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					Springfield/Clark County
          2007
        Study of
  Wages and Benefits



       Sponsored by
Springfield/Clark County
          2007
        Study of
  Wages and Benefits




                                  Prepared By: Dillon Charney
                                               Sean Fields
                                               Mark-Christian King
                                               Matt Lynch
                                               Joel Puthoff
                                               Sarah Sprenkle

                             Counseling Period January 10 – May 7, 2007

                            Faculty Supervisors Prof. Wendy Gradwohl
                                                Prof. Pamela S. Schindler




  Project Management Assistance Program
               Center for Applied Management
                         Wittenberg University
                            Project Management Assistants




(From Left to Right): Sarah Sprenkle, Dillon Charney, Mark Christian-King, Sean Fields,
Joel Puthoff, and Matt Lynch

Team Bios

Sarah Sprenkle ’07 is a senior Management major with a Human Resource and Public
Relations focus. Sprenkle has been working with Wittenberg University’s WittCAM
team to put together the 2007 Clark County Wage & Benefit Survey. Sprenkle’s major
contributions have been reorganizing the survey, entering data into SPSS, confirming
information with firms, analyzing data by cross tabulations, and creating charts through
Excel and Word to help with the data that was analyzed. Sprenkle is an active member of
the Delta Gamma sorority. She was also a Wittenberg Cheerleader during the years 2004-
2006 in which she helped with two summer camps for junior-high cheerleaders in her
spare time. Sprenkle plans on pursuing an MBA in Human Resource Management and
Public Relations.

Dillon Charney ’08 is a junior Management major with a Human Resources focus, and
Political Science minor. Charney has taken a leadership role with the Wage and Benefit
Survey WittCAM team by serving as project coordinator and client correspondent. The
Wage and Benefit project provided an opportunity to understand, determine, and
demonstrate certain trends across different types of organizations concerning their HR
policies such as benefits offered, insurance coverage, and specific wages. Some of his
other responsibilities with the team included creation and distribution of the survey, data
entry, corresponding analyses, and assisting in the presentation to the client. Charney also
works as a server at Cracker Barrel. He is also a member of the Wittenberg Investment
Club, Wittenberg Human Resource Management Association, and Wittenberg College
Democrats. During his time off he likes to play golf, tennis, basketball, poker, and enjoys
the outdoors. Charney’s future plans include working in Human Resources or Business
Administration and obtaining his MBA in Human Resources.


                                                                                           1
Mark King ’09 is a sophomore Management major. He has been a member of the
Wittenberg Track and Field team for the past two years. King’s future plans include
finishing his Management degree at Wittenberg University and then earning a Masters
degree in either Marketing or Advertising before working in either field of study.

Sean Fields ’08 is a junior Management major with a concentration in Finance. Sean has
been working with the WittCAM team in developing the Clark County Wage and Benefit
Survey. He has developed skills in survey construction, data entry, and data analysis
using SPSS. Currently, he works at the Springfield Foundation as a clerical assistant
which includes duties both in the financial investment and marketing fields. Also, Sean
has recently been elected the Executive Vice President of the Wittenberg Investment
Club for the 2007-2008 academic year. His future plans include working this summer for
JcPenney in the operations summer internship program. He would like to pursue a career
in the banking industry upon graduation.

Joel Puthoff, currently a junior Management major at Wittenberg University, has been
working with his Wittcam team putting together the Clark County Wage and Benefit
analysis. While collecting data throughout the semester, Joel was responsible for
confirming information with companies in creating our data, trying to maximize our
sample size by getting a hold of companies that didn’t respond, and cross tabulating the
information that was received and entered into our survey data. Joel also spends much of
his time running his own painting business with Student Painters, in the Springfield,
Yellow Springs, and Urbana areas. He has also been a member of the Wittenberg
baseball team for the last three years, taking on the role of shortstop in his junior year.
Joel loves activities such as baseball, basketball, and golf in his free time. In the future,
Joel would like to work in the sales industry, having a big interest in real estate.

             08
Matt Lynch ' is a junior majoring in Sociology and Management, with a Marketing
focus. Lynch has worked with the Wage and Benefit Survey WittCAM project team. He
assumed the role as one of the team’s project coordinators, and provided assistance to
other team members on methodology and SPSS issues. Additional responsibilities
included survey distribution, data entry, data analysis, and preparation of the final report.
Lynch was selected as one of the 2007 Dr. Woodrow Wilson Prize winners for
Excellence in Management. He was also recognized as the 2007 Junior Financial
Executives International (FEI) Scholar. Lynch was recently inducted into the Tau Pi Phi
National Honor Society for Management and Economics and elected as the 2007-2008
Vice President of the society. Lynch was recently inducted into the Alpha Kappa Delta
National Honor Society for Sociology. Lynch will be working with the Turner
                                                                            s
Foundation over the summer as an intern to the NextEdge project. Lynch' future plans
include obtaining a Masters degree in Marketing and working in that field.




                                                                                            2
                                Executive Summary

The 2007 Springfield/Clark County Wage and Benefit Survey was a collaborative process
between Workplus, the Opportunities Industrialization Center of Clark County (OIC), the
Springfield Chamber of Commerce, the City of Springfield, and the Wittenberg Center
for Applied Management (WittCAM).

The data gathered from the 2007 Springfield/Clark County Wage and Benefit Survey will
be useful for employers to evaluate and compare their positioning concerning the wages
and benefits they offer.

The project formally began in January 2007 and concluded on May 7, 2007, when the
report was presented to Amy Donahoe of Workplus, as well as representatives of the
Chamber of Commerce, City of Springfield, and Clark County. A total of 1,136
questionnaires were mailed and faxed to organizations in the county. The WittCAM
Project Management Assistance (PMA) team conducted follow-up calls to encourage
response, resulting in 110 usable questionnaires, a 9.68% response rate. The self-selected
sample includes a combination of manufacturing, service, distribution, non-profit, and
government organizations that provided wage and benefit information for more than
14,341 employees.

The following report provides an in depth analysis and presentation of wage and benefit
information from the companies that participated in the survey. A general summary of
some of the project’s primary data findings include:

       •   Service and Manufacturing organizations represent 61 percent of the firms
           that responded.

       •   Only 4.6 percent of the companies that responded had more than 600
           employees.

       •   Of the companies that responded, 26.3 percent of employees have been with
           their company for 10-14.99 years. Only 8.1 percent indicated that employees
           on average have tenure of less than two years.

       •   On average, almost half of the companies that responded (48.6 percent)
           indicated that they never hire seasonal workers.

       •   67 percent of organizations conduct drug testing and 52 percent of companies
           perform criminal background checks on their employees

       •   Most firms (82.7 percent) advertise their job openings, and 57.3 percent
           advertise through local media, such as local newspapers or job listings, or on
           Internet job posting websites



                                                                                            3
•   The average length of time that companies keep applications on file is
    between 6 and 7 months.

•   A majority of companies (66 percent) offer yearly salary increases to their
    employees, while some companies (19 percent) have no set pattern.

•   Companies use formal evaluation (61.8 percent) and cost of living (28.6
    percent) as a basis for salary increases.

•   The mean value of the total benefit package was between $5,000 and $6,999,
    while the most frequently selected total value of the benefit package was
    $9,000 and above.

•   A vast majority (83.6 percent) of the companies that responded offer health
    insurance to their employees; 60.9 percent offer dental coverage; 44.5 percent
    offer vision/eye coverage; 72.7 percent offer life insurance; and 52.7 percent
    offer disability coverage.

•   Almost all (90 percent) of the companies offer paid holidays to their
    employees, with the mean number of paid holidays equaling 8 days.

•   The mean value of vacation days and personal days offered by firms after one
    year is 7.3 and 3.5, respectively.

•   A majority (75.5 percent) of firms indicated that they offer an employee
    pension plan to their employees, and over half (58.2 percent) match employee
    contributions at some level.




                                                                                  4
                                               Table of Contents

I.     Project Management Assistant Biographies..................................................1
II.    Executive Summary .........................................................................................3

III.   Introduction......................................................................................................8
       Research Objectives...........................................................................................8
       Methodology ......................................................................................................9

IV.    General Survey Results .................................................................................14
       Q1: Type of Firm .............................................................................................14
       Q2: Union/Non-Union/Total Employees .........................................................15
              Q2: Number of Employees by Type of Firm .......................................15
              Q2_A: Union/Non-Union Employees..................................................15
       Q3/Q4: Applications on File............................................................................16
              Q3: Number of Applications................................................................16
              Q4: Application Retention ...................................................................16
              Q4_A: Application Retention for Manufacturing................................17
              Q4_B: Application Retention for Distribution ....................................17
              Q4_C: Application Retention for Service............................................18
              Q4_D: Application Retention for Government....................................18
              Q4_E: Application Retention for Non Profit .......................................19
              Q4_F: Application Retention for Other ...............................................19
       Q5: Advertising Job Openings.........................................................................20
              Q5: Advertise Job Openings ................................................................20
              Q5_A: Where Does Company .............................................................20
       Q6: Drug/Credit/Background...........................................................................21
              Q6_A: Drug Testing ............................................................................21
              Q6_B: Criminal Background Check ....................................................21
              Q6_C: Credit Check.............................................................................23
       Q7: Seasonal Hiring Patterns ...........................................................................24
              Q7_A: Seasonal Hires by Type of Firm ..............................................24
              Q7_B: Seasonal Hires in Manufacturing .............................................24
              Q7_C: Seasonal Hires in Distribution..................................................25
              Q7_D: Seasonal Hires in Service.........................................................25
              Q7_E: Seasonal Hires in Government .................................................26
              Q7_F: Seasonal Hires in Non Profit ....................................................26
              Q7_G: Other Seasonal Hires................................................................27
       Q8: Years of Service........................................................................................28




                                                                                                                        5
V.     Employee Incentives & Benefits ...................................................................29
       Q9a: Salary Increases.......................................................................................29
       Q9b: Basis for Salary Increases .......................................................................30
              Q9b_A: Aggregate Basis for Salary Increase ......................................30
              Q9b_B: Basis for Salary Increase by Type of Firm.............................31
       Q10: Wage Benefits.........................................................................................32
              Q10: Incentives by Type of Firm.........................................................32
              Q10_A: Non-Production Bonus by Type of Firm ...............................32
              Q10_B: Paid-Shift Differential by Type of Firm.................................33
              Q10_C: Cost Savings Incentive by Type of Firm................................33
              Q10_D: Premium Pay for Overtime by Type of Firm .........................34
              Q10_E: Skill Based Incentive by Type of Firm...................................34
              Q10_F: Graduated Training Wage Programs by Type of Firm ...........35
       Q11: Average Dollar Value Benefit Package ..................................................36
       Q16: Other Benefits .........................................................................................37

VI.    Employee Insurance Coverage .....................................................................38
       Q14: Insurance Coverage.................................................................................38
             Q14_A: Manufacturing Employee Insurance Coverage.......................38
             Q14_B: Distribution Employee Insurance Coverage ...........................38
             Q14_C: Service Employee Insurance Coverage...................................38
             Q14_D: Government Employee Insurance Coverage...........................39
             Q14_E: Non Profit Employee Insurance Coverage ..............................39
             Q14_F: Other Employee Insurance Coverage ......................................39
             Q14_G: Manufacturing Dependant Insurance Coverage......................40
             Q14_H: Distribution Dependant Insurance Coverage ..........................40
             Q14_I: Service Dependant Insurance Coverage ...................................40
             Q14_J: Government Dependant Insurance Coverage...........................40
             Q14_K: Non Profit Dependant Insurance Coverage ............................41
             Q14_L: Other Dependant Insurance Coverage.....................................41
             Q14_M: Workers Compensation/Self Insured......................................41

VII.   Paid Time Off .................................................................................................42
       Q12: Vacation/Personal Days Based on Tenure..............................................42
             Q12: Mean Paid Days Off.....................................................................42
             Q12_A: Vacation Days after 1 Year.....................................................43
             Q12_B: Vacation Days after 2 Years....................................................43
             Q12_C: Vacation Days after 5 Years....................................................43
             Q12_D: Vacation Days after 10 Years .................................................44
             Q12_E: Vacation Days after 15 Years..................................................44
             Q12_F: Vacation Days after 20 Years ..................................................44
             Q12_G: Vacation Days after 25 Years .................................................44
             Q12_H: Personal Days after 1 Year......................................................45
             Q12_I: Personal Days after 2 Years......................................................45
             Q12_J: Personal Days after 5 Years .....................................................45



                                                                                                                      6
               Q12_K: Personal Days after 10 Years ..................................................46
               Q12_L: Personal Days after 15 Years ..................................................46
               Q12_M: Personal Days after 20 Years .................................................46
               Q12_N: Personal Days after 25 Years ..................................................46
         Q13: Other Time Off .......................................................................................47
               Q13_A: Use of Paid Holidays by Type of Firm ...................................47
               Q13_B: Number of Paid Holidays by Type of Firm.............................47
               Q13_C: Unpaid Holidays by Type of Firm ..........................................48
               Q13_D: Number of Unpaid Holidays by Type of Firm........................48
               Q13_E: Pay in Lieu of Vacation by Type of Firm................................49
               Q13_F: Paid Jury Duty by Type of Firm ..............................................49
               Q13_G: Use of Flex Time by Type of Firm .........................................50
               Q13_H: Compensatory Time by Type of Firm.....................................50
               Q13_I: Non-Lunch Breaks by Type of Firm ........................................51
               Q13_J: Duration of Non-Lunch Breaks by Type of Firm.....................51
               Q13_K: Length of Lunch Break by Type of Firm................................52

VIII. Retirement Savings & Pension Plans ...........................................................53
      Q15: Retirement Offerings and Pension Plans ................................................53
            Q15_A: Use of Pension Plan ................................................................53
            Q15_B: Retirement Plan Options by Type of Firm ..............................53
            Q15_C: Use of Matching Contributions ...............................................53

IX.      Wage Section (Q17)........................................................................................54
         Aggregate.........................................................................................................54
         Manufacturing..................................................................................................57
         Service..............................................................................................................59
         Government......................................................................................................61
         Non-Profit ........................................................................................................63

X.       Limitations......................................................................................................64

XI.      Recommendations to Next Project Team ....................................................67

                                                  Appendices

XII.     Exhibit 1: 2007 Wage and Benefit Survey ...................................................68

XIII. Exhibit 2: Survey Cover Letter ....................................................................73

XIV. Exhibit 3: Workplus E-mail Reminder........................................................74

XV.      Exhibit 4: Javabreak Reminder ...................................................................75

XVI. Exhibit 5: 2007 Wage & Benefit Job Descriptions......................................77




                                                                                                                              7
                                  Research Objectives

       The main purpose of this research is to provide wage and benefit benchmarks and

a means of comparison between businesses both within Springfield and the surrounding

Clark County.

       The information provided by the data in this report will assist economic

development in our community. By having information on the business environment

within Springfield and Clark County, and knowledge of the competitive market, a more

beneficial strategy may emerge to attract new businesses to the area and spur the growth

of economic development. Also, by providing analytical and basic data on common

benefits, incentives, and wage averages businesses will be able to determine if they lag

behind, match, or lead the market in terms of compensation practices. Employee turnover

and productivity issues may be avoided if businesses are able to use this information to

become more competitive in attracting and retaining reliable and effective employees.




                                                                                           8
                                       Methodology

How the Wage and Benefit Survey was developed:

        The WittCAM team began with the 2005 Alan County survey instrument and
made changes based upon the 2002-2003 Chamber of Commerce, input from a WorkPlus
representative, as well as suggestions from several HR professionals in the
Springfield/Clark County area. Some of the more significant changes involved
adding/deleting items, adding/deleting job titles, as well as editing changes (e.g., format,
grammar, spelling, consistency in wording). Further editing included making all answer
choices range from negative to positive (e.g., “no” to “yes”) or from least to most (e.g.,
“less than one month” to “more than one year”). Examples of all these changes are
explained in detail below.

        The team created a web site link on the Wittenberg University Department of
Management page that connected users to job title descriptions that were taken from
O*Net and Salary.com. These descriptions helped survey respondents determine whether
the job title listed in part 3 of the survey matched the job at their organization. In
addition, WorkPlus provided additional job titles from several companies to increase the
variety of jobs across type of organization.

