
academic discipline/department offices, and college Student Service offices. The class
schedule and student services handbook is widely distributed in the community via high
schools, libraries, and local businesses. The college website also contains digital copies of the
current schedule of classes and student services handbook and college catalog.

The college uses direct mail to market major semester offerings (fall and spring) to potential
students in the community. The ―mini-schedule‖ (2.61) contains information including a
complete listing of the college’s class offerings and descriptions of services provided. Each
fall and spring, 303,000 of the mini-schedules are printed, and about 27,000 are mailed
directly to students who have attended ELAC during the past year. Three thousand are
distributed to high school students at recruitment events, libraries, and other community
venues. The balance (approximately 273,000) is distributed within the zip codes where most
the college’s students reside using door-to-door delivery and mail.



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The college website is periodically updated. It contains multiple sources for obtaining
information about the college, such as those mentioned above, as well links to other
resources that are available to students, staff, and faculty. The Class Schedule and the college
catalog are made available to those visiting the website.

Self Evaluation

New and revised information and college policies and procedures occur regularly. As a
result, the college must continually revisit its publications and work to ensure that the college
maintains its lines of communication through committees, department chair meetings,
campus mail, postings, and website uploads. The wide dissemination of information to staff
and faculty helps to ensure the quality and accuracy of campus publications. The Faculty and
Staff Survey indicates that 81.3% of employees agree or strongly agree that accurate
information about programs, graduation requirements, conduct standards, etc. is accessible to
all prospective and currently enrolled students in official college publications.

Information is disseminated to students and to the community. More than 80% of students in
the Spring 2007 Student Survey reported that the schedule of classes was either important or
very important in their decision to attend college.

Publication of catalog updates in a timely manner is a challenge. Information is received on
time but further changes are identified throughout the process and even once publication is
complete.

Though changes and improvements to college website have been made and continue to
occur, there is still a need to conduct regular updates and train faculty so that they can
participate in departmental site updates. The current communication system seems
ineffective in making changes and improvements in a timely manner.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.B.3. The institution researches and identifies the learning support needs of its student
population and provides appropriate services and programs to address those needs.

Descriptive Summary

The college is a large minority-serving institution with more than3 0,000 students.
Demographic information is collected for each student directly during the admissions
process. Data are stored on the Student Information System permanently for use in ongoing
student analysis. The Research and Planning Office compiles data each year to create a
college profile. The current profile portrays the student profile as of fall 2007.

This profile reports that Latino students represent the largest ethnic group on campus, with
75.1% of the general student body self-identifying as Hispanic or Latino. Asian/Pacific

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Islanders represent an additional 20.1% of the student body. Other ethnicities include 1.9 %
self-identifying as African American, 2.1 % as Caucasian, and 0.8 % as other. The campus is
61.9% female. Fifty-five percent students are under the age of 24, typically described as a
―traditional‖ student age group. Twenty-four percent are between the ages of 25 and 34, and
16% over the age of 35. The latter two groups represent a large portion of the student body
who are non-traditional college students and who may be in need of additional or different
student services to meet their needs.

Only 58.6% of the college’s students report English as a primary language. First-time college
students represent 19.5% of the student body. Thirty-one percent of students report
vocational educational goals, 32.9% report a goal of transfer, and 21.0% are undecided as to
their educational goals. Students come from various academic backgrounds, with 5.8% of the
student body reporting having never have received a high school diploma. Of those students
receiving assessment services in the 2007-2008 academic year, 86.2% tested below transfer-
level English, and 95% tested below transfer-level mathematics. The College Profile also
reports an environmental scan in order to demonstrate the community that the college serves.
Of the top thirty feeder schools, only one reports an API score above the federal target of
800. In addition, a majority of the college’s feeder schools report high rates of socio-
economically disadvantaged students.

The data on the college’s service area and the student body are distributed to all departments
on campus and are posted on the college website. In addition, specific data from the profile
are reported to individual committees such as the Educational Plan Subcommittee,
Matriculation Advisory Committee, and the Transfer Committee. Also, a portion of the
college’s Opening Day professional development was used in order to present the faculty
with a student profile that included the basic skills needs of students attending the college.

Student surveys, such as the Spring 2007 Student Survey, (2.37) faculty/staff/administrator
surveys, such as the Spring 2008 survey, (2.38) and other means of data collection represent
some of the continuous efforts made to understand and address the needs of our students.

The Spring 2007 Student Survey contains questions to clarify student usage and satisfaction
with student support and academic services. In addition, the survey found that 58% of
responding students indicated they had minor to major problems with study skills. As a
result, the Student Services division created more personal development classes to meet these
student needs. Reading and writing courses and resources such as tutoring services have also
been made available due to the 50% of student respondents indicating they have minor to
major problems with reading and writing skills.

Sixty-seven percent of our students have reported working anywhere from 10 to over 40
hours per week. Therefore, critical student services such as Counseling, Admissions, and
Financial Aid have extended service hours.

A comprehensive faculty/staff/administrator survey was also conducted in order to determine
what perceptions of services provided to the student body. In addition to these regularly
conducted general surveys, there has been a move to include more student surveys

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throughout the year. The Research and Planning Office conducted a Summer Drop Survey to
determine the reasons that students withdraw from classes late in the semester. Although the
survey was small in scale, the results were presented to ESGC and second survey was
commissioned for to further analyze reasons students had for dropping and work to improve
student services as needed.

Cooperative research studies have been used to assess student needs and success. One such
study is the Transfer of Urban Community College Students (TRUCCS) study, which was
run in collaboration with the University of Southern California. The study followed 5,000
students in the Los Angeles Community College District to yield information about factors
that promote retention and persistence of urban community college students to include issues
on remediation and course taking patterns.

Based on the December 2006 Measures of Accountability report from the LACCD Office of
Institutional Research and Information and the most recent Basic Skills as a Foundation for
Student Success in California Community Colleges March 2007 study, the college has
reviewed the data and literature. The literature provides a guide to effective practices in basic
skills in California Community Colleges. The study provides a strategic plan that focuses on
five goal areas: college awareness and access; student success and readiness; partnerships for
economic and workforce development; system effectiveness; and resource development for
the purpose of improving student access and success. In addition, the college completed the
Basic Skills Self-Assessment Tool which was designed to allow colleges to determine how
their current practices fit with and reflect the finding from the literature regarding what are
known to be effective practices for basic skills students.

Student needs are identified through the Program Review process, which is a cycle of
continuous self-review and refinement of college programs in support of the college mission
and strategic priorities. Every student service unit has been assessed through the Program
Review process. The comprehensive review has resulted in recommendations for each unit to
increase methods for assessing student needs and improving student services.

Early Alert (2.65) is another method of identifying student support needs. During the fourth
week of every semester, faculty members are asked to identify those students perceived to be
in need of additional support services on their census rosters. Identified students are then sent
letters referring them to the appropriate services. In addition, the Extended Opportunity
Program and Services and the Adelante programs collect information from instructors on
their student’s progress for continuous and immediate referrals to the appropriate support
services. (2.66)

The development of the Los Angeles Community College District Strategic Plan 2006-2011
(2.67) articulates a shared mission and vision for the nine LACCD colleges, and establishes a
clear series of District goals. The college has also developed and Educational Master Plan
that addresses the future plans for student services. Through a thorough process of faculty
consultation, the college developed goals and measurable outcomes that will lead to
improved student support services and success. This plan was presented to an open forum
held by the student Associated Student Union (ASU) in order to gain input from the student

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population. The results of this forum were taken back to the EPSC in order to further
incorporate student reported needs into the educational plan.

Based on assessed needs, the college has developed a system of comprehensive student
services. The following represents some of the broad-based academic and student support
services (2.68) available at the college:

The Adelante First Year Experience Program is committed to the educational success of
students. Adelante is a comprehensive program involving student services, linked courses, a
stimulating learning environment, and committed faculty which together provide all
Adelante first-year students with opportunities to succeed in transferring to four-year
universities. Students are identified based on their English and math course levels, and are
expected to participate in a Supplemental Instruction program (SI). Supplemental Instruction
is a regularly scheduled out-of-class review for student study sessions which integrate study
skills with content and uses peer-led collaborative learning. In addition, Adelante students are
required to attend an orientation which is conducted in collaboration with Financial Aid and
EOPS offices.

The Admissions Office provides a wide range of services to students from admission to the
college through the completion of their educational goal. The office is responsible for the
processing of admission applications and determining California residency status. The office
is a vital component of the Matriculation process and works to inform students of the
assessment placement, counseling and enrollment processes. The office processes numerous
petitions and is responsible for updating and monitoring of student academic records. The
office processes transcript requests, enrollment verification, and evaluation of graduation,
certification, and transfer eligibility. The office also services faculty in attendance accounting
record keeping as required by the State, including the processing and storage of class and
grade rosters.

The Admissions Office identifies the student’s learning support needs through input from
faculty, students, other student services offices, and through direct observation of problems
and issues. Current issues relate the lack of awareness of graduation and transfer
requirements and the process of adding or dropping courses by the applicable deadlines.
Services provided by the Admissions office include web-based and off-campus services. The
college’s academic program is now expanded to include one satellite locations at South Gate
Educational Center and numerous single class locations at local high schools and the
community. In response, the Admissions office has developed an offsite office at the South
Gate Educational Center and improved web services. The modern college student needs
many admission services to be available through the Internet, and the college has responded
by implementing an online application and registration process and is in the process of
offering online transcript processing.

Student Activities and Associated Student Union were until spring 2008 housed in the
full-service Student Center. However, due to construction on campus, they are now located in
G-8 119 in very limited space. The primary function of Student Activities is to provide an
avenue for students to become involved in various on- and off-campus activities. On-campus

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activities include workshops, film series, speakers, blood drives, and fairs. This provides a
physical space for students to study and relax in between classes.

The learning support needs of the college’s students are identified by the ASU in two ways.
The first is through the verbal and written requests submitted to the office. For example,
students have expressed a strong need for wireless internet access across campus. The
Associate Dean of Student Activities is also the college’s Ombudsperson and as such, all
student comment/complaint forms are directed to that office. This offers the staff an
opportunity to identify immediate needs such as the need to clarify various forms on campus.
These forms also point out procedural and policy needs of the college. Secondly, needs are
identified by local and state policy and concerns.

The Associate Dean of Student Activities attends and actively participates in local, district,
and state meetings and conferences. This ensures that the needs of our students are analyzed
and compared to national and state needs. The Associate Dean also works closely with
various academic departments on campus to identify needed services. Networking with
departments ensures not only a collaboration of services but the targeting of services most
needed by our students. For those services lacking resources, the Associate Dean advocates
and works with senior administration to identify funding sources. An ASU representative is
also present at the ELAC Shared Governance Committee and there is a standing ASU report
on the agenda for this committee. This allows ASU and general student concerns to be voiced
directly to the president and other campus leaders.

The Athletic Department is an integral dimension of the college. The responsibility of the
Athletic Department is to provide athletically oriented students, regardless of race, religion,
creed, or sexual orientation, with opportunities to enhance their collegiate education, promote
and develop educational leadership, physical wellness, sports and participation, recreational
pursuits, and athletic excellence through a competitive intercollegiate program. Student
athletes receive support services to enhance their academic and athletic processes both while
at the college and in preparation for their continued education and participation beyond the
college.

The college offers 14 intercollegiate sports. Women’s sports include badminton, basketball,
cross-country running, softball, soccer, track and field, and volleyball. Men’s sports include
baseball, basketball, cross-country running, football, soccer, wrestling, and track and field.
The Athletic Department has two full-time trainers. The head coach for one women’s sport is
a full-time LACCD employee. The head coaches for four of the men’s sports are full-time
LACCD employees.

CalWORKs (California Work Opportunities and Responsibility to Kids) is a ―Welfare
to Work‖ program that assists TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) recipients in
obtaining educational degrees and certificates that will lead to sustainable employment.
Through coordinated student services, CalWORKs students receive a comprehensive array of
services designed to assist students in achieving long term self-sufficiency.




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The CalWORKs department has placed major focus on job placement for participants and
best practices in service delivery, which consists of identifying goals, working with
participants’ strengths and providing participants with support when in off-campus positions.
The Work-Study component of CalWORKs is thriving as it has reached and surpassed its
annual goals. Supplemental funding was received for the Work Study component in January
2007, allowing 30 participants to be placed in off-campus agencies through the Department
of Social Services (DPSS). This collaborative effort with LACCD, the college, and DPSS has
opened new avenues of work study for students as well as opportunities for future Los
Angeles County employment. In recent months the number of students within this
collaborative effort has risen to 67, leading the District and state in CalWORKs Work Study
job placements.

The CalWORKs program has a part-time counselor for its participants. The CalWORKs
counselor assists the student in developing an educational plan that must be approved by the
county. In order to develop this plan, the student must bring in any assessments that may
have been completed prior to their arrival to the CalWORKs office. These county
assessments and the college’s assessment/placement, as well as one-on-one consultation
between the student and the counselor assists in determining the learning support needs of the
CalWORKs student. After intake eligibility is determined, a needs assessment is conducted
to determine what services a student may need to be referred. This needs assessment comes
in the form of questions included on the program’s intake form. An orientation to the college
and its frequently visited departments is given to the student, as well as answers to frequently
asked questions about CalWORKs. CalWORKs assessment is also required to determine
what services the participant will need, or should be referred to.

The participant is given a point of reference to the college, making sure that the students
make use of college services, such as Financial Aid, EOPS, work study, tutoring labs, child
care, Counseling (Education Plan), mental health, and/or referrals to other services. These
services include monitoring educational progress and hours of activity including in-class
time, work-study, employment, and other activities. These hours of activity are in turn
reported to the County Welfare Department.

An Educational Plan is then developed with the CalWORKs counselor that will help meet the
work participation hours of the individual student. If needed, a referral to other campus
services may also be given. In addition, the CalWORKs counselor is a licensed Marriage and
Family Therapist that can be utilized for some of the more sensitive issues affecting a
CalWORKs student’s life.

The Child Development Center (CDC) has two broad-based missions. The first is to
provide a quality age-appropriate, nonbiased, multicultural child care program, and to
provide parenting education and referral services for low-income parents in the community.
Because of multiple funding streams, four child-care tracks are open throughout the year to
low-income parents of children between the ages of three and ten years. The emphasis is
however on student-parents at the college and their children’s needs.




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The CDC’s second mission is to provide a learning laboratory setting to help train students in
quality child development practices based upon current research, and to foster continual
career-building opportunities. The Child Development Center opened its new state-of-the-art,
open classroom, and full-services facility in spring 2000. The Child Development Center is
open evening four days per week until 10 p.m., but has no evening hours during the summer
months. The Child Development Center addresses the needs of students through the use of
various means including the preparation and review of curriculum/lesson plans,
Developmental Profiles action plans and summaries, written and posted communications,
attendance at parent/teacher conferences, mid-fall and spring semesters data gathering and
dissemination, recording of unmet parental responsibility-negative reporting, notations,
tracking, verbal communication, observer exit reports, and practicum evaluations.

The Counseling Department provides day and evening assistance with general program
planning, academic guidance, career guidance, and transfer planning at the main campus and
at the South Gate Educational Center. Additionally, counselors have responsibility for the
Puente Project, the college’s Athletics program, CalWORKs, Adelante, Matriculation,
Articulation, Transfer Center, and the Career/Job Placement Center.

Workshops for undecided majors and personal development classes are offered on the main
campus and at the South Gate Educational Center. Counseling services are available in six
languages, English, Spanish, Russian, Armenian, Taiwanese, and Mandarin. The Counseling
Department identifies the student’s learning needs through individual counseling
appointments, surveys handed out during the academic workshops, instructional services
through the Personal Development courses, during the initial in-take session, and instructor
referrals. The Counseling Department services are evaluated and identified through student
comment forms (2.70), district student surveys, departmental staff meetings (2.71), and the
Program Review process, to ensure that the services are adequate in meeting the student’s
needs.

The Disabled Students Program & Services (DSPS) provides services to assure an equal
educational opportunity for students with verified disabilities. Accommodations and services
throughout campus have been designed to alleviate the barriers that may interfere with these
opportunities. DSPS provides academic, vocational, and personal counseling to all students
in the program.

The DSPS professionals prescribe the appropriate academic accommodations based on the
documented disability. These may include priority registration, on-campus mobility
assistance, adaptive equipment, note-taking assistance, supplemental tutoring, test
facilitation, and access to specialized computer services in the High Tech Center (computer
lab). The DSPS also offers an assessment process to identify those students who meet the
state criteria for the Learning Disabilities program. Students can be recommended for this
testing process if they have a history of Special Education, or if referred to the program by
their instructors. The DSPS professional uses the assessment placement results when placing
the students into appropriate classes. DSPS provides the needed educational accommodations
based upon the specific disability and legal guidelines from Title V Section 504. Students
with disabilities are also encouraged to utilize other campus support resources, such as the

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Writing Center, Learning Center, and the Math Lab. They are also referred to programs such
as EOPS/CARE and Noncredit.

The Jaime Escalante Math and Science Program has as its principle objective the
engagement of inner-city disadvantaged youths in the demanding academic regimen of pre-
college and college mathematics in order to foster matriculation into college and college-
level math and science courses. The program provides students with a challenging academic
environment in which to practice and master complex mathematical theory and applications.

This program operates on the basic principle that given the availability of excellent teaching
and a commitment to work hard, more time spent by the student working on the subject will
result in improved student outcomes. The Escalante Program is an integrated sequence of
intermediate and advanced mathematics coursework supported by the commitment of each
student and instructor to a rigorous schedule. Classes are taught by instructors selected for
their teaching skills and history of success with students. Most are instructors at the
program’s participating public schools: Garfield High School, Roosevelt High School, South
Gate High School, Montebello High School, Huntington Park High School, Wilson High
School, and their feeder middle schools.

The Escalante classes fall within the purview of the mathematics departments of the
participating schools and are designed to augment and integrate with the middle and high
school’s own curriculum. Escalante students are surveyed and tested to identify the support
needed. School transcripts together with test results are used to adequately place and provide
support services for each student. In math programs the support comes in the form of
tutoring. Students are enrolled in classes based on Counselor recommendation and/or grade
reports. During the summer break or the end-of-year intersession (for those in year-round
schools), students are registered for an intensive six-week session during which participants
will complete a full year of math instruction with credit. Depending on the number of
intersessions or summer sessions attended a student could, for example, complete five, six, or
even seven years of high school mathematics during the four years of high school.

Extended Opportunity Programs & Services (EOPS)/CARE is a comprehensive student
support program funded by the state for full-time, qualified low-income students who are
educationally and financially disadvantaged. EOPS/CARE presently services approximately
2,000 students. The goal of the program is to assist and guide students to achieve their
educational goals. EOPS services include orientation, counseling transfer assistance, book
grants, bus grants, registration assistance, progress monitoring, tutoring, workshops, and
cultural events. The office is open evenings, Monday through Thursday and the first Saturday
of the month.

CARE is a student-support program for single parents who are heads of households, are
recipients of TANF, and have at least one child under the age of fourteen. CARE services
include child-care grants, book grants, transportation grants, tutoring, transfer assistance,
workshops on study skills, and parenting seminars. Counseling contacts are mandatory and a
Student Educational Plan (SEP) is developed for each student to assist the students in
achieving their educational goal. Students submit Progress Verification Reports (PVRs) mid-

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semester to assess their academic progress and, based on instructor evaluations, make
appropriate recommendations (i.e. tutoring, additional counseling contacts, and workshops).

Student eligibility for the EOPS program is limited to those who meet specific criteria
identified in Title V. The program is responsible for determining the student’s eligibility and
documenting this in the student’s file. The CARE program has additional eligibility
requirements which must be reviewed and documented to accept students into the program.
The programs must monitor student progress and continued participation. Services are
provided to students in good standing with EOPS: three mandatory contacts per semester,
GPA of at least 2.0, completing 9-12 units per semester.

The Financial Aid Office is responsible for providing eligible students with funds to assist
them in meeting the expenses of attending college. The office administers over $13,466,648
in federal funds and over $1,900,880 in state programs. The Financial Aid Office processes
both federal and state aid programs. For 2006-2007, Financial Aid awarded $24,086,759 to
5,777 of the 5,955 ELAC students who applied for assistance. Most of the awards came from
the Pell Grant Program.

A Financial Aid Committee has been formed to increase student awareness of aid
opportunities and encourage them to apply (2.73). Financial aid information is communicated
to faculty to pass on to their students. Staff members have been trained to make classroom
visits at the beginning of every semester. Evidence of effectiveness of this effort can be seen
in the increase in the number of awards since 2005-2006, when 5,309 students received
$14,862,998 in assistance through federal and state programs.

The Financial Aid Office has three locations to better serve students. The financial aid needs
of students are identified by meeting with students and helping them to complete the FAFSA
application. Determination of the financial aid needs of students is based on the information
reported on the FAFSA, and awards are in accordance with their demonstrated financial aid
needs. Student’s awards are based on their Expected Family Contribution (EFC) and
enrollment status. The Financial Aid office identifies factors that contribute to a student
being academically at-risk and develops a plan to reduce/eliminate impact. All financial aid
students need to meet the Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards. If students do not
comply with the standards they are automatically disqualified for financial aid. As a result of
this, students are required to meet with an academic counselor to review their educational
objective and complete a Student Educational Plan before they can be reinstated for financial
aid and therefore complete their educational objectives.

The Financial Aid Office counter service has been redesigned, wherein the Financial Aid
Assistants and Financial Aid Technicians receive required documents and review them for
accuracy and completeness. This improved process has proven to be more efficient, and
provides better service to students. The Financial Aid Office staff members attend training on
a regular basis to keep up with the district, state, and federal rules and regulations. They are
involved in contributing to the college community through their participation in financial aid
workshops for high school students and classroom presentations throughout the year.



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Student Health Services promotes students’ physical, emotional, spiritual, and social well-
being. It offers programs designed to help students meet their educational, career and
personal goals by encouraging healthy attitudes and behavior, and fostering students’
responsibility for their own health. Services include treatment of acute illness/injury, first aid,
emotional/behavioral counseling, preventive health information/screenings, tests, and
immunizations.

Student Health Services identifies the learning support needs of students from Los Angeles
County, state, and federal Health Alerts, as well as trends in preventive medicine and
health/fitness awareness via direct input and requests from students and comments and
suggestions from teaching faculty, counselors and other student services groups, such as
Student Activities.

Input from the Psychology Department faculty and administration have identified the need
for increased mental health services for college students. The Health Center has expanded its
mental health service hours of coverage and developed group counseling sessions for key
topics. Additionally, the Health Center is developing more preventive and health fitness
awareness outreach to students.

The International Student Program provides comprehensive student services and legal
documentation to over 400 international students from around the world. The office provides
all pre-admission information, international application, and documentation required to grant
an I-20 for international student acceptance. The office provides a dedicated counselor,
conducts new student orientation, assists in housing and campus employment, and supports
an International Student Club. The office maintains all legal records on international student
enrollment, academic progress, and SEVIS system monitoring as required by the Federal
government for F-1 student visas.

The International Student Office has constant input from English Department faculty,
matriculation assessment placement results, counselors and other academic supports services
on the specific learning support needs of international students. The office also conducts
focus group sessions to identify the specific needs of international students during freshman
orientation and International Student Club meetings. The International Student office
monitors freshman English and math assessment placement results each semester to
determine if current college English and math course offerings meet the academic needs of
international students. Trends in the past few years have shown an increase in the number of
basic ESL course demands and higher levels of math needs.

The International Student Office monitors academic progress for each student through mid-
term grade reports and final grades. The International Student Office has increased awareness
of campus tutoring support and other academic support available. The needs for an increasing
knowledge of the American education system to assist students in the adjustment to a new
process, and issues related to university transfer are being addressed with the development of
an expanded freshman orientation, the creation of new student activities clubs for
international students (such as the Vietnamese Student Club), and the University Center e-
mail ―blast‖ of university events to all international students.

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The Learning Assistance Center (LAC) is designed to assist all students in their pursuit of
excellence at the college. Recognizing the unique potential of each individual, the Learning
Assistance Center promotes a student-centered learning environment and provides each
student with the academic support he/she needs to become an independent, responsible
learner. The central activity is peer tutoring for students in basic skills; reading, writing,
mathematics, science, study and test taking skills. Supplemental Instruction is also available
to assist in college-level courses such as accounting, economics, chemistry, anatomy and
foreign languages.

The Computer-Assisted Instruction Lab within the LAC is utilized to supplement tutoring or
serve as an alternative learning mode. Workshops and study groups are also available.
Through the addition of the PLATO system in fall 2007, the Learning Center serves life
science and chemistry students for required or supplementary lab hours. All services are
available by appointment or on a walk-in basis. Workshops for classes regarding the use of
word processing, the internet, and web-based classroom materials are also available, in
addition to e-mail access. Instructors may schedule an appointment to bring their classes to
the Center for these services. All students receiving tutoring or computer-assisted instruction
services at the Learning Center enroll in Supervised Learning Assistance I, a noncredit, open-
entry/open exit course for which no grade is received and no tuition is charged.

Since 2003, the Learning Assistance Center has focused on serving the general college
population, respecting the fact that the Writing Center and the Mathematics Lab have specific
missions to serve students enrolled in their departments and programs. Students who request
assistance solely in either English or mathematics classes are first referred to the
corresponding Centers for service.

The Matriculation Office offers the assessment placement process, and it serves as a
resource for other student services units. The assessment placement process (English,
reading, and mathematics course placement and orientations) are available Monday through
Friday, the first Saturday of the month, and on Saturdays of the two weekends prior to the
start of the fall and spring semesters. The assessment placement process is made available
consistently on campus and at the South Gate Educational Center. All off-campus services
are scheduled on a need basis; for example, assessments done at local feeder high schools are
scheduled in coordination with the office of Outreach and Recruitment. Other services
offered include the ―Ability to Benefit‖ test, which is offered once month for students who
are trying to meet the financial aid requirement, and the District Math Competency exam,
which satisfies a graduation requirement (offered once per semester). In addition, the
Matriculation office works in coordination with the office of Admissions, the Enrollment
Center, and the Counseling Department to ensure that all new, returning, and continuing
students obtain the necessary matriculation information and services.

Online Education opportunities are available. The college offers about 100 classes online.
This means that students can read lectures, take exams, participate in discussions, and turn in
assignments 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The Distance Education Coordinator provides
support services to both faculty and students. The learning support needs of online students
are identified by the Coordinator’s constant communication with the online students and the

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faculty members teaching online. However, there is a need to analyze how student services
are provided to online students and determine appropriate means through which services can
be provided online.

The Transfer Center focuses on transfer activities and resources and provides services to
students who are planning to transfer to four-year colleges and universities. Services include
on-campus visits, college fairs, transfer workshops, transfer application assistance, university
and college tours, Transfer Admissions Guarantees (TAG), and special transfer programs
(Adelante, Honors, MESA, PACE, Puente, USC Scholars). The University Transfer Guide is
a printed booklet which provides basic transfer information and detailed instructions to all
students. It is handed out at all new student orientations and is made available at the
Counseling office and the Transfer Center. The student learning support needs are identified
through transcript evaluation, Transfer Center events participation, Transfer Center office
suggestion box, Counseling Department faculty suggestions, and students self-reporting their
needs. The appropriate services for the Transfer Center are identified through evaluation of
Transfer Center events, counseling faculty suggestions, college and university representative
suggestions, evaluation of other community college transfer centers, statewide training
related to transfer, and the campus Transfer Center Committee.

Title V – Project for Academic Literacy (PAL), Hispanic Serving Institutions Grant is
designed for Generation 1.5 students – students who are only partially fluent in their native
language and in English. The number of Generation 1.5 students at the college is estimated to
be between 14,000 and 19,000 enrolled in credit programs (2.74). Services include Smart
Classrooms, web-enhanced technology, learning communities, supplemental instruction, and
adoption of ―best practices‖ in basic skills instruction.

The college’s Adelante Project is a component of this five-year PAL project, which in 2008
was in its second year. The Grant Proposal used data and studies of the college’s student
population and also used research in best practices known to effectively support this
population. A major program focus of the grant is to further identify best practices and
effective program designs to achieve appropriate services. Funded programs with services
listed in the above description, must, as a basis for continued funding, institute ongoing
evaluation and research as a means to demonstrate effectiveness and as a guide to improve
the practices.

Veterans Services provides assistance to eligible military veterans, dependents, and
survivors in processing the paperwork needed for federal educational benefits, such as the GI
Bill, and monitors veteran enrollments as required by federal regulations. The office also
works with community groups to encourage veterans to utilize support networks and other
veteran services available in the community. The learning support needs of the college’s
students within Veterans Services are identified from multiple sources, including annual
Federal Veterans Updates, input from Counseling, faculty who have daily contact with
students, and direct student/veteran input.

Some learning support needs identified within this population include combat stress
management, proper academic planning, and transfer awareness. Some of the additional

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services provided by Veteran’s Services include group mental health counseling for veterans,
group and individual academic planning with a college counselor, and promoting transfer
awareness events, such as university fairs and university campus tours, directly to veterans.

The Writing Center has trained tutors who assist students through all the different stages of
writing from brainstorming and outlining to organizing, analyzing, and polishing. During a
typical session, students meet with a tutor for thirty minutes, a limited time span that is
supposed to prevent students from receiving too much help. The tutors primarily focus on a
holistic approach, first concentrating on a thesis development, paragraph structure and focus,
overall essay cohesiveness, close reading of the text if applicable, and then on to addressing
grammar/syntax/punctuation error patterns. Students often identify their needs themselves.
However, many are referred to the Center by their instructors. Carefully trained tutors also
diagnose the writing students bring in and address specific weaknesses. The identification of
appropriate services is determined from student questionnaires, instructor input, a Writing
Center Committee, and the director’s experiences with the classes.

The Career/ Job Placement Center provides career and job services to students. The center
is open in the day and evening hours to accommodate all students. The first Saturday of the
month, the center is also open for extended hours. The career counselor is available for
appointments. When requested by faculty, classroom presentations are conducted to educate
students and faculty regarding services provided. Workshops are also conducted on the
semester basis for career and job skills preparation. To provide service at the off-site center,
workshops and appointments are available at Southgate campus.

Career services are provided for undecided students to assist in deciding on a major,
occupation, or simply identifying a career path. Career counseling appointments are
scheduled to discuss these options or resources available. Students can take a number of
career assessments to identify interest types, personality, work skills, and work values. Then
interpretations are conducted during career counseling appointments. Several books, manual,
and resources are available to review specific majors, fields of interests, occupations, and
careers. The career counselor also teaches Personal Development 4 for career planning.

Occupational services and resources are provided for students needing the skills to prepare
for the job market. Job listings are listed on the ELAC website as well as in the center for (a)
full-time, (b) part-time, (c) on-campus, (d) off-campus positions, as well as (e) internships
and (f) volunteer positions. Scholarship information is also posted in the center. Students are
able to schedule appointments to review and assist in creating resumes and cover letters.
Interviewing techniques and conducting mock interviews are also done in appointments.
Career & Job Resources Guide was created by the career counselor as a tool for career
preparation and is available to all students.

Resources at the center include career computer databases as Eureka and Choices Xplore and
are provided to students on a walk in basis. There, information can be found on majors and
occupations. The database identifies over 800+ occupations and 300+ majors as well as
information on universities and colleges that offer interested majors. Occupational salary
ranges and educational requirements for the occupations are also provided. Students can also

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view the connection between a major to an occupation, as well as occupational salary ranges
and the respective educational requirements.

Self Evaluation

The wide variety of academic programs and student services available at the college provides
evidence of the college’s focus on the needs of under-prepared students to help them succeed
and matriculate to reach transfer and/or vocational goals. In addition, the college is
committed to student success through the formation and continued active role of the shared
governance Student Success Committee.

The college is undergoing major construction, and relocation of various programs and
services to on- and off-campus locations makes delivery of services a challenging endeavor.
A concern for the Student Activities and Associated Student Union is the permanent loss of
the Student Center as of spring 2008. The Center has been a central location for many
exciting and memorable events throughout the years. Student life at the college is well
known in the community. Students at the college have been involved in many grass-root
movements and have gone on to become great leaders and mentors. The Student Center is
temporarily housed in G8-119 for an unidentified length of time. It is expected that the needs
and services for this area will not be met as the physical space will no longer be able to
support ASU board meetings, club meetings, social and cultural gatherings, and educational
workshops and lectures.

On September 24, 2007, the Los Angeles Community College District launched the
DegreeWorks project (degree audit software). In December 2008, the district degree audit
project, DegreeWorks Phase One is scheduled to go live for the college and Los Angeles
Southwest College, another college within the LACCD. The degree audit project is another
tremendous resource for faculty, staff, and students in which electronic student educational
plans, certificate completion audits, general education Associate of Arts/Science audits,
California State University general education audits, and the University of California general
education audits will all be made available.

The college has multiple means through which to assess the ability of student support
services to improve student learning. Program Review, faculty and student surveys,
committee and advisory group input, and responses from students utilizing services have led
to an increased knowledge about the success of student services. However, there is still a
need for further and more in depth evaluation of these services. The recommendations from
the Program Review process have consistently requested that student service units conduct
point of service surveys in order to determine the manner in which the college services are
improving student learning and meeting student needs. Although work has been completed
on this effort, the surveys have not yet been deployed as recommended.

There are a great deal of data available through the state, the district and the college Research
and Planning Office, but the information has not been disseminated to the extent needed. It is
necessary to increase the use of this information in the decision making process and in the
creation of future plans.

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The Admissions Office’s planned agenda items for 2008 include implementing the CC Apply
Spanish version, implementation of the degree audit system, development of the use of
electronic transcripts via CC Trans, improving the admissions website to have many of the
admission documents available, and to develop a bilingual student services phone bank
system in cooperation with the Outreach and Recruitment Department.

The 2008 goals for the Child Development Center include providing ELAC students with an
opportunity to conduct ECE observation and practicum teaching experiences for their classes
and offering parenting workshops for Child Development Center parents.

The Career/ Job Placement Center plans and goals for 2008 include modifying the website to
incorporate job listings for online access, increase awareness of the new location and services
available through the center, expansion of career and job preparation skills workshops at the
main campus and for the South Gate Center.

The Counseling Department will further develop online counseling and establish Counseling
Express site closer to the Admissions office for easier student access to counselor services
during critical time periods.

The Counseling Department, including the Career Center, plans and goals for 2008 include
modifying the website to incorporate job listings for online access, increase awareness of the
new location and services available through the Career Center, expansion of career and job
preparation skills workshops at the main campus and for the South Gate Center, development
of the online counseling, and the establishment of a Counseling Express site closer to the
Admissions office for easier student access to counselor services during critical time periods.

The Disabled Student Program and Services plans for 2008 include offering a Learning Skills
class for students with disabilities, offering workshops for students with disabilities, and
providing a specialized student orientation for the disabled students.

The Extended Opportunity Program and Services plans for 2008 include development of a
user-friendly and interactive website, development of an EOPS student handbook, offering
EOPS counseling services at the South Gate Center, and implementing the CARE Computer
Lab and Laptop Lending Program.

The Health Center 2008 plans include listing the campus services and community referrals
on their website, increasing marketing of the new location, expanding mental health services
and offering group session topics, expanding services to the first Saturday of the month, and
working with Women’s and Men’s Physical Education Departments to promote fitness
events.

The International Students 2008 plans include implementing the CC Apply – International,
improving the website, working with the Transfer Center and the Scholarship Department to
promote transfer and scholarship opportunities for international students, expanding
freshman international student orientation sessions to two days, and developing study aboard



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program in cooperation with Student Activities and Foreign Language department to give
ELAC students opportunity to study in Latin America, Europe, and Asia.

Matriculation and Assessment plans for 2008 include making the online orientation
accessible, computerizing and enhancing the Early Alert process, computerizing and
enhancing as many of the Assessment instruments as possible, work with the Admissions
office to ensure the success of the degree audit system and CC Apply- Spanish and work with
Outreach and Recruitment to increase the number of schools hosting offsite matriculation
services (admissions, assessment, orientation, and counseling).

The Outreach and Recruitment goals for 2008 included implementing an interactive Outreach
and Recruitment website, implementing an integrated tracking system, and increasing the
number of schools hosting offsite matriculation services (admissions, assessment, orientation,
and counseling).

Student Activities plans for 2008 include updating the web page, purchasing new computers
and desks for a Cyber Café in the new Student Center office, and working with clubs and
their advisors to focus on student retention.

The Transfer Center recently updated its web page, expanded services and resources at the
South Gate Center, and offered three workshops through the Staff Development office to
promote faculty awareness of the ―Transfer Process, Requirements, and Deadlines‖ for
public and private institutions.

The campus plans to conduct ―Point of Service‖ surveys for all student service units. The
college plans on complete implementation of this survey system and the integration of
student learning outcomes by spring 2009.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.B.3.a. The institution assures equitable access to all of its students by providing
appropriate, comprehensive, and reliable services to students regardless of service location
or delivery method.

Descriptive Summary

The college provides equitable access, appropriate and comprehensive support services
designed for student retention and achievement of educational goals for student success.
Academic support is provided in the libraries on the main campus and the South Gate
campus, the Learning Assistance Center, and the English and Math labs. The college
provides financial assistance support through the Financial Aid Office, EOPS/CARE
program, and the scholarship program. There are financial aid representatives and
EOPS/CARE counselors located at the main campus and at the South Gate Educational
Center.

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As noted earlier in this standard, a number of student support services are available,
including the Child Care Center, DSPS, Health Services, Matriculation, Counseling,
Career/Job Placement Center, and the Transfer Center. The college also has many specialized
programs, which matriculate unique student populations, including PACE, international
students, Adelante, athletics, CalWORKs, and MESA. Counseling, DSPS, and Matriculation
services are offered at the South Gate Educational Center. In addition, the Matriculation
Office provides assessment services at offsite centers, including high schools at which the
college offers courses.

Reliable college program information and services can be obtained in person, on the
telephone, and on the Internet. The Student Services Division has implemented universal in-
person services hours for all offices. All programs generally provide services between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Fridays. As of the fall 2007 semester, Financial Aid, EOPS, Matriculation, Admissions,
Counseling, and the Transfer Center are open on the first Saturday of the month from 9:00
a.m. to 1:00 p.m. In addition, the Admissions Office has weekend hours during the first two
weekends of a semester.

All major student services offices have in-person operations at the South Gate Educational
Center. The college also noted a need to provide increased services to students who attended
evening courses only. As a result, the Student Service Division created the Night Owl
program. This program increased the hours of operation for the first week of the semester to
improve student access and address student need. Direct services at South Gate include
admissions (application, registration, transcript, and enrollment verification request), fee
payment, financial aid, EOPS, counseling, tutoring, assessment placement, transfer center,
and library services. Detailed information about all college support services and programs is
published in the college catalog, class schedule, and student handbook and available via the
web.

The District Student Telephone and Registration (STAR) system provides complete
registration services in both English and Spanish. Services include adding and dropping
classes, class availability, fee payment, and final grades. All student service programs have
published telephone lines for student inquiries. Department telephone numbers are published
in the college catalog, class schedule, and student handbook. General student inquiries are
direct to the well-publicized general college information line in the Enrollment Center.

In addition, students are able to apply for admissions through the CCC apply internet system.
This service increases the access to those students who may have difficulty coming to
campus during traditional business hours. The District Student Information System allows
students to enroll in classes, drop classes, check grades and pay enrollment fees through the
internet. This system allows many part-time evening and weekend students to access services
at their convenience.

The Enrollment Center, Office of Matriculation, and Counseling, along with many other
offices, have staff members that are bilingual in English/Spanish and English/Chinese to



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assist students. The college has an automated telephone and voice message system on which
messages can be left during non-working hours.

The college and district websites provide comprehensive student information and services.
General college information related to college admissions, student services
programs/telephone numbers, class offerings, college calendar, student transcripts, college
bookstore services, college catalog, and financial aid information can all be accessed on the
college Website. Students can complete the admission application online, add and drop
classes online, access assessment placement results online, access unofficial grade reports
and other student-specific information online. Students can send inquiries via e-mail to the
college and District websites.

All e-mail inquiries are forwarded by the District or campus LAN administrator to the
Associate Dean of Admissions for response or referral to a specific Student Services office.
All college offices have e-mail addresses for direct student inquiries. The college has
Internet-accessible computers for free use by the students at varying academic and student
support offices such as the library, Career/Job Center, Transfer Center, Learning Center, and
the various labs.

