Docstoc

UHV SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM HANDBOOK

Document Sample
UHV SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM HANDBOOK Powered By Docstoc
					                          2010
UHV SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM HANDBOOK




                          For more information about UHV's
                          School Psychology program, please
                          contact Dr. Anitra Shelton-Quinn,
                          Program Director at
                          sheltonquinna@uhv.edu.

                          UHV | School of Arts & Sciences
                          3007 North Ben Wilson,
                          Victoria, TX 77901
                          Phone: (361) 570-4848
                          Toll free in Texas (877) 970-4848
                                                   Table of Contents
Program Introduction and Overview .............................................................................................. 3
Program Mission & Philosophy ...................................................................................................... 3
Program Goals and Objectives……………………………………………………………..……...4
Professional Dispositions………………………………………………………………………….8
Program Faculty Profiles………………………………………………………………………….9
Academic Advisement & Orientation .......................................................................................... 10
     New Student Advising Requirement .................................................................................... 10
Prerequisites & Program Degree Requirements ........................................................................... 11
     Transfer Credits .................................................................................................................... 11
     Recommended School Psychology Plan of Study…………………………………...…… 12
School Psychology Practical Experiences .................................................................................... 13
     Practicum .............................................................................................................................. 13
     Internship .............................................................................................................................. 16
     Comprehensive Examination ................................................................................................ 20
Licensure and Certification ........................................................................................................... 20
Change of Program ....................................................................................................................... 22
Concurrent Enrollment in School Psychology Program ............................................................... 22
The Assessment and Continuous Improvement Process……………………………………… 20
Assessment of Student Progress…………………………………………………………………20
      Annual Review Faculty Evaluation Form…………………………………………………24
             School Psychology Exit Evaluation Report………………………………………...28
Academic/Behavioral Remediation & Probation.......................................................................... 30
Professional Development ............................................................................................................ 30
        Psychology Colloquium Series ......................................................................................... 30
        Professional Associations ................................................................................................. 31




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                                                      Page 2
Program Introduction
You are now a graduate student in the School Psychology Master’s program at the University of
Houston-Victoria. Congratulations! You have chosen one of the most outstanding training
programs in the region. The UHV School Psychology program is outstanding because it has an
excellent faculty from diverse backgrounds with applied school psychology skills and teaching
and research skills. Furthermore, the UHV School Psychology faculty is genuinely concerned
about your growth, development and success as a professional who will provide competent
psychological services to children, families, and schools. Please take the time to get to know the
school psychology core faculty because they will play an important role in your education and
development into a Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP). The UHV psychology
faculty expects you to exhibit the hard work and dedication necessary to acquire the skills and
knowledge to be a successful school LSSP. We are prepared to work and partner with you to
give you the opportunity to become a skilled and professional leader as an LSSP within the
public schools of Texas and beyond.

Program Overview

The School Psychology master’s program is housed in the Social and Behavioral Sciences
Division of the Arts & Sciences School of the University of Houston-Victoria. The program in
school psychology is dedicated to providing students with a comprehensive, integrated program
of study delivered by qualified faculty, as well as substantial supervised field experiences
necessary for the provision of school psychological services which positively impact children,
youth, families, and the schools that serve them.

The training standards within the program are consistent with both the National Association of
School Psychologists (NASP) training standards those of the Texas State Board of Examiners of
Psychology (TSBEP) for the Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP) credentialing.
This, upon completion of the program, students will be eligible to apply for the LSSP credential
from the TSBEP and the nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP) credential from
NASP. The program is undergoing a continuous and data-based improvement process and is
actively seeking NASP program recognition status.

______________________________________________________________________________

                    Program Mission &Philosophy
__________________________________________________________________

The mission of the UHV school psychology program is to train entry-level school psychology
practitioners, namely, Licensed Specialists in School Psychology (LSSP), in accordance to the
standards set by the Texas State Board of Examiners (TSBEP). With emphasis on best practice
application of school psychology, faculty and students are expected to be both consumers and
evaluators of empirically-based practice, while providing empirically-based school psychological
services to a diverse population of individuals including children, families, school personnel, and
other related professionals. The School Psychology program has a core philosophy based on a
School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                            Page 3
tripartite fundamental paradigm that emphasizes student development of competencies in the
delivery of practical, empirically sound services to a wide range of children in diverse learning
environments. The tripartite paradigm is based on the following three components:
     Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability (Stoiber & Kratochwill, 2000; NASP
         Standards, 2001), which, pervades the training of school psychology practitioners and
         defines a best practices approach to service delivery. This model is characterized by the
         utility of empirically sound assessment methods and interventions.
     Problem Solving (Brown-Chidsey, 2005;Deno, 1995). This component is based on the
         premise that school psychology practitioners utilize a collaborative problem solving
         approach in offering a continuum of services that include assessment, interventions, and
         consultation
     The final component is based on the Stimulus-Organism-Response-Consequence (S-0-
         R-C) model of human behavior (Shapiro & Kratochwill, 2000). This model views
         behavior as a complex interaction of external and internal variables, with the primary
         purpose of assessment being to identify and accurately measure those variables that
         interfere with and/or contribute to the acquisition of academic, social, and behavioral
         skills. Assessment findings are then used as the basis for designing individualized
         interventions that promote the development of socially meaningful behaviors.

______________________________________________________________________________

                     Program Goals & Objectives
__________________________________________________________________

School Psychology Program Training Foundations
    Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability (Stoiber & Kratochwill, 2000; NASP
       Standards, 2001). This pervades the training of school psychology practitioners and
       defines a best practices approach to service delivery. This model is characterized by the
       utility of empirically sound assessment methods and interventions.
    Problem Solving (Brown-Chidsey, 2005; Deno, 1995). This component is based on the
       premise that school psychology practitioners utilize a collaborative problem solving
       approach in offering a continuum of services that include assessment, interventions, and
       consultation
    The final component is based on the Stimulus-Organism-Response-Consequence (S-0-
       R-C) model of human behavior (Shapiro & Kratochwill, 2000). This model views
       behavior as a complex interaction of external and internal variables, with the primary
       purpose of assessment being to identify and accurately measure those variables that
       interfere with and/or contribute to the acquisition of academic, social, and behavioral
       skills. Assessment findings are then used as the basis for designing individualized
       interventions that promote the development of socially meaningful behaviors.