       In addition, some survey questions were formatted into a table to make the survey
professional and user friendly. Also, some questions required that specific type of
answer grids be used as answer choices.

   Each change, addition, or subtraction made to 2007 Wage & Benefit Survey:

   Part One - General:

   •   Question 1 was added to classify organizations that responded to the survey into a
       specific type of firm. This allowed the data to be broken down by organization
       type in the analysis stage.
                       Type of firm:     Manufacturing      Distribution   Service
                       Other
   •   Question 2 was broken down into Union and Non Union employees instead of
       asking only for total employees.
   •   Question 6 (hiring procedures) was added based on the 2002-2003 Chamber of
       Commerce Wage & Benefit Survey.
   •   Question 7 (hiring on a seasonal basis) was modified so that response options
       ranged from least to greatest values.




                                                                                           9
Part Two - Benefits:

•   Question 9a (frequency of salary increases) was added based on the 2002
    Chamber of Commerce survey. Response options were reordered from least to
    greatest value.
        o 2002-2003 Chamber of Commerce Wage & Benefit Survey:
        o None Annual Adjustments            No Set Patterns   Other

       o 2007 Wage & Benefit Survey:
       o Every six months  Yearly    No set pattern           Other ________

•   Question 9b (reason for salary increases) was added based on the 2005 Alan
    County Survey. This was done to add more options for the respondent and to give
    a professional user friendly way to answer the question.

       o 2005 Alan County Survey:
       o    Cost of Living   Merit Pay         Contract Stipulation    Other ____

       o 2007 Wage & Benefit Survey:

        •        Formal Evaluation     •      Exceeding Goals
        •        Years of Service      •      Piece Rate/Productivity Measure
        •        Cost of Living        •      Contract Stipulation
        •        Other__________________________________________________

•   Question 10 added the response option of “Graduation-Training Wage Programs
    for New Employees”.
•   Question 11 changed response option “estimation of the value of your benefit
    package as a % of wages?” from an open ended response question close ended
    question using responses that were exhausted and mutually exclusive. The ratio
    data was put into ordinal form because of the almost infinite responses that could
    have been provided otherwise. This would aid analysis at a later date.
•   Question 14 (employee and dependent coverage chart) subtracted response option
    of “shared cost %”.
                    Restructured the chart to be consistent on both sides.
•   Question 13 (benefits offered) added the response options of “flextime” and
    “compensatory time” and asked information regarding non-lunch breaks, duration
    of each break, and lunch break based on the 2002-2003 Chamber survey.
•   Question 15c (matching employee contribution) added a dollar value response
    option. This would allow for the analysis to be separated by dollar or percentage
    value.
•   Question 16 (benefits offered) changed the response option from “savings & thrift
    plan” to “flexible spending account”.




                                                                                    10
Part III – Wages

•   Jobs titles that were added to the survey:

    Accountant, administrative assistant/office assistant/secretary, case manager, cost
    accountant, credit manager, engineer-mechanical, food preparation person,
    groundskeeper, help desk support, human resources-assistant, human resources-
    representative, information tech trainer, inventory control clerk, legal assistant,
    machine operator-CNC, maintenance supervisor/facilities manager, mechanic,
    network/telecommunications-engineer, nurse registered-medical facilities, nurse
    registered-non medical, operations/support, payroll administrator, sales
    representative-inside, sales representative-outside, systems administrator, systems
    hardware technician, and technician manager.

•   Job titles that were deleted from the survey:

    Personnel Support

General changes and additions:

•   Answers to questions dealing with time periods were changed so that they were
    exhaustive.
                  Example Question 4:

           less than 1 month     1-2 months         3-6 months      7-12 months   more
           than 1 year

•   Tables were added to make the item more user friendly:

                   Question 12 Paid Days for Vacation, Sick Leave, and Personal
                   Days including 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 years. Table formatting
                   makes the survey user friendly for both the respondent and the
                   analyst.

                                                 Paid Days
       Years
       Employed            Vacation         Sick Leave           Personal Days

       1 year
       2 years
       5 years
       10 years
       15 years
       20 years
       25 years




                                                                                     11
                        Question 14 about insurance coverage based on employee
                        coverage and dependent coverage cross tabulated with how much
                        the company pays versus how much the employee pays.

                    Employee Coverage                                         Dependent Coverage
             No   Yes Company       Employee                       No   Yes     Company        Employee
                        Pay %         Pay %                                       Pay %          Pay %
Health                                                Health
Dental                                                Dental
Vision/Eye                                            Vision/Eye
Life                                                  Life
Disability                                            Disability

Workers’ Compensation      OR   Self-Insured



    •   On the first page of the survey, respondents were asked to fill in their name and
        phone number in case clarification would be needed.
    •   Additional changes were made to the survey based on a pilot test of 2 individuals.

    How the Wage and Benefit Survey was distributed to companies:

    First, WittCAM numbered each return envelope to correspond with a specific
organization for tracking reasons. This enabled the project team to contact those
companies that did not participate in the survey or call companies when clarification of
their data was needed.

   Companies were selected based upon a non probability sampling technique. Surveys
were sent primarily to Chamber of Commerce members because their contact information
was readily available. The use of this convenience sampling does not allow the data to be
generalized to the greater Springfield area.

    The survey (see Exhibit 1) was mailed to the specified organization’s address with a
cover letter (see Exhibit 2) and a postage paid return envelop. The surveys were to be
returned to Wittenberg University. All businesses were guaranteed confidentiality. Due
to weather circumstances, the surveys were mailed later than what was intended. By the
time organizations received the survey, organizations only had approximately one week
to return the survey as indicated in the cover letter. Thus, several emails were sent out by
WorkPlus (see Exhibit 3) informing participants that the deadline for returning the survey
had been extended.

   For analysis of incoming surveys WittCAM used the Statistical Package for the
Social Sciences (SPSS). Each piece of information from the survey was numerically
coded and entered into SPSS. Instances where the respondents wrote in an answer were
coded as string variables. These contents of the string variables were analyzed and then
compressed into similar categories for analysis purposes.


                                                                                           12
    When entering data, if a certain answer was unclear, a note was made on the survey
and that variable was skipped. All surveys were put into one file to have questions
clarified at a later date. Clarification of survey answers were made through personal
telephone calls. Calls followed a set script. The calls were first made to the contact
person specified at the top of the survey, and if that person was unavailable then a call
was made to the company itself. Questions were also clarified via email or fax. If a
question could not be clarified then the data for that variable was left blank.
    A note was also made for any comment added to the survey by the respondent that
was not specifically asked for. Additional variables were made as needed.
    Follow up calls were made to the companies who did not return the survey. Calls
were made to the phone number provided by WorkPlus, and a specific script was used by
the WittCAM team in an effort to encourage participation in the study.

How Wage and Benefit Survey was analyzed:

    Because the survey was sent to all Chamber of Commerce members (n=1136), and
only 110 were returned (response rate of 9.68 %), it was a self-selected non-probability
sample. Since it was a self selected non-probability sample we cannot generalize to the
greater Clark County area. Data is only representative of those companies that responded
to the survey
    The data was screened for any data entry errors. In order to do this, frequencies were
run for all variables. Any variables with responses outside the expected range were
corrected by verifying the data against the actual survey response.
    Final analysis will differ from question to question. The “n” size will vary from chart
to chart because most companies left multiple answers blank where their company did
not relate.




                                                                                        13
Q1: What type of firm would you classify your business as?




                    Distribution (n=4)
                             4%
             Non-Profit (n=7)
                  6%
     Government (n=10)                                   Service (n=34)
           9%                                                31%




       Other (n=22)
           20%




                                            Manufacturing (n=33)
                                                  30%




        Of the companies that participated in the survey, the majority were either Service
or Manufacturing firms. The Distribution category was selected by only four of the
respondents. The Other category was further divided into Non-Profit organizations and
Governmental institutions. Organizations were only classified as non-profits if they
specified explicitly that they were non-profits. The Government category includes all
respondents that explicitly specified that they were government agencies as well as
schools and public libraries. Organizations that did not fit into any of the above
categories were listed in the Other category.




                                                                                        14
Q2: How Many Employees Does Your Company Have At This Facility?

       The table below represents a breakdown of the number of employees by type of
firm. The columns are separated into range of responses and then subsequent columns
represent organizational size, as determined by the number of employees. The
organizational size categories were determined by natural breaks in the data.

                                                  Number of Employees
                    Range           1-10        11-20        21-74      75-249    250+
Manufacturing      10-1007           1           11           10           6          5

  Distribution      18-460           0           1            1            1          1

    Service         2-651           13           7            4            4          5

 Government         11-980           0           1            2            2          5

   Non-Profit        2-75            3           1            2            1          0

     Other          1-2432           7           7            3            3          2

    Total           1-2432          24           28           22           17      18
  Employees

Q2_A: Unionization of Employees (n=109)

The table below represents the combined results of the organizations that returned a
survey. Within the table, rows are separated into three categories: Union Employees,
Non-Union Employees, and Total Employees.

                                 Number of Employees
                 Range        1-10       11-20      21-74            75-249      250+
   Union         0-900         6            2            1             4          5

 Non-Union       0-2432        26           25           21           22          13

  Total          1-2432        32           27           22           26          18
Employees

Government and Manufacturing organizations tend to be more unionized than any other
type of firm, with 10 of the 14 reported firms with union employees coming from these
types of firms. Service organizations had the most organizations under with under 10
employees (39.4 percent).




                                                                                          15
Q3: How many applications does your company have on file?

                           Number of
                         Companies That          Average # of        # of Applications
     Type of Firm          Responded          Applications on File         Range
    Manufacturing              33                      62                   0-300
     Distribution               4                     276                  0-1000
       Service                 33                     110                  0-1847
     Government                10                     242                  0-1847
      Non-Profit                7                      32                   0-100
        Other                  22                     146                  0-2400
        Total                 109                     116                  0-2400



Q4: How long does your company keep applications on file?

         The average time companies keep applications on file is between six and seven
months. Of the companies that keep applications on file, 74.5% kept their applications on
file for less than one year. Only 25.7% of the companies reported zero applications on
file at their establishment.


                                  Total (n=106)

  60.0%


  50.0%


  40.0%
                                                      34.9%

  30.0%                                   27.4%
                                                                     25.5%


  20.0%


  10.0%       7.5%
                           4.7%

   0.0%
           Less than a   1-2 Months    3-6 Months   7-12 Months   Over 1 Year
             Month




                                                                                         16
Q4_A:

                          Manufacturing (n=33)

 60.0%


 50.0%

                                       39.4%        39.4%
 40.0%


 30.0%


 20.0%

                          9.1%
 10.0%      6.1%                                                   6.1%


  0.0%
         Less than a    1-2 Months   3-6 Months   7-12 Months   Over 1 Year
           Month



Q4_B:

                            Distribution (n=4)

 60.0%

                                       50.0%                      50.0%
 50.0%


 40.0%


 30.0%


 20.0%


 10.0%

            0.0%            0.0%                     0.0%
  0.0%
          Less than a   1-2 Months   3-6 Months   7-12 Months   Over 1 Year
            Month




                                                                              17
Q4_C:

                             Service (n=31)

60.0%


50.0%


                                                                 38.7%
40.0%
                                                   32.3%
30.0%


20.0%
           12.9%                      12.9%

10.0%
                          3.2%

 0.0%
         Less than a   1-2 Months   3-6 Months   7-12 Months   Over 1 Year
           Month



Q4_D:

                          Government (n=10)

60.0%

                                                   50.0%
50.0%

                                                                 40.0%
40.0%


30.0%


20.0%

                                      10.0%
10.0%

           0.0%          0.0%
 0.0%
        Less than a    1-2 Months   3-6 Months   7-12 Months   Over 1 Year
          Month




                                                                             18
Q4_E:

                            Non-Profit (n=7)

 60.0%


 50.0%
                                                                 42.8%

 40.0%


                                      28.6%        28.6%
 30.0%


 20.0%


 10.0%

            0.0%         0.0%
  0.0%
         Less than a   1-2 Months   3-6 Months   7-12 Months   Over 1 Year
           Month



Q4_F:

                                Other (n=21)

 60.0%


 50.0%


 40.0%
                                      33.3%        33.3%

 30.0%


                                                                 19.0%
 20.0%

            9.5%
 10.0%
                         4.8%

  0.0%
         Less than a   1-2 Months   3-6 Months   7-12 Months   Over 1 Year
           Month




                                                                             19
Q5: Does Your Company Advertise Job Openings? (n=110)

                                   Type of Firm                           Yes
                                Manufacturing (n=33)                     78.8%
                                 Distribution (n=4)                     100.0%
                                   Service (n=34)                       88.2%
                                 Government (n=10)                      100.0%
                                  Non-Profit (n=7)                       71.4%
                                    Other (n=22)                        72.7%
                                   Total (n=110)                        82.7%

 Q15_A:

          Where Does Your Company Advertise Job Openings? (n=110)

  70.0%


  60.0%    57.3%


  50.0%


  40.0%
                        34.5%

  30.0%


  20.0%


  10.0%                              8.2%
                                                 6.4%        6.4%         5.4%                    6.4%
                                                                                       4.5%

   0.0%
          Local media   Internet   Agencies &   Colleges &    Public       Trade       Internal   Other
                        Postings   Job Banks     Dept. of    Postings     Assoc.       Postings
                                                Education               Publications




        The above bar graph represents the percentages of where companies advertise job
openings. Because the item allowed respondents to select all that apply, percentages are
independent of one another and will not equal 100%. For example, 57.3% of the 110
companies that returned a survey stated they advertise in the local news media such as the
local newspaper. Another 34.5% of the companies that returned a survey noted they
advertise somewhere on the internet, which would include job search engines (Monster,
Career builder, etc.) or any other kind of web site.




                                                                                                          20
Q6: Which of these procedures does your company perform?

                       Q6_A: Does Company Perform Drug Testing?
                                      (n = 110)




                           33%


                                                                    No


                                                                    Yes


                                                     67%




Of the companies that perform drug testing:
    • 85.1% perform pre-employment drug tests
    • 63.5% perform post-employment drug tests
    • 64.9% perform drug tests after an accident

Breakdown:
   • 91% of Manufacturing firms perform drug tests
           -Information for those with 1 to 10 employees is not available**
           -81.8% with 11 to 20 employees perform drug tests
           -90% with 21 to 74 employees perform drug tests
           -100% with 75 to 249 employees perform drug tests
           -100% with 250+ employees perform drug tests
   • 61% of Service firms perform drug tests
           -38.5% with 1 to 10 employees perform drug tests
           -42.9% with 11 to 20 employees perform drug tests
           -100% with 21 to 74 employees perform drug tests
           -75% with 75 to 249 employees perform drug tests
           -100% with 250+ employees perform drug tests
   • 100% of Distribution firms perform drug tests
   • 60% of Governmental institutions perform drug tests
   • 42.9% of Non-Profit firms perform drug tests
   • 50% of firms in the Other category perform drug tests

The larger the organization (in terms of employees) the more likely it performs drug
testing. This was a common pattern among all firms.

**The Manufacturing category only had one case with 1 to 10 employees, so this data
was not reported to maintain confidentiality.


                                                                                       21
                 Q6_B: Does Company Perform Criminal Background Checks?
                                         (n = 110)




                                                                      No
                         48%
                                                       52%
                                                                      Yes




Of the companies that perform criminal background checks:
    • 88.7% perform pre-employment criminal background checks
    • 13.2% perform post-employment criminal background checks
Breakdown:
    • 45.5% of Manufacturing firms perform criminal background checks
             -Information for those with 1 to 10 employees is not available**
             -36.4% with 11 to 20 employees perform criminal background checks
             -60% with 21 to 74 employees perform criminal background checks
             -33.3% with 75 to 249 employees perform criminal background checks
             -60% with 250+ employees perform criminal background checks
    • 42.4% of Service firms perform criminal background checks
             -38.5% with 1 to 10 employees perform criminal background checks
             -42.9% with 11 to 20 employees perform criminal background checks
             -25% with 21 to 74 employees perform criminal background checks
             -25% with 75 to 249 employees perform criminal background checks
             -80% with 250+ employees perform criminal background checks
    • 75% of Distribution firms perform criminal background checks
    • 70% of Governmental institutions perform criminal background checks
    • 42.9% of Non-Profit firms perform criminal background checks
    • 45.5% of firms in the Other category perform criminal background checks

The larger the organization (in terms of employees) the more likely it performs criminal
background checks. This was a common pattern among all firms.