Full services, day and evening, are provided for all essential student service programs at the
South Gate Educational Center. South Gate students participate in many extracurricular
activities, including clubs, student government and university transfer fairs. The Admissions
Office, Matriculation Office, Financial Aid Office, EOPS, and Counseling Office all provide
staffing, offering basic student services including such as admission application/registration,
workshops, counseling, assessment placement process, and orientations. Student services
workshops and/or activities are scheduled at both at the main campus and at the South Gate
Educational Center.

The Outreach and Recruitment Office provides a valuable connection for the students
enrolled in classes taught at satellite locations. Students are provided with a student
information packet, college catalog, schedule of classes, and the Academic Planner/Student
Handbook. In addition, the Outreach and Recruitment office has ―in-reach‖ staff located
throughout the main campus at ―Student Information‖ tents providing a place for mobile
inquiries. Available resources include schedule of classes, program brochures, open/closed
class information, etc.

Students who apply online are mailed informational packets from Admissions listing the pre-
admission/matriculation process and the telephone numbers to student services offices.
Online students can also access most student information and services via the college
website.

Self Evaluation

The college provides a substantial number of support services and programs regardless of the
location of the students. Weekend and Friday evening hours for student services are limited,
yet course offerings are expanding during these times. With the construction and relocation

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of all offices, the 2007-2009 college catalog may not reflect the appropriate locations of all
offices at the main campus and some of the offices at the off-campus locations may not be
printed in the catalog. Updated signs placed around the main campus help to offset this issue
of relocated offices.

The District and college websites provide essential student services in the areas of
admissions, financial aid, and general college information, but the information is not always
up to date. Expanded services are needed in the areas of degree audit and advisement(
Counseling Department).

The South Gate Educational Center provides substantial services to students, but increased
effort is needed toward serving other off-campus students, such as those attending courses at
the Rosemead Center.

The assessment placement process is available to all students throughout the year at the main
campus and at the South Gate Educational Center. The process is also provided for satellite
locations and at local feeder high schools. Approximately 11,000 students are assessed
through the assessment process each year (2.75).

The Rosemead Center provides Community Services and the program courses. At this time,
there is no permanent presence of Student Services at the Rosemead Center; however, some
Student Services units have requested additional staffing in their Program Reviews in
preparation for accommodating the Rosemead Center’s need for student services.

With major construction on campus and relocation of vital student services throughout
campus, student access to and from the various offices continues to be challenging. However,
in 2009 after the remodeling of the Student Services building is completed, all Student
Services will be housed in one area for easier access to all students.

The Student Service Division does not yet offer online services beyond admissions,
enrollment, and class management. However, the college has worked with the District to
pilot the DegreeWorks system. This system will provide online access to students in need of
educational planning. In addition, the college has sought to use online systems to improve
student services within the Counseling Department. Student forums and comments stated that
the in-person and phone-based scheduling of counseling was not effective for students who
could not attend during morning hours. As a result, the college decided to move forward with
purchasing a new server that would allow the counseling SARS system to schedule
counseling appointments online.

The Program Review process analyzes the manner in which student services are provided
and reviews whether all services provided are equal, regardless of location and modality.
This comprehensive review allows a diverse constituency to determine the extent to which
each student service is provided in a manner that improves student learning. Although
general data on student services is available, there is a need for improved evaluation methods
to assess the quality of all services provided.



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Planning Agenda

By the end of 2008, with the development of Student Service Outcomes (SSOs) and the
collection of assessment data, there will be a systematic approach of assessing how the
student service units and programs are meeting the needs of the students.

The college recognizes the need to provide greater access to student services through
improved technology. The Student Services Division is in the process of determining the
feasibility of implementing online student services. Specifically, the Student Services
Division plans to provide a means through which counseling services can be provided to
students over the internet.

II.B.3.b.The institution provides an environment that encourages personal and civic
responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development for all of its
students.

Descriptive Summary

Under the leadership of the Associate Dean of Student Activities, the Associated Student
Union government has increased the number of clubs on campus that directly influence the
learning environment of the student population, and enhance their exposure to the importance
of personal and civic responsibility and promotes their appreciation for intellectual, aesthetic,
and personal development. The ASU clubs represent the diversity of student interests on
campus, and allow students to expand their learning beyond the classroom.

The college also seeks to provide activities which foster a sense of civic responsibility and
personal development. The college has been host to numerous speakers, including well
known authors, local leaders, and U.S. Senators. In addition, the campus has hosted events to
enhance student development, including cultural events such as the Day of the Dead Altar,
which allows students to present original works of art exemplifying their artistic abilities and
personal culture. The college also has a Performing Arts program that organizes theatrical
presentations for the college and general community. The college is also home to the Vincent
Price Art Gallery, which provides students with the ability to utilize fine art and access
world-class artists to enhance their intellectual pursuits.

The Program Review process has served to initiate dialogue within and between the college’s
environment and Student Services, and has enhanced the ability of the college to provide a
stimulating learning environment. Part of the Program Review process includes the
solicitation of student and faculty comments on the manner in which services are being
provided. In addition, the college has sought to include students in the shared governance
process and to solicit student input in the college-wide decision-making process. The input
from the Program Review and shared governance processes has led to the creation of a
Student Services Cluster Plan and the College Educational Master Plan. These documents
detail the areas that the college has determined are needed to improve student learning and
enhance the campus climate.



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The Student Survey also provides some information on the college environment. 18.5% of
students report that community-based or service projects were part of their course work,
indicating that some academic programs have sought to improve a sense of civic
responsibility within the student community. 17.5% of respondents reported having attended
a college sporting event, theater production, or musical performance. 85.5% of students
responding reported that the college experience helped them to improve to at least some
degree their ability to understand people of other racial, cultural or ethnic backgrounds.
82.3% of students responding indicated that the college experience helped them to improve
to at least some degree their ability to develop a personal code of values or ethics, while
66.8% of students reported that the college experience helped them to improve to at least
some degree their ability to contribute to the welfare of their community.

Self Evaluation

The college has many services and programs that work to encourage student development of
personal and civic responsibility, intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development. These
programs are provided through Student Services, such as the Student Activities Unit, and
through embedded course work. The Student Survey indicates that the college in general has
been able to encourage this development. However, there is a need to determine the manner
in which individual programs have impacted student development. The creation of ―Point of
Service‖ surveys detailed in the previous section will help to assure these ends.

Services provided at South Gate Educational Center are limited. The space dedicated to
student activities is available at the main campus only. Although there is a campus shuttle
that transports students between the two campuses, the South Gate Educational Center itself
lacks these services. In addition, aesthetic and artistic activities such as student performances
and the Vincent Price Gallery are available exclusively at the main campus.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.B.3.c. The institution designs, maintains, and evaluates counseling and/or academic
advising programs to support student development and success and prepares faculty and
other personnel responsible for the advising function.

Descriptive Summary

Formal advising services for students are provided by the Counseling Department, Transfer
Center, Career/Job Placement Center, Extended Opportunities Program and Services (EOPS),
International Students, CalWORKs, Athletics, Puente, Adelante, and Disabled Students
Programs and Services (DSPS).

The Counseling Department has 19 full-time counselors (35 FTEF counselors when adjunct
counselors are taken into account) available for student advisement and has maintained this
number over the last three years. In addition, the student services division has provided full-

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time counseling services at the South Gate Educational Center and has DSPS and EOPS
counselors at the South Gate campus as well. Counselors have access to student records to
assist in educational planning. Programs such as ASSIST, EUREKA, and Myers-Briggs are
computerized career information programs that are available to counselors in the involved in
the student advisement process. Counselors annually attend conferences at University of
California, California State University, and the Association of Independent California
Colleges and Universities that provide updated information on transfer advising.

The career counselor is currently on a 1.00, full-time assignment and conducts career
counseling appointments. To accommodate the 24,000 + students on campus, students can
also make career advising appointments with several Career Guidance Counseling
Assistances, as interns in master’s programs preparing to become counselors.

The Career/Job Placement Center works closely with Career Tech, CalWORKs, and Career
and Technical Education on several projects to assist all students.

The career counselor is heavily involved in career issues locally and statewide. Being a
member of the Chancellor’s Office Statewide Career Development Advisory Committee and
a planning member of the Annual Region 7 Career Retreats, the counselor is on the fore front
of career issues and changes. The career counselor also attends career conferences as well as
transfer and college conferences. On the campus level, the counselor is in attendance of all
Career Tech Meetings and a planning member of ELAC Annual Career & Job Fair.

The Career/ Job Placement Center designed a program that is able to provide extensive
services to all types of students. Career is available on electronic databases such asto assist in
educational planning. Pro EUREKA and Choices Xplore for students to use at home and is
also available in hardcopies, such as books to appeal to all student learning types. Career
assessments such as Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Strong Interest Inventory are also
offered electronically and in the paper/ pencil version. Furthermore, more assessments and
inventories such as Motivated Skills Card Sorts and Work Values Card Sorts are also
available to students.

The Transfer Center Director provides counseling faculty with university updates, changes,
and listings of current transfer events at biweekly Counseling Department meetings. In
addition, campus department chairs are invited and welcomed to provide all counseling
faculty members with information as it pertains to their departmental certificates, degrees,
and transfer programs. Academic and student service units work together to establish
articulation agreements that allow for a less complicated transfer process.

Counseling faculty members provide advisement through scheduled appointments. All
students are eligible to receive advisement, and information on counseling services is
provided in the Matriculation packet during the initial admissions process. Students can
schedule counseling appointments one week in advance beginning on the Monday of that
week. Currently counseling appointments are completely scheduled on a weekly basis.
Counselors also participate in outreach through classroom presentations, University Day



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activities, Transfer Center events, provision of workshops, and group counseling. They also
participate in the annual High School Counselor Day activities.

The Transfer Center Director, a Counseling faculty member, brings in representatives from
four-year universities to meet with students individually and in groups regarding the transfer
process for their individual schools. In addition, the director schedules and participates in
tours to various universities throughout the state providing students with the opportunity to
visit universities outside the local area. Programs linked with four-year universities are also
available to enhance the student experience. USCholars program is one example in which
university representatives assist students in the transfer process and seek to increase the
number of community college transfer students who attend top tier institutions.

In January 2007, Counseling faculty participated in the planning and activities of the Night
Owl event. Night Owl was scheduled from 7:00 pm to 11:00 pm on Thursday January 25,
2007, where admission, enrollment, counseling, financial aid, EOPS, DSPS, and other
services were made available to all students. Counseling services provided during this event
were critical, and sought to increase access to non-traditional students who are only able to
attend evening courses.

On June 4-6, 2007, all counselors participated in training for the Career and College
counseling applications of the Strong and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) instruments.
This training was requested by members of the Counseling faculty so that they are able to
provide additional career advising, given that there is only a 0.5 (50% assignment) Career
Counselor on staff. Based on this instruction being so broadly provided, all counselors have
been able to gain skills on this instrument and are able to use/administer it in the absence of
the Career Counselor.

Counseling faculty are scheduled year-round to provide both on and off-campus orientations
as part of the assessment placement process. In addition, the Counseling Department offers
Personal Development courses throughout the fall, spring, and summer semesters/sessions.
These personal development classes are designed to introduce students to the college,
increase motivation for study, enhance career planning, improve knowledge of post-
secondary education, and develop group seminars to address student needs.

Counseling faculty members act as liaisons to high school counselors to provide them with
information and services.

The Counseling Department participated in the Program Review process during the spring of
2006. This process supported and evaluated the ongoing services and activities as currently
provided by the Counseling faculty members Identified during this evaluation was the need
for more data on the effectiveness and availability of counseling services.

Self Evaluation

The college has invested in new programs, publications, and events to effectively serve the
needs of its students: the Adelante program has a dedicated counselor; the Academic

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Planner/Student Handbook and University Transfer Guide are made available year round; the
Career /Job Placement Center has a counselor in charge of its operation; the South Gate
Educational Center currently has two full-time counselors; a Transfer Center was established
at the South Gate Educational Center; as well as active participation with High School Senior
Day, offsite orientations, and on and off-campus workshops.

In the Spring 2007 Student Survey, 55% of ELAC students indicated they were satisfied with
counseling services. In addition, 39% indicated satisfaction with group orientations, 30%
with the Transfer Center, and 35% with Career Center services. 57.2% of faculty/staff
surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that the college provides reliable academic advising and
counseling that is accessible to all students. However, nearly a quarter of all respondents
disagreed with this premise. The survey results indicate a need to increase student access to
academic advisement. The Counseling Office has identified a need for additional general
counselors to increase the number of students that can be served.

The Program Review recommendations indicated a need to further investigate student needs
and the ability of counseling and advisement to improve student learning outcomes. The
recommendations also indicate a need to determine the effect of having counselors assigned
to other special assignments. For example, although counselor-provided orientation improves
the quality of services during such orientation, it also limits the hours available for traditional
advisement and other student service programs. In addition, the Program Review committee
noted a need to increase the number of counselors available for the general student
population. The increase in student headcount has led to additional demand on the
Counseling Office.

As the college continues to institute new student retention programs such as the Adelante
(First-year experience) program, and to focus on serving all students (especially in the basic
skills area), counseling services are an essential part to the success of these new programs.
All counseling faculty members are actively participating in the various programs and
activities as described above. The Counseling Department has been working with the
college’s administration to pursue replacement of retired faculty with new hires.

The Counseling Department recognizes the need to provide online access to counseling
services, which the college is not currently capable of providing. Online counseling is an area
of great concern; it is anticipated that the Degree Audit software system will alleviate some
of these concerns and address to a certain extent the need for online counseling services.

The Counseling Department is keenly aware that no self evaluation process exists other than
Program Review, the general College Profile, and the data collected from the District Student
and Faculty Surveys. The department did create a ―Point of Service‖ Survey in 2006 to
evaluate the effectiveness of counseling services. This survey was to be implemented as part
of the Student Services Division’s evaluation process; however, due to the untimely passing
of the Vice President of Student Services, the process was not finalized. Now the Counseling
Department is working on establishing Student Service Outcomes (SSOs) to evaluate
counseling services and how it enhances student development and success.



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The degree audit software system known as DegreeWorks will become operable in
December 2008. One of the main features of this system is to provide students with online
access of their academic progress in terms of their certificate, associate degree, and/or
transfer general education completion status. This resource will allow students to have online
access to their academic progress, which is a precursor to the provision of online counseling
services in the future.

Planning Agenda

The Counseling Department will develop and implement online counseling by the end of
2008.

The Counseling Department will seek to increase the number of counseling faculty members
to meet the increased demand of the growing student population.

By the end of spring 2009, the Counseling Department plans to have established Student
Service Outcomes (SSOs) for implementation, and to start the collection of data for review
by the fall 2009 semester. This process will include the deployment of a survey system
capable of creating Point of Service surveys for all Student Service units including
Counseling.

II.B.3.d. The institution designs and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and
services that support and enhance student understanding and appreciation of diversity.

Descriptive Summary

The college’s mission recognizes and promotes an appreciation for diversity. It has further
become a part of the process in developing SLOs. Services provided to students account for
the diverse cultures and needs presented by the community. Planned college activities center
around the community the college serves. The campus hosts several cultural events reflecting
the diverse backgrounds of the student population. Some of these events include: a week-
long Chinese New Year celebration; Dia de los Muertos observances; an Asian Pacific
American Heritage Month celebration; the screening of a film documentary depicting Asian
immigrant workers and the labor movement in America; and American Sign Language
(ASL) storytelling. The college also advertises cultural events in the community such as El
Dia de Nino. A relief fund event involving the college community, held at a local Carl’s Jr.
Restaurant assisted victims devastated by the earthquake in China. The Student Activities
Office, ASU, and student clubs sponsor and publicize many of these activities.

The college makes efforts to include students in the planning of events, development of
student learning outcomes, policies, advocacy, and other related items relating to their
success as students and overall college experience. Some departments have made diversity a
part of the course content, either directly or indirectly.

Equal opportunity guidelines in hiring are strictly adhered to. Attention is given to staffing in
order to reflect languages, other than English, of students served by the college. The majority

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of the staff is fluent in another language, such as Spanish or Chinese, which correlates with
the student community of the college. The Counseling Department has Spanish, Chinese, and
Russian-speaking faculty members. The college has a diverse faculty that includes 30.5%
Hispanic/Latino, 14.3% Asian/Pacific Islander and 3.8% African American. The diversity of
the faculty helps to promote the value of diversity and understanding of various cultural and
social perspectives.

Efforts are made to provide and publish several sections of some materials in the language of
the student body, as can be noted in the Schedule of Classes and in the application forms
linked to obtaining college student services (2.76). Publications also represent the culture in
the communities the college serves, as they incorporate photographs and graphics that are
representative of the college community’s diversity.

The college offers student orientations to assist students in feeling welcomed to the campus,
to get to know others, to become familiar with staff and faculty, to get to know the
prospective and/or new students, and to become familiar with services provided by the
college. Promotion of enhancing student understanding and appreciation of diversity is a by-
product of these orientations. Student orientations are planned and conducted at three levels:
campus-wide orientation; orientation for online students; and department and/or program
orientations within the discipline the student has selected or is contemplating being part of.

The college serves its diverse population and is sensitive to the needs of its students by
offering certificate programs and courses geared for students who are limited in the English
language, students with different abilities, working students, and students for whom
transportation and child care are a challenge. Certificates that can be acquired in a short time
period include the disciplines of Child Development, Nursing, Computer Applications and
Office Technologies, Automotive Technology, Administration of Justice, and Architecture.

Certificate programs give students the opportunity to become more employable while at the
same time continuing their educations. Noncredit courses are available to students who may
need extra-curricular assistance in areas such as Academic Preparation/GED, English as a
Second Language (ESL), citizenship, basic math, basic reading, basic writing, and other
basic skills.

Classes at satellite campuses, off-campus classes, and weekend classes are all offered with
the intent to meet the diverse needs of our students. Transportation to and from the main
campus and the South Gate Educational Center is provided to expand the educational
opportunities to students attending at both campuses, based on course availability and time
schedules.

The mini-schedule (2.61) is distributed to the community and is designed as a pure marketing
piece in direct contrast with our official schedules and catalog. These academic publications
are designed to promote cultural achievements of the college.

Self Evaluation


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The college has a diverse faculty and staff that contribute to student appreciation of different
cultures and views. The faculty and staff have skills in multiple languages and meet the needs
of the community. The campus holds many cultural events throughout the year that highlight
the diversity of the community within which the college resides. The college’s Student
Survey shows that 85.5% of students report that the college experience helped them to
improve to at least some degree their ability to understand people of other racial, cultural or
ethnic backgrounds. While this general information indicates that the college is assisting
students in their understanding of diversity issues, there is a need to conduct further
evaluation to determine which methods are most effective for promoting appreciation of
diversity.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

II.B.3.e. The institution regularly evaluates admissions and placement instruments and
practices to validate their effectiveness while minimizing biases.

Descriptive Summary

The college uses four assessment placement instruments selected from the State Chancellor’s
list of approved assessment instruments that meet Title 5 Regulation Section 55512(a)
regarding disproportionate impact. Students are assessed in English as a native language
(ENL), English as a second language (ESL), mathematics, and chemistry, upon student
request.

The College Test for English Placement (CTEP) is used for English and Reading course
placements for English as a native language. The Combined English Language Skills
Assessment (CELSA) is used for English as a second language course placement. The
Mathematics Diagnostic Testing Project (MDTP) is used for mathematics course placements.
The California Chemistry Diagnostic Test is used to assess general chemistry abilities for
those students wishing to enroll in Chemistry 101.

The English and mathematics assessments were selected more than seven years ago. Prior to
their administration, validation studies were conducted to determine whether the tests were
appropriate to the curriculum and to create cut-scores for each level of math and English. The
English faculty also reviewed the English exams for assessment of biased language. This
resulted in the re-wording of one question that was determined to be culturally biased.

The California Chemistry Diagnostic Test was selected by the Chemistry faculty in 2006.
The Chemistry faculty, in consultation with the Research and Planning Office, conducted a
content evaluation and determined that the exam included the needed content areas. In
addition, the faculty ranked the importance of each question to aid in the development of
initial cut-scores.




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During fall 2006 and spring 2007 semesters, the test was administered to students who were
enrolled in Chemistry 101 and Chemistry 065. An additional post-test was conducted for
those in Chemistry 065. The total results were used as criterion validation to support the
initial cut-scores for entry into Chemistry 101. Further studies are anticipated to continue the
cycle of evaluation on this instrument, including criterion and consequential validation
studies.

The College Profile provides data on the assessment results for all students. Opening Day
2008 included an in depth presentation on the assessment results. Highlights from the event
included a focus on Basic Skills levels of the student body, and how assessment scores
translate into English and mathematics skill sets.

The Matriculation Office has created the Matriculation Advisory Committee, which is
comprised of the Dean of Admissions and Records, the Chair of the English Department,
Chair of the Mathematics Department, Co-Chair of English/ESL, Chair of the Counseling
Department, the Matriculation Director, and representatives from both Academic Affairs and
the Research and Planning Office. This committee has worked to identify problems with the
assessment placement tests and the assessment processes. The group discusses student needs
and the manner in which the matriculation process can address these needs.

Self Evaluation

In recent years there has been turnover in the Research and Planning Office, as well as a
lengthy vacancy of the permanent Associate Dean of Research. These staffing issues have
resulted in constraints being placed upon the college’s ability to conduct regular evaluation
of assessment tests/instruments. The English and mathematics assessments have not been
regularly evaluated in accordance with State Chancellor’s guideline (―Standard, Policies, and
Procedures for Evaluation of Assessment Instruments Used in the California Community
Colleges‖).

In spring 2007, an Acting Associate Dean of Research was selected, and there have been
recent efforts to improve the assessment process. Over the past year, the English and Math
Departments have been involved in revising the assessment placement process. Both
departments discussed satisfaction levels with the current tests, and voted to begin the
process of selecting new instruments in fall 2008. The departments have made a commitment
to review possible testing instruments and to select a new instrument by the end of the
semester. This will allow the faculty to work with the Matriculation Office and the Research
and Planning Office in order to select and validate new assessment tools.

After one year of data collecting, and due in large part to the recent hiring of the Associate
Dean of Research and Planning, starting in July 2008 the college was able to offer a
Chemistry Placement Assessment.

Planning Agenda




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The Research and Planning Office and the Chemistry, Mathematics, and English
Departments have committed to conducting regular evaluations of the assessment placement
instruments in coordination with the Assessment Office and the State Chancellor’s guidelines
in accordance with ―Standards, Policies, and Procedures for Evaluation of Assessment
Instruments Used in the California Community Colleges.‖

The college plans to conduct validation studies on newly selected instruments during winter
and spring of 2009. Newly validated Mathematics and English assessment tests will be
deployed thereafter. These efforts have been integrated into the Basic Skills Planning Matrix
for the 2008-2009 academic year. Regular evaluations will be conducted on each instrument
on a continual basis.

II.B.3.f. The institution maintains student records permanently, securely, and
confidentially, with provision for secure backup of all files, regardless of the form in which
those files are maintained. The institution publishes and follows established policies for
release of student records.

Descriptive Summary

Los Angeles Community College District Board Rule 7708 defines student records as any of
the following: permanent records, optional records, and disposable records. All permanent
records have historically been secured in a fire-proof records vault. During the relocation of
the Admissions Office during the college’s current construction, all permanent records were
scanned to electronic format. Current permanent records are housed in fire-proof, locked file
cabinets for approximately two years following their collection. These records are also
scanned into electronic format for permanent retention. Disposable records are stored on
campus for a two-year period and then are destroyed according to Board Rule 7709.1
procedures.

Historic records are in electronic format and are secured with backup on the college
mainframe system. Current records are secured (locked) in fire-proof file cabinets in E6-102
(Dean of Admissions Office). The college’s Admissions Office is in the process of becoming
a ―paperless‖ department. The college has purchased the Viatron document scanning system.
All incoming transcripts from other colleges/universities are scanned into the college
database and the originals destroyed.

The college’s release of student records policy complies with LACCD Board Rules.
Transcripts or verifications of student records are released to the requesting student or other
educational institute based upon signed student release request, judicial order or subpoena,
federal or state program mandate, authorized research studies, federal financial aid
conditions, emergency health and safety issues, federal military and college/district school
officials based on legitimate educational interest (2.78).

Self Evaluation




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All records are secured and released according the appropriate board rules. The Admissions
Office needs to take the next step in becoming a true ―paperless‖ department. In the new
Admissions Office within the new Student Services Building, there will be less vault space
for storage of records. The technology does exist, yet the Admissions Office does not have
the staffing level to scan all documents.

Planning Agenda

The college’s Admissions Office will seek the additional staffing resources to dedicate to
directly scanning or contract scanning of all admission documents to an outside company.
The admission forms will be redesigned for the ease of indexing and scanning into the
computer database.

II.B.4. The institution evaluates student support services to assure their adequacy in
meeting identified student needs. Evaluation of these services provides evidence that they
contribute to the achievement of student learning outcomes. The institution uses the
results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary

An annual College Profile is completed to offer the campus comprehensive data on the
college student population, and academic and student services. The profile includes
characteristics of the student body and the surrounding community. These data are used to
inform the decision-making process. The Profile also presents data on student service units
such as Assessment, Admissions, EOPS, DSPS, International Students, and the Financial Aid
Office. These data offer five-year trends to assess growth of the student body served by these
units.

A Student Survey is also administered district-wide to the general student population that
includes data on the usage of and satisfaction with student service units. Evaluation of
Student Support Services is also accomplished through district audits for certain units, such
as EOPS, DAPS, and Matriculation. The results are used to improve the services to students
and also must be reported in audit findings.

The Program Review is the most comprehensive evaluation of the student service units. The
review questionnaire includes internal and external scans and incorporates the college goals
in the assessment of units. A Validation Committee reviews each unit’s questionnaire, holds
meetings to review the data presented, and meets with the chair or head of each
department/unit for clarification as needed. Student and faculty comments are solicited
during this process to support the development of unit recommendations.

The Validation Committee presents suggested commendations and recommendations to the
ESGC for shared governance approval. The ESGC has the ability to request further review of
the unit, which has occurred on several occasions. The approved commendations and
recommendations are then forwarded to the college President for approval, and are
distributed to the units for use in planning. An annual update process is established to

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determine whether each unit has made significant progress towards the fulfillment of the
recommendations. This process serves to promote dialogue within the unit and extend the
dialogue to include the other campus constituencies.

The student services units have worked to create Student Service Outcomes for each unit.
Several meetings have been held at the unit and division level to create SSOs and determine
appropriate assessment tools. The result of these meetings and the recommendations from the
Program Review process has been a push to create Point of Service surveys that can be sued
to assess the unit’s impact on student learning, student satisfaction, and general service
quality. Software programs have been reviewed to determine whether they would assist in the
evaluation of student learning outcomes and administrative unit outcomes. The results of
these assessments will be used in order to stimulate dialogue on student learning and to plan
improvements in student services.

Self Evaluation

General college data and some student service data are available for use in determining the
efficacy of the student service units. These data are useful, but not as widely disseminated as
they need to be. The student service units need to work more closely with the Research and
Planning Office to arrange for better dissemination of college data, and discussions should be
held on the interpretations of the data and its usage in the decision-making process. The
college also needs to work to improve evaluation methods such that individual units can
develop processes for collecting and analyzing unit-level data.

The college has worked to develop student service outcomes for student service units. All of
student service units have developed unit-level SSOs. A software system has been selected
for use in the deployment of Point of Service surveys that will serve as an assessment tool for
the student service units. There is a continued need to implement this plan and begin the
evaluation cycle, including initiation of a dialogue on student learning and the results of SSO
assessments.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

                       II.C. Library and Learning Support Services

Library and other learning support services for students are sufficient to support the
institution’s instructional programs and intellectual, aesthetic, and cultural activities in
whatever format and wherever they are offered. Such services include library services and
collections, tutoring, learning centers, computer laboratories, and learning technology
development and training. The institution provides access and training to students so that
library and other learning support services may be used effectively and efficiently. The
institution systematically assesses these services using student learning outcomes, faculty
input, and other appropriate measures in order to improve the effectiveness of the services.


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II.C.1.a. Relying on appropriate expertise of faculty, including librarians and other
learning support services professionals, the institution selects and maintains educational
equipment and materials to support student learning and enhance the achievement of the
mission of the institution.

Overview

The two principal learning support services are the Library and the Learning Assistance
Center, which are discussed in detail in this section.

Aside from the Library and the Learning Assistance Center, several departments and
programs offer information and learning resources specific to their specialty areas for
students. Their hours and days of operation may vary from semester to semester, but they are
open Monday through Friday, while many are open on Saturday. A list of these resources,
which are discussed in detail in other parts of this self study, appears at the end of this section
of the self study.

                                             Library

Two library facilities serve East Los Angeles College: the Helen Miller Bailey Library
(HMBL), located in Monterey Park, and the South Gate Educational Center Library
(SGECL) located in South Gate.

The East Los Angeles College libraries have six professional librarians including the Library
Chair (five librarians at the Helen Miller Bailey Library and one librarian at the South Gate
Educational Center Library). The two libraries are also fortunate to have the assistance of
three adjunct librarians during fall 2008 semester. All librarians have the requisite
professional expertise and knowledge with which to perform their duties. For effective
library operations, librarian duties at HMBL are divided generally according to the following
principal services: Acquisitions, Cataloging, Systems, Circulation, Instruction, and
Periodicals. The sole librarian at SGECL performs all of these functions.

All HMBL librarians regularly share reference and instruction duties while also assisting
each other—particularly with collection development and systems functions—as needed. The
East Los Angeles College libraries have eight classified staff including an Instructional
Assistant/Information Technology. Since 2003, the number of the classified staff at the East
Los Angeles College libraries has grown from six to eight. HMBL hired a Library
Technician to provide technical work in the acquisition of books, media and other library
materials and, as computer usage expanded, added an Instructional Assistant/Information
Technology to provide technical assistance. SGECL has the service of one Library
Technician. As a team, librarians and staff strive to provide quality services to all library
users: students, faculty, staff and community patrons.

As of October 1, 2008, the East Los Angeles College libraries have a combined book
collection of 137,826 items, including 13,466 electronic books that are held jointly
(individually, HMBL holds 121,113 and SGECL 16,713 items). (2.79) The electronic book

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collection has been expanded significantly since 2003 both to supplement the print collection
and to increase accessibility to research sources. (2.80) These electronic books include fiction
and non-fiction titles as well as reference works, such as encyclopedias, that had previously
been available for in-library-use only. The acquisition of electronic books has been especially
helpful for students enrolled in distance education courses but is also a great convenience for
students who have to schedule study around job or family obligations.

To meet the varied demands of the research and instructional needs of students and faculty,
the libraries have increased the acquisition of audio-visual materials such as DVDs and
videocassettes. (2.80) The total number of DVDs and videocassettes at HMBL is 960 and
305, respectively. SGECL has 290 DVDs. (2.79) The videocassettes are being closed-
captioned through the DSP&S Office.

The libraries continue to maintain small print periodical collections. HMBL subscribes to
133 print periodicals and seven newspapers. Since 2003, subscriptions were reduced from
320 to 133 as many publications have become available online. SGECL subscribes to 27
print periodical titles and one newspaper. (2.81) The print periodicals are supplemented by
online periodicals which are accessible by any ELAC student 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

HMBL still holds 4,600 microfilm reels of periodicals and newspapers. No microfilms have
been added to the collection since 2003 except for the addition of the ELAC student-
published newspaper, ―Campus News.‖ As older information has become available through
electronic databases, just as many print periodicals have been replaced, there is no longer a
need to purchase microfilm.

For the past five years, the libraries have received great support from the college with
increased funding for books, audio-visual and media materials. (2.82) In addition, the
libraries received supplemental funds through a private grant from the Ahmanson
Foundation. (2.83) However, these few years of good budgets followed decades of
inadequate funding, so the book collection is still aged, and many titles are obsolete. We need
continued good funding for years to be able to develop a collection sufficient to support the
curriculum and the research needs of students. (2.84)

To broaden access to books, the libraries have an intra-library loan system among the Los
Angeles Community College District (LACCD) libraries. (2.85) Further, the ELAC libraries
made a reciprocal arrangement with the California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA)
Library that permits ELAC students to borrow their books. (2.86) For students who want to
borrow books from libraries other than those of LACCD or CSULA, HMBL and SGECL
have websites that contain links to the online catalogs of selected libraries in the area. (2.87)

The libraries also provide access to 14 subscription-based and five free electronic databases
(excluding the NetLibrary and Gale Virtual Reference Library electronic book databases) for
students to retrieve full-text information online from journals, research reports, and other
sources. The databases are accessible remotely 24 /7.




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Our collection development policy for print and electronic books guides our selections based
on our current curriculum and student research assignments. (2.88) In selecting new titles, the
librarians regularly use online book selection tools such as Baker &Taylor’s E-Lists, Choice
Reviews Online, and Resources for College Libraries (RCLweb), and YBP’s First Look
service. They also frequently consult reviews in Library Journal and New York Review of
Books. We also share backlists with other district libraries.

From 2005-2008, the Acquisitions Librarian served on the Curriculum Committee, in part, to
get access to recommended reading lists in new or revised course outlines. The Instruction
Librarian now serving on the Curriculum Committee will bring the same lists to the library.
The Acquisitions Librarian also seeks direct input from faculty through the distribution of
book, audio-visual and periodical suggestion forms at Opening Day and other venues, by
collaborating with faculty who apply for grants, through informal discussion at committee
meetings and other opportunities, and by allocating book budget funds or grants by
discipline/department. The librarian who oversees the print periodical collection also collects
input from faculty to maintain or develop the print periodical collection. All librarians
forward student suggestions to their colleagues for books or magazines. (2.89) To reduce the
burden of high textbook costs for students, faculty and fellow students donate textbooks to
the libraries to be placed on reserve. (2.91)

To keep up-to-date with research needs, as time permits, the book collections are reviewed
title by title according to the discard criteria of the collection development policy (2.88) by
librarians. (2.80) Instructors participate in weeding the book collection while earning
professional development credit. (2.92)

The periodical titles are also reviewed annually using various criteria such as usage,
relevancy, electronic article availability and faculty input. Based on these criteria, titles are
discontinued or added. The electronic databases are also reviewed periodically based on
quality of data, reliability of service, and usage statistics. When funding permits, new
databases are added after reading reviews, such as those provided by Community College
League of California, careful examination of the content, comparison with competitors, and
usability and reliability testing through trial accounts. In order to maintain up-to-date
collections in various formats, all librarians including adjuncts participate in reviews and
selection decisions.

To facilitate access to freely available resources for research, the libraries provide bookmarks
arranged by topic in ―Del.lic.ious.‖ (2.87) These Internet resources are continually updated
by librarian interns under the guidance of the supervising librarians.

To further assist students with their research projects and to teach information-competency
skills in a self-paced manner, the libraries also have various research guides, library handouts
and an Online Tutorial posted on the website. These aids are updated on an ongoing basis.
(2.87)

The libraries distribute print brochures to students throughout the year. These library
brochures contain information on services and they are distributed to faculty at Opening Day

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every year and at special campus events such as Senior Day and New Student Open House.
(2.93)

HMBL provides 111 computers (including 21 computers for the Library Classroom and 4
computers for community users) and SGECL has 10 computers for student use. In addition to
the college’s high-speed Internet connection, the computers house Microsoft Office 2007
software for students to produce reports, spreadsheets, presentations, flyers, and databases.

The libraries also provide copiers, printers, and a scanner and HMBL provides wireless
access to the Internet. Further, each library has an ADA compliant computer with a dedicated
scanner provided by DSP&S. Information Technology Department provided and supports a
networked printing system called, ―GoPrint‖, including a color printer.

To provide efficient support for student learning through rapidly changing computer
technology, the libraries submitted the technology plan for the next three years which was
included as an appendix to the College’s Technology Master Plan. (2.94)

HMBL has a microfilm reader/printer upgraded in 2005. It also has two multimedia podiums
(one permanently stationed in the Library Classroom and a portable one to be used at various
locations in the library). HMBL also lends audio-visual equipment to instructors.

At HMBL, technical assistance on computer hardware and software is mainly provided by
the Instructional Assistant/Information Technology at the ―Computer Help Desk,‖ but all
librarians also provide technical assistance as part of reference services. Assistance using the
microfilm reader/printer and other equipment is provided by all librarians and staff. To
maintain and upgrade the computers and software, the Systems Librarian works as the
libraries’ primary liaison with the Information Technology Department. The Instructional
Assistant/Information Technology in HMBL performs his duties under the guidance of the
Systems Librarian and Information Technology Department. Audio-visual equipment is
maintained by the Instructional Assistant/Information Technology under the guidance of the
Systems Librarian.

Self Evaluation

The libraries have qualified librarians who continue their education; staff is qualified and
gets training as needed to handle changes in software, systems or procedures. Both libraries
select and maintain educational equipment and materials well suited to support student
learning and faculty teaching in furtherance of the college mission.

However, in a 2006 Library Survey, 43.5% of main campus faculty and 36.7% of South Gate
Educational Center faculty said that the library collection does not have sufficient titles in
their discipline, a judgment with which librarians concur. (2.95) This is principally because
prior to 2004, funds for books were severely limited (with the exception of the school year
2001-2002 when the libraries received $100,000).




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Regarding the audio-visual collection, we started acquiring DVDs in 2005. This new media
format is intended to supplement our small and aging videocassette collection. The
circulation of DVDs by students has been steady and many faculty members are
recommending DVD titles for their classes.

Though we recognize the problem of ever-increasing prices for textbooks, as do most college
libraries, it is our practice to purchase only reference works and research-related books. The
libraries keep textbooks on reserve, but rely on faculty donations to maintain the collection.
Each year at Opening Day, the library provides textbook reserve forms for faculty to send
courtesy copies to the library. The libraries also contact individual faculty to obtain more
textbooks to be on reserve. Further, in 2005 the library sought financial support from the
Associated Student Union but without success.

Even though the library had added 45 computers from 2003 -2006, in a Library Survey
conducted in 2006, 32.2% of main campus students said that more computers needed to be
added. (2.96) Therefore, 16 more computers were added in 2007-2008.

To improve access to Internet resources in the library catalog, the Cataloging Librarian has
applied some of her continuing education to cataloging web resources. She has begun to
create MARC records for Internet sites with subject headings.

To improve access and increase the efficiency of cataloging, the book collection was
converted from the Dewey Decimal Classification system to Library of Congress
Classification system in 2007. This major project was funded by the college under the one-
time funding program.

As another one-time funding project, the OCLC Preservation Office digitized the student
newspaper, Campus News. Issues from 1945 through 1999 will be searchable online when
the ContentDM server is set up by the Information Technology Department and the database
is made available through the library website. In the process of digitization, the student
newspaper was filmed and three sets of microfilms were produced: a service copy for
circulation, an archival copy for preservation and a print master for future reproduction. The
issues from 2000 to present will be digitized by ELAC in the future and subsequently added
to the database.

Including the above two projects, the libraries developed proposals for 16 other projects and
applied for one-time funding offered by the college during 2005-2007. Of the 16 proposals,
14 were approved and the following 12 projects were completed. Two projects were not
completed because a contractor failed to complete them. (2.97)

 1.    Information Competency pilot project (2005-2006)
 2.    Modernization of Library Classroom (2005-2006)
 3.    Conversion of book numbering system to standard academic scheme (2005-2006)
 4.    Increasing and enhancing computer access for students (2005-2006)
 5.    Campus News digitization project (2005-2006)
 6.    South Gate Educational Center Library computer purchase (2005-2006)

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 7.    Reconfiguration of South Gate Educational Center Library computer layout (2005-
       2006)
 8.    Book collection inventory and weeding project (2006-2007)
 9.    Library security gate for the 2nd floor (2006-2007)
10.    Installation of multifunction printer (2006-2007)
11.    Modernization of Library Conference Room (2006-2007)
12.    Upgrading of student computers & software (2006-2007)

Improvements have been effected in all service areas since 2003; most notable were the
updated and expanded book (print and electronic) and audio-visual collections, and electronic
databases. (2.79, 2.98, 2.80)

For the year 2002-2003, the book budget for both libraries was merely $26,100, and in 2003-
2004, the budget was reduced to $18,013 for a college of more than 25,000 students. To
supplement the limited book budget given by the college, the library decided to seek a grant
opportunity from an outside entity, applied for a book grant and received $50,000 from the
Ahmanson Foundation in 2004. The announcement of the $50,000 Ahmanson Foundation
book grant to all faculty became the turning point for the college to recognize the need for an
increased book budget. As a result, the college increased the book budget for the subsequent
years. The college also increased the budget for electronic databases. Supplemented by TTIP
funds, the number of electronic databases that the libraries were able to offer to students and
faculty dramatically increased since 2003.