NASP Domains                                School Psychology Program Goals & Objectives
2.1 Data-Based Decision-Making and          2.1.1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of statistical
Accountability: School psychologists have   concepts and vocabulary and apply
knowledge of varied models and methods of          them to an understanding of the strengths, limitations,

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                       Page 4
assessment that yield information useful in        utility, and interpretation of
identifying strengths and needs, in                         standardized assessment measures.
understanding problems, and in measuring           2.1.2. The student will demonstrate advanced skills in selecting
progress and accomplishments. School               and using assessment measures
psychologists use such models and methods as                based on psychometric characteristics of the measures,
part of a systematic process to collect data and   referral questions and client
other information, translate assessment results             characteristics including racial, cultural, and language
into empirically-based decisions about service     factors.
delivery, and evaluate the outcomes of             2.1.3. The student will demonstrate skills in standardized test
services. Data-based decision-making               administration, scoring and
permeates every aspect of professional                      interpretation.
practice.                                          2.1.4. The student will demonstrate skills in applying and
                                                   reporting factors that influence test
                                                            results.
                                                   2.1.5. The student will demonstrate skills in written interpretation
                                                   of standardized test results in
                                                            psychoeducational reports and oral reporting of
                                                   standardized test results to children,
                                                            parents, teachers and other professionals.
                                                   2.1.6. The student will demonstrate skills in making appropriate
                                                   recommendations for
                                                            interventions, accommodations and other services to meet
                                                   individual needs based upon
                                                            assessment results.
                                                   2.1.7. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the legal
                                                   and ethical implications of
                                                            assessment and data-based decision-making.
                                                   2.1.8. The student will demonstrate competency in the use of
                                                   appropriate technological
                                                            applications for assessment including computerized scoring
                                                   and word processing.
                                                   2.1.9. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the legal
                                                   principles underlying the professional
                                                            practice of school psychology.
                                                   2.1.10 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the laws and
                                                   regulations underlying special
                                                             education eligibility.
                                                   2.2.1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of methods of
                                                   indirect service delivery.
                                                   2.2.2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of consultation
                                                   models.
                                                   2.2.3. The student will demonstrate knowledge of families,
                                                   classrooms, schools, and communities
                                                            as systems.
                                                   2.2.4. The student will apply skills in working within multiple
                                                   systems to facilitate child growth.
                                                   2.2.5. The student will apply skills in working collaboratively with
                                                   parents, teachers and other
                                                            professionals.

                                                   (Also: 2.8.3)
2.3 Effective Instruction and Development          2.3.1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of human learning
of Cognitive/Academic Skills: School               and memory.

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                              Page 5
psychologists have knowledge of human                2.3.2. The student will demonstrate understanding of cognitive
learning processes, techniques to assess these       development.
processes, and direct and indirect services          2.3.3. The student will demonstrate skills in developing and
applicable to the development of cognitive           evaluating individualized academic
and academic skills. School psychologists, in               and cognitive interventions based upon psychological and
collaboration with others, develop appropriate       educational research and
cognitive and academic goals for students                   concepts.
with different abilities, disabilities, strengths,
and needs; implement interventions to achieve        (Also: 2.1.3, 2.1.6, 2.2.1, 2.6.2, 2.7.1, 2.7.2, & 2.9.5)
those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of
interventions. Such interventions include, but
are not limited to, instructional interventions
and consultation.
2.4 Socialization and Development of Life            2.4.1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of overall human
Skills: School psychologists have knowledge          development.
of human developmental processes,                    2.4.2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of social
techniques to assess these processes, and            development.
direct and indirect services applicable to the       2.4.3. The student will demonstrate skills in developing and
development of behavioral, affective,                evaluating individualized behavioral
adaptive, and social skills. School                         interventions based upon psychological and educational
psychologists, in collaboration with others,         research and concepts.
develop appropriate behavioral, affective,
adaptive, and social goals for students of
varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and      (Also: 2.1.3, 2.1.6, 2.2.1, 2.6.2, 2.7.1, 2.7.2, & 2.9.5)
needs; implement interventions to achieve
those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of
interventions. Such interventions include, but
are not limited to, consultation, behavioral
assessment/intervention, and counseling.
2.5 Student Diversity in Development and             2.5.1.   The student will demonstrate an understanding of and
Learning: School psychologists have                           appreciation for human diversity and multicultural
knowledge of individual differences, abilities,               awareness.
and disabilities and of the potential influence      2.5.2.   The student will demonstrate an understanding of
of biological, social, cultural, ethnic,                      individual differences.
experiential, socioeconomic, gender-related,         2.5.3.   The student will demonstrate knowledge of typical and
and linguistic factors in development and                     atypical development.
learning. School psychologists demonstrate           2.5.4.   The student will demonstrate skills in working with
the sensitivity and skills needed to work with                individuals from a variety of backgrounds.
individuals of diverse characteristics and to        2.5.5.   The student will demonstrate skills in selecting
implement strategies selected and/or adapted                  assessment and intervention techniques most appropriate
based on individual characteristics, strengths,               for individuals from a variety of backgrounds.
and needs.
                                                     (Also: 2.1.2 & 2.1.6)
2.6 School and Systems Organization,                 2.6.1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the structure of
Policy Development, and Climate: School              schools, regular and special
psychologists have knowledge of general                     education, and the written and unwritten rules of
education, special education, and other              educational settings.
educational and related services. They               2.6.2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of curriculum and
understand schools and other settings as             research-based instructional
systems. School psychologists work with                     methods.
individuals and groups to facilitate policies        2.6.3. The student will demonstrate knowledge of factors that
and practices that create and maintain safe,         promote safe, supportive and
supportive, and effective learning                          effective learning environments for all children and youth.
environments for children and others.                2.6.4. The student will demonstrate skills in working within public
                                                     schools to meet the needs of

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                                 Page 6
                                                           children and youth.
2.7 Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and           2.7.1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of direct methods
Mental Health: School psychologists have           of service delivery including
knowledge of human development and                         counseling and crisis intervention.
psychopathology and of associated biological,      2.7.2. The student will demonstrate skills in direct methods of
cultural, and social influences on human           service delivery including
behavior. School psychologists provide or                  counseling and crisis intervention.
contribute to prevention and intervention          2.7.3 The student will apply skills in the prevention and treatment
programs that promote the mental health and        of academic, behavioral, and
physical wellbeing of students.                            mental health problems.
                                                   2.7.4. The student will demonstrate knowledge of primary,
                                                   secondary and tertiary prevention for
                                                           universal, selected, and targeted populations.