                                                                                       22
                       Q6_C: Does Company Perform Credit Checks?
                                       (n = 109)


                                  11%




                                                                    No


                                                                    Yes




                                              89%




Of the companies that perform credit checks:
    • 75% perform pre-employment credit checks
    • 25% perform post-employment credit checks

NOTE: Due to the fact that the overwhelming majority of companies did not perform
credit checks, a further breakdown was not needed. Most companies shared views in that
if they were to perform a credit check at all, it would be before employment. Companies
were also more likely to perform these checks as they grew in size (in terms of number of
employees).




                                                                                      23
Q7: Does your company hire on a seasonal basis?

 Q7_A: Aggregate Data for Seasonal Hiring (n=109)

                 Response Option         Frequency     Percent
                      Never                  53         48.6%
                  Almost Never               21         19.2%
                   Sometimes                 19         17.4%
                      Often                  16         14.8%
                      Total                 109        100.0%

 Q7_B:

               Seasonal Hires in Manufacturing (n=32)

  80.0%
             71.9%
  70.0%


  60.0%


  50.0%


  40.0%

  30.0%


  20.0%                      15.6%
                                              9.4%
  10.0%
                                                            3.1%

   0.0%
              Never       Almost Never     Sometimes        Often




                                                                    24
Q7_C:

           Seasonal Hires in Distribution (n=4)

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%   25.0%             25.0%         25.0%      25.0%

20.0%

10.0%

 0.0%
        Never          Almost Never   Sometimes    Often



Q7_D:

                Seasonal Hires in Service (n=34)

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

        38.2%
40.0%

30.0%
                          20.6%         20.6%      20.6%
20.0%

10.0%

 0.0%
        Never          Almost Never   Sometimes    Often




                                                           25
Q7_E:

           Seasonal Hires in Government (n=10)

 80.0%

 70.0%

 60.0%

 50.0%

 40.0%
                       30.0%                      30.0%
 30.0%
         20.0%                       20.0%
 20.0%

 10.0%

  0.0%
         Never      Almost Never   Sometimes      Often



Q7_F:

             Seasonal Hires in Non-Profit (n=7)

 80.0%

 70.0%

 60.0%

 50.0%
         42.8%
 40.0%

                       28.6%
 30.0%

 20.0%
                                     14.3%        14.3%

 10.0%

  0.0%
         Never      Almost Never   Sometimes      Often




                                                          26
Q7_G:

                Seasonal Hires in Other (n=22)

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%
        50.0%
50.0%

40.0%

30.0%
                                       22.8%
20.0%
                         13.6%                   13.6%

10.0%

 0.0%
        Never         Almost Never   Sometimes   Often




                                                         27
Q8: What is the average number of years employees have been with your company?
(n=99)

                 0 - 1.99   2 - 4.99   5 - 6.99   7 - 9.99   10 - 14.99     15 +
 Type of Firm     Years      Years      Years      Years       Years       Years   Total
                     1          8          9          4           3           4     29
Manufacturing
                  3.4%      27.6%      31.0%       13.8%       10.3%       13.8%   100%
                     0          0          0          2           2           0      4
 Distribution
                  0.0%       0.0%       0.0%       50.0%       50.0%        0.0%   100%
                     6          3          8          2          10           3     32
   Service
                 18.8%       9.4%      25.0%       6.3%        31.3%        9.4%   100%
                     0          0          0          1           4           2      7
 Government
                  0.0%       0.0%       0.0%       14.3%       57.1%       28.6%   100%
                     0          4          2          0           1           0      7
  Non-Profit
                  0.0%      57.1%      28.6%       0.0%        14.3%        0.0%   100%
                     1          3          4          5           6           1     20
    Other
                  5.0%      15.0%      20.0%       25.0%       30.0%        5.0%   100%
                     8         18         23         14          26          10     99
    Total
                  8.1%      18.2%      23.2%       14.1%       26.3%      10.10%   100%

        The table shows that the majority of organizations have employees who have been
with the company for either 5 – 6.99 years (23 cases) or 10-14.99 years (26 cases).
        Of the Government employees, 85.7% have been with the company for 10 or
more years. Of the Distribution employees, 50% have been with the company for 10 or
more years. Of the Service employees, 40% have been with the company for 10 or more
years. For employees having 10 or more years of seniority, 35% are in the Other category,
24% in Manufacturing, and 14% in Non-Profit.
        From the data, it is clear that Government employees tend to have more longevity
than other types of firms’ employees. Service employees tend to have more seniority than
Manufacturing employees.




                                                                                      28
Q9a: How often does the company provide salary increases?


                          Frequency of Salary Increases
                                    (n=110)
                       Every 6 Months
                             4%
                       Other
                       11%




      No Set Pattern
          19%




                                                    Yearly
                                                     66%




NOTE: This chart was not broken down by type of firm because the data was common
across all firms. Only 12 organizations selected the “Other” category.




                                                                                   29
Q9b: On what basis are salary increases determined? (Check as many as apply)
                         Q9b_1: Basis for Salary Increases
                                     (n=110)
 70.0%
            61.8%
 60.0%


 50.0%


 40.0%


 30.0%                                                             28.2%
                        26.4%        26.4%


 20.0%


 10.0%                                             7.3%                            6.4%


  0.0%
           Formal      Exceeding    Years of    Productivity   Cost of Living    Contract
          Evaluation     Goals      Service      Measure                        Stipulation



       There is an overwhelming majority of the companies preferred formal evaluation
as mean to determine if salary increases was earned. Both productivity measures and
contract stipulations were not very common as determinants of salary increases.




                                                                                              30
                Breakout of Basis for Salary Increase by Type of Firm
                                       (n = 110)
Q9b_2
                 Formal      Exceeding    Years of    Productivity   Cost of     Contract
 Type of Firm   Evaluation     Goals      Service       Measure      Living     Stipulation
Manufacturing
                  75.8%        36.4%        21.2%        15.2%        33.3%        3.0%
    (n=33)
 Distribution
                  75.0%        25.0%        0.0%         50.0%        25.0%        0.0%
     (n=4)
   Service
                  67.6%        20.6%        29.4%        0.0%         17.6%        5.9%
    (n=34)
 Government
                  40.0%        20.0%        20.0%        0.0%         60.0%        10.0%
    (n=10)
  Non-Profit
                  85.7%        28.6%        28.6%        0.0%         28.6%        14.3%
     (n=7)
    Other
                  31.8%        22.7%        36.4%        4.5%         22.7%        9.1%
    (n=22)
     Total
                  61.8%        26.4%        26.4%        7.3%         28.2%        6.4%
   (n=110)

NOTE: Because an organization might use more than one option, each column and the
corresponding percentages are independent of one another.
         Companies also provided other response options in addition to the ones listed in
the survey. Among those responses, “profitability and economic state of the company”
was most frequently noted as the basis for salary increases. An example includes:
economic growth and overall availability of funds. Other companies mentioned that
salary increases were based on meeting other specific goals besides the “Exceeding
Goals” category. Some examples include: fulfillment of expectations by employees such
as attendance, skills and attitude, or informal decisions by management.




                                                                                       31
Q10: Which of the following does your company offer? (Check as many as apply)

                             Incentives by Type of Firm (n=110)

                      Non-                                                                          Graduated
                  Production          Premium            Cost        Premium            Skill-       Training
                     Bonus           Paid Shift         Savings       Pay for           Based         Wage
 Type of Firm      Incentive         Differential      Incentive     Overtime         Incentive     Programs
Manufacturing
                     21.2%               60.6%          12.1%          87.9%           33.3%         15.2%
    (n=33)
 Distribution
                     25.0%               50.0%           0.0%          75.0%           25.0%         25.0%
     (n=4)
   Service
                      8.8%               26.5%           0.0%          50.0%           11.8%          5.9%
    (n=34)
 Government
                     10.0%               10.0%           0.0%          60.0%            0.0%         10.0%
    (n=10)
  Non-Profit
                      0.0%               0.0%            0.0%          14.3%           14.3%          0.0%
     (n=7)
    Other
                      9.1%               18.2%           4.5%          40.9%            4.5%          4.5%
    (n=22)
     Total
                     12.7%               32.7%           4.5%          59.1%           16.4%          9.1%
   (n=110)

NOTE: Because an organization might use more than one option, each column and the
corresponding percentages are independent of one another.

 Q10_A:

             Use of Non-Production Bonus Incentives by Type of Firm
                                  (n=110)

  90.0%

  80.0%

  70.0%

  60.0%

  50.0%

  40.0%

  30.0%                      25.0%
             21.2%
  20.0%
                                                8.8%         10.0%                          9.1%
  10.0%
                                                                           0.0%
   0.0%
          Manufacturing   Distribution      Service       Government     Non-Profit         Other




                                                                                                     32
Q10_B:

          Use of Premium Paid-Shift Differential by Type of Firm (n=110)

90.0%

80.0%

70.0%
            60.6%
60.0%
                           50.0%
50.0%

40.0%

30.0%                                   26.5%

                                                                            18.2%
20.0%
                                                    10.0%
10.0%
                                                                 0.0%
 0.0%
         Manufacturing   Distribution   Service   Government   Non-Profit   Other



Q10_C:

              Use of Cost Savings Incentive by Type of Firm (n=110)

90.0%

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%
            12.1%
10.0%                                                                       4.5%
                            0.0%        0.0%        0.0%         0.0%
 0.0%
         Manufacturing   Distribution   Service   Government   Non-Profit   Other




                                                                                    33
Q10_D:

            Use of Premium Pay for Overtime by Type of Firm (n=110)
            87.9%
90.0%

80.0%                      75.0%

70.0%
                                                    60.0%
60.0%
                                        50.0%
50.0%
                                                                            40.9%
40.0%

30.0%

20.0%                                                           14.3%

10.0%

 0.0%
         Manufacturing   Distribution   Service   Government   Non-Profit   Other



Q10_E:

                Use of Skill Based Incentive by Type of Firm (n=110)

90.0%

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%
            33.3%
30.0%                      25.0%

20.0%                                                           14.3%
                                        11.8%
10.0%                                                                       4.5%
                                                    0.0%
 0.0%
         Manufacturing   Distribution   Service   Government   Non-Profit   Other




                                                                                    34
 Q10_F:

            Use of Graduated Training Wage Programs by Type of Firm
                                   (n=110)

  90.0%

  80.0%

  70.0%

  60.0%

  50.0%

  40.0%

  30.0%                     25.0%

  20.0%      15.2%
                                                     10.0%
  10.0%                                  5.9%                                  4.5%
                                                                  0.0%
   0.0%
          Manufacturing   Distribution   Service   Government   Non-Profit    Other



NOTE: Companies also provided different response options other than the choices listed
above. The most common response among these was a “profit sharing” or “profitability
incentive option,” which was listed by 8 of the 15 companies that indicated that they had
an alternative.




                                                                                       35
Q11: What is your estimate of the average dollar value per employee of your
company’s benefit package?

                 Under    $1000 -   $3,000 -   $5,000 -   $7,000 -   $9,000 and
 Type of Firm    $1,000    $2999     $4,999     $6,999     $8,999       Over      Total
                   1*         2        10          9          2           7         31
Manufacturing
                  3.2%     6.5%      32.3%      29.0%       6.5%       22.6%      100%
                    0         0         1          0          0           2         3
  Distribution
                  0.0%      0.0%     33.3%       0.0%       0.0%       66.7%      100%
                    4         3         6          5          5           8         31
    Service
                 12.9%     9.7%      19.4%      16.1%      16.1%       25.8%      100%
                    0         0         1          1          0           7         9
 Government
                  0.0%      0.0%     11.1%      11.1%       0.0%       77.8%      100%
                    2         2         0          0          0           3         7
  Non-Profit
                 28.6%     28.6%      0.0%       0.0%       0.0%       42.9%      100%
                    4         3         6          0          2           5         20
     Other
                 20.0%     15.0%     30.0%       0.0%      10.0%       25.0%      100%
                   11        10        24         15          9          32        101
     Total
                 10.9%     9.9%      23.8%      14.9%       8.9%       31.7%      100%

         *Indicates # of organizations, so one manufacturing company out of 31 (3.2%)
responded that it provides a benefit package under $1000/employee.
         Responses from Service and Manufacturing firms were spread out across benefit
package categories. Non-Profit and Other organizations showed a bi-modal distribution
(i.e. lower-value and higher-value packages with few, if any, average-value packages).




                                                                                     36
Q16: Which of these benefits does your company offer? (Check as many as apply)
(n=110)

                           Profit                      Flexible Spending
     Type of Firm         Sharing       Tuition Aid        Accounts           Other
                              9              18                 8               10
 Manufacturing (n=33)
                          (27.3%)         (54.5%)           (24.2%)          (30.3%)
                              1               2                 0                1
   Distribution (n=4)
                          (25.0%)        (50.0%)             (0.0%)          (25.0%)
                              9              13                13                3
    Service (n=34)
                          (26.5%)        (38.2%)            (38.2%)           (8.8%)
                              0               7                 0                1
  Government (n=10)
                           (0.0%)        (70.0%)             (0.0%)          (10.0%)
                              0               2                 3                2
    Non-Profit (n=7)
                           (0.0%)         (28.6%)           (42.9%)          (28.6%)
                              5               5                 5                2
     Other (n=22)
                          (22.7%)        (22.7%)            (22.7%)           (9.1%)
                             24              47                29               19
     Total (n=110)
                          (21.8%)         (42.7%)           (26.4%)          (17.3%)

       Because an organization might use more than one option, each column and the
corresponding percentages are independent of one another. The Tuition Aid category was
the most frequently selected category with 47 cases, which was 42.7% of the total.




                                                                                    37
Q14: Insurance – Please check yes or no if the insurance listed below is available,
and then provide percentage within each column. (Check as many as apply)

          The employee insurance coverage is first broken down by the types of firms that
have responded to the survey. The data represents the companies that responded ‘yes’ by
checking the appropriate box, and then provided the company and employee pay
percentages for the given types of coverage.
          Tables Q14_A through Q14_F represent the employee coverage offered by
companies and their subsequent breakdowns. Tables Q14_G through Q14_L represent
the dependent coverage offered by companies and their subsequent breakdowns. There is
also data that breaks down each type of industry and presents whether the company offers
worker’s compensation or if their employees are self-insured (Table Q14_M).
          *The data in the “Company Pay %” and the “Employee Pay %” are means
(averages) of the given data for each type of firm.