Based on the initial success of faculty input for book suggestions when the Ahmanson
Foundation book grant was announced, we now distribute a portion of the book budget by
discipline/department to entice department chairs and faculty to provide more suggestions for
books to support their courses. The distribution of book budget by discipline/department
achieved a moderate success when it was first implemented last year and a greater success is
expected this year.

In 2003, the libraries had just begun to use Baker & Taylor’s online ordering database, B&T
Link Online. Since then we have fully utilized TS3, vendor-supplied book order systems, and
now maintain workbooks to record and backup the libraries’ orders.

With the growth of library resources in various formats, the number of computers for
students grew dramatically. At HMBL, the number of computers has grown from 48 to 111
since 2003. Printing capabilities were significantly improved through the installation of the
GoPrint stations. Another enhancement at HMBL is a color laser printer to complement the
existing black and white printers. HMBL also purchased two multimedia podiums for
instruction; one stationed in the Library Classroom and another portable one to be used in
various locations such as the Library Conference Room.

At HMBL, a new microfilm reader/printer was purchased in 2005 with enhanced capabilities
to view and print microfilms. New 3M book security detection systems and
sensitizer/desensitizer machines were also purchased for both HMBL and SGECL.



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To provide enhanced access to library resources and services, new ADA §508 compliant
websites were posted for HMBL and SGECL. The content of the websites are updated
frequently. (2.87)

The Systems Librarian has researched a virtual reference service based on instant messaging
and the libraries are piloting E-Reference using the instant messaging system, Meebo.

Hiring a Library Technician for acquisitions enabled the Acquisitions Librarian to focus
more on review and selection of books while the technician improved the efficiency of
processes such as ordering, receiving, invoice payment and communication with the vendors.

Hiring an Instructional Assistant/Information Technology for HMBL in the fall of 2007
increased the availability and quality of technical assistance to troubleshoot computer
problems or to assist students with wireless access, Microsoft Office, and other document
creation programs. Students have been very appreciative of the new ―Computer Help Desk.‖

In fall 2008, off-campus access to our subscription databases was significantly improved
with the installation of a proxy server for user authentication. ELAC students no longer have
to enter a different username and password for each database, but simply enter their student
ID number and PIN to access all databases off-campus. (2.99)

Planning Agenda

The Helen Miller Bailey and South Gate Educational Center Libraries meet this standard.

                                Learning Assistance Center

Mission Statement: The Learning Assistance Center is designed to assist all students in
their pursuit of excellence at East Los Angeles College. Recognizing the unique potential of
each individual, the Learning Assistance Center promotes a student-centered learning
environment and provides each student with the academic support he or she needs to become
an independent, responsible learner. (2.100)

Descriptive Summary

All Learning Assistance Center services focus on assisting students to become self-regulated
and responsible for their own learning. The central activity is peer tutoring in various forms:
one-to-one, small group, class-specific workshops, by appointment and walk-in. Students are
assisted with basic skills, study and test taking skills, and support in reading, writing,
mathematics, natural and social science, and other college-level courses. Supplemental
tutoring and study groups are also available. The Computer Assisted Instruction Lab provides
services that complement tutoring or serve as an alternative learning mode. Sixty-five
computer stations and thirty tutoring stations are available for individual and class-specific
work. Word processing, web-based instructional materials recommended by faculty, use of
the Internet for academic purposes, access to the Academic Computing Environment (ACE)
of our college, anatomy models, videos, CD’s and printing capability are all available for

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ELAC students. The staff is comprised of the Director who is certificated, a classified
Instructional Aide, and thirty tutors (unclassified staff) (2.101).

To support the college’s mission as well as student learning and achievement, the Learning
Assistance Center provides ample training materials for tutors and staff, and ample
instructional support materials for faculty and students.

Since 2003, a Policies and Procedures Manual has been handed to all new and continuing
tutors at the beginning of their employment. This Manual contains all rules and regulations
for employees of the Learning Assistance Center, and it is updated yearly to include the latest
materials on tutoring techniques or on instructional software programs, protocol, and campus
and District policies and procedures. (2.103) This Manual was developed as a result of
discussions held at bi-monthly tutor-training meetings, discussions held with Learning Center
Directors throughout the District, and discussions held with UCLA during its Fund for the
Improvement of Postsecondary Education project of 2001-2004.

The materials available for tutors and tutees are the following: textbooks for tutor use,
whiteboards, markers, and erasers for tutoring stations, and printed materials on college study
skills and success. Samples of basic skills and study skills handouts can be viewed in the
evidence. (2.103-2.101) Additional evidence provides a sample of college-level handouts for
students in General Education classes. (2.112-2.117)

In the Computer Assisted Instruction Lab, discipline-specific software, videos, and CDs
recommended by faculty and software programs for general academic use are available for
tutors, students, and faculty as needed or requested (2.118, 2.119). The CAI Lab is equipped
with the latest computers, scanners, printers, video monitors and digital projectors to insure
access to state-of-the-art software and Internet-based instructional materials. (2.120, 2.121)
For Life Science students, anatomy and physiology models are available for study and review
inside the Learning Center (2.122). Finally, the Front Desk displays a variety of printed
materials, including recommended websites for study skills and homework help.

Self Evaluation

At bimonthly tutor training and staff meetings, training materials are discussed and analyzed
for their relevance and use by faculty and students (2.123) Based on these discussions, the
LAC Director consults with faculty members who have recommended the materials and
inquires as to their current use. Materials are weeded as faculty cease to use them or replace
them with updated information.
In addition to faculty-recommended supplementary materials, the Learning Center also
submits semester or yearly requests for current textbooks to faculty who teach courses in
high demand for tutoring assistance, such as Accounting and Economics (2.124). LAC tutors
use these textbooks to assist students and prepare for their tutoring sessions. To insure that
tutoring supplies last throughout the year, the Center monitors the use of its whiteboards and
markers to project yearly depletion and subsequent purchasing needs (2.125).



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In addition to requesting current textbooks, the LAC sends invitations to faculty each
semester requesting that they recommend discipline specific software that may be housed in
the Center for student use (2.126). The Learning Center also maintains ongoing
communication with the IT Department to update software programs and keep its equipment
in working condition (2.127).
Each semester, the Center uses its student, peer tutor, and faculty evaluations to determine
additional materials needed. The Exit Evaluation and Peer Evaluation for tutors include
questions regarding ideas for improvement of Center services and inclusion of current
materials. (2.128-2.132) Furthermore, ongoing communication with the Life Science
Department is maintained regarding frequency of student use of the anatomy models.
Moreover, the Center conducts a yearly review of printed materials and recommended
websites to determine their currency and relevance and to replace any outdated materials.
Since 2003, the Learning Assistance Center has extended its programs and services through
grant writing projects and collaborations with several departments and units. In 2005, the
LAC moved to the Technology Building (E7), doubling the physical space for tutoring and
computer assisted instruction. The Center went from servicing 6229 students in 2005-2006
to servicing 7225 students in 2007-08, an increase of 14% (2.133). Although the total hours
students spend at the Learning Center fluctuate semester to semester, the total number of
students has increased steadily during the aforementioned two-year period.
To expand tutoring services outside the main campus, the Learning Center Director
collaborated with the Dean of the South Gate Educational Center in 2006 on a One-Time
Assistance grant to implement tutoring services in several subjects at the SGEC. Those
tutoring services are now operational.
Then in 2007, through a One-Time Assistance grant of $80,254 the LAC completely replaced
and augmented its computers and peripheral equipment to facilitate the use of the college’s
powerful Academic Computing Environment (ACE) and other high powered programs.
(2.134, 2.135) Prior to replacing its entire equipment, the LAC collaborated with the Earth
Science department to implement a pilot program with UC Santa Barbara involving distance
learning for earth science students. Furthermore, in 2007, the Learning Center collaborated
on a One-Time Assistance grant with the same department to implement the use of
AVATAR software for earth science students. Finally, the Learning Center has expanded its
computer assisted instruction services to include PLATO for life science and chemistry
students (2007) (2.136).

Planning Agenda

The Learning Assistance Center meets this standard.

II.C.1.b. The institution provides ongoing instruction for users of library and other
learning support services so that students are able to develop skills in information
competency.

                                         Library


Standard II                                                                       Page 157
Descriptive Summary

The ELAC libraries teach students information-competency skills primarily through five
formats: 1) Reference desk services, 2) Library orientation classes, 3) Library workshops, 4)
Library Science courses and (5) Web-based research guides and other aids. All librarians
participate in teaching information-competency skills at the reference desk, but the
instruction librarian conducts the majority of our orientations and workshops. Full-time or
part-time librarians teach the Library Science courses.

Reference Desk Services. The reference desk is considered to be the main contact with
students. Whenever a student’s time permits it, librarians provide individualized instruction
to teach information-competency skills from simply finding books using the library catalogs
to finding information using a variety of print or electronic sources. The instruction is
customized according to the research needs, learning ability and academic level of each
student. (2.137)

Library Orientations. Based on information received from instructors, librarians conduct
library orientation classes customized to each class and students’ research topics. These
classes are conducted in the Library Classroom or wherever at least a networked computer
with a projector is available. (2.138) Typically, librarians create research handouts for
students to use for research assignments. In every orientation, students are encouraged to ask
questions and librarians seek ways to interact with them in order to stimulate and promote
active learning of information-competency skills. The number of library orientations has
grown steadily since 2003 and we expect that trend to continue, especially as librarians
educate more instructors about the importance of developing students’ information
competency and research skills. (2.139)

Library Workshops. In the spring of 2007, the ELAC libraries developed a pilot
information-competency program. The pilot program launched workshops on six specific
information-competency skill areas to allow students to devote more time to each and to give
them more hands-on practice. The six areas are:

a)   Get Started With Research
b)   Online Library Catalogs
c)   Journal, Magazine & Newspaper Articles
d)   Cite Your Sources & Avoid Plagiarism
e)   Credible Sources On The Web
f)   Critical Thinking About Information

Student learning outcomes (SLOs) have been created and assessments were conducted two
consecutive years in 2007 and 2008. SLOs were measured with rubrics for each workshop,
some of which included pre- and post-tests. (2.140, 2.141)

While these workshops started as a pilot project in the spring of 2007, they have already
become very popular as a result of the vigorous outreach efforts of our Long-term Substitute
Librarian for instruction. This librarian met with the Student Success Committee and

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Academic Senate, visited department meetings, and published announcements to all faculty
members. Many faculty members required their students to take one or more workshops as a
course assignment or for extra credit. In the second year of the project, HMBL offered 49%
more sessions and 60% more students attended the workshops than in spring 2007. (2.142)

SGECL workshop attendance statistics, however, have shown declining numbers since the
pilot was launched in the spring of 2007. Initially, there were 400 attendees, but the number
dropped to 166 students in the fall semester. After the initial buy-in from faculty who made
the workshop attendance mandatory, they have chosen only to recommend attendance.
Without the incentives of extra credit or mandated assignment, fewer students voluntarily
take advantage of the information-competency workshops. (2.143)

Library Science Courses (1 unit credit). HMBL offers two Library Science courses:
Library Science 101 (Library Research Methods, 1 unit, General Education Credit, and UC
& CSU transferable, online and face-to-face sections) and Library Science 102 (Internet
Research Methods, 1 unit, CSU transferable, online only) to teach information-competency
skills. SGECL offers the Library Science 101 course (face-to-face) in the fall semesters only.
Both of these courses are offered as short-term classes: Library Science 101 as 10 weeks and
Library Science 102 as 8 weeks. (2.14)

Library Science 101 teaches information-competency skills comprehensively and in-depth
with weekly assignments, mid-term and final exams. Students learn basic concepts ranging
from the types and organization of libraries to effective research strategies. They also learn
how to identify plagiarism, how to avoid it by properly citing their sources, and positive
reasons to avoid plagiarism.

Library Science 102 teaches information-competency skills using Internet resources. In
addition to finding information on the Internet, it teaches students how to evaluate the
accuracy, authority and currency of the Internet information and how to use it critically for
research.

The contents of these two Library Science courses have been continually updated to reflect
new resources. Both courses have embedded questions or exercises to assess SLOs and new
SLOs are being created or older ones are being amended as data analysis indicates. (2.141)

Instructional Publications. In addition to the aforementioned instructional services taught
by the librarians, the library websites have an Online Tutorial, Research Guides and
Handouts to teach information competency and otherwise to assist students with writing
research papers. The Online Tutorial provides self-paced instruction on information
competency and library research skills. The Research Guides are regularly created for
particular subject areas and for specific courses upon faculty request .The library handouts
are also updated or added whenever necessary. (2.123)

Self Evaluation




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The libraries have provided ongoing instruction to teach information-competency skills in
various formats. Reference Desk Service statistics have been recorded since winter
intersession of 2006; the categories are Research, Directional, Telephone and Technical
Assistance. (2.137)

The number of library orientation sessions fluctuates each term with the highest number of
requests coming in fall semesters. Overall, the number of orientation requests has been rising
steadily and we anticipate this trend will continue. (2.139)

Demand for the library workshops has been rising at HMBL. Even though the popularity of
the workshops at SGECL has fallen for reasons described above, the students who attend on
their own initiative benefit from the focused lessons that they learn. (2.142, 2.143)

Enrollment for the online section of the Library Science courses has been stable; however,
the face-to-face section of Library Science 101 has not been filling satisfactorily for the past
three (3) years despite extensive marketing. (2.144) Therefore, the library took another tack
to increase enrollment for the face-to-face section. After consultation with counselors,
starting in the fall of 2007, the date, time and duration of class meetings were adjusted. As a
result of these changes, enrollment at the main campus stabilized. However, further actions
are required at the South Gate Educational Center because in fall semesters of 2006 and
2007, classes had to be cancelled due to low enrollment.

SLO measures were developed and assessments were completed for both Library Science
101 and 102 and for the workshop series. (2.141)

However, the very success of our marketing efforts and quality of instruction now requires
another classroom and adjunct assistance, if that success is to be maintained.

In the spring of 2006, a librarian worked with the Curriculum Committee members to have
the Library Science 101 course approved as a general education elective for an AA degree by
the Curriculum Committee, which is recognition that the information-competency skills
taught through this class are a significant part of our community college students’ education.
(2.1)

In the spring of 2007, the ELAC libraries worked with the SLO Committee and Academic
Senate to include information competency in ELAC’s core competencies for students. (2.36)
Moreover, the two Library Science courses and workshop series have been through a
complete SLO cycle. (2.141)

To promote information competency for students more widely without geographic and time
restrictions, the ELAC libraries launched an Online Tutorial in the fall of 2006. (2.123)

Through library workshops, faculty awareness of information competency has increased,
with many instructors encouraging their students to take the workshops, either on a
mandatory basis or for extra credit. (2.142)


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After relying on long-term substitute librarians for instruction for two years, the library was
able to hire a full-time tenure-track librarian for instruction in the fall of 2008.

Planning Agenda

The Helen Miller Bailey and South Gate Education Center Libraries meet this standard.

                                Learning Assistance Center

Descriptive Summary

To assist students in their development of skills in information competency, the LAC
conducts class orientations and Internet workshops every academic term for various student
populations, including the following: 1) general college courses requiring internet-based
instruction—these workshops are specifically requested by instructors; 2)          special
populations such as EOPS, Outreach and Recruitment, Community Services, DSPS,
Financial Aid—these workshops are requested by program directors and counselors; 3) LAC
workshops for online applications to UC and CSU requested by the University Center; 4)
Online workshops on the FABSA application requested by Financial Aid; 5) LAC tutoring in
basic word processing, Internet and e-mail access on an individual basis.

Self Evaluation

Although many workshops have taken place in the Learning Center in the past three years, no
surveys have been taken of participating students to determine the impact of the these
workshops. There is a need to survey both instructors and students on this ongoing service.

Planning Agenda

To assess the quantitative impact of LAC workshops that promote information competency,
the Learning Center will determine the following: 1) total class orientations and workshops
for the past three years as noted on the Appointment Calendar; 2) The number of repeat class
orientations and workshops requested by particular instructors; 3) total number of
orientations and workshops for special populations for the past three years; 4) the number of
repeat orientations and workshops for special populations for the same time period; 5) Total
number of LAC workshops for online applications to UC and CSU for the past three years as
noted in the Appointment Calendar and at the Transfer Center; and, 6) total number of
FABSA workshops conducted for the past three years.
To assess the qualitative impact of workshops that promote information competency, the
Learning Center will develop evaluation tools for the following:1) class orientations and
workshops; 2)online college application workshops; and, 3)individual tutoring sessions on
word processing, Internet and e-mail access.

II.C.1.c. The institution provides students and personnel responsible for student learning
programs and services adequate access to the library and other learning support services,
regardless of their location or means of delivery.
Standard II                                                                          Page 161
                                           Library

Descriptive Summary

During fall and spring semesters, HMBL is open 67 hours per week for the following hours:
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Friday; 9:00 a.m. –
4:00 p.m. Saturday.

Two weeks prior to final exams, the library operates on extended hours, Monday-Thursday
8:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m. for a total of 6 days per semester, and three Sundays from 10:00 a.m.-
5:00 p.m.

SGECL is open 47.5 hours per week for the following hours: 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Monday
through Thursday; 9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Friday.

During the summer and winter intersessions, HMBL is open 56 hours per week: 8:00 a.m. –
8:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Friday; SGECL operates 30
hours per week: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday and Wednesday; 11:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday. (2.146)

Full services are provided throughout the hours that the libraries are open. All computers and
equipment are available at the time the doors open and staff is ready to help students.
Disabled students can use an ADA-compliant computer with assistive software as well as a
scanner and printer at both libraries.

To provide effective access to library resources and services regardless of location 24/7, the
ELAC libraries maintain websites through which students can access the book catalogs and
all of our subscription databases. As mentioned above in II.C.1.a, the addition of electronic
books, especially reference works, has freed students from some of the more persistent
constraints of brick and mortar libraries. Access to the electronic databases has become much
easier since the installation of the proxy server in fall 2008. The websites also contain self-
guided instruction such as the Online Tutorial, Research Guides, and Library Handouts on
citing sources and other research skills. Information about library operations, policies, and
personnel are also posted online. (2.123)

To serve distance education students and those who cannot come to the library, the librarians
also provide telephone reference services during all hours that the libraries are open. In fall
2008, HMBL began to pilot an E-reference service using the instant messaging system,
Meebo.

To provide access to online resources anywhere in the building, HMBL provides wireless
access. To aid students using this new service, an instruction handout is available. (2.147)

The videocassettes are being closed-captioned for the hearing impaired through the DSP&S
Department.


Standard II                                                                          Page 162
Self Evaluation

ELAC libraries’ hours are the most extensive of all the libraries in the Los Angeles
Community College District. Still, in the 2006 Library Survey, 62.4% of students at the main
campus and 55.6% at South Gate Educational Center said that the library hours did not
entirely meet their needs. (2.96) Additional funds for staff would allow for longer hours,
including perhaps open on Sundays.

Regarding the usage of the library’s electronic databases, 43.7% of the main campus students
and 22.5% of the South Gate Educational Center students said that they have never used
these databases. (2.96)

The rollout of E-Reference service through Meebo in the fall of 2008 demonstrates the
libraries’ continuing efforts to expand services to students wherever they may be located.

Library hours have been increased since 2004 and HMBL has begun to offer E-reference
service. The number of electronic databases has increased significantly since 2003. (2.98)
New ADA §508 compliant websites were created for both libraries, including an Online
Tutorial and other research aids. In addition, HMBL was a pilot site for the deployment of
wireless access on campus and provides wireless access to library resources from anywhere
in the building. (2.147)

Planning Agenda

The Helen Miller Bailey and South Gate Education Center Libraries meet this standard.

                               Learning Assistance Center

Descriptive Summary

To ensure adequate access to its services, the LAC has maintained day and evening hours of
operation since 1991. For the past three years, the hours of operation have been the
following: Monday through Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.; Friday from 9:00 a.m. to
1:00 p.m.; and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Both tutoring and computer assisted
instruction are available during these hours (2.148). To expand access and availability, the
Learning Center implemented Supplemental Instruction services in 1997 and has continued
them to this day.

Self Evaluation

Hours of service are expanded as needed. For example, beginning fall 2007, the Learning
Center increased its hours of operation to accommodate the surge in student attendance and
use due to the PLATO software for life science and chemistry students. In summer 2007, the
Learning Center tripled its attendance (from 1,300 students in Session I to 3,300 students in
Session II) due to the new service for life science and chemistry students. During fall 2008


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semester, the Center is open from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday, from
9:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 on Friday, and 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday.

Planning Agenda

The Learning Assistance Center meets this standard.

II.C.1.d. The institution provides effective maintenance and security for its library and
other learning support services.

                                          Library

Descriptive Summary

HMBL has floor space of 36,800 square feet and provides 65 tables, 125 study carrels, and
30 study rooms for a total of 547 seats. There are 21 computers in the library, 90 computers
in an open lab environment, 2 black and white and 1 color printer, 1 scanner and 4 copiers for
student use. There are 15 computers and 6 printers for the librarians and staff.

SGECL has a space of 845 square feet and provides 2 study tables with seats for 16 students,
10 computers, 1 printer, 1 scanner and 1 copier for student use. Staff members have two
computers and one printer.

The student copiers are leased and the company’s technicians provide maintenance service
whenever staff members report a problem. The library was able to receive personalized
service and maintenance for the copiers throughout the past years due to a strong business
relationship with this company.

HMBL has a multifunction printer for staff and is maintained by contract with the
manufacturer, Canon.

A plan is underway to renovate HMBL and add 11,000 square feet. The college received
$10,086,000 from the California State government for the renovation of the Helen Miller
Bailey Library. The architectural design of the library has been completed and the renovation
is scheduled to start in June of 2009 if the college finds matching funds. During the
renovation, the library will be relocated to a temporary facility on campus. The design of the
library temporary facility is completed and the college is waiting for an approval from the
Division of the State Architect (DSA).

A new SGECL will be created when the college moves the South Gate Educational Center to
a new site in a few years. The library’s facilities are expected to be much improved.

Staff members monitor use of each library’s facilities during open hours to prevent misuse of
their resources. Additional security is readily available from the Campus Police (currently
provided by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department). Custodial staff from Plant


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Facilities provides building upkeep. The Plant Facilities Department provides electrical and
other types of physical maintenance.

The book collections are maintained by staff who inspect returned books for wear and tear
and by librarians who select books for discarding, replacement, repair or archiving.

All library books and periodicals have security strips to prevent theft. Circulation staff
members sensitize/desensitize returned or borrowed books. The book security detection
systems at public doorways are maintained through an annual maintenance service contract
with the 3M Company. As part of regular maintenance, the library staff cleans the filters in
the systems every month. When the security system detects a sensitized strip, an alarm goes
off. In addition, at HMBL, a voice message is activated.

A new microfilm reader/printer was purchased in 2005 with enhanced viewing and printing
capabilities. Service for the microfilm reader/printer is also provided through an annual
maintenance service contract.

The installation, upgrades and maintenance of the computers, hardware and software are
provided by the Instructional Assistant/Information Technology for HMBL and by the
Assistant Computer Network Specialist for SGECL in consultation with the Information
Technology Department. All library computers are locked to the tables for security.

Self Evaluation

The Helen Miller Bailey and South Gate Education Center Libraries enforce the building and
equipment use policy that aims to promote an environment conducive to research and study
while maintaining the facilities and resources for continued use. The book security detection
systems at both libraries protect books from theft. The book security detection systems and
the sensitizer/desensitizer machines for books at both libraries were purchased within the last
5 years and the equipment has been working well.

All copiers are well maintained. The microfilm reader/printer was purchased within the last 5
years and has not required repair. The computer hardware and software are well maintained
by the Instructional Assistant/Information Technology in consultation with the Systems
Librarian and Information Technology Department.

For proper maintenance of the book collection, the librarians have been weeding the books as
time permits. However, the current level of librarian staffing does not allow sufficient time to
inventory and weed the entire book collection. The library needs more help from adjunct
librarians and faculty for weeding.

Proper upkeep of the library facility has been a challenge due to a shortage of custodial staff.
However, the custodial supervisor has been responsive when problems were reported and has
assigned his staff to work overtime for projects such as dusting books, removing carpet
stains, etc.


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Essential equipment such as the book security detection systems, sensitizer/desensitizer
machines, recently purchased microfilm reader/printer and the multifunction printer for staff
has been working well without problems as the items of equipment were purchased within
the last 5 years.

Hiring of the Instructional Assistant/Information Technology in the fall of 2007 for HMBL
improved the on-site maintenance of the computers, installation and upgrades of software,
and troubleshooting of computer problems. Since hiring the Instructional Assistant/
Information Technology, librarians and staff are able to concentrate more on their regular
duties instead of providing technical assistance to students or troubleshooting computer
problems.

Planning Agenda

The Helen Miller Bailey and South Gate Education Center Libraries meet this standard.

                                Learning Assistance Center

Descriptive Summary

To insure that it provides effective maintenance of computers, software and other equipment,
the Learning Center works closely with the IT Department in all matters related to the
upkeep and upgrade of its hardware and software. In addition, the campus provides electronic
security for the LAC and all its corresponding rooms within E7-210 (2.150).
To determine the effective maintenance and upgrade of other learning support materials, the
LAC conducts ongoing reviews of its print materials to determine their relevance and
currency and continuously requests current textbooks from faculty that can be used by the
tutors.

Self Evaluation

To insure the effective maintenance and security of its support services, the LAC has
continuous communication with the following: 1) the IT Department regarding the
maintenance and upgrade of equipment; 2) the faculty regarding recommended software;
and, 3) the tutors regarding print materials and textbooks in use.

Planning Agenda

The Learning Assistance Center meets this standard.

II.C.1.e. When the institution relies on or collaborates with other institutions or other
sources for library and other learning support services for its instructional programs, it
documents that formal agreements exist and that such resources and services are adequate
for the institution’s intended purposes, are easily accessible, and utilized. The performance
of these services is evaluated on a regular basis. The institution takes responsibility for and


Standard II                                                                          Page 166
assures the reliability of all services provided either directly or through contractual
arrangement.

                                         Library

Descriptive Summary

The ELAC libraries purchase electronic databases with substantial discounts through the
Community College League of California Libraries Consortium. (2.98) In the fall of 2006,
the ELAC libraries spearheaded a Los Angeles Community College District-wide purchase
of the Gale Virtual Reference Library, which resulted in each college receiving a deep
discount on a large number of online reference works. Using the model established with the
Los Angeles Community College District, the Gale Company was able to negotiate a similar
offer with the California Community College Libraries Consortium and thereby extended the
deal to all California community colleges.

The ELAC libraries collaborate with their sister colleges in the Los Angeles Community
College District (LACCD) by sharing nearly 1,000,000 volumes of books through intra-
library loan. Books can be shipped to the requesting library within two to three days by
District courier, and students check out and return the material at their home college. The
LACCD intra-library loan policy is evaluated periodically to improve services. (2.85)

The ELAC libraries also have a reciprocal agreement with the CSULA Library, where ELAC
students can borrow materials with their proof of ELAC registration. This agreement allows
ELAC students to have access to the much richer collection of materials in a 4-year
university. The agreement is reviewed and updated whenever there are changes in loan
policy, loan periods, or contact information. (2.86)

HMBL has collaborated with local public libraries, especially the East Los Angeles Public
Library of the Los Angeles County Public Library System. In spring 2008, the two libraries
collaborated on a Big Read program. SGECL also partnered with the Leland Weaver Public
Library of the Los Angeles County Public Library System in South Gate for a similar joint
program (2.151) The libraries receive announcements of the programs or special events
offered by the local public libraries and distribute the information to students.

The libraries collaborate with all college departments and centers. One of the notable
collaborations is with the Child Development Center which started in summer of 2008. One
of the librarians now works with the Center staff for collection development of Children’s
books and promotes the use of the children’s books at our library and the Center. (2.152)

Self Evaluation

The cost savings for electronic database subscriptions through the California Community
College Libraries Consortium is becoming increasingly valuable as more California
community college libraries buy databases through the Consortium.


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The intra-library loan of materials from other Los Angeles Community College District
libraries has helped students to access nearly 10 times more books than they can at ELAC
alone. Our students have made good use of the service for the past 5 years. (2.153) Though
the librarians frequently refer students to the CSULA Library, statistics showing ELAC
students’ borrowing of materials from the CSULA library or database usage are not
available.

Collaboration with local public libraries, especially the libraries in the Los Angeles County
Public Library system, has been very successful.

The ELAC libraries spearheaded the LACCD group purchase of the Gale Virtual Reference
Library (electronic books for reference works), which benefitted all California community
colleges.

Collaboration with the East Los Angeles Public Library on the Big Read program increased
the college’s visibility because it included lectures by ELAC faculty given to patrons of the
public library. (2.151)

Planning Agenda

The Helen Miller Bailey and South Gate Education Center Libraries meet this standard.

                               Learning Assistance Center

The Learning Assistance Center does not have any contractual agreements with outside
institutions.

II.C.2. The institution evaluates library and other learning support services to assure their
adequacy in meeting identified student needs. Self Evaluation of these services provides
evidence that they contribute to the achievement of student learning outcomes. The
institution uses the results of these Self Evaluations as the basis for improvement.

                                          Library

Descriptive Summary

The ELAC libraries have prepared a program review every 3 years. Through the program
review process, the libraries document their services, programs and resources. Responses to
the Program Review Questionnaire are evaluated by a Program Review Validation
Committee. This committee is composed of administrators and faculty who determine
whether the library has met the needs of students and faculty and supports the curriculum
adequately. Recognitions and recommendations are discussed with the Library Chair who
uses them to improve services and resources. (2.154)

The libraries set annual goals and submit them to the supervising Dean every year. To set the
annual goals, the Library Chair receives input from the librarians and staff. Librarians and

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staff also assess their achievement of the goals when the annual goals are discussed for the
new year. (2.155)

The libraries conducted faculty and student surveys in 2006 to evaluate the perceived quality
and breadth of library services and resources and to solicit feedback for improvement. The
survey results revealed faculty and student experiences about how well the libraries had
performed various services as well as their assessments of the resources. (2.95, 2.96)

Informal comments received from students and faculty in daily interactions is used to find
ways to improve services and resources.

The library book collection is evaluated through collection analysis. (2.84) Library science
courses and workshops are evaluated through SLO assessments. (2.141)

HMBL holds Librarians’ and Staff meetings several times a semester. During the meetings,
the librarians and staff discuss various ways to improve services or add new services. (2.156)

The library also has a suggestion box to receive written suggestions from library users. The
suggestions are reviewed by the Library Chair and strategies to improve services or upgrade
resources are planned in consultation with the library staff.

Self Evaluation

The Library Program Review process is the most comprehensive tool to evaluate and
improve its services and resources. (2.154)

Student and faculty library surveys conducted in 2006 were useful tools to evaluate the
library's services, collections and resources. Overall, 88.8% of responding students were
―very satisfied‖ or ―somewhat satisfied‖ with the Helen Miller Bailey Library and 92% of the
responding students reported that they were ―very satisfied‖ or ―somewhat satisfied‖ with the
South Gate Educational Center Library. (2.95, 2.96)

The ELAC libraries try to improve services by analyzing results for each service area. The
Library Science courses and library workshops are constantly evaluated for improvement in
terms of content and pedagogy, based on the assessments to measure the SLOs.

Comments received through daily interactions at the reference and circulation desks provide
more immediate opportunities to identify areas to improve services and library resources.
Written suggestions from library users have also been helpful in identifying areas needing
improvement.

The Sirsi/Dynix Integrated Library System installed in summer 2005 enabled the library to
conduct meaningful collection analyses for the first time. (2.84) The library developed SLOs
for its workshop series, Library Science 101, and Library Science102, and submitted the
annual SLO report to the college in 2007 and 2008. (2.141)


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In the fall of 2006, the library conducted a Library Survey for faculty and students to
evaluate and recommend improvements in library resources and services. (2.157)

Planning Agenda

The Helen Miller Bailey and South Gate Education Center Libraries meet this standard.

                                Learning Assistance Center

Descriptive Summary

The Learning Assistance Center participates in various activities that evaluate its adequacy in
meeting identified student needs. In 2006, the LAC participated in Program Review and
received various commendations for its contributions to student success, as well as
recommendations for the development of online tutoring services and Student Learning
Outcomes. Commendations focused on the Center’s flexible tutoring modes, extensive
training, supervision, and evaluation of tutors, and substantive advertisement and publicity of
its programs and services. Recommendations centered on expanding tutoring services at the
South Gate Educational Center, creating online tutoring services, and developing Student
Learning Outcomes for tutors and students who use the LAC (2.158).

Aside from its periodic participation in Program Review, the Learning Assistance Center has
internal evaluation measures that assist in the maintenance and development of academic
support services that promote student success. In-house evaluation procedures include
semester evaluations by students, faculty, and peer tutors to denote the quality and quantity
of services and to suggest improvements in these areas. In addition, faculty, students, and
tutors participate in informal evaluation activities of LAC services on a daily basis through
observation, participation at bi-monthly tutor training meetings, and oral feedback as needed.

Self Evaluation

As previously stated, the LAC Program Review of 2006 identified areas of expansion and
improvement and created timelines for action plans. The Program Review was based on
attendance (FTE), total services, semester evaluations, and daily student feedback. In
response to the Learning Center’s self-evaluation, the Program Review Committee issued
commendations and recommendations. To complete its evaluative processes, the Learning
Assistance Center has developed SLOs for tutors and students who use its tutoring and
Computer Assisted Instruction services. This process has begun with the development of an
objective test that measures the tutors’ knowledge of LAC protocol, tutoring methods, and
District policies and procedures (2.159). Additionally, the Learning Center Directors of the
District held a discussion on SLOs during their discipline meeting in April 2007 (2.160). In
spring 2008, the Director developed two SLOs for the LAC’s tutor training program (2.161).
A preliminary study of performance outcomes for students receiving one-to-one tutoring was
initiated in summer 2008, and it has rendered some interesting results. For example, 85% of
students who received tutoring three to six times at the Learning Center earned grades of A,
B, C, or Credit in spring 2008. Further studies need to be conducted with students who

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received tutoring fewer than three times and with students who did not pass or withdrew
from the courses in which they received tutoring. (2.162) In addition, a rubric that measures
the skills acquired through the use of Learning Center services still needs to be developed.

                             Other Learning Support Services

Descriptive Summary

In addition to the Library and the Learning Assistance Center, other instructional labs
provide support services that offer information and learning resources for students who are
currently enrolled in related classes. The laboratories and learning resources are listed below
in alphabetical order:

   Academic Technology Support Lab, located at the South Gate Educational Center
   consists of computers, computers on wheels with projectors, notebook computers,
   scanners, headphones, audio visual. Staff includes an instructional assistant information
   technology, Assistant PC & Network Support Specialist, and program assistants. The lab
   is open Monday/Wednesday from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and Tuesday/Thursday from
   10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Hours during summer
   and winter intersession are dependent on budget.
   Architecture Lab, located in E7-117 provides student support with one instructional
   assistant. The lab is open on Mondays/Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. through 1:00 p.m. and
   again at 2:00 p.m. through 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. through 1:00 p.m. and 2:00
   p.m. through 9:00 p.m. Thursdays from 2:30 p.m. through 6:00 p.m. and Fridays from
   10:30 a.m. through 1:30 p.m. The equipment includes computers, central network station,
   wall screen, 42‖ plotter, printers, file cabinet for 24‖ x 36‖ drawings, overhead projector,
   and software including AutoCAD, 2008 AutoCAD, 3D modeling, SketchUp, Revit, and
   PhotoShop.
   Art Labs consist of several labs including Media Art lab, Audio/Post Production Lab,
   Animation Lab, Camera Room, and Instruction IT Office. Equipment and materials
   include computers and monitors, printers, scanners, digital projectors, media box, dry
   mount press, audio/visual library, video and digital camera, software: Maya, Macramedia
   Flash, Fireworks, Dreamweaver, Net Objects Fusion, Fontographer, Apple Desktop
   Remote, Aftereffects, and Adobe creative suite. The Career/Technical Education (CTE)
   lab operates Monday/Wednesday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:20 p.m.; Tuesday/Thursday
   from7:00 a.m. to 8:20 p.m., and Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The Fine Arts lab
   operates Monday to Thursday from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.; Friday from 7:00 a.m. to
   1:00 p.m., and Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The labs are supervised by faculty
   and classified employees. Student tutors are available.
   Business Administration has four PC computer labs, and one Mac lab located in the E7
   building, rooms 314, 315, 317, 318, and 405. The labs are staffed and serviced by two
   full-time instructional assistants Monday through Saturday. Two labs, E7-317 and 318,
   are open labs serving students from 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Mondays through
   Thursdays, from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Fridays and noon to 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays.
   Only one lab, E7-405, is a Smart classroom used for lectures. Equipment includes
   computers, printers, projectors, smart equipment, and whiteboards. The labs support

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   primarily the Accounting, Computer Science, Business, Marketing, Real Estate, and Law
   courses, both traditional instruction and online.
   Child, Family & Education Labs are located in the E3-106 and G5-109. The hours are
   Tuesday/Thursday from 12:15-1:30 p.m.; Friday 12:30–3:30 p.m.; and some Saturdays
   dependent on student requests and faculty availability. Equipment includes digital
   cameras, computers, computerized whiteboards, laminating machines, and binding
   machines.
   Computer Applications and Office Technologies Department, located in E7-418, has
   one full-time instructional assistant and one full-time instructional assistant for
   technology who oversee the labs, held in various fourth-floor classrooms throughout the
   day. Student tutors are also available as budget permits. Equipment in the smart
   classrooms includes computers, laser and dot matrix printers, DVD player, ceiling-
   mounted projectors, and cameras. The lab is open Monday – Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to
   6:45 p.m.; Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.; and Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
   This lab also supports the department’s online classes, which require specific software
   that is needed for online students.
   Computer Assisted Drafting and Computer Graphics Lab, located in E7-204/E7-201,
   is used by Architecture and Art students. A full-time instructional assistant operates the
   lab.
   Computer Science Instructional Technology Lab located in the E7 building has two
   instructional assistants to operate the lab.
   Disabled Student Programs & Services Lab located in F5-111 provides services to
   eligible students. There hours are Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
   Equipment and material includes High Tech Center Training Unit (HTCTU-Sacramento)
   Braille Note Takers and Displays, Large Print Display software, Screen/Read software,
   speech recognition software. Braille Translation software, close captioning circuit, tactile
   image maker, high speed scanners & software. One full-time instructional assistant staffs
   the lab. Tutoring services are available at this location. Alternative media services are
   provided to students with learning disabilities.
   Electronics Lab is located in E7-302 and is available to students enrolled in Electronics
   120. Lab hours are Monday through Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
   to 10:00 p.m.
   Engineering Computer Lab, located in the E7-101 building is used by engineering
   students. A full-time laboratory technician operates the lab. The lab is open
   Monday/Friday from 11:45 a.m. through 4:00 p.m., Tuesday/Thursday from 8:30 a.m.
   through 2:00 p.m., and Fridays from 12:30 p.m. through 4:00 p.m.
   English as a Second Language Lab (REC 3) includes assessment office and CASAS
   program administration. Equipment includes computers.
   Basic Skills Lab, located in F9-103, is open 53 hours per week from 9:00 a.m. through
   9:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The
   lab includes resource center with computer workstations equipped with PLATO
   Learning, Rosetta Stone, Azar Interactive, Learning 100, Steck-Vaughn GED, Microsoft
   Office and Internet access. It also includes books, audio visual materials. This lab is
   staffed by instructors and student workers.
   Distance Education Support Services offers student support for online classes from the
   distance education coordinator by e-mail or in her office.