2.8 Home/School/Community                          2.8.1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of family systems
Collaboration: School psychologists have           and their impact upon child
knowledge of family systems, including                    development.
family strengths and influences on student         2.8.2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the importance
development, learning, and behavior, and of        of family involvement for the
methods to involve families in education and              success of children and youth and factors that make schools
service delivery. School psychologists work        more or less family-friendly.
effectively with families, educators, and          2.8.3. The student will demonstrate skills in working effectively
others in the community to promote and             with families.
provide comprehensive services to children
and families.                                      (Also: 2.2.3, 2.2.4, & 2.2.5)
2.9 Research and Program Evaluation:               2.9.1 The student will demonstrate knowledge of basic statistics
School psychologists have knowledge of             and research design.
research, statistics, and evaluation methods.      2.9.2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the application
School psychologists evaluate research,            of research into practice.
translate research into practice, and              2.9.3. The student will demonstrate skills in the application of
understand research design and statistics in       research into practice.
sufficient depth to plan and conduct               2.9.4 The student will demonstrate skills in translating
investigations and program evaluations for         psychological and educational research
improvement of services.                                   into a form understandable to public school personnel and
                                                   parents.
                                                   2.9.5. The student will demonstrate knowledge of program
                                                   evaluation.

                                                   (Also: 2.1.1)
2.10 School Psychology Practice and                2.10.1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the history
Development: School psychologists have                     and foundations of the profession of school psychology
knowledge of the history and foundations of                and the various service models for provision of school
their profession; of various service models and            psychological services.
methods; of public policy development              2.10.2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of public policy
applicable to services to children and families;           and its impact upon children, families and schooling.
and of ethical, professional, and legal            2.10.3. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the best
standards. School psychologists practice in                practices in provision of school psychological services.
ways that are consistent with applicable           2.10.4. The student will demonstrate skills in the best practices in
standards, are involved in their profession, and           provision of school psychological services.
have the knowledge and skills needed to            2.10.5. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the ethical
acquire career-long professional development.              principles adopted by the National Association of School
                                                           Psychologists (NASP) and the American Psychological
                                                           Association (APA).
                                                   2.10.6. The student will demonstrate skills in applying the ethical
                                                           principles adopted by the National Association of School

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                               Page 7
                                                         Psychologists (NASP) and the American Psychological
                                                         Association (APA).
                                                 2.10.7. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the legal
                                                         principles underlying professional practice of school
                                                         psychology.
                                                 2.10.8. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the laws and
                                                         regulations underlying special education eligibility.
                                                 2.10.9. Students will demonstrate skills in ethical and legal
                                                         decision making in professional practice.

                                                 (Also: 2.1.9)
2.11 Information Technology: School              2.11.1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the
psychologists have knowledge of information      applications of technology to the practice
sources and technology relevant to their work.             of school psychology.
School psychologists access, evaluate, and       2.11.2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the legal and
utilize information sources and technology in    ethical issues related to the use
ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of              of technology within the practice of School Psychology.
services.
                                                 (Also: 2.1.8 & 2.1.9)



______________________________________________________________________________

                      Professional Dispositions
__________________________________________________________________
The School Psychology Program at the University of Houston Victoria is committed to an
ongoing assessment of the program, the faculty, and the students. One aspect of this assessment
is an appraisal of the student’s personal characteristics and work habits which are reviewed as a
component of the yearly student evaluation as well as the practica and internship evaluations.
The following personal characteristics are considered to be essential to the effective practice of
School Psychology:

    1.       School psychologists are committed to their profession. They are aware of and meet
             the ethical and practice standards of their profession. They participate in professional
             organizations. Experienced school psychologists provide mentorship and guidance to
             those entering the profession.
    2.       School psychologists are committed to meeting the needs of children and families.
             They serve as advocates for children’s needs. They work to promote system level
             change to better meet the needs of children and their families.
    3.       School psychologists are committed to diversity. They realize the essential worth of
             all people and the energy and wealth of ideas and experience that can be gained
             through diversity. They realize that good professional practice requires skills in
             assessment, consultation, counseling, and data-based decision-making with
             individuals from a broad variety of cultures and backgrounds. School psychologists
             work to increase tolerance and respect for all individuals regardless of gender,
             disability, racial or ethnic identity, social or economic status, religion, or sexual
             orientation.

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                           Page 8
   4.      School psychologists are aware of the importance of technology as a tool as well as
           the ethical and practical considerations of its use. They work to use technology to
           increase efficiency in their work and access of services to children.
   5.      School psychologists display excellent communication skills. They are good listeners
           who utilize active listening techniques and display empathy. They can clearly
           communicate their ideas and complex information orally, and in writing, to diverse
           audiences such as parents, teachers, fellow school psychologists, and other
           professionals.
   6.      School psychologists display strong interpersonal skills. They are warm, empathetic,
           and compassionate. They are able to relate to a broad variety of individuals and form
           productive professional relationships. They are able to function effectively as a
           member of a multidisciplinary team.
   7.      School psychologists are reliable. They can be depended upon to meet their
           professional obligations in a timely manner. They display initiative and leadership on
           the job.
   8.      School psychologists display flexibility and tolerance for ambiguity. They are able to
           negotiate the complex social system of schools with patience and good humor.

______________________________________________________________________________

                            School Psychology Core Faculty
______________________________________________________________________________

Anitra Shelton-Quinn, PhD, LSSP                     Dr. Libby Rhoades, PhD, NCSP, LSSP
Program Director &                                  Associate Professor of Psychology
Assistant Professor                                 rhoadese@uhv.edu
sheltonquinna@uhv.edu                               361-570-4292
(932) 226-7355

Meet Dr. Shelton-Quinn
Dr. Shelton-Quinn is the Director of the UHV School Psychology graduate program. Dr.
Shelton-Quinn is a Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP) who completed her pre-
doctoral internship with Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District. Her specialty areas
include testing and measurement, consultation, community mental health outreach, and child
psychopathology. Dr. Shelton-Quinn completed her doctoral coursework at Mississippi State
University and brings more than 10 years of experience working with children, families, and the
schools who serve them. Dr. Shelton-Quinn’s areas of expertise include psychological/psycho-
educational assessment, crisis intervention, community-based interventions, school-based mental
health, child psychopathology, and school-based interventions.




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                          Page 9
Meet Dr. Rhoades
Dr. Libby Rhoades has been a school psychologist for over 20 years, practicing in public schools
in North and South Carolina, West Virginia and Texas. She worked as a faculty member at the
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and directed the School Psychology graduate
program at Marshall University for four years. Dr. Rhoades designed and led the School
Psychology graduate program at West Texas A&M University for five years. She serves as a
Program Reviewer for the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and is on the
Executive Board of the Texas Association of School Psychologists (TASP). Dr. Rhoades
professional interests include: school program development, efficacy of online instruction,
culturally competent assessment, addictions & recovery, and support of gay and lesbian youth.