Q14_A: Employee Insurance Coverage for Manufacturing (n = 33)

      Type of Coverage           Yes         Company Pay %      Employee Pay %
           Health              100.0%           70.8%*              29.4%
           Dental               72.7%           54.6%               45.6%
         Vision/Eye             45.5%           63.0%               37.0%
             Life               93.9%           90.3%                9.7%
         Disability             57.6%           79.5%               20.5%



Q14_B: Employee Insurance Coverage for Distribution (n = 4)

      Type of Coverage           Yes         Company Pay %      Employee Pay %
           Health              100.0%           68.5%               31.5%
           Dental               75.0%           43.3%               56.7%
         Vision/Eye             50.0%           65.0%               35.0%
             Life              100.0%           81.3%               18.8%
         Disability            100.0%           81.3%               18.8%



Q14_C: Employee Insurance Coverage for Service (n = 31)

      Type of Coverage           Yes         Company Pay %      Employee Pay %
           Health               80.7%           78.5%               21.5%
           Dental               67.7%           63.3%               34.1%
         Vision/Eye             45.2%           50.3%               49.7%
             Life               67.7%           89.4%               10.6%
         Disability             45.2%           75.0%               25.0%




                                                                                      38
Q14_D: Employee Insurance Coverage for Government (n = 10)

      Type of Coverage        Yes       Company Pay %       Employee Pay %
           Health           100.0%         90.2%                 9.8%
           Dental            90.0%         56.1%                43.9%
         Vision/Eye          80.0%         62.7%                37.3%
             Life            90.0%         80.0%                20.0%
         Disability          40.0%         40.0%                60.0%



Q14_E: Employee Insurance Coverage for Non-Profit (n = 7)

      Type of Coverage       Yes        Company Pay %       Employee Pay %
           Health           57.1%          84.0%                16.0%
           Dental           28.6%          85.0%                15.0%
         Vision/Eye         28.6%          85.0%                15.0%
             Life           57.1%          97.5%                 2.5%
         Disability         57.1%          75.0%                25.0%



Q14_F: Employee Insurance Coverage for Other (n = 22)

      Type of Coverage       Yes        Company Pay %       Employee Pay %
           Health           72.7%          83.1%                16.9%
           Dental           36.4%          38.6%                61.4%
         Vision/Eye         36.4%          27.1%                64.5%
             Life           50.0%          88.4%                 3.0%
         Disability         59.1%          76.7%                23.3%




                                                                             39
Q14: Insurance – Please check yes or no if the insurance listed below is available,
and then provide percentage within each column. (Check as many as apply)

Q14_G: Dependent Insurance Coverage for Manufacturing (n = 33)

      Type of Coverage          Yes         Company Pay %     Employee Pay %
           Health              93.9%           61.1%              39.0%
           Dental              66.7%           52.6%              50.2%
         Vision/Eye            39.4%           73.5%              28.0%
             Life              30.3%           50.0%              50.0%
         Disability             9.1%            100%               0.0%



Q14_H: Dependent Insurance Coverage for Distribution (n = 4)

      Type of Coverage          Yes         Company Pay %     Employee Pay %
           Health             100.0%           68.5%              31.5%
           Dental              75.0%           43.3%              56.7%
         Vision/Eye            50.0%           65.0%              35.0%
             Life              75.0%           75.0%              25.0%
         Disability            50.0%           72.5%              27.5%



Q14_I: Dependent Insurance Coverage for Service (n = 31)

      Type of Coverage          Yes         Company Pay %     Employee Pay %
           Health              64.5%           76.3%              23.6%
           Dental              51.6%           61.5%              38.4%
         Vision/Eye            38.7%           41.2%              58.8%
             Life              32.3%           25.0%              75.0%
         Disability            13.3%           35.0%              65.0%



Q14_J: Dependent Insurance Coverage for Government (n = 10)

      Type of Coverage          Yes         Company Pay %     Employee Pay %
           Health              90.0%           80.9%              19.1%
           Dental              80.0%           40.6%              59.4%
         Vision/Eye            60.0%           69.6%              30.4%
             Life              20.0%            0.0%             100.0%
         Disability            30.0%            0.0%             100.0%




                                                                                      40
Q14_K: Dependent Insurance Coverage for Non-Profit (n = 7)

     Type of Coverage           Yes      Company Pay %   Employee Pay %
          Health               57.1%        64.0%            44.7%
          Dental               28.6%        45.0%            55.0%
        Vision/Eye             28.6%        45.0%            55.0%
            Life               14.3%         0.0%            100%
        Disability             14.3%         0.0%            100%



Q14_L: Dependent Insurance Coverage for Other (n = 21)

     Type of Coverage           Yes      Company Pay %   Employee Pay %
          Health               52.4%        76.0%            24.0%
          Dental               31.8%        45.0%            55.0%
        Vision/Eye             27.3%        18.0%            71.0%
            Life               19.0%        22.5%            77.5%
        Disability             13.6%        30.0%            70.0%



Q14_M: Does the Company Offer Worker’s Compensation or
      Are the Employees Self-Insured?

          Type of Industry      Worker’s Compensation    Self-Insured
        Manufacturing (n=28)            89.3%               10.7%
          Distribution (n=3)           100.0%                0.0%
           Service (n=31)              90.3%                 9.7%
         Government (n=10)             70.0%                 30.0%
           Non-Profit (n=6)            100.0%                0.0%
            Other (n=20)               85.0%                 15.0%
             Total (n=98)              87.8%                 12.2%




                                                                          41
Q12: Please indicate the number of paid days based on years of service offered by
your company.


               Years Employed       Vacation Days       Personal Days
                       1              7.30 (n=94)        3.48 (n=42)
                       2             8.55 (n=101)        3.41 (n=47)
                       5            11.67 (n=101)        3.83 (n=47)
                      10            14.36 (n=100)        4.09 (n=46)
                      15            15.83 (n=100)        4.20 (n=46)
                      20             16.38 (n=98)        4.24 (n=45)
                      25             17.02 (n=98)        4.24 (n=45)




       The table above represents the data in aggregate form. The years of service that
an employee has been employed is represented by the “Years Employed” column. The
“Vacation Days” and “Personal Days” columns show the means (averages) across all
firms with the number of cases in parenthesis. So, for one year of employment,
companies offer an average of 7.30 vacation days. This number is based upon 94
responses to the question.
       Those respondents that put a zero for either vacation days or personal days were
omitted from the analysis. Thus the data shows the values for only those companies that
responded to the question with at least one paid vacation or personal day.
       The following pages show a much more detailed description of vacation and
personal days offered by companies. These are broken down by Type of Firm, and give
such information as the range and modes (most common responses).

NOTE: Most companies reported vacation days in terms of weeks. To convert the data,
it was assumed that a week equals 5 days. Thus, the most common responses are usually
multiples of 5.

       Paid Sick Leave was omitted from the following data because of an insufficient
response rate. Most companies that reported having paid sick days wrote that they were
counting paid sick days within their personal days.

NOTE: The “Vacation Days” tables on the subsequent pages do not represent the mean
because the bimodal distributions were much more informative. The tables show the
most common and the second most common responses to best represent this bimodal
distribution.




                                                                                     42
Q12: Number of paid days based on years of service offered by companies

Q12_A: Vacation Days After 1 Year:

                         Total          Most      Second Most       Range:
      Type of Firm
                         Cases        Frequent      Frequent    Lowest - Highest
     Manufacturing        31         5 (71.0%)     10 (25.8%)       5 to 15
      Distribution         4         5 (100.0%)        N/A           5 to 5
        Service           28         5 (39.3%)     10 (35.7%)       1 to 18
      Government           9         10 (77.8%)        N/A          5 to 14
       Non-Profit          5             N/A           N/A          5 to 15
         Other            17         5 (70.6%)     10 (23.5%)      5 to 16.5



Q12_B: Vacation Days After 2 Years:

                         Total          Most      Second Most       Range:
      Type of Firm
                         Cases        Frequent      Frequent    Lowest - Highest
     Manufacturing        33         10 (51.5%)     5 (36.4%)       5 to 15
      Distribution         4         10 (75.0%)      5 (25%)        5 to 10
        Service           31         10 (48.4%)     5 (25.8%)       1 to 21
      Government           9         10 (88.9%)        N/A         10 to 14
       Non-Profit          6         10 (33.3%)        N/A          5 to 15
         Other            18         10 (61.1%)     5 (27.8%)      1 to 16.5



Q12_C: Vacation Days After 5 Years:

                         Total          Most      Second Most       Range:
      Type of Firm
                         Cases        Frequent      Frequent    Lowest - Highest
     Manufacturing        33         10 (66.7%)    15 (21.2%)       9 to 20
      Distribution         4         10 (75.0%)    15 (25.0%)      10 to 15
        Service           31         10 (48.4%)    15 (25.8%)       2 to 23
      Government           9         10 (44.4%)    15 (33.3%)      10 to 15
       Non-Profit          6         15 (33.3%)        N/A          5 to 21
         Other            18         10 (44.4%)    15 (33.3%)      2 to 21.5




                                                                               43
Q12_D: Vacation Days After 10 Years:

                         Total       Most      Second Most   Range: Lowest -
     Type of Firm
                         Cases     Frequent      Frequent       Highest
     Manufacturing        33      15 (60.6%)    10 (24.2%)      10 to 25
      Distribution         4      15 (75.0%)    10 (25.0%)      10 to 15
        Service           30      15 (43.3%)        N/A          3 to 23
      Government           9      15 (44.4%)        N/A         10 to 20
       Non-Profit          6      20 (50.0%)        N/A          5 to 24
         Other            18      15 (44.4%)    10 (22.2%)      2 to 26.5



Q12_E: Vacation Days After 15 Years:

                         Total       Most      Second Most   Range: Lowest -
     Type of Firm
                         Cases     Frequent      Frequent        Highest
     Manufacturing        33      15 (54.5%)    20 (24.2%)       10 to 25
      Distribution         4          N/A           N/A          10 to 20
        Service           30      15 (33.3%)    20 (26.7%)        3 to 25
      Government           9      20 (55.6%)    15 (33.3%)      15 to 22.5
       Non-Profit          6      20 (50.0%)        N/A           5 to 24
         Other            18          N/A       10 (22.2%)       3 to 26.5



Q12_F: Vacation Days After 20 Years:

                         Total       Most      Second Most   Range: Lowest -
     Type of Firm
                         Cases     Frequent      Frequent       Highest
     Manufacturing        32      20 (40.6%)    15 (37.5%)      10 to 30
      Distribution         4          N/A           N/A         10 to 20
        Service           29      15 (39.5%)    20 (24.1%)       3 to 23
      Government           9       20 (88.9)    25 (11.1%)      20 to 25
       Non-Profit          6      20 (50.0%)        N/A          5 to 24
         Other            18      20 (33.3%)        N/A         3 to 26.5



Q12_G: Vacation Days After 25 Years:

                         Total       Most      Second Most   Range: Lowest -
     Type of Firm
                         Cases     Frequent      Frequent       Highest
     Manufacturing        32      20 (43.8%)    15 (31.3%)      10 to 30
      Distribution         4      20 (50.0%)        N/A         10 to 20
        Service           29      15 (31.0%)    20 (13.8%)       3 to 35
      Government           9      20 (66.7%)    25 (22.2%)      20 to 30
       Non-Profit          6      20 (50.0%)        N/A          5 to 24
         Other            18      20 (27.8%)        N/A         4 to 26.5




                                                                           44
Q12: Number of paid days based on years of service offered by companies

* Of the reports for personal days, there was one that had an all-inclusive plan. This plan
dealt with vacation, personal days, and sick leave as the same. Even though it included
all types of paid days, it was included under the personal days.

Q12_H: Personal Days After 1 Year:

                              Total
       Type of Firm
                              Cases      Average # of Days     Range - Lowest to Highest
      Manufacturing             9              3.55                      1 to 5
       Distribution             2              2.50                      1 to 4
         Service               11              3.18                      1 to 9
       Government               8              2.63                      1 to 3
        Non-Profit              4              7.25                     2 to 20*
          Other                 8              3.00                      1 to 5



Q12_I: Personal Days After 2 Years:

                              Total
       Type of Firm
                              Cases      Average # of Days     Range - Lowest to Highest
      Manufacturing            10              3.70                      1 to 5
       Distribution             2              2.50                      1 to 4
         Service               13              3.08                      2 to 9
       Government               9              2.67                      1 to 3
        Non-Profit              4              7.25                     2 to 20*
          Other                 9              2.78                      1 to 5



Q12_J: Personal Days After 5 Years:

                              Total
       Type of Firm
                              Cases      Average # of Days     Range - Lowest to Highest
      Manufacturing            10              4.20                     1 to 10
       Distribution             2              2.50                      1 to 4
         Service               13              3.92                     2 to 16
       Government               9              2.67                      1 to 3
        Non-Profit              4              8.25                     2 to 24*
          Other                 9              2.78                      1 to 5




                                                                                         45
Q12_K: Personal Days After 10 Years:

                          Total
      Type of Firm
                          Cases    Average # of Days   Range - Lowest to Highest
     Manufacturing         10            4.70                   1 to 15
      Distribution          2            2.50                    1 to 4
        Service            12            4.33                   2 to 19
      Government            9            2.67                    1 to 3
       Non-Profit           4            8.50                   2 to 25*
         Other              9            2.90                    1 to 5



Q12_L: Personal Days After 15 Years:

                          Total
      Type of Firm
                          Cases    Average # of Days   Range - Lowest to Highest
     Manufacturing         10            5.20                   1 to 20
      Distribution          2            2.50                    1 to 4
        Service            12            4.33                   2 to 19
      Government            9            2.67                    1 to 3
       Non-Profit           4            8.50                   2 to 25*
         Other              9            2.90                    1 to 5



Q12_M: Personal Days After 20 Years:

                          Total
      Type of Firm
                          Cases    Average # of Days   Range - Lowest to Highest
     Manufacturing         10            5.20                   1 to 20
      Distribution          2            2.50                    1 to 4
        Service            11            4.45                   2 to 19
      Government            9            2.67                    1 to 3
       Non-Profit           4            8.50                   2 to 25*
         Other              9            3.00                    1 to 5



Q12_N: Personal Days After 25 Years:

                          Total
      Type of Firm
                          Cases    Average # of Days   Range - Lowest to Highest
     Manufacturing         10            5.20                   1 to 20
      Distribution          2            2.50                    1 to 4
        Service            11            4.45                   2 to 19
      Government            9            2.67                    1 to 3
       Non-Profit           4            8.50                   2 to 25*
         Other              9            3.00                    1 to 5




                                                                               46
Q13: Please check which of the following is offered by your company. (Check as
many as apply)

 Q13_A: Use of Paid Holidays by Type of Firm (n=107)

     Type of Firm         No       Yes      Total
                           0       33**      33
    Manufacturing
                         0.0%     100.0%   100.0%
                           0         4        4
     Distribution
                         0.0%     100.0%   100.0%
                           3        29       32
       Service
                         9.4%     90.6%    100.0%
                           0        10       10
     Government
                         0.0%     100.0%   100.0%
                           0         7        7
      Non-Profit
                         0.0%     100.0%   100.0%
                           5        16       21
        Other
                        23.8%     76.2%    100.0%
                           8        99      107*
        Total
                         7.5%     92.5%    100.0%
*4 companies did not specify
**This means # of organizations


 Q13_B: Number of Paid Holidays per Year by Type of Firm (n=103)

                                        1-6      7-10      10+
      Type of Firm          0 days     days      days     days       Total
                               0        10        15         7         32
      Manufacturing
                             0.0%     31.2%     46.9%    21.9%      100.0%
                               0         2        2         0          4
       Distribution
                            0.00%    50.00%    50.00%    0.00%     100.00%
                               3        13         7         6         29
         Service
                            10.4%     44.8%     24.1%    20.7%      100.0%
                               0         1        4         5         10
       Government
                             0.0%     10.0%     40.0%    50.0%      100.0%
                               0         0        3         4          7
        Non-Profit
                             0.0%      0.0%     42.9%    57.1%      100.0%
                               5         7        7         2         21
          Other
                            23.9%     33.3%     33.3%     9.5%      100.0%
                               8        33        38        24        103
          Total
                             7.8%     32.0%     36.9%    23.3%      100.0%
       From this above data, 99 organizations had paid holidays. Out of these
organizations, the majority had 7 or more paid holidays and (60.2%).




                                                                                 47
 Q13_C: Use of Unpaid Holidays by Type of Firm (n=105)

     Type of Firm         No           Yes      Total
                           31           2        33
    Manufacturing
                         93.9%        6.1%     100.0%
                            3           0         3
      Distribution
                        100.0%        0.0%     100.0%
                           29           2        31
        Service
                         93.5%        6.5%     100.0%
                           10           0        10
     Government
                        100.0%        0.0%     100.0%
                            7           0         7
      Non-Profit
                        100.0%        0.0%     100.0%
                           16           5        21
         Other
                         76.2%        23.8%    100.0%
                           96           9       105*
         Total
                         91.4%        8.6%     100.0%
       *3 companies did not specify


 Q13_D: Number of Unpaid Holidays per Year by Type of Firm (n=102)

                                         1-3      4-5
      Type of Firm        0 days        days     days     Total
                             31           2        0        33
     Manufacturing
                           93.9%       6.1%      0.0%    100.0%
                              3           0        0        3
       Distribution
                          100.0%       0.0%      0.0%    100.0%
                             29           1        1        31
         Service
                           93.6%       3.2%      3.2%    100.0%
                             10           0        0        10
      Government
                          100.0%       0.0%      0.0%    100.0%
                              7           0        0        7
       Non-Profit
                          100.0%       0.0%      0.0%    100.0%
                             14           3        1        18
          Other
                           77.7%       16.7%     5.6%    100.0%
                             94           6        2       102
          Total
                           92.1%       5.9%      2.0%    100.0%
        The overwhelming number of firms (91.4%) do not use unpaid holidays within
their benefit package.