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   Faculty Media Center, located in F5-105, is staffed to provide professional development
   training in the latest administrative and educational computer applications.
   Journalism Department has a news room in E7-303 which students use for writing,
   laying out, processing photos, editing and producing the print version of Campus News.
   It will soon also be used for an online version of Campus News. Equipment includes
   computers, cameras, scanner, printers, and digital recorders.
   Media Arts Center, located in the E7-203 was designed to support the Technology in
   Entertainment, Animation and Multimedia Program curriculum.
   Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) offers tutoring,
   software enhanced training, Academic Excellence workshops, professional development,
   and a student study center. Equipment includes computers, scanners, printers, and a
   digital projector. Located in the Learning Center.
   MEnTe Laboratory (Mathematics Enrichment through Technology), located in the
   F5- 107, assists students with math tutorials and computer aided instruction. Hours are
   from Monday through Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. and Fridays from 9:00 a.m. to
   4:00 p.m.
   Model Shop, located in the E7-116, is utilized by art and architecture students for three-
   dimensional representations of their projects.
   Basic Skills Lab, located in F9-103, is open 53 hours per week from 9:00 a.m. – 9 p.m.
   Monday through Thursday and Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The lab includes
   resource center with computer workstations equipped with PLATO Learning, Azar
   Interactive, Learning 100, Microsoft Office and Internet access. It also includes books,
   audio visual materials. This lab is staffed by instructors and student workers.
   Nursing Learning Laboratory, located in the G9-109, is coordinated by a registered
   nurse. This lab provides training materials and tutors. Equipment includes computers,
   video monitors, DVD players and a projector. Rooms are made available for small study
   groups. One instructional assistant coordinates lab activities.
   Photography Labs are located in the E7 building and include 1) Black/white processing
   laboratory B012, 2) and Color processing lab B015, 3) Digital Imaging Lab B010, 4)
   Photo finishing lab B020, 5) Black/white Film B018. This department also has a Studio
   for students to learn portrait and product lighting. Equipment and materials in the labs
   include digital and film cameras, film driers, light tables, enlargers, print driers, an
   automated color film processor, 30 inch color print processors, printers, film scanners,
   computers, and flat bed print scanner. The labs operate when classes are not in session.
   Two instructional assistants operate the lab.
   Respiratory Therapy Lab, located G6-110, is designed to support student learning in
   the respiratory care program. The lab is equipped with adult mechanical ventilators, audio
   visual equipment, medical diagnostic software, artificial test lungs, assortment of
   pulmonary function and hemodynamic monitoring equipment, oxygen monitoring
   devices, computers, and manikins, including advanced life support, trached, infant full
   body, and infant heads.
   South Gate Educational Center offers both Math and English tutorials, as well as
   computer with the common software and the Internet. They offer an open computer lab
   located in room 122 open from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The Math lab is open from
   Monday through Thursday from 1:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. in room 104. The Writing Center


Standard II                                                                        Page 173
   is open Monday through Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and Thursdays from
   9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in room 104.
   Teaching and Learning Center for Faculty and Staff Development in the F5 building
   provides technical support in the use of computerized equipment and software. It serves
   staff in preparation for Microsoft Office User Specialist certification. Hours of operation
   are Monday to Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Equipment and materials include
   computers, poster production, projectors, laptops, boom box, black/white and color
   printers, Internet access.
   Writing Lab, located in F5 second floor, provides one-hour orientation sessions, 30
   minute tutoring sessions, forty-five minute writing workshops, and a twice weekly
   conversation lab. Equipment and materials include computers with Internet access and
   grammar software, a book collection which includes grammar and writer’s handbooks,
   thesaurus, dictionaries, ELS workbooks, classic novels, and visual aid collection. The
   hours of operation are from Monday through Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.,
   Thursday 8:00 a.m. through 6:00 p.m., and Friday/Saturday 8:00 a.m. through 2:00 p.m.

Self Evaluation

These labs operate under the auspices of the responsible department and are evaluated as a
part of the department’s program review.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.




Standard II                                                                         Page 174
                                                Standard III:
                                                   resources



                                           meet elac people
                                           Victor Parra
                                           Assistant Curator,
                                           Vincent Price Art Museum




                                           “   The Vincent Price Art Museum is a
                                               teaching collection. Recently Chicano
                                               Studies students researched pieces from
                                               our pre-Columbian collection and their
                                               research helped to document each piece.
                                               We are finally fulfilling Vincent Price’s
                                               vision of an art collection that informs
                                               the public and inspires ELAC students


                                                                         ”
                                               to learn and experience art.




                   Start at ELAC…
                            Go Anywhere!
Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 9                                                12/8/08 9:16:57 AM
                                   STANDARD III: RESOURCES

                                               Committee
            Richard Guy                                           Daniel Judge
Co-chairs   Director, College Facilities                          Professor, Mathematics
            guyrm@elac.edu                  265-8754              judgedd@elac.edu       415-5364
            Wendy Bass                                     Michael Iwashita
            Professor, C, F, & E S                         Staff, College Information Systems
            Distance Education Coordinator                 iwashimj@elac.edu               267-3712
            basskew@elac.edu                415-8877
            Patricia Combes-Brighton                       Yesenia Jara
            Professor, Architecture                        Student Worker, College Facilities
Members     combespb@elac.edu               415-4145       Jaray@elac.edu                  265-8754
            Ryan Cornner                                   Gonzalo Mendoza
            Associate Dean, Research                       Manager, College Information Systems
            cornnerr@elac.edu               265-8967       mendozg@elac.edu                415-5397
            Erlinda de Ocampo                              Kaneesha Miller
            Manager, Fiscal Office                         Associate Dean, Outreach & Recruitment (former)
            deocamen@elac.edu               265-8738       millerkk@email.laccd.edu        213-8891-2104
            Jeff Hernandez                                 Kirk Olsen
            Professor, Political Science                   Professor, Life Sciences
            hernanj@elac.edu                265-8824       olsenkn@elac.edu                265-8882
            Tom Furukawa                                   Danny Telles
            Associate Vice President, Administrative       Senior Office Assistant, IT Dept.
            Services                                       tellesdk@elac.edu               265-8700
            furukat@elac.edu                415-4148
            Robert Isomoto                                 Robert West
            Vice President, Administrative Services        Chair, Anthropology, Geology & Geography
            isomotorg@elac.edu              415-4110       westrb@elac.edu               260-8115


   The institution effectively uses its human, physical, technology, and financial resources to
   achieve its broad educational purposes, including stated student learning outcomes, and to
   improve institutional effectiveness.

                                       III.A. Human Resources

   The institution employs qualified personnel to support student learning programs and services
   wherever offered and by whatever means delivered, and to improve institutional effectiveness.
   Personnel are treated equitably, are evaluated regularly and systematically, and are provided
   opportunities for professional development. Consistent with its mission, the institution
   demonstrates its commitment to the significant educational role played by persons of diverse
   backgrounds by making positive efforts to encourage such diversity. Human resource
   planning is integrated with institutional planning.


   Standard III                                                                                   177
III.A.1.The institution assures the integrity and quality of its programs and services by
employing personnel who are qualified by appropriate education, training, and experience to
provide and support these programs and services.

Descriptive Summary
Processes for hiring qualified full-time and adjunct faculty, classified staff and administrators are
clearly defined and in place. These structures and processes have been developed in order to
ensure the selection of the most qualified individuals who meet the programmatic and
institutional needs of the college.
The minimum qualifications for classified staff are determined by the Los Angeles Community
College District Personnel Commission. Using the California Merit System, the Personnel
Commission oversees the selection of classified employees, including the creation of job
classifications and minimum qualifications for each classified position. Positions for which a
classification has already been developed are listed on the district website under the Personnel
Commission. The Commission maintains lists of qualified candidates for each of these positions.
Qualifications are determined through an examination process which may include written tests
and/or interviews. When the college makes a request to fill a position, the Personnel Commission
provides the top candidates for the desired classification. These applicants are interviewed at the
college level and final recommendations are forwarded to the President for final approval.
In response to a need for a new position or a change in job classifications, the Vice Presidents’
Council may request that the Personnel Commission conduct a review to determine whether the
position is needed, and, if it is, the qualifications that will be required for the job classification.
The Personnel Commission will conduct a study for the requested position including a survey of
relevant labor markets, job duties and related minimum qualifications. The colleges and
Classified AFT Union collaborate in this process to ensure that job qualifications are
appropriately selected. Upon creation of a job classification, the Personnel Commission becomes
responsible to ensure that there is a list of qualified applicants from which colleges may select.
Hiring criteria for certificated administrative positions are determined by state and local policies.
ELAC uses the state minimum qualifications, which are subject to faculty review and
modification on an ongoing basis by the District Academic Senate. These requirements include
the completion of a Master’s degree or higher and one full year of administrative or managerial
experience. In addition, the College creates its own qualifications that meet the specific needs of
the areas in which each administrator will work. All full-time faculty members meet the
California State minimum qualification for their discipline. Discipline-specific requirements are
defined by the District Discipline Committees representing each discipline taught in the District.
Each of these committees engages in dialog regarding professional qualifications and discipline-
specific needs. In addition, each department, in collaboration with its respective dean, works to
establish desired qualifications that meet the needs of the department and the college.
ELAC determines institutional needs through the joint hires process. The Joint Hires Committee
convenes yearly to determine the need for additional faculty in each department. This committee
is comprised of both faculty and administrators, with the goal of evaluating the needs of each
department requesting additional staffing. Further, hiring interview committees are composed of
representatives from faculty and administration. This assures that applicants’ expertise in the

Standard III                                                                                      178
subject matter and understanding of the college’s administration and operation are fully reviewed
during the interview process.
The process integrates quantitative data representing student demand for departmental offerings
and qualitative justification for additional staffing presented by the department in its proposal.
The Joint Hires Committee makes recommendations in the format of a ranking system indicating
the positions that need to be filled. The Academic Senate reviews the hiring priority list. To help
in its review, the Senate has asked the co-chairs of the Joint Hires Committee to attach brief
explanations regarding the priority placement on the hiring list. Members of the Joint Hires,
especially the co-chairs, are also urged to attend the Senate meetings when the priority list is
discussed. The Senate then forwards its approved list to the President, who makes the final
decision regarding the number of faculty to be hired, adhering to the Senate’s recommendations.
Changes, alterations, additions, deletions to the list must be explained to the Senate president in
writing. The procedures followed by this committee are outlined by the District and the college’s
Hiring Policy. (3.1)

Self Evaluation
The college meets this standard by ensuring that all faculty members meet the state minimum
requirements and additional requirements as deemed desirable for programmatic and institutional
needs. Classified staff members are sufficiently experienced as determined by personnel
commission exams and interviews at the college level. However, the restrictions in the hiring
process placed by the Personnel Commission are sometimes problematic and can result in the
inability to hire the most qualified candidate. Lists for some positions are not updated frequently
leading to a forced selection of candidates who the college may have previously interviewed and
decided not to select for a previous position. The creation of the District Human Resources
Council has led to increased input from the colleges in the creation and implementation of hiring
policies and position classifications. However, the college would be better served by establishing
its own Human Resource Office on campus.

Planning Agenda
The responsibilities and purpose of the newly created District Human Resources Council should
be communicated to all college leadership, including the faculty, to ensure their input,
suggestions, and recommendations.
The college leadership will examine the possibility of establishing a Human Resource Office on
campus.
III.A.1.a.Criteria, qualifications, and procedures for selection of personnel are clearly and
publicly stated. Job descriptions are directly related to institutional mission and goals and
accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities, and authority. Criteria for selection of
faculty include knowledge of the subject matter or service to be performed (as determined by
individuals with discipline expertise), effective teaching, scholarly activities, and potential to
contribute to the mission of the institution. Institutional faculty play a significant role in
selection of new faculty. Degrees held by faculty and administrators are from institutions
accredited by recognized U.S. accrediting agencies. Degrees from non-U.S. institutions are
recognized only if equivalence has been established.


Standard III                                                                                  179
The institution ensures that its certificated administrators are qualified through several methods.
The college selects administrators using the District guidelines, which include a minimum
educational requirement of a master’s degree and previous administrative or teaching experience.
The college may add additional requirements that are relevant to the assignment and the needs of
the campus. Applicants are screened by a hiring committee which includes administrative and
faculty representation. The most-qualified candidates are invited to be interviewed by the
committee. Interviews consist of questions relevant to the job duties of the position and may
include a presentation or demonstration of work in that area. The top two to three candidates are
invited to a final interview with the President for selection.
The need for a full-time faculty position is determined through the Joint Hires process described
in the previous section. The criteria for hiring are based on the State minimum qualifications.
Candidates must hold degrees from appropriately accredited institutions. A candidate holding a
degree from a non-U.S. institution must pay for a state-approved evaluation service to verify it. If
a candidate does not meet minimum qualifications, equivalency is evaluated by a district
discipline committee and by the District Academic Senate. Additional qualifications may be
added to the state minimums as deemed necessary by the hiring department and supervising
dean. The additional criteria directly relate to the duties that the new faculty member will be
expected to complete and his or her ability to work on a diverse, multi-cultural campus.
A screening committee comprised of faculty familiar with the applicant’s discipline, an equal
employment opportunity compliance officer, and an administrator conduct an initial meeting to
screen applications. At the beginning of this meeting, the committee reviews the state-supplied
minimum qualifications and any additional criteria established prior to advertising for the
position. Once all criteria are understood and acknowledged, all the applications are reviewed by
every member of the committee and those applicants meeting the entire set of criteria are then
considered for an interview.
This hiring committee is comprised of at least three faculty members, a majority being faculty in
the discipline (or with Academic Senate approval, closely related disciplines), an administrator,
and a non-voting Equal Employment Officer, who assures that hiring procedures are consistently
applied. The committee evaluates the knowledge of the subject matter and effectiveness of
teaching through multiple methods. Academic knowledge is evaluated by reviewing the
applicant’s academic background, degrees earned, and relevant grades. In addition, questions
pertaining to subject expertise may be included in the interview and written samples may be
requested prior to or during the interview process. The committee also ensures that applicants are
adequately prepared to convey their expertise to the ELAC student body and have some
sensitivity to or awareness of effective pedagogy. Letters of recommendation and previous
experience in teaching allow for a cursory review, and a teaching demonstration during the
interview process allows the committee to experience the applicant’s skills first-hand. The
committee may also include questions on teaching methodology and pedagogy to aid in the
evaluation process. In this manner, college peers evaluate effective practices for their own
discipline during the interview process.
The hiring committee recommends two or more of these applicants for further review by the
President of the College and the Vice President of Academic Affairs. The President makes a final
decision for hiring a tenure-track faculty member and forwards the recommendations to the

Standard III                                                                                   180
District. The District conducts a final review to ensure that all qualifications are valid and meet
the State minimum standards.
This process may be followed to hire part-time or adjunct faculty. However, typically a less
extensive process is used. In those cases, the department chair evaluates applicant qualifications
and interviews potential adjunct faculty members for his or her discipline. Verification that the
new hire has met the minimum qualifications is still conducted at the District level. In rare
situations where the applicant is very close to meeting the minimum qualifications, the college
may hire a candidate for one semester under the district-approved provisional equivalency
process if there is a reasonable expectation that the minimum qualification will be met during
that semester.
Jobs are advertised on the District website, the State community college registry, college job
fairs, and discipline-specific print and online publications. All minimum qualifications and
requirements for subject expertise are listed. In addition, a detailed job description, including
position responsibilities and desired skills, is Flisted in order to assist the applicants in
determining whether they fit the needs of the campus. The criteria, qualifications and procedures
for selection of personnel are explained in detail by our faculty hiring policies and procedures.
(3.1) The college President and Academic Senate are responsible for ensuring that these
procedures are followed.
Hiring of classified staff is overseen by the District Personnel Commission, which approves job
descriptions and ensures that notices are publicly available. The college works with the
commission during the hiring process to ensure that local needs are being met and the college is
adhering to all hiring regulations provided by the Personnel Commission.
Self Evaluation

The College has been successful in recruiting and hiring qualified staff, faculty and
administrators. In the Faculty/Staff Survey, 68.5% of all employees stated that the faculty are
qualified by appropriate experience and are selected using subject matter knowledge and
teaching effectiveness as the principal criteria for selection. (3.3) The guidelines aid in the ability
to select the most qualified candidate that matches the campus needs. The ability of faculty
applicants to apply directly to the college has improved the College’s ability to oversee the
faculty hiring process and ensure that selected candidates meet the needs of the campus and
hiring department. This is a departure from previous regulations which stipulated that the
applications be submitted to the District.
The hiring of classified staff is overseen by the Personnel Commission, leaving local needs as a
substandard to the general qualifications. This process limits the college’s ability to select the
best match for the position, as the campus must select from only the three top-ranked candidates
or risk waiting as long as a year for a new list of candidates to be created. While this process
maintains a standard selection process and ensures that general qualifications are met, it also
limits the depth of the candidate pool from which the college can draw.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.


Standard III                                                                                      181
III.A.1.b.The institution assures the effectiveness of its human resources by evaluating all
personnel systematically and at stated intervals. The institution establishes written criteria for
evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned duties and participation in
institutional responsibilities and other activities appropriate to their expertise. Evaluation
processes seek to assess effectiveness of personnel and encourage improvement. Actions taken
following evaluations are formal, timely, and documented.

All college personnel—faculty, administrators and classified staff—are required to be regularly
evaluated to ensure the effectiveness of services provided and to enhance efforts to improve the
quality of instruction and student services. Bargaining agreements and personnel rules delineate
procedures for the evaluation of all personnel and include consistent procedures for follow-up if
evaluations are unsatisfactory. The right to review and to challenge evaluations through
grievance procedures is also described in the bargaining agreements for cases in which personnel
disagree with the results of an evaluation.
Newly hired full-time faculty members are evaluated through a four-year probation process,
normally culminating in tenure at the end of the fourth year. An evaluation committee is formed
for each probationary hire. The committee is comprised of an academic dean, the department
chair, an Academic Senate representative, a tenured faculty member chosen by the evaluee, and a
tenured faculty member chosen by the department. The dean and Academic Senate
representative are non-voting members of the committee. This committee evaluates the
effectiveness of the faculty member based on classroom observations, student evaluations, and
other data that the department has agreed may be included in an evaluation. The committee
meets with the evaluee to review the process and set up time lines and future meeting dates. The
tenure review process is ongoing during the first four years of a new faculty member’s
employment (with the contract providing for a faculty mentor, and constant guidance from the
department chairperson, faculty and administration). The formal evaluation is conducted yearly
during that time. Whenever possible, the composition of the evaluation committee is unchanged
during the entire four-year process. This maintains consistency for the tenure-track faculty
member and allows the committee members to become familiar with the work habits of the
faculty member. The guidelines for achieving tenure are delineated in the faculty contract and
are available to all faculty members.
Evaluations are also conducted for all tenured faculty. At a minimum, they are conducted on a
three-year cycle during the entire employment of the faculty, and alternate between “basic” and
“comprehensive” evaluations. While the basic evaluation is conducted between the faculty
member and department chairperson, the comprehensive evaluation is conducted by a committee
comprised of the department chair, another tenured faculty member chosen by the department, a
tenured faculty member chosen by the evaluee, and the supervising dean, who is non-voting.
There is no requirement for data gathering during the basic evaluation unless requested by the
chair or faculty member being evaluated. Comprehensive evaluations are conducted by the
similar procedures as used in evaluations of probationary faculty. Suggestions for improvement
are made, and progress towards correcting past deficiencies is evaluated. Evaluation criteria
measure teaching effectiveness by requiring students and committee members to evaluate faculty
members on a number of standardized criteria. (3.4)



Standard III                                                                                 182
The overall goal of probationary and tenured faculty evaluations is to aid faculty members in
becoming more effective teachers. The evaluation process allows the faculty member under
review and the college to recognize performance improvements and to increase awareness of
teaching strengths and weaknesses. Noted areas of growth may be addressed through the many
professional development activities offered on campus, faculty dialogue, or other methods as
required.
Faculty evaluations extend beyond the tenure process of the first four years. Adjunct faculty are
also evaluated every three years, with the evaluation provided by the department chairperson or
the chair’s designee. Adjunct faculty are subjected only to basic evaluations, although the
evaluee can request a comprehensive evaluation. Adjunct faculty are expected to receive their
initial evaluation by the end of their second semester of teaching. In the event of an
unsatisfactory evaluation by the chair or designee, an administrative review is initiated.
The office of Academic Affairs maintains records on faculty evaluations and is responsible for
ensuring that all probationary, tenured, and adjunct faculty are regularly evaluated as stipulated
in the faculty contract.
The criteria and timeline for the evaluation of classified staff is determined by the collective
bargaining agreement under which that employee works. The criteria for the evaluation of each
classification are listed on a classified evaluation form, which the employee’s direct supervisor
completes during the evaluation process. Evaluations are conducted on yearly during the
employee’s month of birth. The District uses an automated system for tracking evaluation
compliance. A computer-generated e-mail reminds supervisors that an evaluation must be
completed one month prior to the evaluation deadline. Continuous notifications are sent to the
supervisor until the completed evaluation is logged into the system. The Single Point of Contact
(SPOC) will forward any delinquent evaluations to a higher supervisor to ensure complete
compliance.
Certificated administrators are evaluated in accordance with their collective bargaining
agreements. Satisfactory evaluations are linked to increases along the pay scale. Evaluations are
used as an opportunity to become more effective in all areas in which the administrator is
responsible.
College vice presidents conduct yearly self-evaluations and receive a comprehensive evaluation
that includes faculty, staff and peer feedback every three years.

Self Evaluation
All classified staff members are being evaluated on a regular basis as required by their collective
bargaining agreements. The initiation of the computerized evaluation system has expedited the
manner in which evaluations are conducted, submitted and tracked. Adjunct faculty evaluations
are being systematically tracked by academic affairs. Department chair evaluations include a
compliance review to ensure that each department is up to date in its adjunct evaluations.
Evaluations of tenure track faculty are being used to improve teaching efficacy and student
learning. However, tracking of all full-time faculty evaluations needs to be enhanced.



Standard III                                                                                  183
While a systematic process is in place regarding faculty evaluations, it remains flawed in several
ways. First, the college hires a large number of new faculty, and administrators, who are required
to serve on probationary and comprehensive evaluation committees, are overburdened, often
serving on too many evaluation committees in any one year to be truly effective evaluators.
Secondly, the district-wide AFT Agreement evaluation forms are problematic, awkwardly
addressing key teaching performance areas supported by the state.
Finally, while there is an over-arching process for faculty evaluations, there is no consistent
measure for how those evaluations are actually conducted to ensure that the evaluations are not
simply perfunctory or, at worst, punitive. No formal evaluation training is provided for both
faculty and administrators who serve on these important committees to increase the quality of the
process.
While a formal evaluation of the two vice presidents of Academic Affairs was conducted nearly
a year ago, no process has been established for how the President will convey appropriate
acknowledgments or recommendations based on these evaluations. Indeed, members of the vice
presidents evaluation committees were never informed of the outcome of their recommendations.

Planning Agenda
The college faculty leadership will study the evaluation process for possible flaws and forward
recommendations to the faculty. Recommendations may include trainings and workshops for
potential evaluators.
The Senate leadership will encourage the District Academic Senate to review AFT faculty
evaluation forms and process, formulating recommendations to be considered for the next
contract ratification.
The college president and the Academic Senate will continue to work together to create a means
of addressing the completion of the current vice presidents’ evaluation process. While still
maintaining confidentiality, the college shall adopt a process for providing feedback to the
faculty to ensure integrity and transparency in the vice presidents’ evaluation process.
III.A.1.c. Faculty and others directly responsible for student progress toward achieving stated
student learning outcomes have, as a component of their evaluation, effectiveness in
producing those learning outcomes.
Descriptive Summary

The issue of incorporating SLOs into faculty evaluations was addressed during contract
negotiations in the spring of 2008. On the evaluation form (Appendix C) of the collective
bargaining agreement, (3.6) the following criterion was added under Professional
Responsibilities:

(For All Faculty) Participates in the Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Cycle (for
classroom faculty, includes approved SLOs on class syllabi).



Standard III                                                                                 184
In spring 2006, the district established a Faculty Evaluation Taskforce to bring together members
of the District Academic Senate (DAS) and the AFT College Faculty Guild to provide the
colleges with guidance in fulfilling this standard. The task force was comprised of the DAS
president, two college Senate presidents and two Senate members, three Guild chapter presidents
and its executive secretary, and the Chancellor’s Liaison (currently the Vice Chancellor for
Institutional Effectiveness). After reviewing the collective bargaining agreement and determining
that its provisions did not preclude consideration of student learning outcomes in the evaluation
process, the group issued a report with several recommendations.

The recommendations involve a model for incorporating student learning outcomes in faculty
evaluations by linking them to the long-term professional development goals of individual
faculty. This approach “closes the loop” of institutional improvement by connecting faculty
development activities to college-wide efforts to improve student learning. In the proposed
model, the comprehensive faculty evaluation process would include a self-assessment of the
faculty member’s professional development activities, an assessment of contributions to campus-
wide and departmental SLO assessment and improvement, and a clear statement of future goals
and action plans. These personal goals would support or link to overarching college goals and
objectives.

The suggestions proposed by the taskforce are best practices that may be adopted by colleges at
the local level. Faculty at each college have been encouraged to engage in vigorous dialogue on
ways to institute these recommendations, with discussions overseen by the college Academic
Senates in consultation with the College Faculty Guild chapter.

In addition to the inclusion of SLO participation in faculty evaluations, the college has
established structures to assist departments and units in the development of SLOs and to ensure
an ongoing dialog on student learning. The college has incorporated SLOs into the Program
Review and Program Review Annual Update. (3.7) In this manner, each department or unit is
evaluated based on the development, implementation and use of SLOs as a method to improve
student learning. The inclusion of faculty, staff and administrators in the Program Review
Process allows for a thorough discussion on each department’s progress toward the improvement
of SLOs. This process also allows departments the opportunity to express changes they have
made as a result of SLOs and associated improvements in student learning.
The college also has an open Student Learning Outcome Committee that serves as a venue
through which each faculty member is able to gain insight into the SLO process and discuss his
or her own opinions on the issue. In addition, this committee has established a Student Learning
Outcome Assessment Committee to review all SLOs to ensure that they are measured and that
these measures are reliable and valid. In this manner, each department will be able to receive
quality feedback on their SLOs, assessment measures and the manner in which results can be
used to improve student learning. The establishment of this committee should lead to increased
discussions on the use of SLOs to improve student learning and the manner in which the college
can work to “close the loop” in the assessment process.
Self Evaluation



Standard III                                                                                185
The college has worked to actively engage faculty in developing and using SLOs to improve
student learning. Active faculty engagement has led to the inclusion of SLO participation in the
faculty evaluation process. The use of these added evaluation components will help SLOs
become a greater part of the college culture. The use of SLOs as component of the unit’s
Program Review and Program review Annual Update will also assist in the development of
interdisciplinary discussions on student learning and the effective use of SLOs.
The faculty are directly responsible for the production of SLOs. Each department has its own
SLO development process. Some larger departments with many disciplines, such as English and
Social Sciences, have small committees formed for each course, while other departments have
open meetings where both full and part time faculty are invited to join.

Faculty have been engaged in more than 143 meetings in the last year which have focused on
SLO development and assessment development. Conversations have occurred between faculty
teaching the same course. All-faculty Opening Day programs have focused presentations on
SLOs and student success. There have also been workshops led by the SLO Coordinator and
Facilitators devoted to give examples of SLO development, assessment and use of assessment
results. All of these have driven our faculty to be encouraged to begin dialogue about how
students are learning in their classes. Assessments of SLOs have included embedded exam
questions, common finals, lab practicum, and special projects. These measures have been
developed by faculty in the same discipline or department.

After assessments, faculty members from the same discipline have gathered to discuss
assessment results. These discussions have led to the changing of course textbooks to better align
with student needs, to change the order in which topics are taught to new approaches which lead
to students being better prepared for their future endeavors, to discussion and collaboration
between departments to help student succeed, to increase emphasis on problem areas during
teaching, to provide more examples where students are having learning difficulty, and increase
number of assignments dedicated to these areas where students struggle. As a result of SLO
assessment results the Spanish division has realized its need to have two curricula to better serve
our population: one that caters toward native Spanish speakers and one track for non-native
speakers. This should really allow for better success by both sets of students. Not only have these
plans been made, but for the departments who have discussed assessment results this has led to
an open discussion of how students learn and a sharing of ideas in terms of how students can be
helped to earn more success. Unfortunately only 6% of our courses have gone through a SLO
cycle and implemented plans. There is still some need to get buy-in from all faculty on SLOs,
and their usefulness. This winter a SLO retreat is being planned where each department will have
representation and examples of the progress that has resulted from SLOs will be highlighted.
This should increase faculty awareness of the usefulness of the SLO process and encourage the
faculty to be part of this process.
Faculty from the same department at SLO meetings have been in conversation about different
teaching methodologies. The improvement plans for courses have incorporated the “best”
teaching practices discussed amongst colleagues in the same department. Again, unfortunately,
this has been done by a small percentage of our departments.



Standard III                                                                                  186
Changes in course content have involved increased emphasis and examples related to difficult
areas for students. Also more practice and assignments have been given related to those problem
areas. Also there has been restructuring course content to really emphasize what students are
expected to gain. There has also been communication between departments to understand
expectations of other department of prerequisite courses and what is being taught. These
conversations have led to improvement for students by offering more cross discipline teaching.
With more departments buying into the SLO process this should increase this effect.

A Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Committee (SLOAC) is being established with the
following duties:

   SLOs are assessed regularly for learning with authentic assessment strategies
   SLOs are tied to college mission and core competencies
   Results are used for improvement in courses, programs, and institution-wide planning
This committee will be composed of both faculty and administrator representation. This
committee will help in making sure the SLOs are measureable and that the assessments are
meaningful. It will help to disseminate the methods that yielding meaningful and useful results to
the campus as a whole.

Planning Agenda
The use of added evaluation components will help SLOs become a greater part of the college
culture. The use of SLOs as component of the unit’s Program Review and Program review
Annual Update will also assist in the development of interdisciplinary discussions on student
learning and the effective use of SLOs.
III.A.1.d. The institution upholds a written code of professional ethics for all of its personnel.

Descriptive Summary

ELAC has adopted the American Association of University Professors Statement on Professional
Ethics. All members of the District Academic Senate are required to abide by this code.

Self Evaluation
ELAC works to foster ethical behavior in all activities. The great number of shared governance
committees active on campus allow for ongoing dialogue on many subjects, including
professional ethics.

Planning Agenda
The Academic Senate will work toward reviving its inactive Ethics Committee.

III.A.2.The institution maintains a sufficient number of qualified faculty with full-time
responsibility to the institution. The institution has a sufficient number of staff and
administrators with appropriate preparation and experience to provide the administrative
services necessary to support the institution’s mission and purposes.


Standard III                                                                                   187
Descriptive Summary
The college maintains a sufficient number of qualified staff, faculty and administrators to fulfill
its mission. Each department is responsible for determining the appropriate staffing level needed
to fulfill its mission and programmatic goals. If a department believes that there is a need for
additional staffing, the department chair will submit a proposal for a growth or replacement
position. All proposals include a section in which the department justifies the need for additional
staffing and details its vision for the future. In this manner the college seeks to ensure adequate
full-time faculty for the present and the future. These proposals are forwarded to the Joint Hires
Committee for review. This shared governance committee is made up of faculty and
administrators and serves the purpose of recommending faculty staffing. After a thorough review
of proposals and presentations from the departments, the committee ranks the need for each
position and forwards recommendations to the Academic Senate for approval. Approved
recommendations are reviewed by the President and his cabinet for a final decision on hiring.
Departments and units may also request classified staff positions. Under current budget
constraints, the District has initiated a freeze on all hiring. In the event that a position is needed,
the President must approve the request for a position. These requests are then forwarded to the
District to determine whether the need for the position is urgent enough to be approved.

Self Evaluation
The college is benefiting from the wise use of financial recourses. In fall 2008, the college was
able to hire eighteen new full-time faculty members. The active involvement of the faculty and
Academic Senate has worked to ensure that all constituencies’ needs are considered in the
ranking process. In addition, the use of Program Review and Program Review Annual Updates
has allowed each department to make projections for future staffing needs. This has assisted the
college in planning for future.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.
III.A.3.The institution systematically develops personnel policies and procedures that are
available for information and review. Such policies and procedures are equitably and
consistently administered.

Descriptive summary
Personnel policies are developed by the Human Resources Council at the District level. This
Council is chaired by two college presidents and includes representation from two college vice
presidents from of each division (Academic Affairs, Student Services and Administrative
Service). The Human Resources Council reviews current human recourse policies and practices
and accepts proposals for revisions or the creation of new policies. The Council works with the
Personnel Commission, the District Office and the colleges to ensure that all constituencies are
able to voice their opinions prior to the approval or implementation of any new policies or
practice. The District also uses the assistance of legal counsel in the decision making process and
some policies are created through the collective bargaining process with the faculty, staff and
administrators representative unions. All Human Resource documents are available on the

Standard III                                                                                      188
District website for employees to review. The Personnel commission also has established
policies and procedures for classified positions. These guidelines are available on the District
website as well.
The College also works to provide employees with all the information that they will need on
human resources policies and procedures. ELAC has developed a faculty orientation that reviews
relevant policies for all new faculty members. In addition, every new full-time and adjunct
professor is given a faculty handbook that references the Human Resource policies found on the
web. The unions also work to ensure that the employees they represent are informed about the
policies impacting them. College-level payroll and human resource staff are also available to
answer questions regarding policies and procedures that faculty or staff may have questions
about.

Self-Evaluation
The District Personnel Commission and collective bargaining agreements adequately detail
human resource policies and are widely available on the District website. In addition, local
efforts have led to greater understanding of the policies, with 70.3% of employees reporting that
the college Faculty or Classified Employee Handbook is a useful and available resource.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.

III.A.3.a.The institution establishes and adheres to written policies ensuring fairness in all
employment procedures.

Descriptive Summary
The Personnel Commission, District Policies, and the collective bargaining agreements provide
comprehensive policies and procedures to be used in the hiring process. These policies include
provisions to ensure fairness in all employment procedures. All managers, supervisors, and
department leaders are offered the opportunity to take part in District training on fairness in
employment related matters. The college also has a Compliance Officer who monitors the
implementation of these policies in all hiring procedures and is available for consultation
regarding all matters of fairness in employment procedures.

Self Evaluation
The college is in compliance with this standard and all guidelines derived from the District
policies, Personnel Commission and collective bargaining agreements. In a survey of faculty and
staff, 257 employees 68.87% either agreed or strongly agreed that the college adheres to written
policies that ensure equal opportunity and fairness in all employment procedures.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.



Standard III                                                                                189
III.A.3.b.The institution makes provision for the security and confidentiality of personnel
records. Each employee has access to his/her personnel records in accordance with law.

Descriptive Summary
The college maintains all employment records under lock and key in order to maintain the
confidentiality of personal records. Each employee is informed of his or her right to access the
personnel file. A written request can be made to the employee’s Vice President in order to gain
access to desired records. In addition, some records are available in the District’s SAP Human
Resource system and can be accessed online by the employee using a secure sign-on.

Self Evaluation
The college is maintaining the confidentiality of employee records and is in compliance with all
laws and regulations regarding record keeping. In addition, there are sufficient venues through
which employees may access their record, including the SAP online system and through written
request to their Vice President.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.
III.A.4. The institution demonstrates through policies and practices an appropriate
understanding of and concern for issues of equity and diversity.

Descriptive Summary
The college fosters an environment of understanding and appreciation for the diversity of the
campus and surrounding community. ELAC has sought to ensure that all faculty members have
an understanding of diversity issues and are dedicated to enhance student and faculty
appreciation of diverse cultures. The college has consistently included an understanding of
diversity and the ability to teach to a diverse student population as a desired qualification in all
faculty job notices. In addition, faculty hiring committees often seek to determine whether
applicants have been able to demonstrate their ability to effectively teach the all ELAC students.
The college has an Equal Employment Opportunity Officer who keeps records of the diversity of
faculty and staff. The Research and Planning Office also uses the College Profile to highlight the
diversity of the student population and college faculty.

Self Evaluation
The college has sought to make understanding and appreciation of diversity a central feature in
the hiring process. This has led to faculty and staff who are able to promote diversity and cultural
awareness on campus. The college is beginning to address issues of equity and is seeking ways
to ensure that all students can be successful at ELAC.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.



Standard III                                                                                   190
III.A.4.a.The institution creates and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and services
that support its diverse personnel.

Descriptive Summary
The college has developed opportunities for the campus to express its culture. Events such as the
display of Dia de los Muertos altars and the Chinese New Year’s celebration allow the faculty
and students to join together in their celebration of diversity. The college, the Associated Student
Union, and the community have hosted many cultural events to enhance appreciation for
diversity. The college also offers professional development opportunities that include equity and
diversity as themes. For instance, faculty and administrators have participated in seminars hosted
by USC Center for Urban Education that have focused on equity issues. These lessons have been
discussed in the Student Success Committee and highlight the need to continue to use data-
driven decision processes that are focused on the college’s ability to enhance student success for
all individuals.

Self Evaluation
The college has sought to make understanding and appreciation of diversity a central feature in
the hiring process. This has led to faculty and staff who are able to promote diversity and cultural
awareness on campus. The college is beginning to address issues of equity and is seeking ways
to ensure that all students can be successful at ELAC.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.

III.A.4.b.The institution regularly assesses its record in employment equity and diversity
consistent with its mission.

Descriptive Summary
The gender and ethnicity of all applicants are noted on the Evidence of Effort college report,
which is submitted to the District Diversity Office. The District SAP system tracks the
demographics of all hires and is available for local access at the college. In addition the EEO
Officer keeps records of the demographic makeup of those hired for the college and individual
departments. The Research and Planning Office also reports faculty and staff demographics in
the annual College Profile for use in decision making and college planning. The planning
committees use this report to determine whether the college is meeting is goals and mission, and
in planning for the future of the college.

Self Evaluation
ELAC supports the development of a diverse faculty and staff through its focus on diversity
issues in the hiring procedures. The college has maintained relevant records to track its progress
towards its diversity goals and for use in college planning.
Planning Agenda


Standard III                                                                                   191
The college meets this standard.
III.A.4.c.The institution subscribes to, advocates, and demonstrates integrity in the treatment
of its administration, faculty, staff and students.

Descriptive Summary
The Personnel Commission and Classified Staff unions provide personnel policies, procedures
and agreements that ensure employee rights, good working conditions and compliance with
relevant laws and regulations. Union contracts and District policies ensure that employee rights
are maintained for faculty and administrators. In addition, the campus has a Work Environment
Committee which seeks to ensure a safe and comfortable place to work for all employees.
Employees also have the ability to file a grievance and there are policies in place to ensure affair
process. The policies and procedures ensure that all employees are treated fairly and equitably.
Student guidelines are provided by the District’s rules and regulations. The Student Services
division under the leadership of the Vice President of Student Services ensures that all students
are treated fairly and offers students the ability to file complaints in cases where they feel that
they were treated unfairly.

Self Evaluation
The college has policies and procedures that ensure fair treatment for all students and employees.
The shared governance process gives a voice to all constituencies to participate in college
planning and the grievance process acts as a stop gate to correct any situations deemed to be
unfair. The college has been successful in the implementation of these policies and maintaining a
just working environment.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

III.A.5. The institution provides all personnel with appropriate opportunities for continued
professional development, consistent with the institutional mission and based on identified
teaching and learning needs.

Descriptive Summary

The college has an active Professional Development Committee led by the Professional
Development Coordinator, which seeks to provide faculty and staff with multiple opportunities
to improve their abilities to meet the college mission, enhance teaching, and improve student
learning. The college has monthly workshops and the Teaching and Learning Center to assist
faculty and staff in skills development. In addition, many committees host workshops to help
personnel improve efforts to increase student learning and student success. The SLO Committee
has hosted many workshops on the development, implementation and use of SLOs to improve
student learning. The college has also developed a new faculty orientation which focuses on
student learning and runs the duration of the entire first semester. A technology grant has been
funded to assist faculty in learning needed technology skills that can be used in the classroom.

Standard III                                                                                   192
There is also available training software to assist faculty in developing skills. The college also
encourages personnel to attend professional conferences and offers reimbursement for those
attending these conferences. Classified staff are also offered training for the Microsoft Office
Specialist (MOS) certification and may receive pay increases for successfully completing
training. Those wishing to further their education may also be eligible for tuition reimbursement.

Self Evaluation
Faculty and staff have many opportunities to participate in professional development activities
and increase their ability to meet student needs and improve student learning. Faculty members
are able to select professional conferences that match their own disciplines, allowing them to
remain current on subject-specific knowledge and new methods for improving teaching efficacy.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.

III.A.5.a. The institution plans professional development activities to meet the needs of its
personnel.