______________________________________________________________________________

                 Academic Advisement & Orientation
__________________________________________________________________

One of the most important people in your graduate education is your School Psychology
Program Advisor or major professor. Your advisor is your advocate and confidant. Your advisor
recommends and approves your degree plan, monitors your progress, approves course selection,
helps you in securing practicum and internship placements, recommends students for
graduation and assists you in the job search. As soon as possible after admission to the school
psychology degree program, but no later than during the first semester of work, the student
should contact his or her assigned school psychology advisor to develop a Degree Plan for the
Master's Degree. During an individual conference, the school psychology advisor will assist the
student with selection of courses for the each semester.

After the student's degree plan is signed by the advisor and department head and approved by the
Graduate School, the student is expected to follow it as the basis for all subsequent enrollments.
The degree plan is the primary advisement tool. It is completed early in the student’s program,
usually in the first semester and provides the listing of courses needed for graduation. The
student is responsible for keeping the degree plan updated and for bringing the plan to
advisement sessions.

Each student is required to meet with his or her school psychology advisor before enrolling in
classes for each respective. For further information or to schedule an advising session, please
refer to your advisor. Students whose last name begins with letters (A-L), please contact Dr.
Rhoades at rhoadese@uhv.edu; students whose last name begins with letters (M-Z), please
contact Shelton-Quinn at sheltonquinna@uhv.edu.

New Student Advising Requirement: At the beginning of each academic year, all newly
admitted and currently admitted graduate students will be invited to attend a mandatory
Psychology Graduate Studies orientation conducted by the UHV Psychology Faculty. During
orientation, students will receive information regarding curriculum and program requirements,
and will be introduced to the Psychology faculty members. All students are strongly encouraged

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                          Page 10
to attend. If a student is unable to attend, he/she is required to contact his/her advisor to obtain
important program information.

__________________________________________________________________

             Prerequisites & Program Degree Requirements
__________________________________________________________________
Students should have evidence of having completed the following undergraduate or graduate
courses before entering the school psychology program: statistics, research, and abnormal
psychology. A particular course will be waived as a requirement if the student passes a
comprehensive final or its equivalent for the designated course with a grade of C or better. The
exam may be taken no more than once for a particular course. Currently, the School Psychology
Program is a 69-hour non-terminal degree that leads to a Master of Arts degree in School
Psychology and meets the academic requirements for the Texas Licensed Specialist in School
Psychology (LSSP) credential. With this licensing, you can practice as a Specialist in School
Psychology in K-12 public schools in Texas. You are also eligible to apply for the Nationally
Certified School Psychologist Credential (long form) from NASP. All students begin and
typically follow through with the course of study in the official university catalog of their
beginning year in the program. Students who are absent for one or more long semesters (fall or
spring) will be required to complete the revised curriculum indicated in the newly modified
degree plan (Fall 2010). Please see the plan of study below, in which students are advised to
follow consistently for successful and timely matriculation through the program.

Transfer Credits: Students with previous graduate work from another institution may transfer in
credits at the discretion of the program director. Credit may be transferred only for graduate
credit courses completed with a grade of A or B. These courses, completed in residence at the
University of Houston‐Victoria under a graduate degree program, must be certified as graduate
level by the Office of Admissions and Records of UH‐Victoria. Transfer students must complete
75% of the coursework required for a degree program at UHV (for example, 36 hours in a 48
hour program) unless transferring from a UH System institution. In the latter case, the student
must complete 50% at UHV.




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                             Page 11
School Psychology Plan of Study:

Year & Term                Required Classes & Experiences
Year 1 Fall - 12 hours     PSYC 6321 Adv. Abnormal Psychology 3
                           PSYC 6334 Theories and Issues in 3
                           PSYC 6344 The Ethics & Profession of
                           School Psychology 3
                           PSYC 6336 Introduction to Assessment 3
Year 1 Spring - 12 hours   PSYC 6330 Life Span Development 3
                           PSYC 6332 Advanced Social Psychology 3
                           PSY 6335 Techniques of Psychotherapy 3
                           PSYC 6345 Integrated School-Based
                           Assessment I 3
 Year 1 Summer - 9         PSYC 6331 Multicultural Psychotherapy 3
hours                      LANG 6310 Linguistics & Reading 3
                           CUIN 6321 or 6322 Curriculum Development 3
                           AEDU 6331 School Law 3
Year 2 Fall - 12 hours     PSYC 6315 Advanced Learning 3
                           PSYC 6326 Advanced Research Methods 3
                           PSYC 6346 Integrated School-Based
                           Assessment II 3
                           PSYC 6349 School Psychology Practica in
                           Assessment 3
Year 2 Spring - 12 hours   PSYC 6328 Biological Psychology 3
                           PSYC 6341 Behavior Management 3
                           PSYC 6340 School Consultation 3
                           PSYC 6348 School Psychology Practica in
                           Consultation 3
Year 2 Summer - 3 hours    PSYC 6347 School Psychology Seminar in
                           Professional Behavior
                           Take Comprehensive Written & Oral Exams
                           Take Praxis II Licensure Exam
Year 3 Fall - 3 hours      PSYC 6305 School Psychology Internship 3
Year 3 Spring - 3 hours    PSYC 6305 School Psychology Internship 3
                           Apply for LSSP in May (Before graduation)
Total of 69 hours


Curricular Changes and Course Substitutions:

Students with degree plans dated prior to the Fall 2010, will be allowed to substitute courses
taken prior to the Fall 2010 for courses in the revised curriculum (See plan of Study above).
However, remaining courses will be substituted by courses in the new curriculum (See Plan of
Study above).




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                        Page 12
__________________________________________________________________

     SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM CLASS REQUIREMENTS
__________________________________________________________________

Practicum Site Requirements

Each practicum student will be assigned a university supervisor who is a faculty member of the
School Psychology Program and who holds an appropriate credential: either a Nationally
Certified School Psychologist (NCSP), Licensed Psychologist, or Licensed Specialist in School
Psychology (LSSP). University supervision will occur both at the practicum site and at the
university or at any other mutually agreed upon place. The practicum student will be responsible
 for documenting for the university supervisor the duties s/he has performed. The university
supervisor may also consult or confer with the field-based supervisor at any time regarding the
practicum student’s progress, and the university supervisor may request a formal evaluation if
deemed appropriate. This option for formal evaluation may also be requested by the student or
field-based supervisor. The university supervisor will serve as a consultant in mediating any
difficulties and as a resource regarding technical information, ethics, standards procedures, rules
and regulations, etc. All students will complete a self evaluation and will be evaluated by their
supervisors at the end of the practicum. Please see the School Psychology Practicum Handbook
for specific details and forms. Note the School Psychology Practica Application below.