                                                                                     48
Q13_E: Use of Pay in Lieu of Vacation by Type of Firm (n=108)

    Type of Firm          No        Yes      Total
                           16        17        33
   Manufacturing
                         48.5%     51.5%    100.0%
                            3         1         4
     Distribution
                         75.0%     25.0%    100.0%
                           25         8        33
       Service
                         75.8%     24.2%    100.0%
                           10         0        10
     Government
                        100.0%     0.0%     100.0%
                            6         1         7
      Non-Profit
                         85.7%     14.3%    100.0%
                           13         8        21
        Other
                         61.9%     38.1%    100.0%
                           73        35       108
        Total
                         67.6%     32.4%    100.0%



Q13_F: Use of Paid Jury Duty by Type of Firm (n=106)

    Type of Firm           No      Yes       Total
                           15       18        33
   Manufacturing
                         45.5%    54.5%     100.0%
                            0        3         3
     Distribution
                          0.0%    100.0%    100.0%
                           10       22        32
       Service
                         31.2%    68.8%     100.0%
                            1        9        10
     Government
                         10.0%    90.0%     100.0%
                            0        7         7
      Non-Profit
                          0.0%    100.0%    100.0%
                            9       12        21
        Other
                         42.9%    57.1%     100.0%
                           35        71       106
        Total
                         33.0%     67.0%    100.0%




                                                                49
Q13_G: Use of Flex Time by Type of Firm (n=105)

    Type of Firm         No        Yes      Total
                          24         8        32
   Manufacturing
                        75.0%     25.0%    100.0%
                           1         2         3
     Distribution
                        33.3%     66.7%    100.0%
                          19        13        32
       Service
                        59.4%     40.6%    100.0%
                           7         3        10
    Government
                        70.0%     30.0%    100.0%
                           1         6         7
     Non-Profit
                        14.3%     85.7%    100.0%
                          15         6        21
        Other
                        71.4%     28.6%    100.0%
                          67        38       105
        Total
                        63.8%     36.2%    100.0%



Q13_H: Use of Compensatory Time by Type of Firm (n=104)

    Type of Firm         No        Yes      Total
                          24        7        31
   Manufacturing
                        77.4%     22.6%    100.0%
                           2        1         3
     Distribution
                        66.7%     33.3%    100.0%
                          25        7        32
       Service
                        78.1%     21.9%    100.0%
                           3        7        10
    Government
                        30.0%     70.0%    100.0%
                           4        3         7
     Non-Profit
                        57.1%     42.9%    100.0%
                          17        4        21
        Other
                        81.0%     19.0%    100.0%
                          75        29       104
        Total
                        72.1%     27.9%    100.0%




                                                          50
Q13_I: Use of Non-Lunch Breaks by Type of Firm (n=106)

    Type of Firm        None       One         Two     Total
                           4         5          23      32
   Manufacturing
                        12.5%     15.6%       71.9%   100.0%
                           1         1           2       4
     Distribution
                        25.0%     25.0%       50.0%   100.0%
                          11         3          18      32
       Service
                        34.4%     9.4%        56.2%   100.0%
                           4         0           6      10
    Government
                        40.0%     0.0%        60.0%   100.0%
                           5         0           2       7
     Non-Profit
                        71.4%     0.0%        28.6%   100.0%
                           9         5           7      21
        Other
                        42.9%     23.8%       33.3%   100.0%
                          34        14          58     106*
        Total
                        32.1%     13.2%       54.7%   100.0%
      *16 companies did not specify.


Q13_J: Duration of Each Non-Lunch Break by Type of Firm (n=90)

                                  Less than      10-15   More than
    Type of Firm           0       10 min.        min.    15 min.     Total
                           2           2           24        3         31
   Manufacturing
                         6.5%        6.5%        77.4%     9.6%      100.0%
                           0           1            3        0          4
     Distribution
                          0%        25.0%        75.0%     0.0%      100.0%
                           2           8           16        1         27
       Service
                         7.4%       29.6%        59.3%     3.7%      100.0%
                           1           2            5        0          8
    Government
                        12.5%       25.0%        62.5%     0.0%      100.0%
                           0           0            4        0          4
     Non-Profit
                         0.0%        0.0%       100.0%     0.0%      100.0%
                           1           3           12        0         16
        Other
                         6.2%       18.8%        75.0%     0.0%      100.0%
                           6          16           64        4         90
        Total
                         6.7%       17.8%        71.1%     4.4%      100.0%




                                                                              51
 Q13_K: Length of Lunch Break by Type of Firm (n=107)

                          Less than     30-60     More than
      Type of Firm         30 min.       min.       1 hr.       Total
                               2          30          0          32
     Manufacturing
                             6.3%       93.7%       0.0%       100.0%
                               0           4          0           4
      Distribution
                             0.0%      100.0%       0.0%       100.0%
                               4          26          2          32
        Service
                            12.5%      81.3%        6.2%       100.0%
                               0          10          0          10
      Government
                             0.0%      100.0%       0.0%       100.0%
                               0           7          0           7
       Non-Profit
                             0.0%      100.0%       0.0%       100.0%
                               5          17          0          22
         Other
                            22.7%      77.3%        0.0%       100.0%
                              11          94          2          107
         Total
                            10.3%      87.8%        1.9%       100.0%
       From this data, you can see that the majority of organizations tend to have lunch
breaks during the 30-60 minute range. There were only 2 cases for Service that held a
lunch break for over an hour, no other organization had any over than an hour.




                                                                                       52
Q15a: Does your company have an employee pension plan?

                     Type of Firm           No               Yes           Total

                  Manufacturing          6 (18.2%)       27 (81.8%)         33
                     Distribution        1 (25.0%)        3 (75.0%)          4
                         Service        11 (32.4%)       23 (67.6%)         34
                     Government          0 (0.0%)       10 (100.0%)         10
                      Non-Profit         3 (42.9%)        4 (57.1%)          7
                         Other           6 (27.3%)       16 (72.7%)         22
                          Total         27 (24.5%)       83 (75.5%)         110

Q15b: If yes, which type(s)? (Check as many as possible)

                              Employee Pension         Employee Stock         Profit
      Type of Firm                                                                           Other
                               Plan: 401K, 403B        Ownership Plan        Sharing
                                       24                       0                 7            3
  Manufacturing (n=27)
                                    (88.9%)                  (0.0%)           (25.9%)       (11.1%)
                                        2                       0                 0            1
    Distribution (n=3)
                                     (66.7%)                 (0.0%)            (0.0%)       (33.3%)
                                       20                       0                 6            4
     Service (n=23)
                                     (87.0%)                 (0.0%)           (26.1%)       (17.4%)
                                        1                       0                 0            8
   Government (n=10)
                                     (10.0%)                 (0.0%)            (0.0%)       (80.0%)
                                        4                       0                 0
    Non-Profit (n=4)                                                                        0 (0.0%)
                                    (100.0%)                 (0.0%)            (0.0%)
                                        8                       1                 3             5
      Other (n=16)
                                    (50.0%)                 (12.5%)           (18.8%)       (31.3%)
                                       59                       1                16            21
      Total (n=83)
                                     (71.1%)                 (1.2%)           (19.3%)       (25.3%)

Q15c: Do you match employee contributions?

                     Type of Firm           No               Yes           Total

                  Manufacturing         12 (36.4%)       21 (63.6%)         33
                     Distribution        1 (25.0%)        3 (75.0%)          4
                         Service        16 (47.1%)       18 (52.9%)         34
                     Government          3 (30.0%)        7 (70.0%)         10
                      Non-Profit         3 (42.9%)        4 (57.1%)          7
                         Other          11 (50.0%)       11 (50.0%)         22
                          Total         46 (41.8%)       64 (58.2%)         110
                      NOTE: Even though survey asked for percent of match and dollar
                      value contributed to employees’ pension plan the responses gathered
                      did not allow for a sufficient data report.



                                                                                                       53
Q17: Please provide the following for the occupations listed below.

     Q17_A: Spfld/Clark Co. Aggregate/Combined Wages
    Survey Job Titles (# of      Number of     Average Hourly         Entry Level    Maximum
     Employees Reported)           Cases          Wage*                Wage*        Hourly Wage*
Accountant (37)                     23             $21.62               $17.86         $25.00
Accounting Clerk (101)              37             $14.60               $11.95         $17.17
Accounting Supervisor (19)          16             $23.36               $18.86         $27.83
Administrative                      31             $13.35               $10.92         $16.12
Assistant/Secretary (234)
Analyst (9)                           5             $22.06              $15.72         $26.73
Assembler (507)                      11             $13.07              $10.87         $15.31
Buyer/Purchasing Agent (41)          21             $19.66              $14.98         $22.35
Case Manager (233)                   9              $17.67              $13.32         $20.91
Clerk Typist (7)                      5             $13.22              $10.82         $13.92
Collections Counselor (15)            6             $15.33              $11.59         $15.95
Computer Programmer (13)              5             $25.12              $20.15         $27.43
Cost Accountant (5)                   5             $21.73              $18.95         $23.31
Credit Manager (4)                    4             $14.19              $13.28         $15.10
Customer Service Clerk (131)         22             $11.26               $9.43         $13.21
Customer Service Supervisor          14             $15.46              $10.72         $19.10
(53)
Database Developer/Database          4              $36.14              $29.68         $37.01
Programmer (35)
Data Processing Manager (4)          4              $26.40              $20.01         $26.81
Department Supervisor (127)          21             $23.94              $19.13         $30.02
Director of Sales (14)               14             $30.49              $26.30         $32.00
Drafter (13)                          9             $18.80              $15.63         $23.29
Electrician (79)                     11             $19.34              $14.49         $20.86
Engineer, Industrial (9)              5              N/A                $30.79          N/A
Engineer, Mechanical (32)            12             $27.81              $24.04         $34.94
Engineer, Technical (22)              3             $33.64              $22.50         $38.30
Estimator (13)                        8             $25.41              $18.75         $28.78
Executive Secretary (74)             27             $17.65              $13.43         $19.69
Financial                            22             $37.75              $24.79         $39.94
Mgr/Controller/Treasurer (28)
Food Preparation Person (342)        10             $10.39               $8.95         $11.88
Grinder Setup/Operator (12)           5             $12.47              $10.30         $14.63
Groundskeeper (21)                    6             $10.81              $8.89          $12.53
Guard (28)                            2             $11.63               $9.47         $13.82
Help Desk Support (4)                 3             $18.55              $15.16         $22.47
Housekeeping Attendant (189)          8              $8.48               $7.45          $9.75
Human Resource Assistant             12             $15.93              $13.16         $19.55
(24)
Human Resources Mgr (24)             22             $33.39              $25.61         $34.20
Human Resources Rep (16)              8             $23.54              $17.01         $24.46
Information Tech Trainer (2)          2             $17.59              $16.71         $26.24




                                                                                         54
    Q17_A (cont’d): Spfld/Clark Co. Aggregate/Combined Wages
    Survey Job Titles (# of       Number of   Average Hourly   Entry Level    Maximum
     Employees Reported)            Cases        Wage*          Wage*        Hourly Wage*
Inspector (77)                       12           $18.42         $13.30         $21.61
Intelligence Analyst (0)             N/A           N/A            N/A            N/A
Inventory Control Clerk (9)           9           $15.92         $12.63         $17.51
Janitor (164)                        18           $11.46         $9.93          $12.59
Lab Technician (44)                   7           $18.43         $14.04         $20.44
Legal Assistant (2)                   2           $20.45         $16.02         $20.45
Loan Counselor (1)                    1           $15.00         $14.00         $16.00
Machine Operator (104)               11           $13.03         $10.55         $15.31
Machine Operator, CNC (137)           10          $14.55         $11.17         $17.90
Mail Clerk (9)                        4           $13.39         $10.11         $14.52
Maintenance                          35           $22.98         $18.61         $27.20
Supervisor/Facilities Mgr. (61)
Maintenance                          27          $14.87          $11.68         $16.56
Worker/Helper/Tech. (131)
Marketing Mgr/Public                  6          $26.87          $14.19         $22.96
Relations (9)
Material Handling Laborer            12          $12.75          $10.61         $14.70
(80)
Materials Planner/Inventory           8          $16.62          $14.00         $20.33
(46)
Mechanic (63)                        11          $18.36          $14.38         $20.35
Network/Telecomm. Engineer           1           $20.05          $15.38         $27.48
(4)
Nurse - Registered,                   8          $20.86          $17.53         $26.92
Med. Facility (480)
Nurse – Registered,                   7          $26.99          $20.67         $40.43
Non.– Med. (28)
Office Mgr (29)                      22          $19.15          $13.51         $20.72
Operations/Support (5)                5          $18.30          $15.17         $23.42
Painter (26)                         10          $13.29          $11.65         $15.98
Paralegal (3)                         1          $17.55          $16.75         $18.35
Payroll Administrator (33)           12          $20.39          $15.92         $22.21
Plant Mgr (21)                       19          $35.90          $29.19         $42.17
Press Operator (124)                  9          $12.44          $10.32         $16.34
Production Supervisor (101)          18          $22.61          $17.89         $25.12
Production Trainee (130)              7          $10.78          $9.16          $11.75
Purchasing Mgr (10)                   8          $27.57          $22.90         $26.69
Quality Control Mgr (36)             14          $28.36          $21.85         $28.36
Receptionist (90)                    28          $11.25          $9.59          $13.05
Safety/Security Director (12)         9          $31.55          $26.08         $36.12
Sales Mgr (15)                       13           N/A            $24.68          N/A
Sales Person/Retail Clerk (47)       10           N/A             $8.07          N/A
Sales Representative, Inside         14          $18.08          $13.61         $21.86
(115)


                                                                                  55
    Q17_A (cont’d): Spfld/Clark Co. Aggregate/Combined Wages
    Survey Job Titles (# of     Number of   Average Hourly   Entry Level    Maximum
     Employees Reported)          Cases        Wage*          Wage*        Hourly Wage*
Sales Representative, Outside      12           $30.60         $21.18         $42.38
(37)
Scheduling Clerk (12)               8          $17.79          $14.48         $19.96
Shipper/Receiver (193)             20          $13.32          $10.71         $15.21
Shipping/Receiving/Warehous        10          $18.07          $13.68         $19.77
e Supervisor (14)
Software Engineer (2)               2          $28.71          $27.70         $30.11
Surface Grinder (2)                 1          $12.50          $10.00         $15.00
Systems Administrator (11)         10          $26.22          $18.49         $25.02
Systems Analyst (1)                 1          $26.04          $24.03         $28.85
Systems Engineer (1)                1          $18.03          $15.94         $24.52
Systems Hardware Tech. (24)         6          $16.43          $12.97         $18.64
Team Leader/Group Leader           25          $15.70          $12.09         $19.05
(117)
Technical Manager (3)               3            N/A             N/A           N/A
Teller (66)                         2           $9.06           $8.12         $12.32
Tool & Die Maker (43)               9          $17.07          $14.26         $19.84
Truck Driver, Heavy and            11          $15.14          $12.40         $16.24
Tractor-Trailer (119)
Truck Driver, Light or             16          $11.19          $9.75          $13.98
Delivery Services (45)
Unskilled Laborer (407)            17          $9.74           $8.25          $11.17
Waiter/Waitress (90)                1           $3.65           N/A            N/A
Welder (133)                       11          $15.14          $12.50         $17.82

*These wages are based on an assumed 40 hour work week, 52 weeks a year. Wages are
the mean/average of all the wages reported for each individual job.