Descriptive Summary

In a continuing effort to decipher and prioritize the multiple needs for professional development
on a large and diverse campus such as East Los Angeles College, the Professional Development
Coordinator works with two advisory committees, the classified staff development and the
certificated staff development. These committees provide important feedback as well as
assistance to the coordinator on planning and developing activities for both classified and
certificated employees. The Professional Development Coordinator also is a member of several
significant campus committees including the ESPC (East Shared Governance Committee) and
the Student Success Committee.
In the last few years professional development activities have increased and include workshops
such as using technology in the classroom, classified leadership and team building, training in
office software programs, student learning outcomes, effective teaching methods, new faculty
institute, adjunct orientation and focus on programs related to student success.
The evaluation of professional development programming in addition to the distribution of a user
survey for classified and certificated staff is an area where more planning is required for the next
phase of planning for future programming.

Self Evaluation
The college offers many diverse activities to aid in professional growth for both faculty and staff
members. The college regularly assesses the success of these offerings and works to match
personnel needs with new development activities. The college also allows faculty to seek out
discipline specific activities that increase their ability to meet student needs.
Planning Agenda



Standard III                                                                                   193
The college meets this standard.

III.A.5.b. With the assistance of the participants, the institution systematically evaluates
professional development programs and uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for
improvement.

Descriptive Summary
Each professional development activities includes a survey that assesses the success of that
activity and evaluates the information gained by those who participated. Campus committees
offer a venue for ongoing discussion on ways to improve professional development activities and
create opportunities that match the needs of faculty. In addition, the professional development
director is available to those who have ideas for new innovative activities.

Self Evaluation
The college has a method for systematically assessing its offerings and ensuring that professional
development activities meet the needs of faculty and staff. In addition, the professional
development committee works to ensure that all activities fit within the college’s mission. The
colleges many planning committees have also worked to include professional development as
action items for planning goals.
Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

III.A.6. Human resource planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of human resources and uses the results of the
evaluation as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary
ELAC has a comprehensive system of evaluation and planning that ensures the effective use of
human resources and the development of institutional plans that integrate staffing projections
needed to meet the college mission. The Program Review process is a comprehensive evaluation
that includes an internal and external scan. Each department or unit is asked to analyze the trends
in their discipline or service area and determine the unit’s needs they relate to the college mission
and local, state and national trends. Included in this evaluation is an analysis of current staffing
and projected staffing needs for the next three years. These staffing needs must tie into the unit’s
for the future. In addition, the college conducts yearly Program review Annual Updates that seek
clarification on staffing needs and determine the progress that the unit has made on its self-
defined goals and the recommendations levied in the Program Review Process. In this manner
the college can effectively tie institutional staffing decisions to institutional and department level
goals and plans.
In addition, each department is required to submit yearly goals. These goals are integrated into
the Joint Hires process to ensure that decisions are based on college need and the degree to
which the department goals coincide with the college’s Strategic Master Plan and goals.

Standard III                                                                                     194
Together with the Program Review and Annual Updates, this process allows the college to make
human resource decisions based on planning needs and determine the overall effectiveness of
current staffing in reaching the institutional goals.

Self Evaluation
The college has a well-defined planning cycle that integrates staffing projections and uses
college and unit-specific goals in determining staffing needs. In addition, the Program Review
process is effective in evaluating the ability of each unit to meet the college mission and in
determining whether current staffing levels are adequate. In some cases recommendations from
the Program Review process have led to recommendations to increase staffing. The college is
working to tie this process to decision making, including decisions regarding departmental
budgets and additional funding.
Planning Agenda
The college will work to improve the link between college planning, Program Review and
budget decisions to ensure that the funds are distributed in a manner that enhances the
institutions ability to fulfill its mission.


                                   III.B. Physical Resources
Physical resources, which include facilities, equipment, land and other assets, support student
learning programs and services and improve institutional effectiveness. Physical resource
planning is integrated with institutional planning.
III.B.1.The institution provides safe and sufficient physical resources that support and ensure
the integrity and quality of its programs and services, regardless of location or means of
delivery.
Descriptive Summary
State and local ordinances, Title 24 of the California Construction Code as well the Fire, Life and
Safety aspects of the Department of State Architecture (DSA) and the college Work
Environment Committee (WEC) assist in the evaluation and coordination processes of college
safety.
State-established environmental criteria for educational institutions as gleaned through the
college’s Space Inventory 2007/2009 (3.8) assist in the college’s determination of sufficiency
and efficiency. The Space Inventory 2007/2009 documents are submitted to the state on JCAF-
Fusion submittal forms on an annual basis. These documents display the levels of use, their
efficiency and deficiency. Student Learning Outcome (3.9) Development criteria as well as the
Western Association of Schools and Colleges Program Review rubrics for the establishment of
evaluating institutional effectiveness also assist in identifying -”Room-Use” efficiency.
Facilities needs are assessed by various means. Academic planning, needs-assessments, Space
Inventory, facility evaluations, and the college’s Facilities Master Plan (3.10) are the primary
vehicles by which needs are identified. The college budget, at present, reflects dynamic

Standard III                                                                                  195
enrollment and strategic planning, which allows for greater flexibility in addressing community
needs and student outcomes. Off-site needs are gleaned from community assessments and
enrollment studies to determine locations and needs. Off-site or satellite facilities are positioned
in key locations identified by need and population studies. The safety and sufficiency are a
college standard, without compromise.
Results of these evaluations identify facilities deficiencies and correctable needs. State space-
inventories articulate sufficient use formulas that determine the appropriateness of facility use
and future need.
Equipment is monitored via Energy Management Systems (EMS) as well as the college work-
request system, TAMIS, which allows for updates and reminders for Periodic Maintenance,
Predictive/Preventive Maintenance as well as standard monitoring of integral components. The
Information Technology Department works in a proactive manner to ensure that our client-server
environments are of the latest self-monitoring technology. (3.12)
Self Evaluation

Institutional needs are constantly improved upon and the college administration and faculty fully
support the forward-thinking results by means of budget, state “One-Time” funding and bond
support.
Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

III.B.1.a. The institution plans, builds, maintains, and upgrades or replaces its physical
resources in a manner that assures effective utilization and the continuing quality necessary to
support its programs and services.
Descriptive Summary
Program Review, Educational & Strategic Planning (3.13) as well as the college’s Master Plan
(3.10) create conceptual needs-assessments which inevitably become designs for future
programs, their services and the overall student support mechanisms.
Upon acceptance of a conceptual facilities plan either by campus or the State, a programming
session (a “Programming Session” is that part of the architectural process that takes the concept,
to the “Design Development” stage) of the intended user groups details the client-server
environment, its tools, its equipment and their associated layout. As the building or facilities take
conceptual shape, funding mechanisms are established, from the initial soft-costs (design,
engineering, etc.) to construction, whereby an estimated FF&E (Fixtures, Furniture, and
Equipment) budget is established.
During annual Program Review, a unit reviews its existing equipment for current usability and
competitiveness in future instructional markets. The replacement and/or upgrading of the
equipment used for instructional purposes is determined, estimated, and requested through either
campus funding, grant funding, one-time-funding, or state funding sources.


Standard III                                                                                    196
Equipment essential to the operations of buildings and grounds is reviewed annually and
maintained constantly (monthly, quarterly, biannually and or yearly). Predictive/Preventive
Maintenance programs ensure normal operations of all college equipment
The college’s annual district and state Scheduled Maintenance Programs utilize best practices in
reviewing the sustainability and effective use of all college equipment. The evaluation process is
that of a series of reviews based on maintenance records, manufacturer specifications, visual
inspections, and timely reporting practices utilized in our predictive, preventive maintenance
programs as well as daily review and inspection by personnel and our varying Building
Maintenance Systems.

Self Evaluation
The college’s continuing growth, expansion, and drive to compete in providing the best in
educating its clientele is a true indicator of the effectiveness of the institution’s use of all
available physical resources as well as a focused drive to obtain more resources as needed and
recognized in its reviews and studies.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.
III.B.1.b. The institution assures that physical resources at all locations where it offers
courses, programs, and services are constructed and maintained to assure access, safety,
security, and a healthful learning and working environment.
Descriptive Summary
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements, state and federal fire, life, and safety
mandates, as well as Department of State Architect (DSA) criteria ensure access and safe exit in
all facilities. ADA projects throughout the district reflect district recognition of all needs of all
facilities built before the newer, more stringent criteria for handicapped access. The recently
published ELAC “ADA Transition Plan” (3.14) has included new design criteria as well as a new
building format. For the last 20 years, all construction had been categorized as “constructible”
via the Uniform Building Code (UBC), but now that criteria has changed world-wide, as the
International Building Code (IBC) has taken precedence.
The college maintains sites at South Gate, Firestone, Rosemead, RCAT, and the main campus on
Avenida Cesar Chavez. Each site is provisioned with maintenance and operations personnel
ranging in number from 1 to 7 staff. At present, the staffing level is appropriate.
The staff is trained in custodial and hygiene practices, trades and crafts maintenance practices,
and immediate fire, life and safety recognition. These staff report directly to supervision and
management at the main college site on a daily basis or on a recognized emergency basis. Visual
inspections are done constantly by all staff and faculty. The college’s web-based work-request
system TAMIS allows faculty and staff to immediate request all needs. This system is a
measurable means of dynamic tracking of all work requests which ensures the effectiveness of
Plant Facilities and Operations departments.


Standard III                                                                                    197
Self Evaluation
The college meets this standard.

III.B.2. To assure the feasibility and effectiveness of physical resources in supporting
institutional programs and services, the institution plans and evaluates its facilities and
equipment on a regular basis, taking utilization and other relevant data into account.
Descriptive Summary
The assessment processes utilized in institutional evaluation are the annual program review, East
Los Angeles Space Inventory 2008/2009 (3.8) and the Scheduled Maintenance Program (SMP),
all of which are reflected in the college’s Five Year Capital Construction Plans (3.16).
Additionally, TAMIS and EMS systems monitor the facilities and their use on a daily basis.
The state and district-monitored SMP programs and the space-inventory models list and detail
the use and effectiveness of all of the Los Angeles Community College (LACCD) facilities, their
use, their effective life cycle and replacement status.

Self Evaluation
Through thorough review, utilizing the abovementioned processes, as well as the college’s
Educational Master Plan (3.17), and the college’s Facilities Master Plan (3.10), the college
identifies and recommends improvements, repairs and upgrades or replacement to a facility that
is required.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.
III.B.2.a. Long-range capital plans support the institutional improvement goals and reflect
projections of the total cost of ownership of new facilities and equipment.
Descriptive Summary
Capital plans are developed in a shared governance forum, via reviews and extrapolations made
from strategic planning. Institutional planning is the driving force behind all capital projects. The
link is a direct relationship to a collegiate review at all levels, emanating from the classroom up.
In the college’s shared governance (3.18) environment, all individuals are eminently responsible
for the forward progress of the college, its collective population. A sense of ownership is imbued
into all faculty and staff that reflect pride in all collective decisions and their outcomes; it is this
atmosphere of collectiveness that truly defines “Total Cost of Ownership”.
Periodic reevaluation of the college’s Mission Statement ensures a single focused total cost of
ownership across the college’s myriad of venues including the Shared Governance Committee,
its standing committees, educational planning, and Program Review process. It is the planning
processes themselves that ensure that the projects support the institutions goals. Goals are the
direct reflection of the collective strategic planning processes.
Self Evaluation

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Long-range planning is the key element to collegiate master planning. The effectiveness of the
long-range plans, the college support and its recognized goals are their own sufficiency. It is the
funding processes and capital construction formats delineated at the state and federal levels that
are variable and unstable elements to all effective planning.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.
III.B.2.b. Physical resources planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of physical resources and uses the results of the
evaluation as the basis for improvement.
Descriptive Summary
Various college subcommittees make recommendations to the president via the East Los Angeles
College Shared Governance Council (ESGC). The college Facilities Planning Subcommittee
(FPSC) is a facilities-focused committee that, through shared governance review and
agreements, makes recommendations to the ESGC and the president and the district office. The
college’s Facilities Master Plan (3.10) clearly articulates the collective decisions of the campus.
The state regulated “Fusion” system lists all facilities and all their associated equipment.
Prioritization is based on life-cycle criteria, use, repair history and eminent need. The college’s
equipment review process, cascades in need across various campus-specific processes such as
predictive and preventative maintenance program review, space inventory reports (3.8) and
manufacturer documentation. Throughout the physical plant, from building-required equipment
to classroom-specific equipment, all of which is prioritized by collective reviews documented in
programmatic studies, viability studies, as well external data on future instructional needs and
changes. The most dynamic documented changes occur in the information technology
environment, all of which is delineated in the Technology Master Plan (3.12).

Self Evaluation
The effectiveness of the college’s physical resources and their direct influence on programmatic
service areas are efficiently reviewed and critiqued on an annual basis via the aforementioned
reporting and recording mechanisms to determine long and short-term needs.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.


                                   III.C. Technology Resources
Technology resources are used to support student learning programs and services and to
improve institutional effectiveness. Technology planning is integrated with institutional
planning.



Standard III                                                                                  199
III.C.1.The institution assures that any technology support it provides is designed to meet the
needs of learning, teaching, college-wide communications, research, and operational systems.

Descriptive Summary
The college traditionally has worked diligently and methodically to assure that the technology
resources are properly provided for students, faculty, staff and any affiliations of the college. The
utilization of the technology resources are prioritized to deliver institutional effectiveness, which
includes supporting student learning programs and services, faculty support requirements,
college wide communication demands, research objectives, and operational systems mandates.
To ensure that the college’s institutional effectiveness is delivered, the college has several
advisory groups to help identify the technology needs:

        Technology Planning Subcommittee (TPSC)
        Academic Senate
        Shared Governance Council (ESGC)
        Educational Planning Subcommittee (EPSC)
        Facilities Planning Subcommittee (FPSC)
        Department Chairs Committee

The college’s Information Technology (IT) Department ensures that the various types of
technology needs are identified by working closely in conjunction with these advisory groups.
As the college continues to grow and the need for more innovative learning tools and services
becomes apparent, so too does the need for more staff. Below is a table which indicates the
growth in staff within the IT Department in response to the growing need for support of
technology on campus and at the South Gate Educational Center. There is one position pending
(Data Communications Specialist). (3.20)

                           Title                                     2005 Staffing            2008 Staffing
     Manager, College Information Systems*                                  0                         1
     Sr. Computer Network Support Specialist                                1                         2
     Computer Network Support Specialist                                    2                         4
     Asst. Computer Network Support Specialist                              3                         4
     Sr. Office Assistant                                                   0                         1
     Web Architect*                                                         0                         1
     Web Designer*                                                          0                         1
     Data Communications Specialist* (pending)                              0                         0
     Total staffing levels                                                  6                        14
   *Indicates new positions created within the Los Angeles Community College District since 2005.

Also, a focus for the IT Department and technology in general on campus is the recently revised
2008-2011 Technology Master Plan, which provides a view of the current status of technology
on campus as well as the future goals and aspirations.
The campus supports two areas of technology: Administrative and Academic (Instructional)
networks. All employees have access to technology which aids in the performance of their duties
including: access to a computer and telecommunications; campus e-mail and voice-mail; access

Standard III                                                                                                  200
to the District Wide Area Network (WAN); intranet applications such as Student Information
Systems (SIS); Human Resources (HR) and Fiscal Information System (FIS); as well as
bulletins, calendars, forms, and new employee services.
The IT Department supports the needs of the Academic and Administrative networks using its
HelpDesk work order system, which allows the end user to submit work orders for technical
support with computers, network issues, lab management, software, voice-over IP (VoIP) phone
systems, and more. The college was the first within the Los Angeles Community College District
(LACCD) to develop and deploy a web portal system as a means of creating more innovative
technologies for the students as well as campus employees/departments (3.21).
The scope of responsibility of the IT Department is vast, covering such areas as maintaining the
campus infrastructure, Academic and Administrative network management, campus wireless
internet, VoIP systems, the college website and Administrative/Academic portals, network back-
up systems, streaming video/Podcasting/RSS feeds, inventory and upgrade of network
equipment, supporting the South Gate and Rosemead Educational Centers, upgrading and
maintenance of employee and student e-mail systems, support for campus and District
applications, inventory/preparation/delivery of technological equipment, and the oversight of all
campus computer labs (3.22).
All instructional labs at the college, including the South Gate Educational Center, are supported
by the Information Technology Department in conjunction with the individual department
presiding over that lab. Each semester the IT Department coordinates the updating of the labs by
communicating with the Department Chairs to ensure all software changes needed for each
semester are instituted prior to the start of the semester. Most labs are staffed with Instructional
Assistants (IA) or student assistants to provide maintenance of the equipment. Computer lab
equipment is replaced on a regular cycle to ensure the equipment is in line with the current
technology standards.
A monthly meeting was established between the IA’s/lab assistants and the IT Department as a
way to ensure that communication between the departments is consistent. The cycle life has been
cited as every three years in the current 2008-2011 Technology Master Plan (3.12) and
reconfirmed by the Technology Planning Subcommittee (TPSC) with input from the faculty to
ensure instructional needs are met. (3.24)
Smart Classroom Technology. The IT Department provides support for all instructional labs,
including smart classroom technology. The campus currently has eighteen smart classrooms each
containing a ceiling-mounted projector, a multimedia lectern cart with a new computer, monitor,
DVD player, document camera, microphone system, wall mounted speakers, and a touch screen
panel installed into the lectern which controls all the devices from one central location. Ten of
those classrooms also have power-controlled projector screens also controlled by the lectern.
Two of those classrooms, located in the Nursing Department, have “Sympodium” touch screens
which, allows the instructor to annotate on any document or website they have visible on their
monitors. (3.12)
The campus also has 48 multimedia classrooms with ceiling mounted projectors and screens,
wall mounted speakers, an audio receiver and laptop to allow instructors to incorporate
technology into their lessons. The campus also has seven computers-on-wheels (COWs), which

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are available for use by instructors. Each cart is equipped with a built in projector, sound system,
wireless microphone system, and laptop. The carts allow mobility and ease to assist the
instructors with bringing technology that may otherwise be unavailable to them or their
department. (3.12) Two COWs are located on the Rosemead Educational Center; one belongs to
the Teaching-Learning Center (TLC) and the other is housed in the IT Department. The TLC and
IT cows are for use by faculty and staff for presentations in locations that do not have any smart
classroom equipment.
Learning Assistance Center (E7-222). With the design and construction of the Technology
Building four years ago, the campus developed an open campus computer lab in which students
can use computers with general and course specific software, obtain tutoring services for course
specific classes, or obtain research assistance from the Instructional Assistants and other staff.
The lab consists of 67 PC computers, running Windows XP and Office 2007, color and B/W
printing services.
The lab has PLATO Mathematics software available to students on 10 workstations. The lab is
staffed with an Instructional Assistant and several student assistants and student tutors to provide
assistance with all student needs. The lab is also equipped with a ceiling-mounted projector and
screen, as well as an instructor station creating a smart classroom environment. The lab houses
course related models for anatomy and physiology courses.
MEnTE LAB (F5-107). The Math Enrichment through Technology program (MEnTe) began as
collaboration between the Math Department and the tutoring program at the college. The
Program provides a comprehensive learning facility with smart classrooms, a tutoring area, an
open computer lab, and technical support staff as a means to assure student success in the math
field.
The MEnTe Lab features the following services to students: Free, walk-in lab usage for all
ELAC students; no reservations required, tutoring for all ELAC math classes, math video
checkout for use at home, textbook and calculator checkout for use in the lab, color and B/W
printing services, general and math-specific software. The lab is serviced by an Instructional
Assistant and student tutors to provide service to all students. The lab consists of 100 PC
computers equipped with Windows XP and Office 2007.
English Writing Center (F5-201). The English Department offers assistance to students via the
English Writing Center. The lab is equipped with 62 new computers and laser printers. The
center has staff available to assist students with writing basics, assignments and other tutoring
services. The lab is staffed with a faculty member and student assistants.
High Tech Center (DSPS) (F5-111). The Disabled Student Programs & Services (DSPS)
Department maintains a computer lab for student with disabilities, which is located centrally on
the campus. The lab currently houses 12 computers, each wheelchair-accessible and loaded with
software to assist the visually impaired and hearing impaired. The lab is staffed with a full-time
Instructional Assistant to provide help to students wanting to do research on school
projects/assignments or check their e-mail accounts.
South Gate Educational Center (SG-109, 122, 121, 123, 124). The South Gate Educational
Center (SGEC) was established in the fall of 1997, and has steadily increased in enrollment,


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services to students and equipment. This has added an increasing need for more support to the
off-site. During the past few years the demand for improved network connectivity to the South
Gate Educational Center has increased dramatically. This is due in part to the increase in services
offered to the students and increased Internet use at the site.
To meet this demand the IT Department has worked with AT&T to add another T1 line to the
existing T1 line connecting the main campus to South Gate. While this solution has worked thus
far, there is still a need for increased network traffic support. The IT Department is working to
secure an Opt-E-Man service that will increase the traffic to a 10GB connection, thus increasing
the flow and allowing for further growth.
Health Information Technology Lab (H6-110). The recently completed Health Information
Technology (HIT) lab was created to allow students in the HIT and Respiratory Therapy
Program access to software specific to their fields. The lab houses 30 new computer systems as
well as a smart classroom lectern with a ceiling mounted projector and power projector screen.
This smart classroom system allows the instructor to use technology not available in standard
classrooms, including accessing the internet and a document camera.
Nursing Lab (G9-109). The Nursing Department currently supports a lab with 14 computers
where students have access to tutorial videos and software, as well as detailed anatomy models to
assistance in the education of their students. The lab is staffed with an Instructional Assistant
who assists students with their equipment needs, supports the computer lab and offers tutoring
services.
Computer Science Information Technology (CSIT) Labs (E7-316, 317, 318, 321, 411). The
CSIT Department has five computer labs in the Technology Building, totaling 151 computers
offering a variety of technological software including standard Office 2007, Visual Basic, C++,
and Microsoft FrontPage. The labs are used for lecture and open lab hours. They are staffed by
two Instructional Assistants and student workers to provide support.
Architecture Lab (E7-122, 126). The Architecture Department has two labs located in the
Technology Building consisting of 53 computers with subject specific software such as C.A.D.D.
The lab also is equipped with plotter printers and scanners to allow student access to equipment
that is standard to their field. The lab is staffed with an Instructional Assistant to provide support
for students.

LIBRARIES (Helen Miller Bailey Library (F3-106, 108, 114, 133, 201) and South Gate
Educational Center Library). Helen Miller Bailey Library (HMBL) currently has 111
computers, including 21 computers in the library classroom and 4 computers for community
users. The HMBL student computers have a standard operating system and software installed:
Windows XP, Microsoft Office 2007, Deepfreeze (Desktop security), NetSupport (Classroom
management system), Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Adobe Reader. HMBL provides printers (2
B&W, 1 color) and a scanner for student use. The library provides access to an ADA compliant
computer with a scanner supplied by Disabled Student Programs & Services (DSP&S). Wireless
access to the academic network is also available to students, staff, and faculty. The library has
two multimedia stations for presentations and instruction; one permanently stationed in the
library classroom (Room 201) and another to be used in the Library Conference Room or in the
convertible lab (cLab) on the first floor. Students can use a Canon microfilm reader/printer

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(Model MS300) to view and print articles from microfilms. HMBL has an information
competency registration system (ICQ) for students to sign up for library workshops. The library
is staffed with an Instructional Assistant/ Information Technology to provide technical assistance
to students.
South Gate Educational Center Library (SGECL) currently has 10 computers for student use.
The SGECL student computers have a standard operating system and software installed:
Windows XP, Microsoft Office 2007, Deepfreeze (Desktop security), Internet Explorer, Firefox,
and Adobe Reader. SGECL provides a B&W printer and an ADA compliant computer with a
scanner. SGECL also has an information competency registration system (ICQ) for students to
sign up for library workshops.

Computer Applications and Office Technologies (CAOT) Labs (E7-403, 404, 426, 438, 439).
The CAOT Department has five computer labs located within the Technology Building, with a
total of 211 computers offering Office 2007 software as the standard. The labs are used as
instructional classes as well as open lab hours for departmental students. There are two full-time
Instructional Assistants staffing the labs ensuring that students are able to complete assignments
and getting the help they need.
Photography Lab (E7-B03, B27). The Photography Department has a lab located in the
Technology Building which has 32 Apple G5 computers, as well as large scale plotter printers.
The lab is used as an instructional class as well as open lab hours for departmental students. The
lab is maintained by an Instructional Assistant to assist students.
Art Labs (E7-203, 204, 215). The Art Department has two labs located in the Technology
Building which have 28 PC and 45 Apple G5 computers for use as an instructional use and open
lab hours for departmental students. The lab has course specific software such as Adobe
Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and Quark Xpress. The lab is staffed with a full time Instructional
Assistant to help student with assignments/projects.
Engineering Lab (E7-113). The Engineering Department has a lab located in the Technology
Building which services students within the discipline. The lab consists of 42 computers with
course-specific software. The lab room is mostly used for classroom purposes, but is made
available so students within the discipline can have access to the software they need to complete
assignments/projects. The lab is supported by an Engineering Lab Technician.
Journalism Lab (E7-307). The Journalism Department is responsible for producing the school
newspaper, The Campus News. The department houses a lab with 15 Apple Mac computers
which provide students with the ability to design layouts for the paper. The lab is used for
classroom use as well as for the preparation of the school newspaper.
Mathematics Labs (G8-115, 123). The Mathematics Department has two computer labs, used
for classroom purposes, in the G8 Building. The computers are used to provide students with
hands-on experience using course specific software. These labs house 34 and 41 computers
respectively, but are not open outside of class time.
Automotive Technology Labs (P1-101, 121). The Automotive Technology Department utilizes
two computer labs to assist in student learning. One lab has 10 computers, which are used by
auto tech students to research technical data online using Mitchell On-Demand and Alldatapro.

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In addition, students do homework and other automotive-related research work on this
equipment.
The second computer lab has 20 computers which are not Internet-capable. Students use
automotive-related software simulating various automotive systems such as: electrical/electronic
systems (Attach) and engine performance systems (Chrysler). There are plans to have these
computers installed online.
Noncredit Lab (F9-103, Rosemead Educational Center). The Noncredit Department
maintains two computer labs, one located at the Rosemead Educational Center and the other on
the main campus. The labs house 24 and 44 workstations respectively, which are used by
instructors within the program offering courses on computer software, including the Microsoft
Office 2007 Suite, reading software, and Plato, as well as Internet access to assist basic skills
students. The lab is monitored by the IT Department and a faculty member through Community
Services.
College-Wide Communications. Support for campus communications is provided by the
campus Information Technology Department as well as the District IT Department. Locally, the
IT Department maintains the infrastructure for the e-mail system for all employees, as well as a
second e-mail system which provides all students with a free e-mail account. The student e-mail
system has been designed to automatically generate an e-mail account when the students register
for a class.
In late 2007, the beginning stages of a new, campus-wide Voice-over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
phone system were put into place for departments being relocated due to campus construction.
All the equipment including servers, software and phones was purchased and prepared for
distribution by the IT Department. The initial deployment of 343 phones on the main campus and
South Gate has taken place after the equipment had been set up and thoroughly tested. The
system works with Microsoft Outlook to provide access to voice-mail messages within e-mail.
(3.25)
If emergent 9-1-1 calls are placed from anywhere on campus, the system provides the 9-1-1
operator the building’s location, as opposed to the previous system only listing the college
address as the location of the call. (3.26) This can prove vital in emergency situations where
timing is critical. The Caller-ID feature also allows the campus to see where a phone call
originates, which can be beneficial in case of a bomb threat or other campus emergency. The
system can also broadcast messages to the campus via speakerphone in the event of a campus
emergency. During the remainder of 2008, those campus areas not already established will be
transitioned to the new system.
During spring 2008, the IT Department developed and implemented a new campus-wide system
of disseminating information to employees. When a user logs into the computer network, the
Administrative Portal Page opens up, displaying current announcements and news regarding
technology, campus construction, facilities, and Presidential announcements. This page will
remain open until the user closes it him/herself.
This new system ensures that all employees have access to the same information that they may
not read had it been sent via e-mail or flyer announcements. The IT Department is looking into a


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similar system directed towards the students logging into campus computers within the labs.
These and other ideas are being discussed as a way to ensure that information is available and
accessible.
College Research. The college, through the Office of Research and Planning, administers a
Student Survey on a regular basis. Data collected from these surveys provides information on the
use of campus technology, training and expectations towards the growth of the college. The last
Student Survey, administered during the spring 2007 semester, indicated that 46.3% of the
students surveyed used a computer on campus “sometimes” or “often”. Also, 79.2% of those
surveyed indicated that they use the internet to get information for an assignment. (3.27) The
Associated Student Union (student body representative organization) has representatives on the
ESGC and the TPSC to ensure student needs are met in terms of technology on campus.
Additionally, a Faculty/Staff/Administrators survey is administered during each accreditation
cycle to solicit feedback on how the campus employees feel the college is maintaining
technology needs supporting educational programming and student learning. Preliminary results
from the latest survey indicate that 55.1% of the respondents feel that the college appropriately
maintains equipment, media resources and other materials, and that 63.7% agree that electronic
resources, including computer labs, Internet connections, and online computing environments are
sufficient to support the college’s courses and programs.
67.2% of the respondents felt that the college maintains up-to-date computers, software, and
technological resources that reflect advances in technology. Similarly, 71.5% feel that technical
training and assistance are provided to staff and faculty to adequately support student learning.
However, only 49.1% of respondents feel that the college provides sufficient technological
resources and IT support services to support its educational programs. The lack of available IT
personnel may contribute to this lower percentage of satisfaction. 53.1% of respondents did feel
that technology planning is adequate and linked to other institutional planning and evaluation
efforts. (3.28)

Self Evaluation
As technology continues to grow on campus, the lack of personnel to meet these needs is
becoming an issue. There are 1,597 academic computers within 39 student labs (3.29) on
campus. We also have 657 administrative computers, 70 servers and 114 switches, (3.30) all of
which are supported by a staff of 12 employees within the IT Department (two staff are
dedicated to South Gate and the Teaching Learning Center, respectively).
ELAC computer labs are understaffed, and IT is unable to meet all the needs of these labs. The
IT Department staff is responsible for maintaining the campus equipment, servers, computer
labs, web presence, phone system, wireless, as well as developing and implementing various
major projects. The ratio of computers to technicians (excluding the Manager, Sr. Office
Assistant and Web Architect/Designer positions) is a staggering 225 to 1, which places our
campus in the Moderate Efficiency range on the Technology Support Index (3.31) and as such,
we cannot meet the needs of a campus this size. The district currently has a hiring freeze, and the
college has one full-time IT technician out on disability, thus furthering the problem of the staff
being over-worked.


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Planning Agenda
Budget conditions permitting, the IT Department will hire more staff to assist in supporting the
current technology as well as developing and deploying future projects.

III.C.1.a. Technology services, professional support, facilities, hardware, and software are
designed to enhance the operation and effectiveness of the institution.

Descriptive Summary
Technology services, including the use of new technology, hardware and software standards,
distribution of such technologies, and maintaining a secure, reliable and accessible network
infrastructure are the main focuses of the TPSC. The committee recently revised its membership
to include representation from key constituencies. (3.32)
The membership/representation of this committee consists of the following:
• Distance Education/Distance Learning Chair               • AFT Classified Staff Member
• Information Technology Manager                           • Academic Senate Member
• Professional Development                                 • AFT Faculty Member
• Associated Student Union (ASU)                           • Library
• Computer Laboratory Group                                • Career Tech (2)
• Specially Funded Programs                                • Matriculation
• Outreach & Recruitment                                   • Tutorial Services
• Offsite Representative                                   • Liberal Studies (2)
• Educational Planning Subcommittee                        • Plant Facilities
• Computer Science Information Technology (CSIT)           • VP of Academic Affairs
• Computer Applications/Office Technologies (CAOT)         • VP of Workforce Development
• Dean of General Studies

The committee meets monthly to discuss the current needs of the campus, discuss and approve
campus wide projects, address issues, and update current projects. The committee is headed by
the Manager of Information Technology (Administrator) and the Distance Education Coordinator
(faculty).
The campus, via the ESGC, determines the priority of technology purchases based on the
Educational Master Plan and the Strategic Master Plan goals for student success. On a
departmental level, the IT Department works with the departments and their Administrators to
determine their needs for technology and provide support for all software and hardware used by
the departments. This includes meeting with individual departments prior to each semester to
ensure that updates to hardware and software for labs are made prior to the beginning of the
semester.
The IT Department provides departments looking to purchase items with information and quotes
on equipment and software, which is then submitted to the appropriate Administrator for review
and budgeting before a purchase can be made. The IT manager reviews purchases of equipment
and software to ensure compatibility of new technology with existing technology. Once



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purchased, the IT Department works with the individual department to prepare and deliver the
equipment and/or software.
The recent focus of the TPSC has been the revision of the ELAC Technology Master Plan
(TMP). The 2008-2011 Technology Plan outlines the current status of technology on campus as
well as the direction we will head within a 3, 5, and 10 year period. (3.12) A subcommittee was
created to focus on the revision and a consultant brought in to assist with the technical needs in
terms of campus-wide fiber, typical room layouts, and an overview of technology trends in an
educational environment. During mid-October 2008 the TMP was approved by the ELAC
Shared Governance Council. (3.33)

Self Evaluation
There is student representation on the TPSC committee. However, committee members feel the
need for more student input in terms of their satisfaction with technology on campus. The
committee’s goal is to create a student survey during the fall 2008 semester to be administered
online, possibly using the ACE SharePoint portal, to encourage the use of campus technology.
Survey results can then be incorporated into the college’s new Technology Master Plan.
The Research and Planning Office developed and administered an employee survey about
satisfaction and knowledge of the campus environment. (3.27) However, only a few questions
pertained to IT issues. As part of the Technology Master Plan revision surveys were created by
the Technology Master Plan Subcommittee to address the concerns of the faculty and staff.
(3.34) Surveys were administered via the Internet, and a total of 158 faculty and 108 staff
completed the online surveys which focused on their opinions on using technology in the
classroom (faculty) and on the job (staff).

Planning Agenda
The IT Department will develop and administer Point of Service surveys for students. These
surveys will be administered during the fall 2008 semester.
III.C.1.B.The institution provides quality training in the effective application of its
information technology to students and personnel.

Descriptive Summary
When new technology is brought onto the campus the IT Department makes training available on
the new technology to ensure that students, faculty & staff are able to fully utilize it and improve
technological literacy. (3.17) The college offers various forms of computer training for faculty,
staff and administrators through its newly remodeled Teaching Learning Center (TLC). The
center is staffed by an Assistant Computer Network Support Specialist, who is partially overseen
by the IT Department, and two student assistants who help faculty and staff with various
computer related issues. The center is overseen by the Professional Development Coordinator to
ensure that training needs for faculty and staff are met.
A recent upgrade to the facilities included replacing outdated equipment with 12 new PC’s and 3
new Apple Macs, laptops and projectors for check-out by faculty, and a new smart classroom
setup to assist in presenting workshops and trainings. The center also has software available to

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help employees with the recently-transitioned Office 2007 software. Also, during spring 2008, an
off-site contractor was brought in to provide hands-on training to the entire campus on this new
Office suite. The center offers training on subjects such as the Office 2007 Suite and Microsoft
SharePoint portal.
The campus also offers trainings on District applications such as SAP and Business Warehouse
(BW), as well as local applications such as Class Information System (CIS), SARS, EBS (budget
system), and COOL (Course Outline Online system). The TLC also offers training on the use of
the new VoIP phone system, using the smart classroom equipment, and distance education/web
enhancement software such as ETUDES NG and Moodle. The center is open from 9:30 a.m. to 8
p.m., Monday thru Thursday, to ensure that evening faculty are able to access the services as
well. Training is provided to the Instructional Assistants and Student Assistants to ensure that
they are able to assist the students with their needs and provide basic information on the software
and technology available with the various campus computer labs.
The college’s Strategic and Educational Master Plan addresses the need for providing training to
increase computer literacy and familiarity with campus technologies. The IT department works
to provide adequate training for all employees, (3.17) and has developed, as part of the
Technology Master Plan revision, an online survey which asked both faculty and staff about their
need and/or satisfaction with proper training to assist in their jobs.
For faculty, a majority of those who responded indicated that they use the Internet (98.2%),
writing software (78.2%) or multimedia presentation tools (75.9%) in their courses. Furthermore,
48.7% of those responding felt they were given opportunities to provide input or feedback on
technology decisions within their department.
For staff, a vast majority of those responding indicated daily use of software (93.8% MS Word,
85.1% MS Outlook) was necessary to complete their tasks. A total of 48.5% of the staff
responding felt that they were given opportunities to provide feedback on technology use within
their departments. Within both surveys there was indication that a need for proper and consistent
training was needed to perform their job with a high quality of service. (3.34)
To ensure that students are receiving current information regarding technology, the college is
working with the District Academic Senate and the Computer Application Office Technology
(CAOT) and Computer Science Information Technology (CSIT) departments to develop a
computer literacy graduation requirement to provide students with the skills they need to
maneuver within today’s technology (software, online research, etc.).

Self Evaluation
The Technology Planning Subcommittee has recently completed the 2008-2011 Technology
Master Plan. It was approved by the Shared Governance Council on October 13, 2008. (3.33)
Issues regarding the need for proper training were brought forth from the TMP as well as the
accompanying surveys and Town Hall Forums held to solicit feedback from faculty, staff and
students on the development of technology on campus.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.

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III.C.1.c.The institution systematically plans, acquires, maintains, and upgrades or replaces
technology infrastructure and equipment to meet institutional needs.

Descriptive Summary
The IT Department, under recommendation from the TPSC and ESGC, provides maintenance
and operation of the campus’ infrastructure including 70 campus servers (34 Administrative and
36 Academic), 2,253 computers (657 Administrative and 1,596 Academic), 114 network
switches supporting 4,000 network ports with 70% connected, printers and all other equipment
users need to meet the needs of the institution. The IT Department also supports multiple open
computer labs in areas such as Mathematics, Library, English, Tutorial Services, Art, Business,
Photography, Engineering, Health Services, CAOT, CSIT, and Non-Credit. Technological
equipment and software within these programs are maintained by Instructional Assistants or lab
technicians, if applicable, and supported by the IT Department.
All computer-based traffic coming into campus, either from within the District or from the
Internet, is directed into the E1 server room, where it is disseminated throughout the campus.
With the increasing demand for web services and increased internet use on campus, the IT
Department is working with the LACCD and the campus service provider (Corporation for
Education Network Initiatives in California: CENIC), to develop a second main point of entry
(MPOE) in the E7 server room which will increase the flow of traffic and provide growth
potential for the buildings which are a part of the campus growth.
The campus currently uses several forms of emergency backup and redundancy to ensure that
data is secure in the event of a natural disaster or network attack. The campus server rooms use
an uninterrupted power supply (UPS) to maintain power in the event of an outage and are
equipped with sufficient air conditioning to avoid shutdown due to overheating. Most servers on
campus employ some form of data back-up including data back-up to tape or redundant hardware
(RAID) where appropriate.
The Admissions & Records, Financial Aid and Fiscal Departments utilize a data back-up
jukebox system which copies data to disCs to ensure student information is secure.
Responsibility for back-up of network servers falls on the IT Department. The IT Department
maintains two different back-up systems located in two different locations on campus to ensure
redundancy and avoid data loss. To avoid the loss of data on the local level, the IT Department
encourages users to store data using their “dedicated user” folders, which stores the information
on a campus server. This helps the user access information for any location on campus, as well
as prevents the loss of data due to issues with their local machine.
The campus supports wireless technology for its students, faculty, and staff. In order to ensure
the continued integrity of the academic network students and faculty wishing to use their
personal wireless devices are required to authentic into the network using their student/faculty
account information. This allows for a higher level of security for the campus and
students/faculty. Access for the staff is provided through their administrative network account
information. Both systems require that anti-virus software is installed and updated on their
personal device to ensure that the user and campus network systems are secure.