Practicum Course Requirements

In addition to the requirements of the practicum site, students are required to adhere to the
following:

   1.      Students may not begin at a practicum site until it has been approved by the
           university supervisor and the Memorandum of Agreement has been signed by all
           parties.
   2.      Students must complete 150 hours of contact which may include administering
           testing measures, scoring protocols, providing interventions, etc..
   3.      A weekly Blackboard discussion entry for every day of work at the practicum site,
           summarizing your daily activities as well as a reflection on thoughts, emotions, and
           questions that are stimulated by your practicum work are required.
   4.      Practicum students are required to attend the monthly colloquium series.
   5.      Practica students are required to complete a 3-5 page reflection paper describing their
           practicum experiences.
   6.      Practica students must follow the NASP ethical code at all times.

Note: The grading scale is included in the course syllabus on the Blackboard course site.




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                           Page 13
           APPLICATION FOR SCHOOL PSYHOLOGY PRACTICA
                    PSYC 6348/PSYC 6349 (Circle One)
Applications for School Psychology Practica must be turned into the Arts and Sciences Main
Office, UW 206 no later than 3pm, to the attention of Dr. Shelton-Quinn on the designated
deadline date. Below are the School Psychology Practica application deadline dates:

     Practica Application Deadline Date                          Practica Start Date
         Assessment Practica: Feb. 1                          Fall _____________(Year)
        Consultation Practica: Oct. 1                         Spring ___________(Year)

You must be officially accepted into the School Psychology Program and completed the
prerequisite courses in order to be considered eligible for Practica.

Name: _______________________________________________________________

Application for Practica Semester:     Fall/ Spring (circle one) Year: ________________

Cumulative GPA: ____________Number of Credit Hrs complete:__________
Year/Semester Entered the Program: ___________
UHV Email address (this will be the primary mode of contact):
________________________________________________________________
*You must provide a valid UHV email address or you will not be considered for Practica.

Telephone: (H) ________________________ (C) _____________________________________

Address: ______________________________________________________________________

Please indicate 5 sites of interest, in which you plan to apply and the Practica Contact for that
site:

        School Site                      Location (City)             Site Contact & Contact Info.
                                                                            (email/phone)




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                            Page 14
Approved course substitution or reasons for not completing any pre-requisite course:
_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________


____________________________________                                   ____________________________
Student Signature                                                      Date

Applicants must complete all course prerequisites and be in good academic standing to be considered for Practica.
Permission from Practica Coordinator is required for enrollment in PSYC 6348/PSYC 6349- Psychology Practica
course. Student liability insurance is required. Refer to the UHV catalog or contact the Practica Coordinator for
more information.

For Office Use Only:

Student Name: _________________________________________________________________________________

Approve __________        Deny: _____________ (Reason for Denial of Application_________________________)

Student notified: Y or N                    Date of Notification: ______________________________

Student Practica Placement:
_____________________________________________________________________________

Name of Site Supervisor:_________________________________________________________

Phone/Email of Site Supervisor______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________                       __________________________________________
Practica Coordinator Signature                                Date




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                         Page 15
______________________________________________________________________________

     SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP CLASS REQUIREMENTS (PSYC 6605)
______________________________________________________________________________

In order to meet the program and licensing and certification requirements, students must
complete a school-based internship with a minimum of 1200 clock hours in a public school or
school system. Students must apply for internship readiness by completing the School
Psychology Internship Application with the department, which is due on Feb. 1st of prior to the
Fall semester in which internship is expected to begin (See Application below). The School
Psychology Internship normally takes place across an academic year with a full-time assignment.
As is appropriate for their professional skills and training, the program requires that all interns be
paid. The beginning and ending dates of the internship and the intern’s working schedule are to
be agreed upon by the student, onsite supervisor, and coordinator, but ordinarily encompass one
school year. A minimum of 1200 hours must be completed by the end of the spring term and the
student’s self and supervisor evaluations should also be completed by this time so that grades can
be assigned and the student can graduate in May. If the student applies for the LSSP before
graduation and all parties agree, he or she may continue to work under supervision for the
remainder of that school year. Throughout the internship the channels of communication shall
remain open between the university, site, and the student, as the university must remain
concerned with not only the student’s well-being, but with that of the site and its clients, and
with the university itself. Prior to beginning the school psychology internship, the site and site
supervisor must be approved by the university supervisor and the Memorandum of Agreement
for Internship must be signed by the student, the school site LSSP supervisor, and the University
of Houston-Victoria school internship coordinator. According to the Texas Psychologists’
licensing law, section 22, students are exempt from TSBEP credentials or contract filing but
must use a title indicating training status as Specialist in School Psychology Intern while
delivering psychological services in the schools.

The primary supervisor for the school psychology internship must be licensed as an LSSP in the
state of Texas with 3 years of experience and must also be an employee of the school district in
which the student is placed. A minimum of 2 hours supervision is required per week (one hour
individual supervision with the primary supervisor, plus an additional hour which can be group
or individual supervision and can be delegated to on-site personnel with competency in the area
being supervised as long as primary supervisor has oversight).

The university school psychology internship coordinator may make on-site visits at the end of
the semester to lend support and monitor quality if feasible. The university school psychology
internship coordinator is not an employee of the internship agency and therefore will not
directly supervise student cases. The coordinator is available for support via phone and email.

Students’ who have not been enrolled the semester prior to practicum or internship are required
to take a pre-practicum/pre-internship competency exam in the areas of (1) assessment, (2)
intervention, (3) consultation, and (4) data-based decision making, arranged by the student’s
school psychology advisor. Please see the School Psychology Internship Handbook for further
details. Note the School Psychology Internship Application below.
School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                             Page 16
APPLICATION FOR SCHOOL PSYHOLOGY INTERNSHIP (PSYC 6605)
Applications for School Psychology Internship must be turned into the Arts and Sciences Main
Office (UW 206 no later than 3pm, to the attention of Dr. Shelton-Quinn on the designated
deadline date. Below are the School Psychology Internship application deadline dates:

   Internship Application Deadline Date                     Internship Start Date
               Feb. 1, 2011                                       Fall 2011

You must be officially accepted into the School Psychology Program and completed the
prerequisite courses in order to be considered eligible for Internship.


Name: _______________________________________________________________

Application for Internship Semester: Fall Year: ________________

Prerequisite Evaluation Competency Work Samples:
One of each evaluation competency work samples below must be submitted with your
application. Please check each submitted below.

(1) Psychological Evaluation Sample
(2) Psycho-educational Evaluation Sample
(3) Autism Evaluation Sample

Anticipated date of graduation: ___________ Cumulative GPA: ____________

Number of Credit Hrs complete:__________ Year/Semester Entered the Program: ___________

UHV Email address: (this will be the primary mode of contact:
________________________________________________________________
(You must provide a valid UHV email address or you will not be considered for an
Internship.)