                                                                                 56
      Q17_B: Spfld/Clark Co. Manufacturing Wages
  Survey Job Titles (Number       Number of   Average Hourly   Entry Level    Maximum
   of Employees Reported)           Cases        Wage*          Wage*        Hourly Wage*
Accountant (7)                        6           $21.25         $17.28         $23.48
Accounting Clerk (23)                10           $14.72         $12.15         $15.81
Accounting Supervisor (8)             6           $21.71         $13.93          N/A
Administrative                       13           $12.88         $9.97          $16.73
Assistant/Secretary (18)
Analyst (3)                           1          $29.86           N/A            N/A
Assembler (468)                       9          $13.41          $11.20         $15.91
Buyer/Purchasing Agent (24)          14          $19.21          $15.16         $20.78
Clerk Typist (2)                      2          $13.16          $12.11         $13.66
Computer Programmer (7)               1          $29.94           N/A            N/A
Cost Accountant (3)                   3          $20.11          $17.98         $23.31
Credit Manager (1)                    1          $13.50           N/A            N/A
Customer Service Clerk (13)          6           $14.93          $10.92         $17.19
Customer Service Supervisor           4          $19.98           N/A           $33.00
(23)
Department Supervisor (17)            7          $24.23          $19.70         $28.11
Director of Sales (7)                 7          $28.30           N/A            N/A
Drafter (11)                          7          $17.41          $14.15         $23.12
Electrician (46)                      4          $23.94          $19.02         $24.01
Engineer, Industrial (9)              5          $28.85           N/A            N/A
Engineer, Mechanical (32)            12          $27.81          $24.04         $34.94
Engineer, Technical (6)               2          $32.96          $22.50         $38.30
Estimator (6)                         5          $25.77          $21.91         $30.13
Executive Secretary (7)              6           $18.62          $15.00         $19.83
Financial                             9          $34.76          $24.62         $43.37
Mgr/Controller/Treasurer (12)
Grinder Setup/Operator (11)           4          $12.97          $10.63         $15.66
Human Resource Assistant (2)          2          $21.27          $14.42         $24.52
Human Resources Mgr (8)               8          $33.17          $23.56          N/A
Human Resources Rep (4)               2          $25.44            N/A           N/A
Inspector (49)                        9          $17.16          $13.77         $18.32
Inventory Control Clerk (3)           3          $13.79          $11.61         $14.24
Janitor (13)                          6          $11.11           $8.75         $12.33
Lab Technician (6)                    3          $18.53          $15.41         $19.96
Machine Operator (104)               11          $13.03          $10.55         $15.31
Machine Operator, CNC (113)           9          $14.77          $11.41         $18.56
Maintenance                          14          $25.10          $19.15         $26.95
Supervisor/Facilities Mgr. (32)
Maintenance                           8          $20.08          $14.35         $20.88
Worker/Helper/Tech. (35)
Material Handling Laborer            10          $12.98          $11.01         $15.05
(60)
Materials Planner/Inventory           5          $16.28          $14.06         $22.07
(43)
Mechanic (36)                         3          $15.02          $13.65         $16.70
                                                                                         57
   Q17_B (cont’d): Spfld/Clark Co. Manufacturing Wages
  Survey Job Titles (Number     Number of   Average Hourly   Entry Level    Maximum
   of Employees Reported)         Cases        Wage*          Wage*        Hourly Wage*
Nurse – Registered,                 1           $27.28          N/A            N/A
Non.– Med. (2)
Office Mgr (7)                      7          $19.28          $12.17           N/A
Operations/Support (1)              1          $19.00          $22.00           N/A
Painter (21)                       6           $13.34          $12.13          $16.47
Payroll Administrator (2)           2          $19.32          $17.12          $24.03
Plant Mgr (16)                     14          $37.43          $31.30          $44.32
Press Operator 124)                 9          $12.44          $10.32          $16.34
Production Supervisor (72)         15          $23.90          $19.43          $25.69
Production Trainee (130)            7          $10.78          $9.16           $11.75
Purchasing Mgr (9)                  7          $27.32          $21.30          $29.69
Quality Control Mgr (34)           12          $27.75          $20.96           N/A
Receptionist (8)                   5           $12.18          $10.37          $13.70
Safety/Security Director (8)        5          $30.95          $24.34          $34.84
Sales Mgr (9)                       7           N/A            $34.40          $38.00
Sales Person/Retail Clerk (1)      1           $13.52           N/A             N/A
Sales Representative, Inside       10          $18.96          $15.21          $21.98
(26)
Sales Representative, Outside       8           N/A            $22.88          $28.97
(29)
Scheduling Clerk (6)                5          $19.46          $16.74          $19.96
Shipper/Receiver (185)             16          $13.39          $10.83          $15.29
Shipping/Receiving/Warehous         6          $18.69          $16.52          $25.43
e Supervisor (7)
Software Engineer (1)               1          $26.04          $24.03          $28.85
Surface Grinder (2)                 1          $13.00          $10.00          $15.00
Systems Administrator (6)           5          $25.82          $15.85          $24.06
Systems Analyst (1)                 1          $26.04          $24.03          $28.85
Systems Hardware Tech. (1)          1          $15.00          $10.00          $20.00
Team Leader/Group Leader           13          $15.68          $11.90          $18.35
(52)
Technical Manager (1)               1          $20.07           N/A             N/A
Tool & Die Maker (43)               9          $17.07          $14.26          $19.84
Truck Driver, Heavy and             5          $13.09          $10.77          $13.88
Tractor-Trailer (17)
Truck Driver, Light or              8          $10.96           $9.50          $12.49
Delivery Services (8)
Unskilled Laborer (390)            13          $10.58          $8.50           $12.38
Welder (133)                       11          $15.14          $12.50          $17.82

*These wages are based on an assumed 40 hour work week, 52 weeks a year. Wages are the
mean/average of all the wages reported for each individual job.



                                                                                         58
              Q17_C: Spfld/Clark Co. Service Wages
  Survey Job Titles (Number       Number of   Average Hourly   Entry Level    Maximum
   of Employees Reported)           Cases        Wage*          Wage*        Hourly Wage*
Accountant (10)                       7           $17.26         $15.05         $23.00
Accounting Clerk (25)                 9           $14.83         $11.58         $17.14
Accounting Supervisor (5)             5           $22.08         $17.40         $25.88
Administrative                       11           $13.04         $11.51         $15.25
Assistant/Secretary (40)
Analyst (2)                           2          $21.65          $17.18         $26.00
Assembler (39)                        2          $11.55           $9.55         $13.20
Buyer/Purchasing Agent (5)            2          $19.48          $11.96         $23.64
Case Manager (39)                     4          $16.45          $12.35         $20.65
Clerk Typist (1)                      1          $13.52          $10.59         $13.52
Collections Counselor (1)             1          $17.67          $13.85         $17.67
Computer Programmer (1)               1          $23.64          $18.57         $23.64
Customer Service Clerk (94)           8          $8.94           $8.14          $10.97
Customer Service Supervisor           6          $10.65            N/A          $13.60
(11)
Database Developer/Database           1          $29.52          $23.11         $29.52
Programmer (1)
Department Supervisor (30)            5          $20.52          $16.04         $26.60
Director of Sales (3)                 3          $22.16          $16.30         $26.08
Drafter (1)                           1          $23.64          $18.57         $23.64
Electrician (24)                      3          $16.78          $11.27         $18.83
Estimator (7)                         2          $22.00          $16.00         $23.50
Executive Secretary (19)              6          $18.52          $12.99         $20.92
Financial                             4          $37.04          $35.27         $55.76
Mgr/Controller/Treasurer (5)
Food Preparation Person (148)         5           $9.04           $7.77         $10.79
Groundskeeper (18)                    3          $10.56           $8.72         $12.49
Guard (5)                             1          $10.70           $8.59         $12.88
Housekeeping Attendant (60)           5           $8.45           $7.30         $10.14
Human Resource Assistant (3)          2            N/A           $14.66         $16.38
Human Resources Mgr (7)               6          $29.51          $22.85         $31.09
Human Resources Rep (7)               3          $23.67          $16.47         $23.41
Inspector (15)                        2          $21.89          $11.15         $28.87
Inventory Control Clerk (2)           2          $19.54          $15.18         $23.11
Janitor (9)                           3          $12.70          $11.29         $13.52
Lab Technician (7)                    2          $16.89          $12.59         $18.78
Legal Assistant (1)                   1          $20.45          $16.02         $20.45
Loan Counselor (1)                    1          $14.50          $14.00         $16.00
Mail Clerk (30                        2          $15.07          $10.81         $17.31
Maintenance                          10          $20.92          $16.78         $26.11
Supervisor/Facilities Mgr. (16)
Maintenance                          10          $12.16          $10.31         $13.90
Worker/Helper/Tech. (42)



                                                                                         59
          Q17_C (cont’d): Spfld/Clark Co. Service Wages
    Survey Job Titles (# of      Number of   Average Hourly   Entry Level    Maximum
     Employees Reported)           Cases         Wage*          Wage*       Hourly Wage*
Marketing Mgr/Public                 1           $41.39          N/A            N/A
Relations (1)
Material Handling Laborer (9)        1            N/A            $9.00          N/A
Mechanic (11)                        2           $18.17         $15.21         $19.30
Network/Telecomm. Engineer           1           $20.05         $15.38         $27.48
(4)
Nurse - Registered,                  5           $22.75         $18.25         $29.11
Med. Facility (108)
Nurse – Registered,                  1           $25.00          N/A            N/A
Non.– Med. (2)
Office Mgr (13)                      7           $16.80         $11.68         $16.97
Operations/Support (1)               1           $15.00         $8.00          $22.00
Painter (2)                          1            $7.00          $7.00          $7.00
Paralegal (3)                        1             N/A          $16.75         $18.35
Payroll Administrator (3)            3           $20.66         $15.89         $22.58
Plant Mgr (3)                        3           $26.50         $22.00         $30.00
Production Supervisor (14)           2           $15.01         $12.83           N/A
Quality Control Mgr (2)              2           $34.54         $29.02         $45.88
Receptionist (30)                   11           $10.72         $8.52          $12.07
Sales Mgr (3)                        3           $26.00         $16.00         $28.00
Sales Person/Retail Clerk (25)      5             $8.15          $7.74          $9.33
Sales Representative, Inside        2            $12.88         $10.21         $16.29
(84)
Sales Representative, Outside        1            N/A            N/A           $99.00
(2)
Scheduling Clerk (6)                 3           $13.64         $11.10          N/A
Shipper/Receiver (4)                 2           $13.10         $10.40         $14.48
Shipping/Receiving/Warehous          1           $15.27         $12.20          N/A
e Supervisor (2)
Systems Administrator (1)            1           $23.70         $18.32         $27.48
Team Leader/Group Leader             6           $14.88         $12.35         $17.84
(15)
Teller (2)                           1            $8.75          $8.00         $10.00
Truck Driver, Heavy and              3           $17.13         $14.31         $18.13
Tractor-Trailer (52)
Truck Driver, Light or               1           $11.50         $10.00         $23.50
Delivery Services (1)
Unskilled Laborer (5)                3           $7.50           $7.50          $7.50
Waiter/Waitress (90)                 1           $3.65            N/A            N/A

* These wages are based on an assumed 40 hour work week, 52 weeks a year. Wages are the
mean/average of all the wages reported for each individual job.




                                                                                          60
        Q17_D: Spfld/Clark Co. Government Wages
    Survey Job Titles (# of      Number of   Average Hourly   Entry Level    Maximum
    Employees Reported)            Cases        Wage*          Wage*        Hourly Wage*
Accountant (6)                       4           $28.87         $25.05         $32.61
Accounting Clerk (29)                7           $15.96         $12.56         $18.54
Accounting Supervisor (3)            3           $26.58         $21.21         $29.15
Administrative                       6           $15.45         $12.46         $17.93
Assistant/Secretary (135)
Buyer/Purchasing Agent (2)           5          $23.28          $16.27         $28.61
Case Manager (138)                   1          $15.23          $11.98         $20.80
Clerk Typist (1)                     1          $13.52          $10.59         $13.52
Collections Counselor (1)            1          $17.67          $13.85         $17.67
Computer Programmer (2)              2          $21.44          $18.57         $23.64
Customer Service Clerk (11)          2          $13.50          $11.47         $15.30
Customer Service Supervisor          2          $22.14          $16.01         $25.90
(8)
Database Developer/Database          3          $38.34          $31.87         $39.51
Programmer (3)
Data Processing Manager (3)          3          $21.78          $18.35         $26.80
Department Supervisor (54)           4          $33.53          $25.72         $42.77
Director of Sales (1)                1          $34.54          $26.25         $42.83
Drafter (1)                          1          $23.64          $18.57         $23.64
Electrician (6)                      3          $16.73          $14.75         $17.89
Executive Secretary (31)             5          $19.61          $14.48         $22.63
Financial                            4           N/A            $23.34         $35.68
Mgr/Controller/Treasurer (4)
Food Preparation Person (151)        3          $13.19          $11.30         $14.72
Groundskeeper (1)                    1           $9.81           $9.81         $12.50
Human Resource Assistant (8)         3          $16.89          $14.33         $22.61
Human Resources Mgr (6)              5          $37.65          $30.16         $40.21
Human Resources Rep (4)              2          $24.15          $17.89         $26.04
Inspector (13)                       1          $22.77          $11.15         $36.74
Inventory Control Clerk (1)          1          $23.11          $18.15         $23.11
Janitor (132)                        5          $13.42          $11.85         $14.61
Lab Technician (5)                   1          $20.78          $13.17         $22.56
Legal Assistant (1)                  1          $20.45          $16.02         $20.45
Mail Clerk (1)                       1          $15.28          $11.96         $15.28
Maintenance                          4          $31.52          $26.43         $32.64
Supervisor/Facilities Mgr. (4)
Maintenance                          4          $15.17          $12.72         $16.48
Worker/Helper/Tech. (21)
Mechanic (10)                        3          $17.94          $15.06         $21.04
Nurse - Registered,                  1          $15.68          $12.72         $16.91
Med. Facility (4)
Nurse – Registered,                  2          $38.82          $24.33         $50.85
Non.– Med. (14)
Office Mgr (1)                       1          $23.11          $18.15         $23.11

                                                                                        61
Q17_D (cont’d): Spfld/Clark Co. Government Wages
    Survey Job Titles (# of    Number of   Average Hourly    Entry Level    Maximum
     Employees Reported)         Cases        Wage*           Wage*        Hourly Wage*
Operations/Support (1)             1           $12.00           N/A            N/A
Painter (2)                        2           $14.43          $12.85         $16.00
Payroll Administrator (25)         4           $23.83          $18.38         $25.64
Receptionist (22)                  4           $13.20          $10.95         $15.81
Safety/Security Director (2)       2           $39.63          $36.00         $43.00
Software Engineer (1)              1           $31.37           N/A            N/A
Systems Administrator (1)          1           $24.04          $15.94         $24.52
Systems Engineer (1)               1           $18.03          $15.94         $24.52
Systems Hardware Tech. (21)        3           $15.80          $13.15         $18.19
Team Leader/Group Leader           2           $17.94          $14.75         $23.02
(13)
Truck Driver, Heavy and            2           $17.10          $13.35          $18.69
Tractor-Trailer (43)
Truck Driver, Light or             1           $10.20           $8.67          $11.73
Delivery Services (3)
Unskilled Laborer (12)             1            $6.97           $6.25          $7.63

*These wages are based on an assumed 40 hour work week, 52 weeks a year. Wages are the
mean/average of all the wages reported for each individual job.




                                                                                         62
          Q17_E: Spfld/ Clark Co. Non-Profit Wages
    Survey Job Titles (# of      Number of   Average Hourly   Entry Level    Maximum
    Employees Reported)            Cases        Wage*          Wage*        Hourly Wage*
Accountant (2)                       2            N/A           $16.37         $23.00
Accounting Clerk (5)                 5           $13.17         $12.83         $20.50
Accounting Supervisor (1)            1            N/A           $25.00          N/A
Administrative                       2           $18.41         $12.67         $21.98
Assistant/Secretary (2)
Case Manager (12)                    3          $19.25          $14.45         $20.99
Customer Service Supervisor          1           N/A            $10.50          N/A
(1)
Department Supervisor (10)           3          $17.73          $15.47         $22.91
Executive Secretary (3)              3          $12.50          $11.00         $15.50
Financial                            1          $20.88          $15.93         $25.82
Mgr/Controller/Treasurer (1)
Human Resource Assistant (2)         2          $18.25           $9.50          N/A
Janitor (7)                          2           $8.63           $8.30         $10.50
Maintenance                          2          $12.80          $14.00         $16.00
Supervisor/Facilities Mgr. (2)
Marketing Mgr/Public                 2          $24.21          $16.42         $25.99
Relations (4)
Nurse - Registered,                  1          $22.38          $15.00         $33.00
Med. Facility (12)
Nurse – Registered,                  1          $25.00          $21.00         $30.00
Non.– Med. (2)
Office Mgr (3)                       2          $32.96          $25.59         $48.90
Receptionist (10)                    2           $9.13           $8.05         $11.25
Systems Administrator (1)            1          $23.00          $21.00         $25.00


* These wages are based on an assumed 40 hour work week, 52 weeks a year. Wages are the
mean/average of all the wages reported for each individual job.