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The IT Department is constantly improving the campus network infrastructure per the college’s
Strategic and Educational Master Plan. (3.17) The introduction of new technology or upgrades to
current technology is recommended by the TPSC and the administration as a means of advancing
the college’s ability to educate and prepare students. Beginning in 2006, the IT Department
began the development of the Academic Computing Environment (ACE), an entirely new
network dedicated solely to the enhancement of the educational experience for the faculty and
students. (3.22) The IT Department worked closely with the TPSC and the Los Angeles
Community College District (LACCD) Information Technology Department to create a system
that would provide several new components to benefit students and faculty.
The ACE is comprised of the Account Management System (AMS) which automatically creates
an account giving students access to a slew of new services and technology to support their
educational learning experiences. These services include a campus e-mail account and document
storage space (“S” Drive, 50MB), among other things. (3.22, pg. 6) Faculty also receive an e-
mail account which allows them to communicate with an entire class by using one e-mail
address, as well as storage space (“R” Drive, 500MB) store documents and another drive (“M”
Drive) which can be shared with their class.
Another major component of ACE is the Microsoft SharePoint Portal, which provides for more
interaction between faculty and students outside the traditional classroom. (3.12, 3.17) Students
can receive and submit assignments, view lectures and other course materials online, view their
current course grades, participate in discussion threads and more. Faculty can assign values to
the various components (homework, quizzes, tests, projects, etc.) and the system will use these
assignments to formulate a grade.
Also part of ACE is a campus-wide printing solution, which gives students the ability to deposit
funds into an account and print from various opens labs on the main campus and at South Gate
Educational Center. Another component is the centralization of a student tracking system which
tracks the number of lab hours students accumulate over a given semester. This proves vital
when determining if the required lab time for many courses has been met. Campus wireless is
available through ACE for students and faculty using their student identification number. A
student referral system was also created to provide faculty with a system of identifying and
recommending tutoring services to those students in need. All of these components have created
opportunities to enhance teaching approaches and improve student learning. (3.35)
Campus computer labs are replaced on a cycle determined by the Technology Master Plan and
the TPSC to ensure students have access to the latest computer systems and software. The TPSC
is in the process of determining a cycle for the replacement of computer systems for faculty and
staff; however, as of now there is no formal process. (3.24)
As the college continues to grow, new servers, switches and routers are made available to replace
older equipment. This includes upgrading the network connection speed to meet the demands of
increasing technology use via the web. The IT Department is in the process of deploying
uninterrupted power supplies (UPS) to the various locations on campus to insure that the
switches which connect the campus remain functioning in the event of a power outage.
The college works closely with the TPSC and the Distance Education Coordinator to ensure that
needs which focus on distance education/learning programs are taken into consideration in

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planning and implementing technology. Training is provided to the faculty using distance
education within their course. The IT Department has implemented the Starbak Communications
System, which gives instructors the ability to post recorded lectures on the network for student
access at a later date.
The development of the Microsoft SharePoint Portal also gives faculty the means to share
information with their students with ease. Instructors can post notes, syllabi, assignments, and
current grades. They may also open and mediate discussion threads, and e-mail classes with one
step; this technology adds to the faculty’s ability to communicate with students outside of the
traditional classroom.

Self Evaluation
The 2008-2011 Technology Master Plan (3.12) cites that Academic computers should be cycled
every 3-4 years. Cycling of Administrative computers is included in this process, but is
dependent on funding. The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) contract states that newly
hired faculty (those not replacing an existing faculty position) shall be provided with LAN,
Internet, and e-mail accessibility. (3.6) The Office of Workforce Education and Economic
Development assists in purchasing computers for these faculty members. Depending on funding,
the office also purchases computers for instructional faculty. Records are kept indicating which
faculty members receive systems and how often. These records are the basis for determining who
gets a new computer, to ensure that those faculty members in need of new equipment receive it.
For Administrative and Student Services Departments, Administrators and staff get new
computers based on their program budgets. Some programs have more funding then others, so
there is a lack of consistency among faculty/staff in how often computers are upgraded or
replaced. The TPSC is revisiting the issue of a replacement cycle, but the issue of funding will
continue to be explored.
The IT Department is working with AT&T and CENIC to establish a second MPOE in the E7
server room which will ensure internet connectivity between the E1 and E7 server rooms in the
event of power failure or other technical issue.
The E-1 Server room (MDF) is in need of upgrades to the air conditioning and UPS power back-
up systems. Also, a new external power generator needs to be installed to ensure that, in the
event of a power outage in the building, the servers which support all campus services will
remain functional until power is restored. A new external power generator needs to be installed
to support the E7 Server room as well. Connection of the E7 MPOE is scheduled to be completed
by the end of 2008.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.

III.C.1.d. The distribution and utilization of technology resources support the development,
maintenance, and enhancement of its programs and services.
Descriptive Summary


Standard III                                                                               212
The TPSC provides direction and recommendations for the use and distribution of the
technology that affects the campus as a whole. This includes implementations to the network, e-
mail services, security features, and other services that affect accessibility. Each department
submits a budget which includes technology requests. IT helps support the generation of
department resource requests. Once approved by Administration and purchased, the IT
Department than implements the equipment requests. For technology resources on a program
level, the IT Department works in conjunction with the department to ensure that support for new
technology and software is readily available. Maintenance of the labs is done on a semester basis
through the assistance of the departmental Instructional Assistants, if available.
The IT Department has several forms of security in place to ensure that student and faculty
information is secure campus-wide. All incoming network traffic is routed through a firewall,
which filters the latest forms of spyware, adware and malware. For e-mail protection the
Microsoft Exchange 2003 server is equipped with the latest Symantec Anti-SpyWare software to
prevent malicious e-mail from entering the system. All local machines are equipped with
Symantec Antivirus, which updates automatically via the server, to ensure that personal mail
accessed from on campus does not interfere with the network or other machines. The local
antivirus software also prevents users from accidentally bringing viruses via floppy drives or
other media which they use for school/work. Students are also capable of storing files and
documents on their storage space (“S” Drive), provided to them automatically on the ACE
system. With 50MB of storage space, students can easily keep their document localized and
prevent bringing viruses into the system.
The Co-chair of the TPSC is the Distance Education Coordinator, who ensures that technology
surrounding this area is addressed. Also, the TLC offers assistance to faculty needing training on
the various distance education/web enhancement programs offered through the college, including
ETUDES NG, Microsoft SharePoint Portal and Moodle. The IT Department maintains a back-up
system which provides routine back-up of many of the campus servers and data, including RAID
technology for data redundancy. ETUDES NG and Moodle are hosted off-site, and the college
does not need to provide any back-up for them.

Self Evaluation
The college is undergoing major campus construction affecting attendance and class sizes. The
opportunity has arisen to expand the college’s distance education program as well as seeking out
potentially new locations for off-site courses.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.
III.C.2. Technology planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of technology resources and uses the results of
evaluation as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary
Decisions regarding technology and its effects on the institutional need stem from the ELAC
Strategic and Educational Master Plan. Recommendations are made through the TPSC and

Standard III                                                                                 213
Facilities Planning Subcommittee (FPSC) and forwarded on to the ESGC for approval before
implementation. (3.17)
On a departmental level, the campus bases its technology decisions on the Program Review
process. As part of Program Review, each Academic department is required to state their
technology needs to improve and assist with student learning. These needs are the basis from
which decisions on technology are made. For non-academic departments and programs, the
technology needs are expressed within Program Review to ensure the processing of student
information is met.
The IT Department works closely with various academic and non-academic departments to
ensure that the technology necessary to support those areas are up-to-date. In working with
Department Chairs and managers, the IT Department is aware of the needs and is able to support
the technology utilized within these departments.

Self Evaluation
The Faculty/Staff/Administrators Survey addresses some issues with effectively determining the
needs within Programs and Service Areas. However, the campus has discussed the option of
administering Point-of-Service surveys at key locations (ex. Financial Aid, EOP&S, DSPS,
computer labs, etc.) to determine if students feel technology needs are being met.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.

                                   III.D. Financial Resources
Financial resources are sufficient to support student learning programs and services and to
improve institutional effectiveness. The distribution of resources supports the development,
maintenance, and enhancement of programs and services. The institution plans and manages
its financial affairs with integrity and in a manner that ensures financial stability. The level of
financial resources provides a reasonable expectation of both short-term and long-term
financial solvency. Financial resource planning is integrated with institution planning.
Descriptive Summary
The annual budget for the college meets all of its basic expenditure requirements. For 2008-2009
the college’s unrestricted budget is $110,398,061, which includes a carry-forward balance of
$21,290,288. Additionally, the ending balance and special reserve represents 44% of the
LACCD’s total reserve. In 2004, the college placed $11 million dollars in a special reserve
account. These monies serve as a “rainy day” account, and can be utilized should the college’s
budget need to be augmented.
Each year the college has fixed costs which amount to 83% of the annual budget. Personnel and
benefit expenditures amount to 80% of the costs. This leaves $15 million dollars for
discretionary funds, which allows the college to fund extra programs and projects that support
the college’s institutional plans. Some examples of such projects receiving this one-time funding



Standard III                                                                                  214
include the Fitness Center project, the South Gate parking lot, the Adelante program and
technology upgrades.

At the college, all faculty and staff realize that increasing the number of students means more
income. Careful planning on all levels has given ELAC a cost per FTES of $391. This is the
lowest and most efficient in the District.
Besides the goals of the three master plans, other factors are considered in the formulation of the
annual operating budget. Additional factors include enrollment growth (FTES), the faculty
obligation number (FON), staff increases, Program Review recommendations, committee
recommendations, departmental/program requests, and one-time funding requests.
As an example, in 2005 and 2006 the Budget Committee implemented a competitive one-time
funding process wherein campus departments submitted proposals with college-wide impact,
student success/academic excellence, and generation of FTES. The source for this funding was
special one-time state allocations. The Budget Committee recommended awards based on
projected measurable outcomes towards the college’s strategic goals. These recommendations
were voted upon by ESGC. In 2007-2008, the Budget Committee has moved to formalizing its
deliberations with bylaws and minutes. The Budget Committee of the ESGC performs a more
detailed review of budgets, expenditures, priorities, and requests.
III.D.1. The institution relies upon its mission and goals as the foundation for financial
planning.
III.D.1.a. Financial planning is integrated with and supports all institutional planning.
Descriptive Summary

Three documents drive the planning process: the Educational Master Plan; the Facilities Master
Plan; and the Technology Master Plan. The Educational Plan and Technology Plan have been
updated. Once the update of the Facilities Plan is completed, all three plans will be incorporated
into the ELAC Strategic Master Plan.

The ESGC reviews matters related to the implementation of these institutional plans and has
made recommendations related to special one-time state allocations. The ESGC has directed the
Educational Plan Subcommittee, which oversees prioritization and implementation of the
Educational Plan, to provide it with a list of Educational Plan action items that are unfunded or
under-funded. Any unfunded or under-funded action items may be referred to the Budget
Committee for review.
The college’s extensive Program Review process assesses progress towards strategic goals. This
information is integrated in planning the college budget.

Self Evaluation
The college meets this standard in certain respects. As evidenced by the positive ending balance
and FTES growth, the college has made tremendous strides in advancing its strategic goal of
ensuring student access. Just prior to the submission of budget requests, Department Chairs are
required to submit annual updates of their progress toward their Program Review goals. Apart


Standard III                                                                                  215
from the successful one-time funding program, the college does not have an on-going shared
governance process for recommending one-time allocations from its fund balance.
Through the shared governance process, the Student Success Committee develops action plans
for implementing special State funding for basic skills, which is specifically linked to our
strategic goal of student success.
To further its institutional goals and implement the sort of projects previously funded by one-
time funding, the college has secured Title V funds and other grants. In addition, the college has
planned for economic hardship and the long term with a “rainy day” account of $11 million
dollars.
Planning Agenda

The college will revise and improve the Integration of financial and institutional planning. The
ESGC will receive reports from the strategic planning subcommittees that will identify unfunded
and under-funded projects to ensure those needs are accounted for in preparing the annual budget
or identified for funding from the college’s positive balance.

The college will also ensure the successful implementation and assessment of the annual update
process to ensure decisions about the annual budget are based on the strategic goals.

III D.1.b. Institutional Planning reflects realistic assessment of financial resource availability,
development of financial resources, partnerships, and expenditure requirements.
Descriptive Summary
Each year the college prepares a financial operations plan to assess the need for financial
resources for all departments. The process is initiated by the District Controllers Office, which
issues a calendar for the coming year’s budget development. The college then distributes its own
budget development calendar to coincide with the District’s preliminary, tentative, and final
budget adoptions.
The college’s preliminary budget is planned in consultation with each department. Each
department is given information on salaries, and non-salary accounts. At individual meetings,
any changes and any new requests are noted
It is the task of the ESGC to review and approve all institutional plans and matters related to their
implementation, include program review recommendations. Program review includes an
assessment of financial resources, partnerships and expenditures. Budget update and District
Budget Committee report are regular agenda items on the ESGC. The ESGC is advised of
information, such as faculty hires, college expenses and district-wide assumptions, that are used
in conjunction with the college goals in recommending a budget for the year.

Self Evaluation
The college meets the standard in that all individuals who are involved in the budget planning
process receive accurate information on the available funds. It is a highly transparent process.


Standard III                                                                                    216
Because the college is one campus in a nine-college district, and the financial condition of the
other colleges affects us, current information from the DBC is critical.
While the Facilities Plan identifies available funding sources, the Educational Plan and
Technology Plan have not. Therefore, the ESGC has requested that the Educational Plan
Subcommittee present it a list of any unfunded or under-funded Educational Plan action items.
The College/District will be providing more training for more employees on the SAP, BW
reports system. This will allow more employees access to the most up to date information as well
as help educate the new members of the ESCG and other committees.
To ensure that institutional plans reflect financial constraints and opportunities, the ESGC will
receive reports from the strategic planning subcommittees that will identify unfunded and under-
funded projects, and will refer these action items to the Budget Committee for review.


Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.


III D.1.c. When making short financial plans, the institution considers long-range financial
priorities to assure financial stability. The institution clearly identifies and plans for payment
of liabilities and future obligations.
Descriptive Summary
The college deals mainly with the annual budget preparation. Long-term issues such as employee
benefits costs are handled by the District Office to assure financial stability. The college has $10
million dollars in a reserve account.
The LACCD has taken significant steps to address the issue of its unfunded liability for retiree
health care. The GASB-mandated accounting standards require public employers to determine
and report their actuarial obligation for “other post-employment benefits (OPEB)” -- primarily
retiree health insurance -- and to develop a plan for addressing those obligations.
The LACCD’s initial actuarial study in 2005 calculated its retiree health benefit liability as
$623.2 million. The large figure was not surprising for a district that has provided pay-as-you-go
retiree health care coverage since its inception in 1969, but the district’s unions and management
recognized that the liability could be reduced by prudent pre-funding of a portion of the
unfunded obligation through an irrevocable trust.

In fall 2006, the district’s six unions and the Board of Trustees approved a negotiated agreement
to begin partial pre-funding by annually directing 1.92% of the previous fiscal year’s fulltime
employee payroll into an irrevocable trust. The district’s full-time employees gave up almost
one-third of the 5.92% Cost of Living Allowance (COLA) provided to community colleges in
2006-07 by the State of California. In effect, LACCD employees agreed that, on an ongoing
basis, they would accept salaries almost 2% lower than they would otherwise have been in order
to secure retiree health care for themselves and future fulltime employees of the district. The

Standard III                                                                                   217
money saved through this sacrifice of salary would create an on-going annual stream of revenue
into the district’s OPEB trust.
In addition, LACCD management and unions agreed that an amount equivalent to the district’s
annual Medicare D refund would also be diverted from the district’s operating budget into the
OPEB trust.
The district and its unions conducted a thorough review of options for the irrevocable trust and
determined that they wanted CalPERS to manage it. Because the law at the time restricted access
to CalPERS trusts to agencies that participated in the PEMHCA health plans, the district and its
unions worked actively to change the law to allow the LACCD (and other non-PEMHCA
agencies) to pre-fund its OPEB obligation through a CalPERS-managed trust. The district had a
second actuarial study completed in accordance with CalPERS guidelines. In fall 2007 Governor
Schwarzenegger signed AB 554 (Hernandez), and in spring 2008, the LACCD moved its
accumulated funds from the Los Angeles County Treasurer to a CalPERS-managed irrevocable
trust. As of fall 2008, the balance in the trust was $11,518,103.

With our pre-funding plan, our annual costs are actually $41,228,000, and our anticipated
funding for 2008 is $38,193,000, which is 93% of the annual costs. (The 2008 figure is higher
than anticipated in subsequent years because it includes a two-year accumulation of pre-funding
in addition to that year’s pay-as-you-go costs.) The second year, it is projected that funding will
be at approximately 80%.
The district’s very successful Joint Labor-Management Benefits Committee continues to work
diligently to find ways to control the cost of health care for both active and retired employees
while continuing to monitor the national debate on the future of American health care. The
district is also working to identify other revenue sources by studying the feasibility of issuing an
OPEB obligation bond and exploring the possibility of directing toward OPEB a portion of the
revenue expected from new public-private partnerships and the sale and/or lease of some district
assets.

Self Evaluation
The college has met this standard by placing $10 million dollars in a special reserve account. The
insurance needs are met by the District Office. During 2007, Governor Schwarzenegger’s
Commission on Public Employee Post-Employment Benefits held hearings across California and
issued a report with recommendations on how the problem of unfunded OPEB benefits could
best be addressed.
Former LACCD Chancellor Rocky Young and LA College Faculty Guild President Carl
Friedlander made a joint presentation to the Commission on the LACCD pre-funding plan at a
hearing at UCLA in September 2007. The Commission included the LACCD plan as a case
study and a model of a “hybrid” solution that fully pre-funds the obligation for young and future
employees while pre-funding a portion of the obligation (and continuing pay-as-you-go) for
those closer to retirement. At a press conference presenting the Commission’s report on January
7, 2008, Commission Chair Gerald Parsky made the following comments:



Standard III                                                                                   218
       “As part of our mission, we surveyed approaches taken by various municipalities
       to fund their pension and retiree health care obligations. We present these
       findings in the „case studies‟ section of the report.
       Looking at these case studies, I think you will see that many of our state‟s local
       governments have been taking this issue very seriously and have implemented
       some very effective and innovative approaches to funding their liabilities.
       Specifically, I encourage you to take a close look at Santa Clara County, Los
       Angeles Community College District, Modesto City Schools District and Central
       Valley Health Trust. Each of these entities has implemented what we regard as
       some of the best practices”.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.

III.D 1.d. The institution clearly defines and follows its guidelines and processes for financial
planning and budget development, with all constituencies having appropriate opportunities to
participate in the development of institutional plans and budgets.
Descriptive Summary
College financial planning operates in a manner that is consistent with the District guidelines and
ensures all constituencies have opportunities in budget development and planning. The essential
process is noted in Standard III.D.1.b. Following adoption of the District budget calendar, the
college disseminates its own budget development calendar to the ESGC and Budget Committee
where all campus constituencies are represented. Following the District’s dissemination of its
budget prep forms and instructions, each campus department is given information on salaries,
and non-salary accounts. Department chairs are instructed to consult with members of the
departments to accurately assess needs and to ensure all constituencies have the opportunity to
participate in the development of the annual budget. Following internal consultation within
departments, department chairs work with their Deans and Vice Presidents to make any changes
and discuss new requests.

Participation in institutional plans occurs college-wide in the development of the Education,
Technology and Facilities Plans and within departments and units through program review. The
college planning process for the development institutional plans involves multiple campus
forums and drafting and approval by shared governances committees, which maximizes
participation of all college constituencies. Program review assesses the implementation of the
institutional plans on an ongoing basis. With the incorporation of the program review annual
update into the annual department goals, each department goes through a more extensive internal
assessment of their program each year and that information is provided to their Deans in advance
of the budget development.

Self Evaluation




Standard III                                                                                  219
Implementation of the program review annual update has occurred for academic units while the
forms for non-academic units are in development and remain to be reviewed by the PRVC and
ESGC.

Planning Agenda

The college will implement the program review annual update process for non-academic units.


III.D.2.To assure the financial integrity of the institution and responsible use of financial
resources, the financial management system has appropriate control mechanisms and widely
disseminates dependable and timely information for sound financial decision making.

III.D.2.a. Financial documents, including the budget and independent audit, reflect
appropriate allocation and use of financial resources to support student learning programs
and services. Institutional responses to external audit findings are comprehensive, timely, and
communicated appropriately.
Descriptive Summary
KPMG LLP audits the District on an annual basis. They produce the “LACCD Report on
Audited Basic Financial Statements” using Government Audit Standards. The most recent result
found the financial statements presented fairly, in all material respects, the net assets of the
LACCD in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.
The District office also has an internal audit division and has conducted several audits. At no
time did ELAC receive any findings that were listed as serious. Responding to these findings was
also comprehensive and timely. The audit division has also conducted audits on the college’s
business procedures without finding any major internal control issues.

Self Evaluation
Recent audits indicate that the college meets this standard; however, the audit findings are not
widely disseminated.

Planning Agenda
The college needs to communicate audit findings beyond the ESGC.

III.D.2.b. Appropriate financial information is provided throughout the institution.

Descriptive Summary

LACCD uses an integrated financial system called Systems, Applications, and Products (SAP).
The implementation of SAP began in 2003. The implementation has been very challenging and
has required the district to undergo several business procedure changes. SAP is a centralized
system and in addition, personnel at the district’s colleges have had a difficult time adjusting to
SAP’s language and input processes.


Standard III                                                                                  220
SAP does, however, provide end-users with up to date financial information and reports. DBC
Report and Budget Update are regular agenda items of the ESGC. From time-to-time under these
agenda items, the ESGC is provided with the following financial information:

    information about the District’s Budget Allocation;
    preliminary, final and adjusted budget information;
    actual and projected data on FTES, revenue, and expenditures;
    information about the budget preparation process, one-time funded projects and occasionally,
    other expenditures;
    approved faculty hires; requested faculty hires;
    fund balance and reserve funds, as well as notification of purchasing deadlines.
(3.40)
Moreover, the college’s Budget Committee functions as a subcommittee that advises the ESGC
on budgetary matters. The Budget Committee reviews fiscal planning information in greater
detail, such as multi-year, line-item analysis of prior, current and projected budgets, specifically
of the program 10100 (unrestricted, general fund) budget. (3.41)

Self Evaluation
Although there is an enormous amount of financial information available to the college, gaining
access to the information has been difficult for faculty and staff. The college meets the standard
but needs to provide training for the employees to understand how to access the financial
information through the network. The college also meets this standard by providing appropriate
financial information to key constituencies through its shared governance process.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.
III D.2.c. The institution has sufficient cash flow and reserves to maintain stability, strategies
for appropriate risk management, and realistic plans to meet financial emergencies and
unforeseen occurrences.
Descriptive Summary
The college receives it monies from the District Office. While awaiting a long-delayed state
budget, the District had sufficient cash and reserves to maintain stability for several months
because of its credit rating and having access to loans. Safety improvements, wellness activities,
and health information have been utilized to help lower employee benefit costs. The college had
an energy balance of $21 million dollars after 2007-08, and has $11 million dollars in special
reserve.

Self Evaluation
The college meets the standard.




Standard III                                                                                   221
III.D.2.d. The institution practices effective oversight of finances, including management of
financial aid, grants, externally funded programs, contractual relationships, auxiliary
organizations of foundations, and institutional investments and assets.
Descriptive Summary
The college and District personnel met on a quarterly basis to review expenditures using E10100
budget and FYTES projections. Discussion and changes may be made during these meetings.
All specially funded programs are within single disciplines/departments. The supervision dean
works with the director on budget so that deadlines are met. Specially funded programs including
the college’s Contract Education component are also processed though the Office of Workforce
Education. The majority of these programs are overseen by Laura E. Ramirez.
Audits are conducted at the local college. Since ELAC receives the largest VTEA amount within
the district, its VTEA programs are audited every year. The Audit Report is distributed at the
Career Tech (Vocational) Deans meeting through the District Liaison, Dean Diane McBride.
Audit findings are sent to colleges and a timeline is made to respond to items of concern. Final
reports are then sent to the district for distribution to all administrators who supervise funding.

III D.2.e. All financial resources, including those auxiliary activities, fund-raising efforts, and
grants are used with integrity in a manner consistent with the mission and goals of the
institution.
Descriptive Summary
All specially funded programs in instruction are audited, and the timing of audits varies
dependent on funding. The college keeps records of expenditures for six years in case of an
audit; as a result, the college has been relatively successful in audits.

Self Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
III.D.2.f. Contractual agreements with external entities are consistent with the mission and
goals of the institution, governed by institutional policies, and contain appropriate provisions
to maintain the integrity of the institution.
Descriptive Summary
The college has facility usage agreements for off-site classes. Such classes fall under the Mission
of the college; ELAC has four such instructional service agreements in the public service area.
These agreements fall under the Goals and Program Review of the Administration of Justice/Fire
Technology programs.
All agreements made in instruction are first sent to the district’s legal counsel for review and
inclusion of any changes/revisions deemed necessary. This is standard operating procedure
throughout instruction including Community Services, Swap Meet, and Contract Education
Division.


Standard III                                                                                  222
Self Evaluation
The college meets this standard.

III D.2.g. The institution regularly evaluates its financial management processes, and the
results of the evaluation are used to improve financial management systems.
Descriptive Summary
KMPG has been used as an external district auditor. The auditors provide feedback to the
college; as a result of such feedback, changes have been implemented in VTEA programs due to
audits. One example of change is equipment tagging; in addition to college inventory control
tags, VTEA-purchased equipment must have a tag that states “VTEA” and the year purchased.
Auditors have actually gone under desks to find these tags.

Self Evaluation
The college meets this standard.
III D.3. The institution systematically assesses the effective use of financial resources and uses
the results of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.
Descriptive Summary
The college has achieved a positive ending balance in each fiscal year since the last
accreditation. During this time, the college has steadily increased enrollment to over 22,000
FTES, becoming a state-defined “large school” in 2006.
Because of the physical limitations and construction activity on the main campus, the college has
had an aggressive attitude toward the development of off-campus courses and has been very
successful at our South Gate, Rosemead, and high school sites. In addition, ELAC has a model
in-service training program with several public service agencies.
Fiscally speaking, the college is a very efficient entity. The college annually monitors its cost per
FTES. The other area to which the college is making a long-term, fiscally prudent commitment is
energy efficiency. The 1.2 MW photo-voltaic farm in the college’s Stadium Parking Lot will
eventually save the college over 1/3 of its electrical costs. The college’s use of financial
resources is systematically assessed through external and internal processes. For instance, the
college submits quarterly expenditure reports to the District Office, which assesses the college’s
use of its financial resources.
Internally, the college’s shared governance process also ensures systematic assessment of its use
of its financial resources. The Budget Committee regularly provides oversight of the college’s
budget and expenditures, which may provide the basis for recommended action by the ESGC.
Moreover, Budget Committee deliberations provide an on-going forum for exploring the
feasibility of linking the college’s use of its financial resources to institutional planning and
evaluation. As an example, in the fall of 2007 the Budget Committee discussed how to connect
departmental budget requests to an evaluation of progress towards Program Review goals.



Standard III                                                                                    223
Resulting from discussions, departments were directed to submit their departmental goals and
program review goals along with their 2008-2009 budget requests in order to enable an
assessment of the use of the college’s financial resources towards advancing its strategic plans.
This opportunity for evaluation was discussed further by the college’s Program Review and
Viability Committee and the Vice Presidents and Deans of Instruction, leading to an update of
the Annual Update process. Consequently, in preparation for the 2009-2010 budget development,
departments have been directed to provide their respective deans with an annual update that
provides information which allows for an evaluation of the allocation of resources to those
departments. That evaluation will provide the basis for improving how the bulk of the college’s
financial resources are used. (3.49)
Additionally, the college regularly assesses the use of financial resources in its distribution of
State Equipment Grant funds and other special funds. As noted earlier, the Budget Committee
requested and received outcome measures for recipients of a competitive one-time funding
process. The recipients were advised that future awarded would be dependent on their outcome
measures.

Self Evaluation
The college meets the standard as evidenced by its growing balance. The college’s quarterly
reports to the district document its effective use of financial resources, particularly with respect
to its positive balance.

Planning Agenda
The college meets this standard.




Standard III                                                                                   224
                                                    Standard IV:
                                        leadership & governance



                                                  meet elac people
                                                  Rose Lee-Chun Huang
                                                  Architecture




                                                 “    I have a bachelor’s degree in tourism
                                                      from Taiwan, but I always wanted
                                                      to design buildings. I majored in
                                                      architecture at ELAC, which prepared
                                                      me to transfer to the master’s degree
                                                      program at Cal Poly Pomona.

                                                                                 ”




                   Start at ELAC…
                            Go Anywhere!
Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 10                                                    12/8/08 9:16:59 AM
                  STANDARD IV: LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE

                                          Committee
          Evelyn Escatiola                                      Reneé Martinez
  Co-     Professional Development Coord.                       Vice President, Workforce Ed
 chairs   escatie@elac.edu              265-8757                & Economic Development
                                                                martinrd@elac.edu      265-8973
          Julie Benavides                                  Armida Ornelas
          Professor, CF&E and Offsite Coordinator          Associate Professor, Political Science
          benavij@elac.edu              265-8870           AFT Chapter Chair
                                                           ornelaao@elac.edu       415-5387
        Danelle Fallert                                    Al Rios
        Associate Dean, EOPS                               Dean, South Gate Educational Center
        FallerdJ@elac.edu             265-8797             riosa@elac.edu          357-6200
        Margaret Galvan                                    Angelica Toledo
Members Professor, Women’s Physical Education              Associate Dean, CalWorks
        galvanm@elac.edu              265-8917             toledoa@elac.edu        267-3746
          Alex Immerblum                                   Vanessa Valverde
          Professor, English and Academic Senate           Professor, Chemistry
          President                                        valverdev@elac.edu      415-4186
          Immerbaw@elac.edu               265-8557
          Sonia Lopez
          Associate Dean, Student Activities
          lopezms@elac.edu                267-3794


                        IV.A. Decision-Making Roles and Processes

 The institution recognizes that ethical and effective leadership throughout the
 organization enables the institution to identify institutional values, set and achieve goals,
 learn, and improve.

 Descriptive Summary
 East Los Angeles College has an established shared governance process that includes
 participation by representatives of all campus constituencies. The intent of this process is to
 provide a means for campus constituents to make their concerns known and participate in
 decision-making. The shared governance structure depends on committees representing the
 different campus constituencies. These committees forward recommendations to the East Los
 Angeles College Shared Governance Council (ESGC), which makes final recommendations
 to the president of the college. The college is developing a shared governance handbook that
 will clearly delineate the process.

 The working relationship among college constituencies—faculty, staff, administrators, and
 students—is designed to be collegial and cooperative. Representatives of the faculty union
 and the Academic Senate work collaboratively. Efforts are made to encourage all

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constituencies to participate in the decision-making process at the committee level.
Additionally, the college leadership works collaboratively with the Los Angeles Community
College District (LACCD) personnel and the governing board of trustees.

IV.A.1. Institutional leaders create an environment for empowerment, innovation, and
institutional excellence. They encourage staff, faculty, administrators, and students, no
matter what their official titles, to take initiative in improving the practices, programs, and
services in which they are involved. When ideas for improvement have policy or significant
institution-wide implications, systematic participative processes are used to assure effective
discussion, planning and implementation.

Descriptive Summary
College leaders on campus are the college president, administrators, department chairs, and
the college’s Shared Governance Council (ESGC). The ESGC is comprised of
representatives from the administration, the Academic Senate, the AFT Faculty Guild, the
AFT Staff Guild, SEIU Local 99, Buildings & Trade Union, the Supervisory Employees
Union, Local 347, and the Associated Student Union. (4.1)

The college maintains an inclusive participatory governance process that promotes our
mission and vision for the college. All constituent groups are brought together to participate
in planning, decision-making, and conflict resolution. The college follows the mandates for
shared governance found in AB1725, the Education Code, Title 5 regulations, collective
bargaining agreements, LACCD policies, and the college’s own shared governance
agreement that has been in force since 1993. (4.2)

The college’s primary shared governance body, ESGC, serves as a clearinghouse for
recommendations presented by our standing committees, as well as a forum for the college
president, Academic Senate, and the leadership of the Associated Student Union to report on
campus issues. (4.3) The following committees report regularly to ESGC:

   Budget Committee monitors the college budget to ensure that it supports the college
   mission;
   Work Environment Committee deals with issues involving campus space utilization, the
   work environment, and the Facilities Master Plan;
   Facilities Planning Subcommittee addresses issues regarding the college’s facilities
   planning;
   Strategic Planning issues are reported by the Dean of Research and Planning. For
   example, recommendations and commendations prepared by the Program Review
   Validation Committees for each unit’s program review are presented for final
   consideration by ESGC. College-wide planning structures and processes such as those in
   program review, strategic planning, and program viability are submitted to ESGC for
   approval. Research and Planning is responsible for monitoring and reporting of District
   planning initiatives and requirements such as the District Strategic Plan and connecting
   the district-wide future bond initiative to educational planning; (4.4)



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   Educational Planning Subcommittee reports on all matters that pertain to the Educational
   Plan, including review and approval of the completed educational plan, vision and
   mission before it is forwarded to the Board for approval;
   Technology Planning Subcommittee provides updates on technology issues;
   The Accreditation Liaison Officer and the Self Study co-chairs report on accreditation
   activities, including review and approval of the college’s self study for renewal of
   accreditation.

These committees, which include representatives from all campus constituencies, meet on a
regular basis to consider issues affecting the campus and forward recommendations to the
ESGC. When the Council approves a recommendation, it is forwarded to the college
president.

Furthermore, the college goals are formulated through planning processes that solicit and
obtain participation from all college constituencies. The following institutional guiding
documents and institutional plans were developed in this fashion:

   College Mission Statement and Vision;
   College Core Competencies;
   SLO Mission Statement and Philosophy Statement;
   Educational Master Plan;
   Basic Skills Initiative;
   Technology Plan;
   Facilities Plan; and
   The Strategic Plan (a compilation of the Education Plan, Technology Plan, and Facilities
   Plan).

The college has numerous committees and subcommittees through which members of the
campus community can provide input and make suggestions to improve the college. (4.5)
Additional opportunities exist for input to the operation of the college:

   Ideas, suggestions, and concerns are discussed at academic department meetings.
   Department chairs then share these ideas at the college’s Chairs Council meeting. The
   Chairs Council reports its concerns to administration at monthly Department Chairs
   meetings, and also may make recommendations directly to the Academic Senate.
   The president of the college meets regularly with his cabinet, comprised of senior
   administrators, who advise him on issues of campus governance.
   Research and Planning Office reports data on institutional performance, such as ARCCs,
   periodically at campus meetings and particularly in Educational Planning Subcommittee
   meetings.
   Individuals can bring forward ideas for institutional improvement in their own units and
   through the shared governance structure of the validation committees during program
   review. Public notice is given to provide individuals, units, and organizations the
   opportunity to submit commendations and recommendations for validation committees to
   consider when specific units are under review.


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   Through the Student Learning Outcomes Committee, constituencies, both instructional
   and non-instructional, participate in setting policy and providing guidance in the SLO
   process.
   The Student Success Committee is actively engaged in formulating goals and timelines to
   improve campus-wide student learning and success. A large number of campus
   constituencies (more than 40) are participating in this effort.
   Members of the college community participate in district-wide shared governance
   committees, including: the District Budget Committee; the Joint Labor Management
   Benefits Committee; Advisory Council on Student Learning Outcomes; the Equal
   Employment Opportunity Advisory Committee; Student Success Initiative Steering
   Committee; District Research Committee; District Planning Committee; and District-
   wide Professional Development Committee.

Self Evaluation

The college’s institutional leaders foster a collegial environment in which viewpoints are
expressed and in which all constituencies are openly invited to contribute their opinions and
suggestions. The college’s administrators work respectfully with all segments of the campus
community. Those who participate in institutional governance have forged an effective
working relationship with their colleagues. The AFT Faculty Guild and Academic Senate
leadership cooperate well during the consultation process. The president regularly receives
recommendations from his cabinet made up of his vice presidents. However, what is
discussed at cabinet is not explicitly reported to shared governance committees. No minutes
are kept, so it is not known what role cabinet decisions play in policy making.

It was noted in the last self study that the college could improve its budget planning process.
A team of basic skills consultants found that the perception exists among some faculty that
the college gives too much priority to ensuring a large fund balance to help build up the
District’s reserves. The concern is that budget planning reflects greater priority on boosting
enrollment, which does further student access, to the exclusion of retention and other
indicators of student success. (4.7)

While a budget planning process exists, this process has not always been clearly linked to
effective and long-term institutional planning. Budget planning decisions are principally the
result of budget requests submitted by department chairs/unit managers and the processing of
those requests by administration based on available financial resources and the needs of the
department/unit. Recently, the college has directed department chairs to provide, in advance
of the budget development, annual updates of the department’s progress towards program
review goals. By adding this requirement, the administration can ensure that department
members are regularly providing input on program review progress and that progress is
linked to the budget development process. (4.8, 4.9)

It should be noted that neither the ELAC Budget Committee nor the ESGC participates in
budget development, a process which limits shared governance oversight of budget planning.
However, the adopted budget and actual expenditures are reviewed by the ELAC Budget
Committee, which may make recommendations to the ESGC. (4.10)

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At the college level, recommendations for allocation of discretionary funds, when one-time
funding is provided by the State, are determined by the ELAC Budget Committee and
recommended to the ESGC. The Budget Committee uses proposals by units, departments, or
divisions as endorsed by college planning committees and department chairs that are
supplemented with program review results to determine the allocation of funds. (4.11)
However, there remain instances when the administration has made decisions to allocate
discretionary funds without following this process. (4.10)

Recently, the ESGC has requested from the Educational Plan Subcommittee a list of
prioritized Educational Plan action items that specifies which items are unfunded and under-
funded, if any. Any unfunded and under-funded action items may be referred to the Budget
Committee for review. (4.3) This report will enable the Budget Committee to oversee and
make recommendations concerning the allocation of financial resources to achieve strategic
goals.

The Program Review and Viability Committee, in collaboration with the vice presidents of
all divisions, will oversee the development, structure, and process that will formalize the use
of departmental planning processes and measures of effectiveness through Program Review
for use in budget allocation. Upon full assessment and confirmation of these processes, they
will be forwarded to the ESGC for approval. With the new program review annual update
process, the process of budget allocation is now clear in facilities, technology, and
operations, as well as for individual units. (4.12) Perhaps what is unclear at this time in the
college’s development is how it will structure the resource allocation process for the long-
term goals and objectives that will be published soon in the college’s latest revision of its
Strategic Plan, especially in the Educational Master Plan, in which goals and objectives are
often tied to innovation and institutional change.

Furthermore, resource allocation decisions operate under a narrow window of time that
negates or severely limits sustained collegial dialog. The resource allocation process on this
campus is fragmented in that each campus unit submits a budget request that is reviewed by
its vice president, sent to the President for approval, and then forwarded to the District. Due
to constraints imposed by the District, the allotted time is primarily during winter intersession
(January) when most faculty members are not available.

Prior to spring 2008 when the college hired an Associate Dean of Research, it had not had
one for the previous two years. Three individual search processes were held over a year and a
half to locate the current Associate Dean of Research. (4.13) During this time, a research
analyst filled requests for institutional data and on student outcomes by the President’s Office
and administration as well as faculty, programs and services as requested. (4.14) However,
data that would provide substantial information about the effectiveness of programs, services,
or for strategic planning were limited, and available mainly as provided to the college by the
District Research Office. (4.15) Therefore, although some data have been available, not all
decisions have been data-driven.




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Using data in the decision-making process is an area which must continue to be improved.
The Research and Planning Office has just completed the design for and has posted a website
providing all consumers, both internal and external, with information on the college and its
students. The website contains all college profiles for the past seven years, in addition to
other information, and will also provide forms and information on how to submit data
requests to the Research and Planning Office.
(http://www.elac.edu/collegeservices/researchplanning/index.htm).

Additionally, the college is forming the Research Prioritization Committee that will assist the
college in establishing a college-wide research agenda for broader use in effective decision
making. This committee will also provide the college at-large with guidelines on how data
should be used in decision making because the production of data does not guarantee that the
college-at-large will use these data to guide in decision making. Institutional data, while
reported in some committees, are not widely circulated to faculty, students and staff, nor are
they explicitly the basis for decision making.

Planning Agenda

The Budget Committee will develop a narrative of the process and structure of the budget
allocation process at all levels and will provide a graphic that assists the college at-large in
understanding this process. It will be incorporated in the college’s decision-making handbook
when it is completed.

The Research and Prioritization Committee will establish a college-wide research agenda and
post this agenda on the college’s Research and Planning website. Additionally, through
consultation with the Research and Planning Office, the Research Prioritization Committee
will develop a structure and process for the dissemination and use of data and research
findings by faculty, staff, committees, the President and his Cabinet for use in decision
making.