Telephone: (H) ________________________ (C) _____________________________________

Address: ______________________________________________________________________




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                      Page 17
Please indicate 10 sites of interest, in which you plan to apply and the Internship Contact for that
site:

        School Site                     Location (City)              Site Contact & Contact Info.
                                                                            (email/phone)




             MASTER OF ARTS IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP
                     VERIFICATION OF REQUIREMENTS

                    Requirements                       Yes/No (Date)        Score or GPA
  All courses complete except Internship
  UHV Written Comprehensive Exam Passed
  UHV School Psychology Orals Passed
  Praxis II Passed
  *Professional/Behavioral Competencies Met
  3 Prerequisite Evaluation Competency Work
  Samples Satisfactory
*Applicants must demonstrate satisfactory behavioral competencies as reviewed by Psychology
Faculty, to meet internship approval.

Approved course substitution or reasons for not completing any pre-requisite course:
_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                            Page 18
____________________________________                                   ____________________________
Student Signature                                                      Date

Applicants must complete all course prerequisites and be in good academic standing to be considered for Internship.
Permission from Internship Coordinator is required for enrollment in PSYC 6305- Psychology Internship course.
Student liability insurance is required. Refer to the UHV catalog or contact the Internship Coordinator for more
information.



For Office Use Only:

Student Name: _________________________________________________________________________________

Approve __________        Deny: _____________ (Reason for Denial of Application_________________________)

Student notified: Y or N                    Date of Notification: ______________________________

Student Internship Placement:
_____________________________________________________________________________

Name of Site Supervisor:_________________________________________________________

Phone/Email of Site Supervisor____________________________________________________

_______________________________________                       __________________________________________
Internship Coordinator Signature                              Date




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                         Page 19
______________________________________________________________________________

                            The Comprehensive Examination
                                 in School Psychology


The program faculty has adopted a comprehensive exam model. As such, the examination is
based upon your course work as well as a broad sampling of the knowledge base of school
psychology. Students are advised to develop a thorough program of self-study in preparation for
the exam. The Comprehensive Exam is comprised of two parts – A written component and an
oral component.

The written component of the Comprehensive Examination in School Psychology consists of a
multiple choice Praxis II-type section that covers school psychology professional knowledge and
competencies as well as an essay section that addresses the broad psychological foundations of
school psychology. Students must pass both sections to receive credit for the written portion of
the exam. The oral portion of the exam will consist of individual questioning from the faculty in
response to case scenarios.

The Comprehensive Exam is offered in the Summer of each year. Students must earn a raw
score of 70 out of 100 multiple-choice questions to pass that portion of the exam. Students must
score a Pass or better on 3 of the 4 essay questions to succeed with that portion of the test. The
participating Faculty must unanimously rate the student’s performance on the oral component of
the exam as a Pass or better in order to pass that portion of the exam. The oral component of the
exam is based on two case studies (one assessment and one consultative) to which the student
must apply a broad knowledge of psychological principles.

Students are eligible to take comps during the Summer before they plan to begin Internship if
they have no remaining incomplete coursework and a graduate grade point average of 3.0 or
better. Further information on the Comprehensive Exam structure, scoring, and preparation will
be covered in the Ethics and Profession of School Psychology Seminar.



                 The Praxis-II Specialty Exam in School Psychology
______________________________________________________________________________

The Praxis II Specialty Examination in School Psychology is a professional examination
administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). The development of this examination
was overseen by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) in order to develop a
test that could be given nationally to assure professional competence among school psychology
practitioners.

All students completing the School Psychology Program must take the Praxis II Specialty
Examination in School Psychology and achieve a passing score according to Texas L.S.S.P.
guidelines (currently 165) in order to graduate from the program.
School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                          Page 20
It is suggested that students take the Praxis II examination in the summer before the internship
year. In some cases it may be to the student's advantage to take the exam earlier. The exam is
offered at ETS testing sites in September, November, January, March, April, and June.
Registration materials for the exam can be obtained on the web at: http://www.ets.org/

When you specify recipients of your test results, be sure to have a copy sent to the program.
When you receive your official results in the mail, be sure to make a copy and give it to your
program advisor.

The Praxis II Specialty Examination in School Psychology is a multiple-choice test consisting of
120 items. Five broad areas are covered - diagnosis and fact finding (25%), prevention and
intervention (25%), applied psychological foundations (20%), applied educational foundations
(12%), and ethical and legal considerations (18%). Further information about the test and sample
questions can be obtained at http://www.ets.org/Media/Tests/PRAXIS/pdf/0401.pdf

It is suggested that students develop an independent program of study for the examination early.
The program traditionally presents a session on study tips each semester during the Ethics and
Profession of School Psychology Seminar.


______________________________________________________________________________

                                    Licensure and Certification


Obtaining the LSSP

In order to provide psychological services in Texas schools, the Licensed Specialist in School
Psychology (LSSP) credential is required. LSSP’s are licensed under the Texas State Board of
Examiners of Psychologists (TSBEP). The LSSP licensure requires completion of a training
program in school psychology, approved/accredited by the American Psychological Association
or the National Association of School Psychologists or a master’s degree in psychology with
specified course work. Passage of the National School Psychology Examination at the score of
165 is required as well as, passage of the Jurisprudence Examination at 90% , according to
Board rule 463.19. Please visit the TSBEP at http://www.tsbep.state.tx.us/app-school-
psychology.html , for more information on the LSSP licensure.

Obtaining the NCSP

The Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP) is a national credential awarded by the
National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). It is a higher credential and is a way to
easily obtain certification or licensure to work in many states. In some places it is also linked to
higher pay. Please visit the NASP site at
http://www.nasponline.org/certification/becomeNCSP.aspx to find out more about the NCSP.

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                            Page 21
__________________________________________________________________

Change of Program/Concurrent Enrollment in School Psychology Program
______________________________________________________________________________

School Psychology Graduate Students requesting to change to another graduate program should complete
the Graduate Action form or click this link for direct access to the form
www.uhv.edu/oar/pdf/AppGradStud.pdf. Any student wishing to complete degree requirements for both
the School Psychology and Counseling programs must fully complete one program, before beginning
requirements for the other desired program. Specifically, any student interested in pursuing both the LPC
and the Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP) credential should first obtain the school
psychology masters degree and then take additional course work to satisfy the LPC requirement.
Otherwise, the student will have to obtain a second masters degree (the first in counseling psychology and
the second in school psychology) to satisfy both degree requirements. By first obtaining the masters in
school psychology and then doing additional course work for the LPC credential, the student can obtain
both goals without having to complete a second degree.