                                                                                          63
LIMITATIONS
    Limitations are problems the project team had to deal with throughout the project.

The various types of problems (e.g., deadlines, returned surveys, data analysis, etc.)

created difficulty and set backs during the project. Each hurdle required a specific

reaction. The way in which the team dealt with these problems is detailed below. Having

knowledge of these limitations should promote better survey construction and execution

in the future.

    •   Survey mailing and completion date. Extensive work on improving the survey

        as well as unpredictable weather that closed the university caused a delay in the

        date in which the surveys were mailed to Clark County businesses. As a result, the

        deadline noted in the cover letter (requesting participation in the survey) gave

        companies very little time to complete and return the surveys. (See Exhibit 2)

        Thus, the due date was extended to prevent a lack of response due to the belief

        that a returned survey may be too late to be included in the results. Participants

        were notified by email. (see Exhibit 3)

    •   Non-probability sample. Surveys were not mailed to a random sample of all

        businesses in Clark County. Instead, the sample frame included only businesses

        who are Chamber members. Of those businesses who received the survey, less

        than 10% completed it. Thus, the current data would be considered a non-

        probability sample. Statistics derived from non-probability samples may not be

        projected with confidence to the population of organizations in Clark County. In

        the presentation of data, the team repeatedly refers to “those who responded” as

        the representative group to which the statistics apply.




                                                                                             64
•   Sample size. Only a small number of employers completed the survey, resulting

    in a response rate of 9.6%. This restricted the project team’s ability to run

    statistical analyses on some sub-groups within the data. However, the data is

    analyzed by relevant groups, when appropriate.

•   Survey completion and accuracy. Some companies decided not to fill out the

    entire survey, which limited the team’s ability to analyze sub-groups in the

    sample. These problems were handled by trying to call companies to get

    clarification about inaccurate or incomplete responses.

•   Survey terminology clarification needed.

    Data clarification. Many returned survey’s needed clarification. For example, a

    participant might respond to a question with data in hours when days were

    requested. Team members attempted to contact the person who completed the

    survey. In many cases, the contact person did not return the phone call or was

    unable to provide the info requested. Ninety-two companies were called back and,

    of those companies, only five were not clarified. Data that could not be clarified

    was not included in the analyses. Also, some responses were non-exhaustive in

    their answers. Some respondents answered survey items that did not directly

    correspond with the way the question was asked. This may have been due to

    different policies across the companies. For example, the Vacation/Sick

    Leave/Personal Days question asked for the number of paid days employees

    received after a given number of years of service. Some respondents answered

    the item in terms of hours, weeks, or other responses that didn’t correspond with

    the preferred response of days. Also, the wages section of the survey was not




                                                                                     65
    meant to be an exhaustive list of job titles. Yet, some companies created their

    own job titles on the survey. In these situations, companies were contacted for

    further clarification. If the company could not be reached, then data was

    converted to correspond to the desired response format (e.g., 8 hours converted to

    1 day). One common problem was that companies provided salary or commission

    data instead of hourly wages, which is what the survey asked. For example,

    salaries were transformed according to an assumed 40-hour work week and weeks

    were transformed to 5 days assuming a 5-day working week. Transformation of

    the data was necessary in order to aggregate across cases.

•   Survey space limitations. In general, the survey didn’t allow for policy

    segregation between different types of employees within the company. For

    example, some companies weren’t able to differentiate between salary employees

    versus hourly wage employees with the same job title or between office

    employees versus factory employees with different benefits.




                                                                                      66
           Recommendations for Next Survey Project Team

•   When preparing to send out the survey, allow a longer window of time for
    companies to respond. Also, possibly include another incentive besides a free
    report to encourage a higher response rate. Furthermore, stress the benefits and
    objectives of the project within the research objectives file; this may increase
    responses.

•   Possible use of a probability sample could allow for a more reflective landscape
    of the information instead of a self-selected sample.

•   Make several questions more specific. For example, Question 12 (Paid Time Off)
    use “number of days” to deter other forms of responses (e.g. number of hours).
    May also want to consider revising the question since some companies are
    moving towards different structures for these paid days off (e.g. paid time off
    program that combines sick and personal days).

•   For Question 17, include columns for salary and weekly pay, as some jobs are not
    paid hourly.

•   Make the job title listing more general, as some companies did not fill out wage
    information because they do not have any employees with those job titles.
    Different companies may have either reported that they do not have employees in
    the specific job titles by indicating the number 0 or the respondent simply did not
    want to report/calculate wages.

•   Make sure all specific changes dealing with survey process are noted as you go
    along so it is easier to reference them later on.




                                                                                       67
                       Exhibit 1: WAGE AND BENEFIT SURVEY
                                       PART ONE - GENERAL

1.   Type of firm:     Manufacturing        Distribution     Service        Other __________________

2.   How many employees does your company have at this facility?
     Union: ________ Non-Union: _________ TOTAL: _________

3.   How many applications does your company currently have on file? _______

4.   How long does your company normally keep applications on file?
       less than 1 month       1-2 months        3-6 months       7-12 months            more than 1 year

5.   Does your company advertise job openings?         No         Yes
     If yes, where?

6. Which of these procedures does your company perform?
                                             If Yes, …
     Drug testing                      No        Pre-employment         Random                 Post-accident
     Criminal background check         No        Pre-employment         Post-employment
     Credit check                      No        Pre-employment         Post-employment


7.   Does your company hire on a seasonal basis?
       Never            Almost Never           Sometimes                Often

8.   What is the average number of years employees have been with your company?             Years

                                       PART TWO - BENEFITS

9.   a.   How often does your company provide salary increases?
            Every six months         Yearly             No set pattern           Other
     b.   On what basis are salary increases determined? (Check as many as apply)
              Formal Evaluation                      Exceeding Goals
              Years of Service                       Piece Rate/Productivity Measure
              Cost of Living                         Contract Stipulation
              Other__________________________________________________

10. Which of the following does your company offer? (Check as many as apply)
        Non-Production Bonus Incentive         Premium Paid Shift Differential
        Cost Savings Incentive                 Premium Pay for Overtime
        Skill-Based Incentive                  Graduated-Training Wage Programs for New Employees
        Other__________________________________________________________________________

11. What is your estimate of the average dollar value per employee of your company’s benefit package?
      Under $1,000                 $3,000 – $4,999           $7,000 - $8,999
      $1,000 - $2,999              $5,000 - $6,999           $9,000 and over




                                                                                                        68
12. Please indicate the number of paid days based on years of service offered by your company.

                                                     Paid Days
             Years
             Employed            Vacation         Sick Leave          Personal Days

             1 year
             2 years
             5 years
             10 years
             15 years
             20 years
             25 years

13. Please check which the following is offered by your company. (Check as many as apply)
       Paid Holidays                   No       Yes, how many days per year? _____
       Unpaid Holidays                 No       Yes, how many days per year? _____
       Pay in Lieu of Vacation         No       Yes
       Paid Jury Duty                  No       Yes
       Flex Time                       No       Yes
       Compensatory Time               No       Yes
       Non-lunch Breaks                None              One        Two
         Duration of each break        less than 10 min.        10-15 min.       more than 15 min.
       Lunch Break                     less than 30 min.        30-60 min.       more than 1 hr

14. Insurance – Please check yes or no if the insurance listed below is available, and then provide
    percentage within each column. (Check as many as apply)

                      Employee Coverage                                            Dependent Coverage
               No   Yes Company       Employee                          No   Yes     Company        Employee
                          Pay %         Pay %                                          Pay %          Pay %
Health                                                   Health
Dental                                                   Dental
Vision/Eye                                               Vision/Eye
Life                                                     Life
Disability                                               Disability

Workers’ Compensation       OR    Self-Insured

15. a.   Does your company have an employee pension plan?       No      Yes
    b.   If yes, which type(s)? (Check as many as apply)
             401K, 403B, etc           Employee stock ownership plan (ESOP)
           Profit sharing                                 Other
     c. Do you match employee contributions?              No          Yes, ______%          Yes, $

16. Which of these benefits does your company offer? (Check as many as apply)
       Profit Sharing                             Tuition Aid
       Flexible Spending Account                  Other ______________________




                                                                                                       69
                                             PART THREE - WAGES

     17. Please provide the following for the occupations listed below. For further clarification of job titles,
         see www.wittenberg.edu/management (Note: These are generic descriptions; all duties may not be
         listed and some duties may not be performed by job incumbents within your organization.)


                                                     # of      Entry Level Wage     Average Wage     Maximum Wage
               Survey Job Title                  Incumbents        per hour           per hour          per hour

Accountant
Accounting Clerk
Accounting Supervisor
Administrative Assistant/Office Asst/Secretary
Analyst
Assembler
Buyer/Purchasing Agent
Case Manager
Clerk Typist
Collections Counselor
Computer Programmer
Cost Accountant
Credit Manager
Customer Service Clerk
Customer Service Supervisor
Database Analyst
Database Architect
Database Developer/Database Programmer
Data Processing Mgr
Department Supervisor
Director of Sales
Drafter
Electrician
Engineer, Electronic
Engineer, Industrial
Engineer, Mechanical
Engineer, Technical
Estimator
Executive Secretary

                                                                                                              70
                                             # of     Entry Level Wage   Average Wage   Maximum Wage
                  Survey Job Title       Incumbents       per hour         per hour        per hour

Financial Mgr/Controller/Treasurer
Food Preparation Person
Grinder Setup/Operator
Groundskeeper
Guard
Help Desk Support
Housekeeping Attendant
Human Resources Assistant
Human Resources Mgr
Human Resources Rep
Information Tech Trainer
Inspector
Intelligence Analyst
Inventory Control Clerk
Janitor
Lab Technician
Legal Assistant
Loan Counselor
Machine Operator
Machine Operator, CNC
Mail Clerk
Maintenance Supervisor/Facilities Mgr.
Maintenance Worker/Helper/Tech.
Marketing Mgr/Public Relations
Material Handling Laborer
Materials Planner/Inventory
Mechanic
Network/Telecomm. Engineer
Nurse – Registered, Med. Facility
Nurse – Registered, Non – Med.
Office Mgr
Operations/Support
Painter


                                                                                              71
                                                   # of      Entry Level Wage   Average Wage    Maximum Wage
                 Survey Job Title              Incumbents        per hour         per hour         per hour

Paralegal
Payroll Administrator
Plant Mgr
Press Operator
Production Supervisor
Production Trainee
Purchasing Mgr
Quality Control Mgr
Receptionist
Safety/Security Director
Sales Mgr
Sales Person/Retail Clerk
Sales Representative, Inside
Sales Representative, Outside
Scheduling Clerk
Shipper/Receiver
Shipping/Receiving/Warehouse Supervisor
Software Engineer
Surface Grinder
Systems Administrator
Systems Analyst
Systems Engineer
Systems Hardware Tech.
Team Leader/Group Leader
Technical Manager
Teller
Tool & Die Maker
Truck Driver, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer
Truck Driver, Light or Delivery Services
Unskilled Laborer
Welder


                     Thank you for your time. ~ Amy Donahoe, Clark County Hiring Coordinator,
                                    adonahoe@oicofclarkco.org, 937-327-1865

                                                                                                      72
Exhibit 2




            73
                                       Exhibit 3




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                                                                                          74
                                                  Exhibit 4
Dear Chamber Members:

 The JAVAbreak e-newsbriefs is offered weekly to help you plan your week (and beyond!). Please share this
information with your co-workers. Many of our companies now post the JAVAbreak in their break rooms.

SIGN UP NOW BEFORE THE PRICE GOES UP!

The next Business After Hours will be held on February 28, 2007, from 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm, at the Springfield
Regional Imaging Center. Tickets are $15 for early bird and $20 at the door. To make reservations please call
325-7621 or logon to MailScanner has detected a possible fraud attempt from "www.springfieldnet.com"
claiming to be www.greaterspringfield.com.

DON’T MISS THIS NETWORKING OPPORTUNITY

Try some coffee, pastries and networking at our next First Thursday Live, 7:30 am on March 1, 2007, at the
Springfield Museum of Art. No reservations necessary. $5 per person includes coffee and rolls. For additional
information or to become a sponsor, please call 325-7621. For more information on the First Thursday Live
program logon to MailScanner has detected a possible fraud attempt from "www.springfieldnet.com"
claiming to be www.greaterspringfield.com.

The 2007 Economic Forecast will be held on March 14, 2007 at 11:30 am, at the Courtyard by Marriott,
Downtown Springfield. This program is sponsored by Fifth/Third Bank; speaker is Michael Kersh, CPA. Tickets
are $20 per person and includes luncheon. To make reservations please call 325-7621 or logon to MailScanner
has detected a possible fraud attempt from "www.springfieldnet.com" claiming to be
www.greaterspringfield.com.

The Springfield Foundation Board of Trustees invites you to attend the 2007 Annual African-American
Community Family of Funds Gala on February 28, 2007, at the Holiday Inn South. Hors d'oeuvres reception
begins at 6 pm; program begins at 6:45 pm. Please RSVP at 324-8773.

On March 1st, the Thiossane West African Dance introduces the richness of West African dance and
justice. The FREE performance begins at 7:30 pm at the Kuss Auditorium.

On March 2nd, the Circle of Friends will hold Courtesy Day II from 10 am - 6 pm. For details call 328-3841.

On March 3rd, Penn Ohio Futurity Indoor Aikman Clinic and Buckeye Weanling Futurity, Stallion Auction in
Banquet Room B at the (             (      . Call 324-4353 for more information.

Don’t miss the Springfield Symphony Orchestra’s performance of Magical Tales on March 3rd. For program
overview logon to )))%              "     % .

On March 4th, the Springfield Symphony Orchestra will join the Springfield Youth Symphony in a special
concert at 3 pm in the Kuss Auditorium. Call 325-8100 or logon on to )))%          "   %     for tickets
and information.

On March 6th, the Paul Taylor Dance Company performs at 7:30 pm at the Kuss Auditorium. Please contact
Phyllis Eberts at 327-6116 for information.

Herbert Martin, author of “Paul Laurence Dunbar: The Eyes of the Poet” speaks in the Gaier Room of the Clark
County Public Library on Wednesday, March 7th at 7 pm.

The Springfield Human Resource Management Association (SHRMA) will hold its monthly luncheon/meeting
from noon to 1 pm, Thursday, March 8th, at the Courtyard by Marriott, Downtown Springfield. Please RSVP no
later than March 6th by calling Heather Speer-Edwards at 525-7264. Individuals interested in joining the Springfield
Human Resource Management Association, contact Amy Donahoe, membership chairperson, at 327-1865 or
  "         #             $ % .




                                                                                                                75
                              Exhibit 4 Continued…
Just a reminder! The 2007 Wage & Benefits Survey was sent to local
businesses on February 14th. This valuable document will be yours free if
  you participate in the survey! The survey, which will be completed this
 summer, will cost $150 to non-participating companies. The deadline for
response has been extended to March 7th (due to our many snow days!). If
 you need a survey or have questions, call Amy Donahoe at OIC 327-1865.
             Please check for all upcoming events by using the interactive calendar at
)))%                 "%     . Call Anne Emmons at 325-7621 to find out how you can post your event on
                                     the community calendar.



                                        Mike McDorman
                                            President
                           Greater Springfield Chamber of Commerce




                                                                                                  76
          Exhibit 5: 2007 Wage & Benefit Study Job Title Descriptions

        Posted to the WittCAM website during the duration of the study.