The Budget Committee will report to ESGC recommendations on spending any discretionary
monies derived from the college’s yearly fund balance.

IV.A.2.The institution establishes and implements a written policy providing for faculty,
staff, administrator, and student participation in decision-making processes. The policy
specifies the manner in which individuals bring forward ideas from their constituencies
and work together on appropriate policy, planning, and special-purpose bodies.

Descriptive Summary

The college follows the mandates for shared governance of AB1725, the Education Code,
Title 5 regulations, collective bargaining agreements, LACCD policies, and its own shared
governance agreement. The college is structured into three major areas: Administrative
Services, Student Services, and Academic Affairs. Each area is responsible for creating its
own goals in alignment with the college goals. All of the different goals feed into the



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college’s Strategic Plan. Additionally, key college committees have bylaws that delineate
their purpose and functions. A decision-making handbook is in draft format . (4.16)

IV.A.2.a. Faculty and administrators have a substantive and clearly defined role in
institutional governance and exercise a substantial voice in institutional policies, planning,
and budget that relate to their areas of responsibility and expertise. Students and staff also
have established mechanisms or organizations for providing input into institutional
decisions.

Descriptive Summary

As previously stated, ELAC was among the first of the district colleges to adopt a shared
governance agreement with the college president in 1993. Faculty members have many
opportunities to participate in shared governance and to serve on committees for which they
volunteer or in some cases are appointed to by the Academic Senate president, by a vote of
the senators, or by the Faculty Guild chapter president. At the annual Fall Opening Day
event, which all probationary and tenured faculty are required to attend, faculty are informed
about college governance and given a list of all the campus committees along with their
meeting days and times. (4.5)

Emphasizing the importance of faculty participation, the LACCD/Los Angeles College
Faculty Guild agreement spells out faculty representation from the union and Senate on
certain shared governance committees. Committee work is considered part of a contract
faculty member’s responsibilities, and faculty evaluations consider performance of
responsibilities, which includes committee participation. (4.17) For key shared governance
leadership positions, for example, the Academic Senate, Curriculum, and Student Success,
and Student Learning Outcomes, that require intensive use of time, the college provides
reassigned or released time.

Adjunct faculty members are welcome to participate on committees. A provision in the
faculty collective bargaining agreement allows for adjuncts to be compensated for duties and
tasks beyond the scope of their primary adjunct assignment, and the college has developed
guidelines to facilitate payment. (4.18) In spring 2007, an adjunct faculty voting
representative was approved to serve on the Academic Senate. (4.19)

In addition to the committee process, ideas, suggestions, and concerns are also discussed at
academic department meetings. Department chairs have two avenues for offering
recommendations to the college leaders: Chairs Committee and Chairs Council. The Chairs
Committee is an administrative body overseen by the instructional vice presidents to inform
the chairs of issues and policies. The Chairs Council is a Senate-sponsored committee that
enables chairs to share and forward departmental concerns to the Chairs Committee and the
Academic Senate.

Department chairs are responsible, in consultation with department members, for submitting
annual budget requests based on departmental needs and goals. In the past, department chairs
have been directed to prepare departmental needs and goals based on their Program Review.

Standard IV                                                                              233
(4.21) To improve the linking of budget requests to program review goals, in advance of the
budget requests, department chairs are to submit annual updates on their progress toward
Program Review goals. (4.22)

Staff members are encouraged to participate in their unit’s Program Review and to serve on
program review validation committees. They also provide input to shared governance
committees, for example, ESGC, through their representatives from their bargaining units.

Administrators are appointed by the college president to shared governance committees
based on their areas of expertise. Students are represented by the ASU, whose president is a
voting member of the ESGC.

Self Evaluation

While the shared governance model attempts to be all inclusive, there are areas which can be
strengthened. For instance, while the shared governance process involves different
constituencies, the individuals representing the different constituencies must be more
proactive in reporting back to their respective constituencies and sharing information.

Also there exists a core group of faculty who are active on more than one shared governance
committee. This places a disproportionate burden on some active faculty. A challenge to
increasing faculty participation at the institutional level is the ever increasing need for
participation on department-level committees, such as SLOs, program review, advisory,
discipline, course outline revisions, and syllabus review.

Full-time faculty member are obliged by their bargaining agreement to fulfill their
professional duties by serving on at least one department, college, or district-wide committee.
This is to be enforced by performance evaluations. Although the information is available
through the published committee list on paper and on the Academic Senate website, there are
some who do not understand how to initiate change or bring suggestions to the proper
committee for implementation. Successful encouragement of faculty participation is not
consistent throughout the academic year. Beyond communicating with constituent leaders,
the college has not developed specific strategies for broadening participation on shared
governance committees.

Student participation in shared governance could also be improved. Given the ―commuter
campus‖ nature of the college, it is often difficult to ensure the participation of our students.

Planning Agenda

In light of the recent increase in the hiring of new faculty, great opportunity exists for
recruiting new committee participants. The importance of participation on committees should
be stressed during new faculty orientation, at department meetings, and during opening day
activities. The college, led by the faculty leadership, classified leadership, and administrators,
will collaborate via a workshop or retreat to determine methods of promoting of the
involvement of all constituents in the governing process.

Standard IV                                                                                  234
The Academic Senate will reexamine professional development guidelines to develop a
specific policy that supports faculty participation on committees.

IV.A.2.b. The institution relies on faculty, its academic senate or other appropriate faculty
structures, the curriculum committee, and academic administrators for recommendations
about student learning programs and services.

Descriptive Summary

The college’s Academic Senate, comprised of faculty members elected by their peers from
each department to represent them in all academic and professional matters, plays a
leadership role in recommending instructional policy and changes in instructional programs
and student services. It meets at least two times a month, as does its executive committee.
Through consultation, as needed, the Senate forwards policy recommendations to the college
president and/or shared governance committees.

The Chair of the Curriculum Committee attends all Senate meetings and brings forward all of
that committee’s actions for final approval by the Senate. The responsibilities of the
Curriculum Committee include reviewing all new curricula prior to approval by the Board of
Trustees. The Committee also oversees revision of existing courses and programs. The
Curriculum Committee includes representation from faculty throughout disciplines on
campus. The committee meets at least 3 times per month. The faculty chair of the Curriculum
Committee is given .6 reassigned time. (4.23)

Faculty play a substantial role on faculty hiring committees, in faculty evaluations, and in
departmental program reviews, which directly impact student learning programs and
services. In fact, when departments submit their budget requests, such requests must be
linked to the department’s Program Review goals. (4.24)

Academic administrators serve on all shared governance bodies as active participants or as
information resources.

The Student Learning Outcomes Committee, chaired by the student learning outcomes
coordinator, meets bimonthly to develop and review policy for the student learning outcomes
cycle. Every college unit is encouraged to send one representative to the meetings. The vice
presidents for academic affairs and for workforce education, as well as some deans, regularly
attend the meeting. (4.25) The SLO Handbook provides guidelines for the SLO process.
(4.26) A recent action by the Student Learning Outcomes Committee is the consideration for
the need to develop a second committee to concentrate on the issues related to the assessment
of SLOs.

A positive example of a program that provided support for academic programs is the ―One
Time Funding‖ program, available during the 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 academic years.
This program was a result of discussions in the Budget Committee, wherein the
determination was made to allocate a designated amount of funding for faculty-proposed

Standard IV                                                                             235
projects specifically related to academic programs with an emphasis on student success.
Hundreds of thousands of dollars were allocated to departments that submitted proposals.

The College also relies on other governing structures including Title 5 regulations, California
Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, Board of Governors, California Education Code,
LACCD human resources guides and hiring policies, and LACCD Regulations and Board
rules for guidance in arriving at recommendations about student learning programs and
services.

Self Evaluation

Faculty and administrators play a central role in decision-making regarding student learning
programs and services. Their principal involvement in program review, SLOs, sound
curriculum development, and the one-time funding awards are examples of this process.
Administration and faculty actively participate in the development and oversight of student
support and academic services. Math and English faculty sit on the Matriculation Committee,
Transfer Committee, and Scholarship Committees.

The faculty has taken a proactive role in developing outreach strategies with the Financial
Aid Office so that a greater number of students receive federal and state financial assistance.
Other committees on which faculty and administrators play a key role are Distributive
Learning/Distance Education Committee, Off-Site Committee, and the Student Success
Committee.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

IV.A.3. Through established governance structures, processes, and practices, the
governing board, administrators, faculty, staff, and students work together for the good of
the institution. These processes facilitate discussion of ideas and effective communication
among the institution’s constituencies.

Descriptive Summary

The college maintains an environment of inclusive participatory governance to promote our
mission and vision for the college. Our structures bring all of our constituent groups together
to participate in planning, decision making, and conflict resolution. In addition to regularly
scheduled committee meetings, other effective methods of communication include the
college website, posted minutes, e-mails, consultations between the president and other
campus leadership, and campus weekly bulletins. When these processes are utilized,
discussion among the institution’s constituencies occurs in the spirit of shared governance.

Self Evaluation




Standard IV                                                                               236
Shared governance brings everyone to the table. Participants feel that they have a voice in
decision-making process. Usually communication between the administration and the faculty
is positive. Two notable exceptions are presented here:

The Senate expressed concerns over the deviation from the practice of shared governance
over faculty hiring decisions as required by the district policy, the AFT/LACCD Faculty
Agreement, (4.17) and the college’s unofficial faculty hiring policy under the interim
president from July 2006 to 2008. The Senate objected to the lack of explanation for the
reasons the interim president gave for his hiring decisions. Moreover, during 2007-2008
period, instead of adhering to the clear and critical timelines delineated in the hiring policy,
(4.29) the president took more than 60 days to forward any changes to the Senate-approved
hiring priority list, and to compound the error, he initially sent his changes to the Joint Hires
Committee co-chairs, not the Senate president. This was the second year in a row that the
interim college president had violated the faculty hiring process and approved shared
governance practices. With the return of the president, the Academic Senate feels more
hopeful that the hiring policy will be honored.

The administration does not always consult the faculty when making decisions regarding
administrative hires. For example, during fall 2008, an administrative hire was initiated
without consulting the faculty. During a meeting with the Senate Executive Committee, the
college president agreed to work with the Chancellor to arrange for a transfer of the new hire
and promised to apprise the Senate president of plans for future administrative hires.

To our credit, the college benefits from having strong and independent constituent groups
which can and have challenged perceived violations of the shared governance process. Two
notable examples have occurred in the area of resource allocation. The Academic Senate has
raised objections over the implementation of the Faculty Hiring Policy and the practice of
hiring administrators without consultation. (4.19)

During the time of the construction occurring under Bond A and AA measures, the Facilities
Committee time and again challenged the lack of communication and follow through
between the constantly changing membership on the construction management team and the
administrative leadership, seriously questioning the escalating costs, limited reporting, and
missed timelines. (4.30)

While the shared governance process can be tenuous, it is productive for advancing the
greater interests of the college. The senate president and college president had several
focused meetings regarding the Student Success Committee’s recommendations to improve
student success. Consequently, the President approved the hiring of an Associate Dean for
Student Success and supports the college’s year-long orientation for new faculty.

Using several modes of communication, including e-mail, Internet, and committee meetings,
communication can be maximized so that particular campus constituencies do not feel left
out of the decision-making process.

Planning Agenda

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The Academic Senate and college president will work to iron out areas of disagreement in
the faculty hiring policy, with the goal of formalizing an official policy.

The Academic Senate and college president will work toward improving transparency and
timeliness of communication between the President and Joint Hires Committee regarding
final hiring decisions and explanation of any deviations from Joint Hires recommendations.

IV.A.4. The institution advocates and demonstrates honesty and integrity in its relationship
with external agencies. It agrees to comply with Accrediting Commission Standards,
policies, and guidelines and Commission requirements for public disclosure, self-study and
other reports, team visits, and prior approval of substantive changes. The institution moves
expeditiously to respond to recommendations made by the Commission.

Descriptive Summary

The college has relationships with many outside agencies – businesses, other colleges and
college districts, the media, the State Chancellor’s Office, neighborhood associations,
Chambers of Commerce, and federal, state, county, and city governmental bodies and
legislators. Some of our programs are audited by outside agencies, such as the National
League of Nursing Accreditation Committee. We have relationships with the U. S.
Department of Education, and CalWORKs/TANF, as well as with Los Angeles area law
enforcement and fire agencies.

Vocational Advisory Boards made up of local business leaders and workers are regularly
convened to advise our deans and instructors regarding our vocational programs. The
construction and renovation made possible by Prop A/AA bonds have required the college to
meet with community representatives (Citizen’s Oversight Committee for the Bond) and
neighborhood associations and coordinate with governmental agencies. The president of the
college also has a community-based advisory council (President’s Advisory Council),
comprised of different community members.

Whenever the college has been involved in accreditation-related processes, it has prepared
appropriate interim reports, midterm reports, and self studies. In all cases, the college has
fully complied with Accrediting Commission standards, policies, and guidelines, including
requirements for public disclosure, team visits, and prior approval of substantive changes.

Self Evaluation

The college has been in compliance with past Accrediting Commission requirements.
Substantive change reports are in progress for the operation of its South Gate Educational
Center and its distance education program. However, they have not been completed in a
timely fashion.

Planning Agenda



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The college will be more responsive to the preparation of substantive change reports as
required by guidelines and policies of the Accrediting Commission.

IV.A.5. The role of leadership and the institution’s governance and decision-making
structures and processes are regularly evaluated to assure their integrity and effectiveness.
The institution widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the
basis of improvement.

Descriptive Summary

The institution’s decision making is guided by the Board of Trustees, the college’s strategic
plan, and shared governance. The Board of Trustees establishes polices that must be
implemented by the district’s chancellor and college president, who is evaluated on his
success in implementing these policies. In addition, the Board of Trustees adopts the strategic
plan for each of its nine colleges.

In June 2007, the interim president held a Strategic Planning Retreat in which members of
the different campus constituencies had a chance to engage in dialogue regarding future
facilities concerns. (4.33)

In fall 2006, the function and membership on the shared governance committee, at that time
named the East Los Angeles College Budget and Planning Advisory Committee (EBPAC),
were evaluated. The membership was restructured and the committee renamed to East Los
Angeles Shared Governance Council. (4.3, 8/28/06 and 9/11/06)

The Academic Senate evaluated its processes when it updated its constitution in spring 2006
(4.19, 5/23/06) and developed bylaws in spring 2007. (4.34) The Senate further committed
itself to reviewing its bylaws every three years, thus assuring regular evaluation of its
governance processes.

Two additional key campus committees, the Student Success Committee and the Budget
Committee (4.34) have developed bylaws to identify their purpose and participation of key
constituents. The Technology Planning Subcommittee will develop bylaws during fall 2008.
The Educational Planning Subcommittee and the SLO Committee will also develop bylaws
by spring 2009.

Self Evaluation

Although the college has made great progress in developing inclusive shared-governance
planning structures and process where college-wide input is obtained for decisions on college
priorities, goals, and objectives since its last accreditation review, it has not been effective in
formally measuring the success of the intended plans. Informal review of the status of prior
plans was required to develop the current Education Plan and the Technology Plan and is
being used for the revision of the Facility Plan that is in progress.




Standard IV                                                                                   239
What is new to this process and completes the evaluation cycle for strategic planning in this
evaluation cycle is the determination of measurable objectives that will be monitored. The
status of these measures of success in implementing plans will be reported to the college at
large on an ongoing basis. Additionally, since the last accreditation, the Research and
Planning staff has been augmented to include staff whose responsibility it will be to monitor
the progress of measurable goals and objectives. (4.37) The creation of the District Planning
Committee has also supported the college in more recently completing the college’s
evaluation cycle by establishing Core Indicators of success that the district will monitor for
all colleges. (4.38)

The district also recently required that each college report to the board on its progress in
meeting the District’s Strategic Plan. (4.4) The college would benefit from feedback about
the results of the achievement of District and College plans, goals, and objectives for ELAC
that were established through a inclusive decision-making process.

Planning Agenda

The Research and Planning Office will present the District Core Indicator measures and the
measures for monitoring the strategic, educational, facility, and technology plans to the
ESGC. Additionally, it will determine the exact timeline it will use to report the progress on
these measures to the college-at large over and above posting results on the Research and
Planning website.

                      IV.B: Board and Administrative Organization

In addition to the leadership of individuals and constituencies, institutions recognize the
designated responsibilities of the governing board for setting policies and of the chief
administrator for the effective operation of the institution. Multi-college districts/systems
clearly define the organizational roles of the district/system and the colleges.

IV.B.1. The institution has a governing board that is responsible for establishing policies
to assure the quality, integrity, and effectiveness of the student learning programs and
services and the financial stability of the institution. The governing board adheres to a
clearly defined policy for selecting and evaluating the chief administrator for the college or
the district/system.

East Los Angeles College is one of nine colleges in the Los Angeles Community College
District (LACCD). The district exists in accordance with Education Code 70902 and 72000,
and as articulated in chapter one of the Board Rules. Currently East Los Angeles College is
participating with Los Angeles Trade Technical College and Los Angeles City College in a
joint multi-college accreditation review.

Section IV.B.1 was authored by representatives from the district office. The college reviewed
the section for accuracy.




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IV.B.1.a. The governing board is an independent policy-making body that reflects the
public interest in board activities and decisions. Once the board reaches a decision, it acts
as a whole. It advocates for and defends the institution and protects it from undue
influence or pressure.

Descriptive Summary

The Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) comprises nine related colleges,
each of which is directly answerable to a seven-member board of trustees, in accordance with
the Education Code. (4.40) LACCD board members are elected for four-year terms district-
wide by voters in the city of Los Angeles and several neighboring communities. Trustee
elections are held on a staggered basis, with three or four seats being filled every two years.
At its annual organizational meeting, the board elects a president and vice president to serve
one-year terms. A district-wide student election is held annually to select a non-voting
student member for a one-year term.

Board meetings are held both at the district’s central office and at each of the nine college
campuses during the academic year. They are publicized and open to the public. The trustees
meet approximately twice a month to consider and vote on policy, financial and personnel
matters. All nine college presidents, district office senior staff, representatives of employee
unions, and students sit at the resource table and may participate freely in the discussion of
issues.

All rules and regulations of the LACCD must be approved by these elected representatives of
the community. On all matters deemed to be academic and professional, the board has agreed
either to rely primarily on the advice of, or to reach mutual agreement with, the District
Academic Senate (DAS). For the creation of collective bargaining agreements, the trustees
delegate authority to the chancellor and his human resources team to bargain in good faith
with agents of the six unions representing employees in the district though they do vote on
the adoption of all collective bargaining agreements.

Self Evaluation

As officials elected at large, the board represents the interests of a broad range of
constituencies. An independent policy-making body, its members are elected at large across
one of the most demographically diverse urban areas in the U.S. Its odd-year election
schedule gives board races greater visibility on the ballot but also results in lower voter
turnout and on occasion a high cost for conducting an election.

Board members work together collegially to support the interests of the district. The board
takes an active role in advocating for the interests of the colleges and the students they serve
and in defending the colleges from undue interference. For example, board members have on
several occasions united to support local college master planning decisions that were made
through sound shared governance processes, despite the opposition of special interest groups.




Standard IV                                                                                241
Planning Agenda

The board meets this standard.

IV.B.1.b. The governing board establishes policies consistent with the mission statement to
ensure the quality, integrity, and improvement of student learning programs and services
and the resources necessary to support them.

Descriptive Summary

The LACCD Board of Trustees exercises oversight of the college’s educational programs by
means of board rules and administrative regulations that establish standards for graduation,
set policies for curriculum development, and detail the faculty’s role in educational matters in
accordance with the district’s stated mission. (4.41) The board has set policies in relation to
the curriculum approval process and its role in ensuring the quality of the college’s academic
offerings as well as the central role played by the district and college academic senates in
relation to academic and professional matters. (4.42) The board also must approve or
disapprove all changes to the curriculum that are brought before it from the district’s Office
of Instructional and Student Support Services or the DAS.

The board is directly responsible for guaranteeing the colleges’ integrity and financial health
by periodically reviewing and approving the colleges’ mission and vision statements and by
requiring regular reports from the college presidents on the colleges’ budgets. Through
district administrative offices, the board is also responsible for overseeing compliance with
all federal, state, and local policies in relation to student financial aid and other fiscal
programs.

Self Evaluation

Over the past 10 years, district administrators, the Council of Academic Affairs (the
assembled Vice Presidents of Academic Affairs), and the DAS have worked to streamline
procedures for the approval of academic programs and courses. As part of this effort,
administrative regulations have been revised to decentralize the curriculum approval process
and empower local college faculty. A policy on emergency equivalencies has also been
adopted to facilitate the hiring of adjunct faculty. In addition, the district adopted a series of
board rules mandating program review, biennial review of vocational programs, program
viability review, and program discontinuance processes at the college level. These and other
aspects of decentralization allow local college academic programs to be more responsive to
local stakeholders. (4.43)

Board members regularly meet with state lawmakers and educational leaders to promote
legislation and other initiatives aimed at improving college access for students and securing
funding for special projects. The board played a central role in promoting the Prop A and AA
bond initiatives passed in 2001 and 2003 that have provided more than $2 billion in badly
needed capital construction funds for projects on all LACCD campuses that will directly
benefit instructional programs.

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Planning Agenda

The board should consider appointing a district representative(s) to oversee the construction
progress within the district.

IV.B.1.c. The governing board has ultimate responsibility for educational quality, legal
matters, and financial integrity.

Descriptive Summary

The board monitors the educational quality of all LACCD programs through its Committee
on Planning and Student Success, which addresses issues related to educational effectiveness,
student achievement, and educational program support. In addition, it oversees the
accreditation process and reviews and comments on college accreditation reports. In
conjunction with the chancellor’s office and district general counsel, the board is apprised of
and assumes responsibility for all legal matters associated with the operation of all nine
campuses. The District Budget Committee (DBC) bears responsibility for monitoring all
aspects of district and college finances. An independent audit of the district’s and the
colleges’ financial statements and accounting practices is made annually by an outside
auditor. (4.44)

Self Evaluation

The ultimate responsibility for policies and decisions impacting all nine colleges lies with the
board. The board and district administration, working cooperatively with the academic
senate, and employee unions, have addressed past accreditation concerns related to college
funding in order to secure the financial future of the nine LACCD colleges. The District
Budget Committee (DBC) was reconstituted in 2003 to assure broader faculty and staff
participation. Under its guidance, allocation procedures and policies were revised to more
accurately reflect the needs of each college’s educational programs. Cooperation among the
board, district, and unions has also resulted in positive ending balances and a healthy district-
wide contingency fund, another result of board and district involvement in overseeing the
fiscal health of the colleges. The maintenance of this significant contingency fund has
allowed the district to minimize the impact of state budget cuts on local college programs and
has also made it possible for smaller LACCD colleges to seek additional funding, when
needed, to support educational offerings.

Planning Agenda

The board should develop a planning policy to allow a college the use of contingency funds
during a budget crisis if the college can demonstrate a significant growth in technical or
academic programs.




Standard IV                                                                                 243
IV.B.1.d. The institution or the governing board publishes the board bylaws and policies
specifying the board’s size, duties, responsibilities, structure, and operating procedures.

Descriptive Summary

The duties and responsibilities of the board are defined externally by the State Education
Code, Section 70902, and internally by board rules. (4.45) The chancellor and general
counsel also play an important role in monitoring board responsibilities. The bylaws and
policies are published on the district’s website.

Self Evaluation

According to the district’s self study, (4.46) the LACCD’s own internal checks and balances
have generally been effective in ensuring compliance with the board’s externally and
internally defined duties and responsibilities.

Planning Agenda

The board meets this standard.

IV.B.1.e. The governing board acts in a manner consistent with its policies and bylaws.
The board regularly evaluates its policies and practices and revises them as necessary.

Descriptive Summary

The process for the adoption of board rules and the administrative regulations that support
them are outlined in Chancellor’s Directive Number 70, District-wide Internal Management
Consultation Process. (4.47) These rules and regulations established through the consultation
process are subject to regular review and revision by district administrative staff to ensure
that they remain appropriate and effective. Revisions are reviewed and considered for
adoption at the board’s regular semi-monthly meetings.

The board relies on the chancellor and the college presidents to ensure that all rules and
regulations are implemented uniformly and effectively across the district. The district’s legal
counsel conducts regular reviews of all board rules and policies to ensure that they are
relevant and up-to-date. When board rules or policies are considered to be in need of
revision, they are directed to the appropriate constituencies for review. In February 2007, the
board adopted Administrative Regulation C-12, which stipulates the process for the cyclical,
automatic review of all policies and regulations. (4.48)

Self Evaluation

The trustees consistently act in accordance with established board policies. When
constituents bring issues to the board’s attention, policies are revised as needed. For instance,
when it was brought to its attention that board rules precluded adjunct faculty from serving
on presidential selection committees, the board changed the rule to allow participation.

Standard IV                                                                                 244
Working in collaboration with the DAS, the board revised district hiring procedures by
adopting the state minimum qualifications for all faculty positions. The board also revised
district-wide faculty hiring policies to streamline procedures and give campuses direct
control over their own hiring processes.

Planning Agenda

The board meets this standard.

IV.B.1.f. The governing board has a program for board development and new member
orientation. It has a mechanism for providing for continuity of board membership and
staggered terms of office.

Descriptive Summary

In February 2007, the board adopted Board Rule 2105, a formal policy for the orientation of
new board members. (4.49) The board has also developed procedures for the orientation of
student trustees. (4.50)

Self Evaluation

While there is no formal guarantee of continuity of leadership, the staggering of board
elections does provide some consistency. The fact that incumbents are frequently re-elected
to their positions provides a measure of continuity to governance.

Planning Agenda

The board meets this standard.

IV.B.1.g. The governing board’s self-evaluation processes for assessing board
performance are clearly defined, implemented, and published in its policies or bylaws.

Descriptive Summary

The board’s formal policy on self-evaluation was adopted in 1995. For the following decade,
the board used a self-evaluation checklist to evaluate its overall effectiveness. In June 2005,
the board reviewed and amended its self-evaluation process, this time expanding it to include
additional feedback on its performance from college presidents, district senior staff, and
union and academic senate representatives, who regularly sit at the resource table during
board meetings. Using this revised process, the board conducts annual self-evaluations,
scoring its performance in 20 general areas and reporting on its self-assessment and the
summarized evaluations of constituency representatives. The board’s most recent self-
evaluation (4.51) was reviewed and discussed at a committee of the whole meeting on
December 19, 2007.




Standard IV                                                                               245
In response to an ACCJC recommendation that the board memorialize the setting of board
goals as part of its annual self-evaluation, the Board of Trustees adopted Board Rule 2301.10
in October 2007. (4.52) At its January 30, 2008 meeting, the board established a new set of
annual board goals. (4.53) In the Fall of 2008, the board will again assess its progress in
accomplishing its goals as part of its self-evaluation process and will set new goals for the
following year.

Self Evaluation

The board meets this standard.

Planning Agenda

Feedback on the board’s performance should also include input from the Student Affairs
Committee.

IV.B.1.h. The governing board has a code of ethics that includes a clearly defined policy
for dealing with behavior that violates its code.

Descriptive Summary

The board adopted a Statement of Ethical Values and Code of Ethical Conduct, Board Rule
2300.10, in October 2005, which requires each member to adhere to values of honesty,
integrity, reliability, and loyalty. With input from district legal counsel, in February 2007 it
established procedures for sanctioning board members in case of ethics violations, Board
Rule 2300.11. (4.45)

Self Evaluation

The board has a clear code of ethics.

Planning Agenda

The board meets this standard.

IV.B.1.i. The governing board is informed about and involved in the accreditation process.

Descriptive Summary

The governing board’s Committee on Planning and Student Success monitors the
accreditation self-study processes of the nine colleges by receiving regular reports on their
progress and reviewing their midterm and final accreditation self-study reports. (4.54) The
board works with this committee to ensure that past recommendations are effectively and
appropriately addressed. During site visits, board members meet with visiting teams, respond
to questions and concerns, and may participate in other forums, meetings, and receptions.



Standard IV                                                                                246
In fall 2007, the Chancellor created the position of District Liaison for Accreditation,
reporting directly to the Vice Chancellor of Institutional Effectiveness. The Liaison
coordinates board activities in relation to accreditation and works closely with the Board’s
Committee on Planning and Student Success. The Liaison meets regularly with faculty
accreditation chairs and ALOs to provide assistance, coordinate efforts, share best practices,
and provide information necessary to respond to ACCJC recommendations regarding the
district.

Self Evaluation

Through the active oversight provided by the board’s Committee on Planning and Student
Success, the colleges have engaged in more positive and productive accreditation processes
since 2000. Over the past eight years, all district colleges have participated in new rounds of
accreditation and have all had their accredited statuses reaffirmed by the ACCJC. More
importantly, the accreditation self study process at all district colleges has become much
more pro-active, collaborative, and collegial than in past years. District colleges are now
approaching accreditation self studies as essential elements in strategic planning and
institutional goal setting, and are using accreditation to address college issues.

Planning Agenda

The board meets this standard.

IV.B.1.j. The governing board has the responsibility for selecting and evaluating the
district/system chief administrator (most often known as the chancellor) in a multi-college
district/system or the college chief administrator (most often known as the president) in the
case of a single college. The governing board delegates full responsibility and authority to
him/her to implement and administer board policies without board interference and holds
him/her accountable for the operation of the district/system or college, respectively. In
multi-college districts/systems, the governing board establishes a clearly defined policy for
selecting and evaluating the presidents of the colleges.

Descriptive Summary

In accordance with board rules, the governing board bears primary responsibility for
selecting the district chancellor and evaluating his/her performance annually. Using the
General Counsel as staff, the board conducts the evaluation of the chancellor, whose contract
includes a provision for an annual evaluation. Each year, the board reviews its previous
evaluation and directs the General Counsel regarding the process for the current year. To
address an ACCJC recommendation in 2007, the Chancellor’s Office wrote a directive that
spells out the evaluation procedure. (4.55) The board solicits input from various
constituencies and collects the data to evaluate the chancellor’s performance on a number of
criteria. (4.56) The chancellor typically prepares a written self-evaluation based upon his
stated goals, and the trustees submit their own appraisals. The trustees then discuss the
evaluation in closed session, and a designated trustee prepares a final draft of the evaluation



Standard IV                                                                               247
for the full board’s review. The trustees meet with the chancellor and provide the final
written document.

The chancellor and senior staff oversee the administrative tasks of the district. The chancellor
also oversees the district foundation to obtain additional resources. He meets regularly with
the cabinet, comprised of senior staff and the college presidents, and has regular
consultations with leadership of the unions and DAS. The chancellor considers
recommendations on financial matters from the District Budget Committee (DBC) and on
employee benefits from the Joint Labor Management Benefits Committee (JLMBC). In
keeping with the provisions of the Education Code, the board delegates its authority to the
chancellor, gives him the autonomy to make decisions without interference, and holds him
accountable for those decisions.

The board shares responsibility with the chancellor for hiring and evaluating the performance
of district vice chancellors, college presidents, and the General Counsel. Board rules specify
selection procedures. (4.57) The selection process for the chancellor and other key
administrative positions typically involves national searches. Hiring committees are
comprised of representatives of all stakeholder groups, including faculty, students, staff, and
community representatives. In accordance with the Brown Act, the board approves
employment contracts and compensation in open session.

The chancellor conducts regular evaluations of the college presidents in accordance with
board rules and makes recommendations to the board on the renewal of their contracts. The
process for the evaluation of college presidents, which has been in place since 2002, is
facilitated by the Chancellor's Office. The procedure is followed each spring with about three
presidents undergoing the comprehensive process each year. To address an ACCJC
recommendation in 2007, the district created a formal written policy, Performance
Evaluation Process for College Presidents, to spell out the evaluation process for college
presidents. (4.58) The description is included in the packet with the evaluation forms that are
used to collect information. (4.59)

Self Evaluation

The broadening of hiring procedures in 2000 to include all stakeholder groups has increased
community and faculty involvement in the selection of the chancellor and the college
presidents. Revised evaluation procedures mandate the hiring of an outside consultant to
facilitate the evaluation of key administrative personnel through interviews with relevant
college constituency groups. This process appears to have worked well in past years and will
continue to be used in future evaluations. The board has also adopted a similar consultant-led
process for the periodic evaluation of the chancellor.

Planning Agenda

The board should reconsider whether a consultant-led process is in fact the best way to
evaluate key administrative personnel and the chancellor. In an effort to promote
transparency from the district, the board should clarify the components/rating system to

Standard IV                                                                                248
include the relevance of a consultant led process in the overall evaluation of key
administrative personnel and the chancellor.


                            IV.B.2. Administrative Leadership

IV.B.2.The president has primary responsibility for the quality of the institution he/she
leads. He/she provides effective leadership in planning, organizing, budgeting, selecting,
and developing personnel, and assessing institutional effectiveness.

IV.B.2.a. The president plans, oversees, and evaluates an administrative structure
organized and staffed to reflect the institution's purposes, size, and complexity. He/she
delegates authority to administrators and others consistent with their responsibilities, as
appropriate.

Descriptive Summary

President Ernest H. Moreno has been serving as the permanent president of the college since
1995 and is the longest serving president in the Los Angeles Community College District
(LACCD). During the period of 2006 through 2008, the college was under the direction of
Interim President Robert Isomoto while President Moreno was away serving as the Interim
President at Los Angeles Mission College. President Moreno was selected by former
Chancellor Rocky Young due to his expertise in college management and leadership.

As President, Mr. Moreno attends biweekly meetings of the Los Angeles Community
College District (LACCD) to represent the interests of the college and to serve as a resource
to the Board. The Chancellor’s Cabinet meets the first Friday prior to Board meetings. The
Cabinet includes the presidents of the nine District colleges and selected District officers.

The President meets once a month with the Academic Senate President/Executive board to
consult on ―academic and professional matters‖ per Shared Governance Agreement (4.2)
signed on August 23, 1993 by former President Omero Suarez. This agreement has been in
effect for over 15 years and continues to support the principle of shared governance on
campus.

The East Los Angeles Shared Governance Council (ESGC), formerly known as East Budget
President’s Advisory Council (EBPAC), is an established shared governance process that
includes systemic participation by representatives of all campus constituencies. (4.60) The
shared governance structure is comprised of several committees (4.61) where different
constituencies are represented. The committee meets biweekly on Monday afternoons. The
ESGC is a recommending committee to the President of the college.

The President meets on a weekly basis with his Cabinet consisting of the Vice President of
Academic Affairs, the Vice President of Workforce Education and Economic Development,
Vice President of Administrative Services, and Vice President of Student Services. The Vice
Presidents annually provide the President with their yearly goals based on ELAC Strategic

Standard IV                                                                               249
plan and the district strategic plan. (4.4) District administration sets enrollment goals for each
of the nine colleges that the Vice President’s are expected to attain as part of their stated
annual goals as reported to the President.

The President has a monthly meeting with his Administrative Council. (4.62) The Council is
comprised of all administrators both certificated and classified. The council provides updates
on their respective areas and advises the president on issues affecting the college.

Additionally, the President meets with other campus constituencies on a regular or in some
cases, an as needed basis or an invited basis. These groups include the American Federation
of Teachers (AFT1521), Classified Union (AFT1521A) and representatives from other
classified staff unions, the Associated Student Union (ASU), and department chairs.
Periodically he holds all-campus as well as town hall meetings. He encourages instructors to
invite him to their classes.

Two key community constituent groups that the President communicates regularly with are
the Community Advisory Oversight Committee and the ELAC Foundation Board.
The passage of two Bonds for college construction requires that the President presides
regularly with the Community Advisory Oversight Committee who provides the check and
balance of building construction taking place on campus over the next 5 years.

To oversee implementation of the Facilities Master Plan, faculty and staff members join
administrators in a monthly facilities planning committee meeting, held on the first Thursday
of each month on campus. The IT Department has also included on each faculty/staff
computer an information webpage that includes alerts concerning ongoing college
construction projects.

The President meets monthly with the ELAC Foundation. This committee is comprised of
members who represent community businesses and organizations who work on fund raising
events to support the college’s mission for student access and success. The Dean of Resource
Development and Community Relations assists the President with this committee.

IV.B.2.b. The president guides institutional improvement of the teaching and learning
environment.

The President provides his goals in writing to his Cabinet and the Chancellor annually. These
goals are used as a framework for the Vice Presidents to plan their annual goals. Goals are
based on measurable data from the district as well as the college’s office of Research and
Planning which reports directly to the president. Data include faculty and student surveys,
(4.63, 4.64) IPEDS, performance indicators (degrees, transfer, persistence, completions,
basic skills, ESL; Accounting Report for Community Colleges (ARCC) data (4.65) and
Internal Scan. (4.66) External Scan data are also used. The system office Management of
Information System (MIS) data and the Labor Market Inventory (LMI) provide annual data
for program planning and improvement.




Standard IV                                                                                  250
The cabinet consists of the four vice presidents, who provide the president with their Cluster
Program Reviews reflecting the strategic plan of the college and the district. Each
department/program under the four vice presidents is required to produce a Program Review
every three years. The Program Review document is evaluated by a shared governance
committee and then reported with recommendations and commendations to the ELAC
Shared Governance council. These program reviews are updated annually to ensure that
program goals are being met and/or improvement continues. (4.8) Student Learning
Outcomes are included in every program review. The SLO committee has created the
mission and vision for the college’s student learning outcomes. The President has supported
reassigned time for 1 SLO coordinator and 3 facilitators to assist the departments with
completion of student learning outcomes in all disciplines. The committee, made up of
department representative and administrators, meets every second Wednesday of each month.
(4.68)

The program review process is linked to program viability.

IV.B.2c. The president assures the implementation of statues, regulations, and governing
board policies and assures that institutional practices are consistent with institutional
mission and policies.

Descriptive Summary

The president is under the directive of the LACCD Board of Trustees, which provides him
with the statutes, regulations and board policies that govern the institution. The president
must provide regular reports to the board. The president meets regularly with his cabinet to
discuss and review institutional practices relative to statutes, regulations and policies. He also
meets with the chancellor individually and is part of the chancellor’s cabinet which is
composed of all of the 9 college presidents and administrative staff.

IV.B.2.d. The president effectively controls budget and expenditures.

Descriptive Summary

The LACCD Board of Trustees is directly responsible for guaranteeing the college’s integrity
and financial health by periodically reviewing and approving the college’s mission and vision
statements and by requiring regular reports from the college president. The president receives
the budget reports on all major budget categories and funds from the vice president of
administrative services. Budget control, utilization, and strategy are regularly addressed in
cabinet and budget committees. Corrective action and adjustments are made on an ongoing
basis. The college has integrated into the budget development process, the annual program
review, which includes program cost analysis to assist in having a more effective budget and
expenditure system.

The college provides a quarterly financial status report on enrollment projections and budget
to the district office.



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The president serves as the chair of the ELAC Foundation Board of Directors. The
foundation provides a newsletter that is distributed local businesses and industries. The
foundation hosts an annual scholarship dinner which includes the new $1million dollar
scholarship for high school students.

To supplement the regular budget an Associate Dean of Resource Development was hired in
December 2005 to write and monitor grant funding. Since that date the college has been
successful in obtaining five federal grants and three local grants to support academic
programs.

Under the Workforce Education and Economic Development division, more than 23 grants
have awarded to the college. (4.69)

The college has established guidelines and training for purchasing and processing of
expenditures as they relate to district policies.

Self Evaluation

In light of budget challenges the college has effectively maintained a respectable budget
balance, hired new faculty (which include both replacement and growth positions), hired
classified staff and updated campus technology.

Planning Agenda

The college meets this standard.

IV.B.2e. The president works and communicates effectively with the communities served
by the institution.

The president is a board member of Monterey Park Hospital and USC Medical Center and
the East Los Angeles Pan American Bank. He is an active member of the East Los Angeles
Rotary Club. He attends regular meetings that are held with Monterey Park City officials and
staff and has established effective lines of communication with community leaders.

The college hosts a number of community events such as dance recitals, musical
performances, theater productions, health fairs, sporting events and art exhibits.