                  The Assessment and Continuous Improvement Process

The School Psychology Program embraces the value of data-based decision-making and uses this
model in ongoing evaluation of individual student progress, group progress, faculty effectiveness
and the quality of the program as a whole. This model involves multiple levels and methods of
assessment across the program.

                                Assessment of Student Progress
Students’ success in meeting the program goals and objectives are measured at several points in
the program. Course syllabi have been developed using matrices that address and assess these
goals and objectives throughout the course series. Assignments and examinations are closely
tied to these criteria. Students are expected to achieve grades of “B” or better in program core
and related coursework. Student performance in these areas is measured in the Oral and Written
Comprehensive Examinations. Performance in the field is evaluated using Self and Supervisor
Evaluations of the Practica in Assessment and Consultation and Interventions. All students must
take and pass the Praxis-II Specialty Exam in School Psychology before beginning internship.
Finally, interns complete an extensive Self and Supervisor Evaluation each semester. Finally, all
students are reviewed broadly by faculty each year through the Student Annual Review process.
As such, students’ academic, behavioral and professional competencies are evaluated following
the Spring semester of each year and feedback is rendered to each student in writing prior to the
Fall semester (See Annual Review Form below).

All School Psychology Students are required to maintain a minimum cumulative Grade Point
Average (GPA) of at least 3.0 (B) in all graduate courses attempted at UH-Victoria, regardless of
whether the courses are counted toward degree requirements. Graduate students must maintain a
minimum GPA of 3.0 on all courses that appear on the student’s degree plan, including
transferred courses. In addition, No more than two courses with earned C’s may be applied
School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                 Page 22
toward graduate degree plan requirements. No credit toward a graduate degree is allowed for
courses in which grades of D or F are earned, although the grades are included in the grade point
average. School Psychology Advisors will review student GPA at the end of each semester to
ensure the GPA requirement is being met. In the event a student’s GPA is lower than 3.0, the
student will be notified in writing that he or she is being placed on academic probation for that
semester and a remediation plan will be implemented, where applicable. If the student’s GPA is
not raised by the subsequent semester, the student will be in jeopardy of being dismissed from
the School Psychology Program. Certain graduate courses may be graded as S (satisfactory), U
(unsatisfactory) and I (incomplete). Such grades will not be considered in computing grade point
average.




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                        Page 23
                        ANNUAL REVIEW FACULTY EVALUATION
                     SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT ANNUAL REVIEW



Student’s Name: ______________________________________________________

Date of Review Meeting with Student: _____________________________________

Date of Faculty Review Meeting: _________________________________________

Comments from Psychology/School Psychology Faculty Meeting: __________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

Academic Coursework (GPA_______):
(Please staple a copy the student’s most recent transcript to this page)

Any grades below a “B?” __________

Any outstanding leveling or remedial coursework needed? __________


Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
Comments: ____________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________


Professional Dispositions:

Any general areas of concern? ______________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________


School psychologists are committed to their profession. They are aware of and meet the ethical and practice
standards of their profession. They participate in professional organizations. Experienced school psychologists
provide mentorship and guidance to those entering the profession.


             Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                          Page 24
              Comments:
              ____________________________________________________________________


School psychologists are committed to meeting the needs of children and families. They serve as advocates for
children’s needs. They work to promote system level change to better meet the needs of children and their families.

              Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
              Comments:
              ____________________________________________________________________

School psychologists are committed to diversity. They realize the essential worth of all people and the energy and
wealth of ideas and experience that can be gained through diversity. They realize that good professional practice
requires skills in assessment, consultation, counseling, and data-based decision-making with individuals from a
broad variety of cultures and backgrounds. School psychologists work to increase tolerance and respect for all
individuals regardless of gender, disability, racial or ethnic identity, social or economic status, religion, or sexual
orientation.


              Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
              Comments:
              ____________________________________________________________________

School psychologists are aware of the importance of technology as a tool as well as the ethical and practical
considerations of its use. They work to use technology to increase efficiency in their work and access of services to
children.


              Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
              Comments:
              ____________________________________________________________________

School psychologists display excellent communication skills. They are good listeners who utilize active listening
techniques and display empathy. They can clearly communicate their ideas and complex information orally, and in
writing, to diverse audiences such as parents, teachers, fellow school psychologists, and other professionals.


              Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
              Comments:
              ____________________________________________________________________
School psychologists display strong interpersonal skills. They are warm, empathetic, and compassionate. They are
able to relate to a broad variety of individuals and form productive professional relationships. They are able to
function effectively as a member of a multidisciplinary team.


              Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
              Comments:
              ____________________________________________________________________

School psychologists are reliable. They can be depended upon to meet their professional obligations in a timely
manner. They display initiative and leadership on the job.

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                               Page 25
             Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
             Comments:
             ____________________________________________________________________

School psychologists display flexibility and tolerance for ambiguity. They are able to negotiate the complex social
system of schools with patience and good humor.


             Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
             Comments:
             ____________________________________________________________________



OVERALL EVALUATIVE IMPRESSION

Outstanding _____ Satisfactory _____ Needs Improvement_____ Unsatisfactory_____
Comments: ____________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________

Is the student ready for practica? ___________

Is the student ready for internship? ___________


REMEDIATION NEEDED: _____ Yes _____ No
(If so, please attach a copy of the remediation plan or contract.)

If yes, indicate purpose and recommendation: ________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________


Student Response & Comments
________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________


School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                          Page 26
_______________________________
Signature of Student

_______________________________
Signature of Advisor

_______________________________
Signature of Program Director




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                       Page 27
               SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY EXIT: EVALUATION REPORT

Student __________________________________ Date__________________________

PROGRAM DIRECTOR'S NOTES:
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________

Section I. Official Requirements & Documentation (Please check if completed.)

___ (1) Approved/Signed Degree Plan
       (with any substitution forms, if necessary)
___ (2) Grade Requirement (3.0)
___ (3) Assessment Practicum Completed
___ (4) Consultation & Interventions Practicum Completed
___ (5) Passage of PRAXIS II
       Score Received ______
___ (6) Passage of Written Comprehensives
       Multiple-Choice Component
       Passed? ______ Score? ______
       Essay Component
       Passed? ______ Score? ______
___ (7) Passage of Orals
       Case Study Component
       Passed? ______ Score? ______
___ (8) Satisfactory Professional Dispositions & Ethical Conduct
___ (9) Internship Completion
___ (10) Application for LSSP submitted prior to graduation
___ (11) Portfolio Reviewed

Section III. Practica Field Supervisors' Evaluations

___ (1) Evaluation from fall semester
Evaluation Date _____________________
___ (2) Evaluation from spring semester
Evaluation Date _____________________


Section IV. Internship Field Supervisors' Evaluations

___ (1) Evaluation from fall semester
Evaluation Date _____________________
___ (2) Evaluation from spring semester
School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                Page 28
Evaluation Date _____________________

Section V. Job Prospectus/Attainment Status

_____Position obtained ____ Interviews in Progress

If checked Position Obtained, specify location below:
____________________________________________

Section VI. Vita/Resume Review (comments)
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                       Page 29
            Academic/ Behavioral Remediation & Probation
__________________________________________________________________
The School Psychology faculty is committed to the successful development of our students into
competent professionals and leaders. As such, the faculty recognizes their obligation to assist students in
obtaining remedial assistance as needed, to consult with colleagues and document their decision
to refer students for assistance or to request that students be dismissed from the program as
deemed necessary from appraisal of the student’s academic performance, personal characteristics
and work habits and professional behaviors reviewed as a component of the annual student
 review.

Unfortunately, there are times when a student may not perform all of the requirements necessary
to fulfill the expectations of a didactic or applied course or he or she may exhibit behaviors that are
inappropriate for professional graduate study. With regard to academic deficiencies or
problematic behavior, the student’s school psychology advisor will notify the student in
writing and the student will be placed on a remediation plan to identify goals and
objectives for improved performance. When placed on remediation plan, the student will
receive a Letter of Notification and a Remediation Plan Agreement & Contract, which
will indicate the time frame of the student’s remediation. The student will be required to
return the signed agreement in a timely manner. This formal plan is outlined in writing, reviewed by
the faculty, signed by all relevant parties, and placed in the students file. This plan is then explained to the
student in conjunction with identification of remedial supports in order to ensure optimal success for the
student. If the student does not meet the conditions of the Remediation Plan Agreement in the
time frame indicated in the plan, the student can be placed on academic probation or
subsequently discontinued in the program, at the discretion of the School Psychology Advisory
Committee.

If the student is placed on probation, the School Psychology Advisory Committee will convene to discuss
the terms of the probation for each individual student case. Adaptations to the initial remediation plan
may be made or a new plan may be developed. This formal probation plan is outlined in writing, reviewed
by the faculty, signed by all relevant parties, and placed in the students file. As with the remediation plan,
problem solving efforts are made with the student to identify the supports needed for successful
completion of the probation plan.



                       Professional Development
  ________________________________________________________________

Psychology Colloquium Series.

The UHV School Psychology program is devoted to fostering professional development of our
students through the Psychology Colloquium series. The colloquium series is recommended for
all psychology graduate students and is required for practicum and internship students. The
colloquium series provides students with a professional medium to become acquainted with

School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                                      Page 30
departmental faculty while providing students with initial preparation relative to expectations of
the graduate experience in psychology. Additionally, the colloquium series extends a platform
for students and faculty to discuss topics of general interest to students of psychology. In an
effort to build professional presentation skills, the colloquium series provides students with a
forum to present and discuss their scholarly endeavors. Finally, the colloquium series provides a
platform for networking among students and faculty.

The UHV School Psychology Association (UHV SPA):

UHV SPA is a student organization run by and for student growth, professional development,
and awareness in the field of School Psychology. The UHV SPA is dedicated to providing
support to current members and those just entering the program, through the School Psychology
Peer Ambassadors program, a component of the Professional Development committee. The
UHV SPA also promotes student involvement in the field of School Psychology at the
University, State, and National levels. School Psychology students are encouraged to become
active in the UHV SPA, by attending monthly meetings, serving on committees, and taking
leadership roles in maintaining the organization’s mission.

UHV Psi Chi Chapter

The UHV Psi Chi student Organization is an affiliate of the International Honor Society in
Psychology, dedicated to encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship,
and advancing the science of psychology.

Professional Associations

The UHV School psychology program recognizes that active participation in professional
associations is vital to professional success. In order to remain current in the ever-changing and
growing field of school psychology, LSSP’s must belong to professional associations after they
earn their degrees. School Psychology students are encouraged to join and become active in:

      Texas Association of School Psychologists
       Students in School Psychology are strongly urged to join the Texas Association for
       School Psychologists (TASP) as a student member and become an active participant in
       the organization. TASP has a significant bearing on the role and function of school
       psychologists in Texas, job opportunities and professional development. Membership
       application forms and other relevant information about the profession of school
       psychology in Texas are located at http://www.txasp.org/

      National Association of School Psychologists
       The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is a primary organization with
       which the student should become familiar. This organization is nationally representative
       of school psychology and professional interests. The NASP journal is the School
       Psychology Review. Student membership is available. Membership application forms
       and other relevant information about the profession of school psychology are located at
       http://www.nasponline.org
School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                           Page 31
      The American Psychological Association (APA)-Division 16 represents the interests of
       psychologists engaged in the delivery of comprehensive psychological services to
       children, adolescents, and families in schools and other applied settings. The Division is
       dedicated to facilitating the professional practice of school psychology and actively
       advocates in domains, such as education and health care reform, which have significant
       implications for the practice of psychology with children. Members receive the journal
       School Psychology Quarterly and the quarterly newsletter The School Psychologist. The
       Division welcomes student members. Non-doctoral level school psychologists and
       practitioners are welcome to join the Division as Professional Affiliates.
       http://www.apa.org/about/division/div16.html
      American Psychological Association Graduate Student Association
       (APAGS)APAGS is the home for graduate students within the APA. APAGS offers all
       of its members enormous opportunities to enhance their development towards a career in
       psychology and to shape the future of the discipline. With more than several thousand
       members, APAGS is one of the largest constituency groups of the APA, as well as the
       largest organized group of psychology graduate students worldwide.
       http://www.apa.org/apags/welcome.html
      Southwestern Psychological Association. SWPA works to promote and strengthen
       psychology's scientific, professional and educational facets. At its annual meeting, SWPA
       offers paper, poster, continuing education sessions, workshops, symposia, and invited
       talks. SWPA prides itself on serving the psychological community by providing access to
       scientific advances and professional development within a collegial atmosphere. Students
       are welcomed and treated as active and valued participants in the discipline.
       http://www.swpsych.org/
      Texas Psychological Association TPA is the state affiliate to the American
       Psychological Association. Information on TPA's Student Division is found at
       http://www.texaspsyc.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=21
      Psi Chi - The International Honor Society in Psychology Psi Chi is the International
       Honor Society in Psychology, founded in 1929 for the purposes of encouraging,
       stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship, and advancing the science of
       psychology. Membership is open to graduate and undergraduate students.
       http://www.psichi.org/

Please note that membership forms for all student organizations can be found on each
organization’s website indicated above.




School Psychology Handbook 2010-2011
                                                                                        Page 32