The publication of the President’s Corner is a quarterly publication that is available both in
hard copy and online and has had a positive impact on campus communication. (4.70) The
college has developed an information campaign in the East Los Angeles service that provides
monthly college updates on events and recognitions (awards, grants, recognized faculty &
staff). Advertisement has been purchased to provide enrollment information as well. The
Monterey Park Cascades, Alhambra News, La Opinion, San Gabriel Tribune, Hoy!, and
University Times are a few of the publications used. Moreover, the college mails a mini-
schedule booklet that features stories and information on the colleges and course offerings to
approximately 300,000 community households. (4.71) Each semester, banners are

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strategically placed on Atlantic Boulevard, a major thoroughfare in Monterey Park. Cable
television interviews have been conducted periodically with administrative staff and faculty
reflecting the multilingual audience/communities served.

A high school principal’s breakfast is held annually with the top feeder high schools in the
service area, and Field trips to the college are encouraged by the College President to learn
about college programs.

A partnership with the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) (4.72) includes
concurrent enrollment in high schools focusing on A through G requirements, and middle
schools focusing on math and science programs such as Escalante and the California High
School Exit Exam (CAHSEE).

IV.B.3. In multi-college districts or systems, the district/system provides primary leadership
in setting and communicating expectations of educational excellence and integrity
throughout the district/system and assures support for the effective operation of the
colleges. It establishes clearly defined roles of authority and responsibility between the
colleges and the district/system and acts as the liaison between the colleges and the
governing board.

IV.B.3.a. The district/system clearly delineates and communicates the operational
responsibilities and functions of the district/system from those of the colleges and
consistently adheres to this delineation in practice.

Descriptive Summary

The areas of responsibility of the district office and its nine colleges are governed through
legislation, the Education Code, board rules, administrative regulations, and current and past
practices. In the past few years, the Board of Trustees has pursued a policy of partial
administrative decentralization, which has shifted additional responsibility and accountability
for planning and decision making to the local college level. Since the board formally adopted
the principle of decentralization in 1999, the district and the colleges have been working to
clarify and delineate operational responsibilities.

Shortly after adopting this principle of decentralization, the district participated in the Multi-
College Pilot Program (MCPP) organized by the ACCJC, aimed at clarifying lines of
accountability in multi-college districts. What came out of the program was the creation of a
45-page functional map, which was revised several times over the years. (4.73) To respond to
ACCJC concerns that the map primarily related to accreditation standards and did not
provide a clear delineation of operational responsibilities and functions, the district initiated a
review of all district office functions in 2005.

Over a two-year period, every district office charted the functions it provides to the colleges
and produced District Office Service Outcomes, specifying user constituencies at the college
level, areas of responsibility, and expected outcomes for all services. (4.74) These service
outcomes were shared with the Chancellor’s Cabinet and the three vice presidents’ councils

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to elicit feedback. Further dialogue took place at the annual District Academic Senate
Summit in September 2006, a day-long event attended by 125 faculty leaders and senior staff
from all nine colleges. A panel comprised of the chancellor, a member of the Board of
Trustees, the president of the DAS, a faculty union representative, and a college president
explored the current state of decentralization and district/college relations with attendees.
Breakouts afforded participants a chance to go more in depth to discuss specific areas, such
as payroll, HR, and marketing. (4.75)

In a continuing effort to clarify district/college responsibilities, the district, in conjunction
with the AFT College Faculty Guild, began holding annual Department Chair Workshops.
(4.76) The first such workshop was held in October 2006; the second in November 2007.
About 100 department chairs and vice presidents of Academic Affairs attended each of these
sessions to learn the ins and outs of district and campus roles related to the vital function of
running the colleges’ academic departments.

To further clarify functions, District Office departments have begun a pilot project to create
flow charts of districtwide functions, both on the district and college levels. The goal is to
create simple, intuitive visual process maps of critical functions, such as faculty and staff
hiring, curriculum approval, procurement, specially funded programs, faculty and staff
evaluations, etc. These functional flow charts will delineate responsibilities between the
colleges and the District Office for each step of the process being described. The eventual
goal is to post these online with links to forms and contact information. The Faculty Hiring
Flow Chart is a sample of the charts that are being developed. (4.77)

In addition, Chancellor Mark Drummond has made a commitment to redefining
decentralization as it impacts the district’s efficiency and effectiveness. One of the board's
goals for 2008 is to further clarify the division of roles and responsibilities between the
colleges and the district office. In response to this Board priority, the chancellor has directed
district senior staff to engage the colleges in an ongoing dialogue to further clarify
district/college relationships. The initial result of this effort is the LACCD District/College
Functional Map, which offers a concise description of the history and current state of
district/college relations and a detailed accounting of how district committees and offices
interface with their college constituencies. The Functional Map also includes an extensive set
of "functional flow charts" which present visual maps of the district and college roles in 30
critical administrative processes, ranging from curriculum approval to the establishment of
specially funded programs. (4.73)

The Functional Map is being discussed by college Academic Senates and shared governance
councils across the district. In Winter/Spring 2009, it will be evaluated and further refined by
the District Academic Senate and be a focus of the Board of Trustee's annual retreat. By
spring, sections of the Functional Map--including the listing of all district-wide councils and
committees and the functional flow charts-- will be added as links on the District website for
the use of faculty and staff.

Finally, the District will further clarify the functional relationships and decision-making
pathways between the district office and the colleges by documenting all district-wide

Standard IV                                                                                 254
committees and by posting complete committee descriptions, charges, and meeting times on
its website. This project expects to be completed by the end of Fall Term 2008 and will be
shared with the college’s administration, Academic Senate, and shared governance
committee.

Self Evaluation

Operating within the framework of a large multi-college district, it is an ongoing challenge to
delineate our roles. Decentralization is a work in progress that requires periodic review and
alterations. Our district has become partially decentralized, with some decisions made locally
and others made by the district. In curriculum, some characteristics of a course are
determined by the college and some by the district. Some aspects, such as hiring decisions,
are totally decentralized.

Although the original functional map was developed and modified with considerable input
from the college community, it was not widely disseminated or clearly understood by all
constituents. However, the district’s efforts in the last several years, including the
Chancellor’s dialogue on decentralization, the creation of functional process maps for critical
administrative functions, and the formal delineation of district-wide committees, have greatly
improved understanding of roles and responsibilities across the district for all campus
constituencies.

At East Los Angeles College the administration has developed a campus-wide organizational
chart delineating administrative and supervision oversight as well as for each campus
division and department. (4.78) In addition, each Department Chair was provided an
orientation and a Department Chair’s Handbook for reference to clarify each department’s
operational responsibilities and considerations.

IV.B.3.b. The district/system provides effective services that support the colleges in their
missions and functions.

Descriptive Summary

The district’s primary purpose is to provide operational and logistical support to the colleges.
In this effort, the district office offers an array of support services to the colleges. The main
services involve instructional and student services support, institutional research, human
resources, business services (including contracts and risk management), financial services
(budget and accounting), legal services, public relations and marketing, facilities planning
(including oversight of the $2 billion-plus construction program by the executive director of
facilities planning), development in conjunction with project managers, and information
technology. Collaborative procedures between the district and the colleges include the budget
allocation model, codes for student conduct, and implementation of board rules. Each
college, through its funding allocations, determines specific operational and educational
priorities, which may vary from college to college.

Self Evaluation

Standard IV                                                                                 255
The district’s recent two-year process of self-analysis resulted in recommendations for the re-
organization of administrative unit structures and the refinement of their functions. Involving
input from all nine colleges, this re-organization has resulted in the establishment of clear
outcomes for all district administrative offices, which will then be used to measure the
effectiveness of support services.

Although many administrative functions have been decentralized to the nine colleges, most
of the functions the district performs are, for technical or financial reasons, best carried out
centrally. Although the previous DEC system was antiquated, the new HR system, SAP, has
created many challenges for the colleges. The various IT systems were not communicating to
manage human resources. Personnel placed on each campus (Single Point of Contact Staff,
or ―SPOCs‖) have been dealing with problems as they arise. The district created an HR Help
Desk to assist employees with HR issues that are not solvable at the campus level and is in
the process of creating an Employee Service Center to assist the district’s employees with
payroll, benefits, retirement, and other personnel matters.

Another example of the district’s role in supporting the colleges is offered by the project
undertaken in 2006-7 to upgrade college websites. Working collaboratively, college public
information officers met over a year period with district staff and outside consultants to
design ―templates‖ for the design and content of college web pages. These templates
combined positive web design features with marketing best practices aimed at improving
communication and creating a positive image of the colleges. At the same time, the templates
allowed each college to fashion a unique identity for their sites—one that stressed the
individual character of their campuses and honored the local communities they serve. This
project, now fully implemented, greatly enhanced district-wide communications and
provided valuable support to college Public Information Office staff.

At East Los Angeles College, the college website has undergone a remarkable transformation
in both design and functionality. Each of the college’s divisions and respective
departmental/program units are now involved in the design of their web pages to ensure
meeting the mission of the college and their units.


IV.B.3.c. The district/system provides fair distribution of resources that are adequate to
support the effective operations of the colleges.

Descriptive Summary

The District Budget Committee (DBC) develops and oversees implementation of the
district’s resource allocation model. In 1999, the DBC was restructured in response to a
district-wide budget crisis in order to include additional faculty representation and expand
union and academic senate participation. It is now comprised of the nine college presidents
and representatives from the administrative units, the DAS, and the collective bargaining
units.



Standard IV                                                                                256
Responding to ACCJC recommendations, the DBC adopted a revenue-based model that
mirrored allocation formulas in place at the state level, a model consistent with board policy,
which stipulates that college funding be allocated in the same manner that revenues are
received by the district.

Periodically, the DBC reviews the allocation model and recommends changes when deemed
necessary. Among these have been changes to the way colleges receive growth funds and
basic skills money, a ―window shade’ approach to the allocation of growth dollars, and the
creation of growth targets/ceilings, designed to maximize FTES growth and basic skills
revenue. An FTES Allocation Taskforce, convened in 2005, concluded that the FTES
allocation formula adequately provided resources necessary for colleges to serve their
communities and should be continued.

In 2001, the DBC instituted allocation grant procedures to assist smaller colleges that had
trouble balancing their budgets. A college ending the year in deficit can request the
intervention of the DBC Allocation Grant Task Force, comprised of administrators, faculty,
and staff from other colleges in the district. To apply for debt relief, the college submits a
fiscal self-study to assess the causes of its deficit. Members of the task force review the data,
visit the college, meet with college constituents, and issue recommendations to help the
college reach financial independence. If the college follows these recommendations, a
portion of the deficit is offset with funds from the district’s contingency reserve. Southwest
College underwent the process in 2001-02, Harbor College in 2003-04, and Mission College
in 2007. In Spring 2007, the DBC decided that a college that ends the year in deficit for more
than $500,000 or 1% of its budget (whichever is greater) is required to submit a financial
plan and participate in a quarterly review.

In response to ACCJC concerns, in the spring of 2006, the district engaged a third- party
consultant to review the district’s budget allocation and funding mechanisms. Studies were
conducted to find out whether the model contained inherent disadvantages for the smaller
colleges in the district. Among the findings were that the district should move quickly to
bring its internal budget allocation formula into alignment with the provisions of SB 361,
adjust the allocation model to make assessments on a cost per FTES basis, and to consider a
different way of conducting assessments. In October 2006, then-chancellor Rocky Young
established a DBC budget allocation task force, comprised of stakeholder groups, including
representatives of both small and large colleges, to review the district’s allocation model.

The Budget Allocation Task Force thoroughly discussed the findings contained in the
independent studies, and in January 2007, issued its recommendations for a new budget
allocation model, (4.80) which was adopted by the DBC on January 17, 2007. The new
LACCD allocation model parallels the state budget formula, distributing funds to the
colleges on a credit FTES basis with a two-tiered basis for noncredit. However, it does differ
from the state formula in one critical respect: it increases the foundation grant for the
district’s four smaller colleges (Harbor, Mission, Southwest, and West) by $500,000. This
augmentation of the basic $3,000,000 foundation grant was made in acknowledgement of the
additional administrative expenses incurred by the smaller colleges.



Standard IV                                                                                 257
The task force also recommended that district-wide assessments be changed from a
percentage of college revenue over total district revenue to a cost per FTES basis, in order to
make the system more equitable. The task force further suggested that the district office
budget allocation not be set at a fixed percentage and that its budget be periodically
reviewed.

Self Evaluation

The allocation of resources is one of the district’s most challenging tasks. However, revisions
made by the DBC to the allocation process in the past few years have created a more
equitable and efficient system. As a result of district intervention, one of our colleges in need,
Harbor College, saw its deficit reduced from $3 million to $1 million between 2005 and
2008. The recent revision allows for flexibility and encourages colleges to live within their
means. It also rewards colleges that practice sound enrollment management strategies and
that shepherd resources wisely.

The new model adopted by the DBC addresses the concerns regarding disparity in the
treatment of the smaller colleges, noted by the ACCJC. Despite these efforts however, as of
fall 2008, several district colleges continue to project potential budget shortfalls. These
shortfalls are expected to be mitigated by future growth funds as they become available. In
addition, the district is working with the colleges on enrollment management strategies for
2008-09 to bring their budgets under control.

IV.B.3.d. The district/system effectively controls its expenditures.

Descriptive Summary

Meeting on a monthly basis, the DBC, with administrative, faculty, and staff representation
from all nine LACCD colleges, monitors all college budgets and expenditures. College
budget projections, including reserve funds, are tracked from quarter to quarter, and district
staff members meet with college administrators as needed to address budget problems before
they arise.

As a result of these procedures, the district has maintained at least a 3% contingency reserve
fund every year since the reform of the DBC and allocation formula in 2000. (4.80) The
district’s outside audit assesses the effectiveness of its financial management. (4.81) The
Board of Trustees, college presidents, and the public are provided periodic updates and
presentations regarding the district’s financial condition.

In order to maintain some level of control over health benefit costs for employees, the district
and employee unions formed the Joint Labor Management Benefits Committee (JLMBC),
which decides collaboratively on medical insurance carriers and plans.

Self Evaluation




Standard IV                                                                                  258
The district effectively controls its expenditures. The maintenance of a significant
contingency fund has allowed the district to minimize the impact of state budget cuts on local
college programs and has made it possible for our smaller colleges to seek additional funding
to support their offerings. The JLMBC has been a successful model for savings in an
environment of spiraling health care costs. It won the 2004 AFT Saturn/UAW Partnership
Award as an exemplary model of labor-management collaboration that has resulted in
delivering cost effective, efficient, high quality services. (4.82)

IV.B.3.e. The chancellor gives full responsibility and authority to the presidents of the
colleges to implement and administer delegated district/system policies without his/her
interference and holds them accountable for the operation of the colleges.

Descriptive Summary

College presidents undergo annual review conducted by the chancellor and a consultant-
administered evaluation every third year. Evaluations contain clear grades for effectiveness
in key areas, so that they are held accountable for the effective functioning of their colleges.
These evaluations are reviewed and approved by the Board of Trustees.

Self Evaluation

Since the adoption of administrative decentralization as the current approach to
district/college relations, presidents have enjoyed additional freedom to make key decisions
and have also been held more directly accountable for their actions than they were in the
past.

At East Los Angeles College, the college president works with his administrative cabinet in
consultation with the East Shared Governance Council (ESGC) which is comprised of
representatives from each of the administrative divisions: Administrative Services, Academic
Affairs, Workforce Education and Economic Development, and Students Services, as well as
members from Academic Senate and AFT.

IV.B.3.f. The district/system acts as the liaison between the colleges and the governing
board. The district/system and the colleges use effective methods of communication, and
they exchange information in a timely manner.

Descriptive Summary

The district office has several vehicles for communicating with the colleges. The district
provides reports pertaining to such areas as finance, personnel, and demographics. District-
wide committees, such as the Presidents’ Cabinet, the Vice Presidents of Academic Affairs
Council, the Vice Presidents of Administrative Services Council, and the Chief Student
Services Officer Council, facilitate the sharing of information, which attendees bring back to
their campuses. The chancellor visits the colleges and conducts cabinet meetings and other
sessions with the college presidents and staff. The district’s mainframe computer database,
DEC, allows personnel to access student information and information related to college

Standard IV                                                                                259
operations and enrollment management. Information is exchanged through courier and e-
mail.

Representatives from constituency groups (all collective bargaining units, including faculty,
staff, and administration, the academic senate, and students) have seats at the resource table
at every board meeting, and comments from the resource table are a standing item on each
agenda. Representatives also have the opportunity to take part in the discussion of any item
that comes before the board for a vote.

Changes in board rules and resolutions passed are communicated to the college presidents via
e-mail and forwarded to all users on campus. Before board meetings, agendas are posted at
the district office and on line, and the college’s president, vice presidents, academic senate
president, and AFT faculty and staff guild chapter presidents receive copies. Minutes of
Board meetings are posted on the district website.

IV.B.3.g. The district/system regularly evaluates district/system role delineation and
governance and decision-making structures and processes to assure their integrity and
effectiveness in assisting the colleges in meeting educational goals. The district/system
widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the basis for
improvement.

Descriptive Summary

The delineation of district/college roles and functions is reviewed and revised regularly. The
delineation of district roles has been revised through the creation of process maps to replace
the previously-used functional map. The chancellor initiated a project to revisit the meaning
of decentralization. Customer service satisfaction surveys of district offices are the most
recent effort to evaluate district processes. At every stage, these changes are discussed by
constituents and evaluated. As an example, the results of the study of district office service
outcomes were presented to the vice presidents’ councils and the DAS in Fall 2006 for
discussion and feedback.
Another opportunity to engage in dialogue related to district/college relationships and
functions was launched in the Spring of 2006, when the district initiated the District Strategic
Planning Initiative. This comprehensive district-wide strategic planning process gave the
colleges a chance to assess progress made toward achieving past goals and establish new
objectives. Informal SWOT analysis focus groups were held at each college that semester.
Participants identified district-wide strengths and weaknesses and suggested future priorities.
(4.85) A draft of the District Strategic Plan 2006-2011 (4.86) was circulated in Fall 2006,
discussed in open forums held on the campuses and at the annual DAS summit, and received
final approval by the Board of Trustees in January 2007.

Among the goals approved is Strategic Plan Goal #4, which deals with the development of a
district-wide culture of service and accountability to maximize the ability of the colleges to
act efficiently as independent entities while enjoying the benefits of being part of a large,
multi-college district. The short-term and long-term outcome measures of effectiveness for
the plan’s goals and objectives are outlined in the implementation matrix. (4.87)

Standard IV                                                                                260
In terms of decision-making structures and processes, the LACCD has a policy in place to
identify, consider, and act upon operation and policy matters and specify the form of board
rules and administrative regulations issued through the chancellor’s office. The policy
engages the three councils of vice presidents and the Chancellor’s Cabinet (the chancellor
and college presidents) in the policy development and review process. When appropriate,
other district-wide committees and constituency groups (academic senate, bargaining units,
Student Affairs Committee) are consulted as well.

Self Evaluation

The recent effort by the district office to clarify and analyze its functions is a positive step
toward improving its processes. The strategic planning initiative has involved all the colleges
in dialogue on ways to work together to achieve mutual goals.

The district’s governance and decision-making structures are collegial and inclusive; with
constituents working together to help the colleges reach their educational goals. District
leadership actively seeks the participation of local college leaders in decisions that affect all
of the colleges. Faculty and staff are well represented on district-wide committees. Students
have a voice through a student trustee, who sits on the College Planning and Advisory
Councils and college president selection committees, and convenes the Student Affairs
Committee, which considers policies that impact students. The current student trustee, Rose
Bustos, is from East Los Angeles College, a participant in the shared governance process as
the former Associated Student Union president.




Standard IV                                                                                 261
                                        planning agenda summary




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                   Start at ELAC…
                            Go Anywhere!
Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 11                                                       12/8/08 9:17:00 AM
                           PLANNING AGENDA SUMMARY

Standard I

Planning Agenda - I.A.1. The institution establishes student learning programs and
services aligned with its purposes and its student population

In consultation with the college’s Academic Senate, the Research and Planning Office will
develop an integrated system of measurement that accounts for Student Learning Outcomes
and their connection to achieving established College Core Competencies. Research and
Planning will then integrate this data along with the ongoing College Profile Data to assess
whether the college is fulfilling its mission to its students and community.

Planning Agenda - I.B.1. The institution maintains an ongoing, collegial, self-reflective
dialogue about the continuous improvement of student learning and educational
processes.

It is one thing to create action plans, but another to implement them. Part of the college
planning agenda for Student Success and Basic Skills must be to implement the four newly
created action plan matrices. The Student Success Committee has formed four ad hoc task
forces, one for each matrix, which will identify actions to be taken, implement and supervise
these actions, and determine how they will be budgeted for the next one to two years. This
will depend on the coordinating efforts of the new Associate Dean.

Planning Agenda - I.B.3. The institution assesses progress toward achieving its stated
goals and makes decisions regarding the improvement of institutional effectiveness in an
ongoing and systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning, resource allocation,
implementation, and re-evaluation. Evaluation is based on analyses of both quantitative
and qualitative data.

The PRVC, in collaboration with the Vice Presidents of all divisions, will oversee the
development of structures and processes that will formalize the ties between Program Review
and budget allocation.

The ELAC Budget Committee will review the effectiveness of the budget development
processes for meeting program review goals and explore alternative mechanisms for
supporting unfunded program review recommendations through the allocation of
discretionary funds.

Standard II
Planning Agenda - II.A.1. The institution demonstrates that all instructional programs,
regardless of location or means of delivery, address and meet the mission of the institution
and uphold its integrity.


Planning Agenda Summary                                                                  263
Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) activities will be implemented in all courses. The college
will rely on the program review process to maintain the educational integrity of all programs
regardless of delivery method.

Planning Agenda - II.A.1.c. The institution identifies student learning outcomes for
courses, programs, certificates, and degrees; assesses student achievement of those
outcomes; and uses assessment results to make improvements.

The SLO coordinator and facilitators will work with departments and administration to
complete the SLO cycle in every campus unit.

Planning Agenda - II.A.2.a. The institution uses established procedures to design, identify
learning outcomes for, approve, administer, deliver, and evaluate courses and programs.
The institution recognizes the central role of its faculty for establishing quality and
improving instructional courses and programs.

The SLO Committee, which is in the process of developing the SLO Assessment Committee
(SLOAC), will validate the assessment tools, review data collected, and ensure the core
competencies are addressed.

Planning Agenda - II.A.2.f. The institution engages in ongoing, systematic evaluation and
integrated planning to assure currency and measure achievement of its stated student
learning outcomes for courses, certificates, programs, including general and vocational
education, and degrees. The institution systematically strives to improve those outcomes
and makes the results available to appropriate constituencies.

The college will ensure that SLOs and assessments are developed for all courses and
programs, and will link them directly into the college's Core Competencies. Results will be
aggregated into institutional information with the expansion of activities by the Research and
Planning Office to continually assess the effectiveness of all programs. The Office of
Research and Planning is also creating a template for a new Internet-based Research and
Planning newsletter.

Planning Agenda - II.A.2.i.The institution awards degrees and certificates based on
student achievement of a program’s stated learning outcomes.

The college is in the process of developing Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for courses
and for degree/certificate programs. Development of SLO assessment tools will enable
departments to assess a student’s achievement of a programs stated learning outcomes. The
college will more effectively link achievement of programs SLOs with the granting of
degrees and certificates.

Planning Agenda - II.A.3.a. General education has comprehensive learning outcomes for
the students who complete it, including the following: An understanding of the basic


Planning Agenda Summary                                                                   264
content and methodology of the major areas of knowledge: areas include the humanities
and fine arts, the natural sciences, and the social sciences.

The college will create programmatic SLOs, including creating specific outcomes for
students completing the General Education portion of each program.

Planning Agenda - II.A.7. In order to assure the academic integrity of the teaching-
learning process, the institution uses and makes public governing board-adopted policies
on academic freedom and responsibility, student academic honesty, and specific
institutional beliefs or worldviews. These policies make clear the institution’s commitment
to the free pursuit and dissemination of knowledge.

The District Academic Senate has almost finalized an Academic Freedom policy that is
similar to the one used by the California State University system. When approved, the
college will print that statement in its Catalog.

Planning Agenda - Standard II. B. Student Support Services. The institution recruits
and admits diverse students who are able to benefit from its programs, consistent with its
mission. Student support services address the identified needs of students and enhance a
supportive learning environment. The entire student pathway through the institutional
experience is characterized by a concern for student access, progress, learning, and
success. The institution systematically assesses student support services using student
learning outcomes, faculty and staff input, and other appropriate measures in order to
improve the effectiveness of these services.

The Student Services Division will annually review and update its cluster plan and develop
strategies to improve student services.

Beginning with the fall 2007 semester and continuing with the spring and fall 2008
semesters, the Student Services Division has continued to reassess the pathways that students
must travel from office to office, given the relocations. As a result, all of the Students
Services units and programs have created goals for 2008 to accommodate the temporary
relocations of their respective units and programs.

Planning Agenda - II.B.1.The institution assures the quality of student support services
and demonstrates that these services, regardless of location or means of delivery, support
student learning and enhance achievement of the mission of the institution.

The college needs to hire regular staff who can be trained in all aspects of student services
programs to provide direct information and service in the morning and evening at the
Rosemead Center.

The college also needs to hire a Student Services Specialist and cross-train him or her in the
diverse student services programs and services provided to students for the Rosemead Center
by the spring 2009 semester.

Planning Agenda Summary                                                                   265
The college needs to work with off campus vendors to investigate the feasibility of increasing
web-based student services in the areas of Admissions, Counseling and Financial Aid. The
college will also investigate the feasibility of an online counseling system to increase access
to services for online and general student populations.

Planning Agenda - II.B.3.a. The institution assures equitable access to all of its students
by providing appropriate, comprehensive, and reliable services to students regardless of
service location or deliver method.

By the end of 2008, with the development of Student Service Outcomes (SSOs) and the
collection of assessment data, there will be a systematic approach of assessing how the
student service units and programs are meeting the needs of the students.

The college recognizes the need to provide greater access to student services through
improved technology. The Student Services Division is in the process of determining the
feasibility of implementing online student services. Specifically, the Student Services
Division plans to provide a means through which counseling services can be provided to
students over the internet.

Planning Agenda - II.B.3.c. The institution designs, maintains, and evaluates counseling
and/or academic advising programs to support student development and success and
prepares faculty and other personnel responsible for the advising function.

The Counseling Department will develop and implement online counseling by the end of
2008.

The Counseling Department will seek to increase the number of counseling faculty members
to meet the increased demand of the growing student population.

By the end of spring 2009, the Counseling Department plans to have established Student
Service Outcomes (SSOs) for implementation, and to start the collection of data for review
by the fall 2009 semester. This process will include the deployment of a survey system
capable of creating Point of Service surveys for all Student Service units including
Counseling.

Planning Agenda - II.B.3.e. The institution regularly evaluates admissions and placement
instruments and practices to validate their effectiveness while minimizing biases.

The Office of Research and Planning and the Chemistry, Mathematics and English
Departments have committed to conducting regular evaluations of the assessment placement
instruments in coordination with the Assessment Office and the State Chancellor’s guidelines
in accordance with “Standards, Policies, and Procedures for Evaluation of Assessment
Instruments Used in the California Community Colleges”



Planning Agenda Summary                                                                    266
The college plans to conduct validation studies on newly selected instruments during winter
and spring of 2009. Newly validated Mathematics and English assessment tests will be
deployed thereafter. These efforts have been integrated into the Basic Skills Planning Matrix
for the 2008- 2009 academic year. Regular evaluations will be conducted on each instrument
on a continual basis.

Planning Agenda - II.B.3.f. The institution maintains student records permanently,
securely, and confidentially, with provision for secure backup of all files, regardless of the
form in which those files are maintained. The institution publishes and follows established
policies for release of student records.

The college’s Admissions Office will seek the additional staffing resources to dedicate to
directly scanning or contract scanning of all admission documents to an outside company.
The admission forms will be redesigned for the ease of indexing and scanning into the
computer database.

Planning Agenda - II.C.1.b. The institution provides ongoing instruction for users of
library and other learning support services so that students are able to develop skills in
information competency.

To assess the quantitative impact of workshops provided by the Learning Assistance Center
that promote information competency, the Learning Center will determine the following: 1)
total class orientations and workshops for the past three years as noted on the Appointment
Calendar; 2) The number of repeat class orientations and workshops requested by particular
instructors; 3) total number of orientations and workshops for special populations for the past
three years; 4) the number of repeat orientations and workshops for special populations for
the same time period; 5) Total number of LAC workshops for online applications to UC and
CSU for the past three years as noted in the Appointment Calendar and at the Transfer
Center; and, 6) total number of FABSA workshops conducted for the past three years.

To assess the qualitative impact of workshops that promote information competency, the
Learning Center will develop evaluation tools for the following:1) class orientations an
workshops; 2) online college application workshops; and, 3)individual tutoring sessions on
word processing, Internet and email access.

Standard III
Planning Agenda - III.A.1.The institution assures the integrity and quality of its programs
and services by employing personnel who are qualified by appropriate education, training,
and experience to provide and support these programs and services.

The responsibilities and purpose of the newly created District Human Resource Council
should be communicated to all college leadership, including the faculty, to ensure their input,
suggestions, and recommendations.


Planning Agenda Summary                                                                    267
The college leadership will examine the possibility of establishing a Human Resource Office
on campus.

Planning Agenda - III.A.1.b.The institution assures the effectiveness of its human
resources by evaluating all personnel systematically and at stated intervals. The institution
establishes written criteria for evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned
duties and participation in institutional responsibilities and other activities appropriate to
their expertise. Evaluation processes seek to assess effectiveness of personnel and
encourage improvement. Actions taken following evaluations are formal, timely, and
documented.

The college faculty leadership will study the evaluation process for possible flaws and
forward recommendations to the faculty. Recommendations may include trainings and
workshops for potential evaluators.

The senate leadership will encourage the District Academic Senate to review AFT faculty
evaluation forms and process, formulating recommendations to be considered for the next
contract ratification.

The college president and the academic senate will continue to work together to create a
means of addressing the completion of the current vice presidents’ evaluation process. While
still maintaining confidentiality, the college shall adopt a process for providing feedback to
the faculty to ensure integrity and transparency in the vice presidents’ evaluation process.

Planning Agenda - III.A.1.c.Faculty and others directly responsible for student progress
toward achieving stated student learning outcomes have, as a component of their
evaluation, effectiveness in producing those learning outcomes.

The use of added evaluation components will help SLOs become a greater part of the college
culture. The use of SLOs as component of the unit’s Program Review and Program review
Annual Update will also assist in the development of interdisciplinary discussions on student
learning and the effective use of SLOs.

Planning Agenda - III.A.1.d. The institution upholds a written code of professional ethics
for all of its personnel.

The Academic Senate will work toward reviving its inactive Ethics Committee.

Planning Agenda - III.A.6. Human resource planning is integrated with institutional
planning. The institution systematically assesses the effective use of human resources and
uses the results of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.
The college will work to improve the link between college planning, Program Review and
budget decisions to ensure that the funds are distributed in a manner that enhances the
institution’s ability to fulfill its mission.


Planning Agenda Summary                                                                   268
Planning Agenda - III.C.1.The institution assures that any technology support it provides
is designed to meet the needs of learning, teaching, college-wide communications,
research, and operational systems.

Budget conditions permitting, the IT Department will hire more staff to assist in supporting
the current technology as well as developing and deploying future projects.

Planning Agenda - III.C.1.a. Technology services, professional support, facilities,
hardware, and software are designed to enhance the operation and effectiveness of the
institution.

The IT Department will develop and administer Point of Service surveys for students. These
surveys will be administered during the fall 2008 semester.

Planning Agenda - III.D.1.a.Financial planning is integrated with and supports all
institutional planning.

The college will revise and improve the integration of financial and institutional planning.
The ESGC will receive reports from the strategic planning subcommittees that will identify
unfunded and under-funded projects to ensure those needs are accounted for in preparing the
annual budget or identified for funding from the college’s positive balance.

The college will also ensure the successful implementation and assessment of the annual
update process to ensure decisions about the annual budget are based on the strategic goals.


Planning Agenda - III.D 1.d. The institution clearly defines and follows its guidelines and
processes for financial planning and budget development, with all constituencies having
appropriate opportunities to participate in the development of institutional plans and
budgets.

The college will implement the program review annual update process for non-academic
units.

Planning Agenda - III.D.2.a. Financial documents, including the budget and independent
audit, reflect appropriate allocation and use of financial resources to support student
learning programs and services. Institutional responses to external audit findings are
comprehensive, timely, and communicated appropriately.

The college will communicate audit findings beyond the ESGC.

Standard IV
Planning Agenda - IV.A.1. Institutional leaders create an environment for empowerment,
innovation, and institutional excellence. They encourage staff, faculty, administrators, and

Planning Agenda Summary                                                                 269
students, no matter what their official titles, to take initiative in improving the practices,
programs, and services in which they are involved. When ideas for improvement have
policy or significant institution-wide implications, systematic participative processes are
used to assure effective discussion, planning and implementation.

The Budget Committee will develop a narrative of the process and structure of the budget
allocation process at all levels and will provide a graphic that assists the college at-large in
understanding this process. It will be incorporated in the college’s decision-making handbook
when it is completed.

The Research and Prioritization Committee will establish a college-wide research agenda and
post this agenda on the college’s Research and Planning website. Additionally, through
consultation with the Research and Planning Office, the Research Prioritization Committee
will develop a structure and process for the dissemination and use of data and research
findings by faculty, staff, committees, the President and his Cabinet for use in decision
making.

The Budget Committee will report to ESGC recommendations on spending any discretionary
monies derived from the college’s yearly fund balance.
        .
Planning Agenda - IV.A.2.a. Faculty and administrators have a substantive and clearly
defined role in institutional governance and exercise a substantial voice in institutional
policies, planning, and budget that relate to their areas of responsibility and expertise.
Students and staff also have established mechanisms or organizations for providing input
into institutional decisions.

In light of the recent increase in the hiring of new faculty, great opportunity exists for
recruiting new committee participants. The importance of participation on committees should
be stressed during new faculty orientation, at department meetings, and during opening day
activities. The college, led by the faculty leadership, classified leadership, and administrators,
will collaborate via a workshop or retreat to determine methods of promoting of the
involvement of all constituents in the governing process.

The Academic Senate will reexamine professional development guidelines to develop a
specific policy that supports faculty participation on committees.

Planning Agenda - IV.A.3. Through established governance structures, processes, and
practices, the governing board, administrators, faculty, staff, and students work together
for the good of the institution. These processes facilitate discussion of ideas and effective
communication among the institution’s constituencies.

The Academic Senate and college president will work to iron out areas of disagreement in
the faculty hiring policy, with the goal of formalizing an official policy.



Planning Agenda Summary                                                                      270
The Academic Senate and college president will work toward improving transparency and
timeliness of communication between the President and Joint Hires Committee regarding
final hiring decisions and explanation of any deviations from Joint Hires recommendations.

Planning Agenda - IV.A.4. The institution advocates and demonstrates honesty and
integrity in its relationship with external agencies. It agrees to comply with Accrediting
Commission Standards, policies, and guidelines and Commission requirements for public
disclosure, self-study and other reports, team visits, and prior approval of substantive
changes. The institution moves expeditiously to respond to recommendations made by the
Commission.

The college will be more responsive to the preparation of substantive change reports as
required by guidelines and policies of the Accrediting Commission.

Planning Agenda - IV.A.5. The role of leadership and the institution’s governance and
decision-making structures and processes are regularly evaluated to assure their integrity
and effectiveness. The institution widely communicates the results of these evaluations and
uses them as the basis of improvement.

The Research and Planning Office will present the District Core Indicator measures and the
measures for monitoring the strategic, educational, facility, and technology plans to the
ESGC. Additionally, it will determine the exact timeline it will use to report the progress on
these measures to the college-at-large over and above posting results on the Research and
Planning website.

Planning Agenda - IV.B.1.b The governing board establishes policies consistent with the
mission statement to ensure the quality, integrity, and improvement of student learning
programs and services and the resources necessary to support them.

The board should consider appointing a district representative(s) to oversee the construction
progress within the district.

Planning Agenda - IV.B.1.c The governing board has ultimate responsibility for
educational quality, legal matters, and financial integrity.

The board should develop a planning policy to allow a college the use of contingency funds
during a budget crisis if the college can demonstrate a significant growth in technical or
academic programs.

Planning Agenda - IV.B.1.g. The governing board’s self-evaluation processes for
assessing board performance are clearly defined, implemented, and published in its
policies or bylaws.

Feedback on the board’s performance should also include input from the Student Affairs
Committee.

Planning Agenda Summary                                                                   271
Planning Agenda - IV.B.1.j. The governing board has the responsibility for selecting and
evaluating the district/system chief administrator (most often known as the chancellor) in
a multi-college district/system or the college chief administrator (most often known as the
president) in the case of a single college. The governing board delegates full responsibility
and authority to him/her to implement and administer board policies without board
interference and holds him/her accountable for the operation of the district/system or
college, respectively. In multi-college districts/systems, the governing board establishes a
clearly defined policy for selecting and evaluating the presidents of the colleges.

The board should reconsider whether a consultant-led process is in fact the best way to
evaluate key administrative personnel and the chancellor. In an effort to promote
transparency from the district, the board should clarify the components/rating system to
include the relevance of a consultant-led process in the overall evaluation of key
administrative personnel and the chancellor.




Planning Agenda Summary                                                                  272
                                                                                           east los angeles college
                                                                                                                    1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez
                                                                                                                  Monterey Park, California 91754



         EAST LOS AngELES COLLEgE ADMInISTRATIOn             LOS AngELES COMMunITY                                          EAST LOS AngELES COLLEgE
         Ernest H. Moreno, President                         COLLEgE DISTRICT                                                     MAIn CAMPuS
         Robert g. Isomoto, Vice President                   770 Wilshire Boulevard                                          1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez
            Administrative Services                          Los Angeles, CA 90017                                            Monterey Park, CA 91754
                                                                                                                                  323.265.8650
         Reneé D. Martinez, Vice President,                  213 891-2000
            Workforce Education
         Dr. Richard A. Moyer, Vice President,               2008-2009 BOARD OF TRuSTEES
            Academic Affairs                                 Kelly g. Candaele, President
         Oscar Valeriano, Vice President, Student Services   Mona Field, Vice President
         Jeremy Allred, Dean, Admissions and Records         georgia L. Mercer
         gayle Brosseau, Dean, Academic Affairs,             nancy Pearlman
            Economic Development                             Angela J. Reddock
         Selina Chi, Dean, Resource Development              Miguel Santiago
            & Community Relations                            Sylvia Scott-Hayes
         Karen Daar, Dean, Academic Affairs                  Rose Bustos, Student Trustee
         Vi Ly, Dean, Academic Affairs/Liberal Arts
         Kerrin McMahan, Dean,                               DISTRICT ADMInISTRATIOn                                            ELAC SOuTH gATE
            Academic Affairs, Liberal Arts                   Dr. Marshall E. Drummond, Chancellor                             EDuCATIOnAL CEnTER
         Adrienne Ann Mullen, Dean, Continuing Education     Dr. Adriana Barrera, Deputy Chancellor                             2340 Firestone Blvd.
         Dr. Leonor X. Perez, Dean, Planning                 John Clerx, Vice Chancellor of Instructional                      South gate, CA 90280
         Laura Ramirez, Dean, Academic Affairs/                 and Student Support Services                                      323.357.6200
            Workforce Education                              gary Colombo, Vice Chancellor of
         Al Rios, Dean, Academic Affairs/South gate             Institutional Effectiveness
         VACAnT, Dean, Student Services                      Marvin Martinez, Vice Chancellor of Economic and
         Ryan Corner, Associate Dean, Research                 Workforce Development
         Danelle Fallert, Associate Dean, EOP&S              Larry H. Eisenberg, Executive Director,
         Sonia Lopez, Associate Dean, Student Activities        Facilities Planning and Development
         Dr. John Rude, Associate Dean,                      Camille A. goulet, general Counsel
            Resource & Development                           Jeanette gordon, Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer
         Angelica Toledo, Associate Dean, CalWORKs
         VACAnT, Associate Dean, Academic & govt Affairs
         VACAnT, Associate Dean, Outreach & Recruitment
         Martha Ermias, Assistant Dean/Specially
             Funded Programs                                                                                                 ELAC ROSEMEAD CEnTER
                                                                                                                               2444 Del Mar Avenue
                                                                                                                               Rosemead, CA 91770
                                                                                                                                  626.307.3306




        323.265.8650 www.elac.edu


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Accreditation Self Study 2008.indd 13                                                                                                                    12/8/08 9:17:04 AM

				
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