Accountant
Prepare balance sheets, profit and loss statements, and other financial reports. Responsibilities also
include analyzing trends, costs, revenues, financial commitments, and obligations incurred to
predict future revenues and expenses. Reports organization's finances to management, and offers
suggestions about resource utilization, tax strategies, and assumptions underlying budget forecasts.

Accounting Clerk (includes Bookkeeping; Accounting; Auditing Clerk; Accounts Payable)
Compute, classify, and record numerical data to keep financial records complete. Perform any
combination of routine calculating, posting, and verifying duties to obtain primary financial data for
use in maintaining accounting records. May also check the accuracy of figures, calculations, and
postings pertaining to business transactions recorded by other workers.

Accounting Supervisor/Accounting Manager
Supervise and coordinate general accounting activities. Gathers data for financial reports. May be
responsible for one or all of the following: payables, receivables, payroll, balance statements,
ledgers, journal activities and vendor ledger.

Administrative Assistant/Office Asst./Secretary
Perform a variety of administrative functions. Schedules appointments, gives information to callers,
and takes dictation. Composes memos, transcribes notes, and researches and creates
presentations. Generates reports, handles multiple projects, and prepares and monitors invoices
and expense reports.

Analyst; Credit Analyst
Analyze information in related field and develops statements and/or reports. Perform leadership
roles in an informal manner, representing the department in the supervisor’s absence. May have
knowledge of software programs to generate reports. Could be a Loan Officer, Employee Assistance
Counselor, Coordinator or Representative.

Assembler
Perform assembly operations with knowledge of equipment necessary to fit and assemble all types
of parts. Could include assembly of equipment, computers, test equipment telemetering systems,
electric motors, batteries, etc.

Buyer/Purchasing Agent (includes Product Specialist)
Buy merchandise or commodities, other than farm products, for resale to consumers at the
wholesale or retail level, including both durable and nondurable goods. Analyze past buying trends,
sales records, price, and quality of merchandise to determine value and yield. Select, order, and
authorize payment for merchandise according to contractual agreements. May conduct meetings
with sales personnel and introduce new products.

Case Manager
Assess and treat individuals with mental, emotional, or substance abuse problems, including abuse
of alcohol, tobacco, and/or other drugs. Activities may include individual and group therapy, crisis
intervention, case management, client advocacy, prevention, and education.

Clerk Typist (includes Word Processor; Typist)
Use word processor/computer or typewriter to type letters, reports, forms, or other material from
rough draft, corrected copy, or voice recording. May perform other clerical duties as assigned.

Collections Counselor (includes Bill and Account Collector; Accounts Receivable)
Locate and notify customers of delinquent accounts by mail, telephone, or personal visit to solicit
payment. Duties include receiving payment and posting amount to customer's account; preparing




                                                                                                      77
                                                     2007 Wage & Benefit Job Descriptions (cont.)

statements to credit department if customer fails to respond; initiating repossession proceedings or
service disconnection; keeping records of collection and status of accounts.

Computer Programmer (includes Programmer)
Convert project specifications and statements of problems and procedures to detailed logical flow
charts for coding into computer language. Develop and write computer programs to store, locate,
and retrieve specific documents, data, and information. May program web sites.

Cost Accountant
Analyze financial information and prepare financial reports to determine or maintain record of
assets, liabilities, profit and loss, tax liability, or other financial activities within an organization.

Credit Manager
To apply the Company’s credit policies, practices and procedures and to administer all credit
operations in a manner that will increase sales, contribute to the profit of the Company, enhance
customer stability, and provide for the prompt collection and adequate protection of the Company’s
investment in accounts receivable.

Customer Service Clerk
Interact with customers to provide information in response to inquiries about products and services
and to handle and resolve complaints.

Customer Service Supervisor
Supervise and coordinate the activities of clerical and administrative support workers. Interact with
customers to provide information in response to inquiries about products and services and to handle
and resolve complaints

Database Analyst
Involvement in database server administration, such as stored procedures and DBCC (Database
Consistency Checks). Handle disk management, log file management, database agent
administration, database queries, etc.

Database Architect
Design database system and all aspects of it (e.g., database server, OS platform, database engine,
engine settings, disk layout, database design, etc.). This position is usually reserved for places with
a very extensive database plan and a lot of data.

Database Developer/Database Programmer
Construct databases, develop and manage the database structure, develop and manage the tables,
rows and records of the database and develop all of the required reporting.

Data Processing Mgr (includes Computer and Information Systems Manager)
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information
systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.

Department Supervisor (includes First-Line Supervisor; Manager of Retail Sales Workers)
Directly supervise workers in an establishment or department. Duties may include management
functions, such as purchasing, budgeting, accounting, and personnel work, in addition to
supervisory duties.

Director of Sales (includes Sales Manager)
Direct the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales
distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for
sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and
inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.




                                                                                                             78
                                                  2007 Wage & Benefit Job Descriptions (cont.)

Drafter (includes Electronic Drafter)
Prepare clear, complete and accurate working plans and drawings from rough or detailed sketches
for Engineering or Manufacturing purposes, according to specific dimensions. Make final sketch of
drawings checks dimensions of parts, material used and relation of one part to another.

Electrician
Install, maintain, and repair electrical wiring, equipment, and fixtures. Ensure that work is in
accordance with relevant codes. May install or service street lights, intercom systems, or electrical
control systems.
.
Engineer, Electronic
Research, design, develop, and test electronic components and systems for commercial, industrial,
military, or scientific use utilizing knowledge of electronic theory and materials properties. Design
electronic circuits and components for use in fields such as telecommunications, aerospace guidance
and propulsion control, acoustics, or instruments and controls.

Engineer, Industrial
Design, develop, test, and evaluate integrated systems for managing industrial production
processes including human work factors, quality control, inventory control, logistics and material
flow, cost analysis, and production coordination.

Engineer, Mechanical
Perform engineering duties in planning and designing tools, engines, machines, and other
mechanically functioning equipment. Oversee installation, operation, maintenance, and repair of
such equipment as centralized heat, gas, water, and steam systems.

Engineer, Technical
The technical engineer specializes in one or maybe a number of technical domains
(telecommunications, information systems, databases and so on). On the one hand, the engineer is
responsible for the up-keep of these systems. In this role, he or she intervenes in cases of particular
difficulty and helps to train the team. On the other hand, the engineer must be adaptable, being
able to renew or to replace software and develop new tools and systems. The engineer makes
suggestions, chooses products, devises and regulates the schedule and sets up and manages test
phases for future technical or software based appliances.

Estimator (includes Cost Estimator)
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid
management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to
particular service performed or type of product manufactured.

Executive Secretary
Provide high-level administrative support by conducting research, preparing statistical reports,
handling information requests, and performing clerical functions such as preparing correspondence,
receiving visitors, arranging conference calls, and scheduling meetings. May also train and supervise
lower-level clerical staff.

Financial Manager/Controller/Treasurer
Direct financial activities, such as planning, procurement, and investments for all or part of an
organization.

Food Preparation Person
Perform a variety of food preparation duties other than cooking, such as preparing cold foods and
shellfish, slicing meat, and brewing coffee or tea

Grinder Setup/Operator (includes Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setter, Operator,
and Tender, Metal and Plastic)
Set up, operate, or tend machines to saw, cut, shear, slit, punch, crimp, notch, bend, or straighten
metal or plastic material.

Groundskeeper (includes Landscaping and Grounds keeping Worker)
Landscape or maintain grounds of property using hand or power tools or equipment. Workers
typically perform a variety of tasks, which may include any combination of the following: sod laying,



                                                                                                     79
                                                  2007 Wage & Benefit Job Descriptions (cont.)

mowing, trimming, planting, watering, fertilizing, digging, raking, sprinkler installation, and
installation of mortar-less segmental concrete masonry wall units.

Guard (includes Security Guard)
Guard, patrol, or monitor premises to prevent theft, violence, or infractions of rules

Help Desk Support (includes Computer Support Specialist; Hardware/Software Specialist)
Provide technical assistance to computer system users. Answer questions or resolve computer
problems for clients in person, via telephone or from remote location. May provide assistance
concerning the use of computer hardware and software, including printing, installation, word
processing, electronic mail, and operating systems

Housekeeping Attendant (includes Maid and Housekeeping Cleaner)
Perform any combination of light cleaning duties to maintain private households or commercial
establishments, such as hotels, restaurants, and hospitals, in a clean and orderly manner. Duties
include making beds, replenishing linens, cleaning rooms and halls, and vacuuming.

Human Resources Assistant
Compile and keep personnel records. Record data for each employee, such as address, weekly
earnings, absences, amount of sales or production, supervisory reports on ability, and date of and
reason for termination. Compile and type reports from employment records. File employment
records. Search employee files and furnish information to authorized persons.

Human Resources Manager
Plan, direct, and coordinate human resource management activities of an organization to maximize
the strategic use of human resources and maintain functions such as employee compensation,
recruitment, personnel policies, and regulatory compliance.

Human Resources Representative
Provide general Human Resources support to the company.

Information Tech Trainer
Provide training and support for all new and incumbent staff in the use of the application software
as well as Microsoft Office Suite. Individual will act as a liaison between the IT department and the
user departments also providing first level help desk support for all software applications.

Inspector
Inspect parts, products and/or processes to insure conformance with standards. Inspect materials
or products using fixed or variable measuring instruments, checks for irregularities and defects.
Compare product with parts list of sample model to ensure completion of assembly. Verify specified
dimensions on product or material using inspection equipment.

Intelligence Analyst (includes Management Analyst)
Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work
simplifications and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist
management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and
management consultants.

Inventory Control Clerk (includes Stock Clerk – Stockroom, Warehouse, or Storage Yard;
Inventory Analyst; Warehouse)
Receive, store, and issue materials, equipment, and other items from stockroom, warehouse, or
storage yard. Keep records and compile stock reports.

Janitor (includes Cleaner)
Keep buildings in clean and orderly condition. Perform heavy cleaning duties, such as cleaning
floors, shampooing rugs, washing walls and glass, and removing rubbish. Duties may include
tending furnace and boiler, performing routine maintenance activities, notifying management of
need for repairs, and cleaning snow or debris from sidewalk.




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                                                 2007 Wage & Benefit Job Descriptions (cont.)

Lab Technician
Sets up and operates small-scale chemical production equipment under laboratory conditions. Tests
methods and chemical processes for product development. Perform standard quantitative and
qualitative tests.

Legal Assistant
Assist lawyers by researching legal precedent, investigating facts, or preparing legal documents.
Conduct research to support a legal proceeding, to formulate a defense, or to initiate legal action.

Loan Counselor
Provide guidance to prospective loan applicants who have problems qualifying for traditional loans.
Guidance may include determining the best type of loan and explaining loan requirements or
restrictions.

Machine Operator (includes Multiple Machine Tool Setter, Operator, and Tender, Metal
and Plastic; Processor)
Set up, operate, or tend more than one type of cutting or forming machine tool or robot.

Machine Operator, CNC (includes Computer Controlled Machine Tool Operator)
Operate computer/controlled machines or robots to perform one or more machine functions on
metal or plastic work pieces

Mail Clerk (includes Mail Machine Operator)
Prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution. Use hand or mail handling machines to time
stamp, open, read, sort, and route incoming mail; and address, seal, stamp, fold, stuff, and affix
postage to outgoing mail or packages. Duties may also include keeping necessary records and
completed forms.

Maintenance Supervisor/Facilities Mgr.
Supervise and coordinate the security or maintenance of facilities and equipment. Schedules
preventive maintenance programs. Train subordinates. Purchases needed items.

Maintenance Worker/Helper/Tech (includes Repair Worker)
Perform work involving the skills of two or more maintenance or craft occupations to keep
machines, mechanical equipment, or the structure of an establishment in repair. Duties may involve
pipe fitting; boiler making; insulating; welding; machining; carpentry; repairing electrical or
mechanical equipment; installing, aligning, and balancing new equipment; and repairing buildings,
floors, or stairs.

Marketing Manager/Public Relations
Formulate and recommend long and short range marketing strategies to increase sales and improve
efficiency. Recommend the establishment of prices and pricing policies. Evaluate competitive
marketing strategies. May help or oversee the development of brochures, advertising and public
image or perception. Responsible for coordinating attendance at industry-wide seminars and
conventions.

Material Handling Laborer
Perform physical tasks to transport or store materials or merchandise. Duties involve one or more
of the following: Manually loading or unloading freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices;
unpacking, shelving or placing items in proper storage locations; or transporting goods by hand
truck, cart or wheelbarrow.

Materials Planner/Inventory
Evaluate materials and develop machinery and processes to manufacture materials for use in
products that must meet specialized design and performance specifications. Develop new uses for
known materials. Includes those working with composite materials or specializing in one type of
material, such as graphite, metal and metal alloys, ceramics and glass, plastics and polymers, and
naturally occurring materials.




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                                                  2007 Wage & Benefit Job Descriptions (cont.)

Mechanic
Perform day to day maintenance and repair on the company’s vehicles (trucks, cars, etc.).

Network/Telecomm. Engineer
Perform the specialized engineering activities required to analyze, plan, design, implement, and
inspect, computer networks and related voice, video, life safety, and data electronic systems and
applications; and perform related duties as required or assigned.

Nurse – Registered, Medical Facility
Assess patient health problems and needs, develop and implement nursing care plans, and maintain
medical records. Administer nursing care to ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled patients. May
advise patients on health maintenance and disease prevention or provide case management.
Licensing or registration required. Includes advance practice nurses such as: nurse practitioners,
clinical nurse specialists, certified nurse midwives, and certified registered nurse anesthetists.
Advanced practice nursing is practiced by RNs who have specialized formal, post-basic education
and who function in highly autonomous and specialized roles.

Nurse – Registered, Non Medical Facility
Assess patient health problems and needs, develop and implement nursing care plans, and maintain
medical records. Administer nursing care to ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled patients. May
advise patients on health maintenance and disease prevention or provide case management.
Licensing or registration required. Includes advance practice nurses such as: nurse practitioners,
clinical nurse specialists, certified nurse midwives, and certified registered nurse anesthetists.
Advanced practice nursing is practiced by RNs who have specialized formal, post-basic education
and who function in highly autonomous and specialized roles.

Office Manager
Supervise and coordinate the activities of clerical and administrative support workers.

Operations/Support
Direct and oversee an organization's operational (non-manufacturing) policies, objectives, and
initiatives.

Painter (includes Painting, Coating and Decorating Worker)
Paint, coat, or decorate articles, such as furniture, glass, plateware, pottery, jewelry, cakes, toys,
books, or leather.

Paralegal
Assist lawyers by researching legal precedent, investigating facts, or preparing legal documents.
Conduct research to support a legal proceeding, to formulate a defense, or to initiate legal action.

Payroll Administrator
Perform payroll functions on a weekly basis.

Plant Manager (includes Branch Manager)
Interact with production supervisor(s), establish production goals, maintain open communications
with sales, marketing, purchasing, financial and personnel department. Plan, coordinate, resolve
problems and direct operations in the plant.

Press Operator (includes Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setter, Operator, and
Tender, Metal and Plastic)
Set up, operate, or tend machines to saw, cut, shear, slit, punch, crimp, notch, bend, or straighten
metal or plastic material.

Production Supervisor (includes Industrial Production Manager)
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in
accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.




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                                                  2007 Wage & Benefit Job Descriptions (cont.)

Production Trainee
Individual hired to learn a recognized skilled craft through shop experience and supplemented by
related instructions.

Purchasing Manager (includes Materials Manager)
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of buyers, purchasing officers, and related workers involved
in purchasing materials, products, and services.

Quality Control Manager
Responsible for installing and supervising inspection and testing procedures for finished products.
Recommend corrective action necessary to ensure conformity with quality specifications and
standards.

Receptionists (includes Information Clerk)
Answer inquiries and obtain information for general public, customers, visitors, and other interested
parties. Provide information regarding activities conducted at establishment; location of
departments, offices, and employees within organization.

Safety/Security Director (includes Safety Manager)
Establish and promote maintenance of safe and healthy working conditions, and recommend
measures to reduce or eliminate industrial accident and health hazards in compliance with OSHA
regulations. Study and analyze accident causes and hazards, formulate general safety policies,
participate in the investigation of accidents and injuries.

Sales Manager
Direct the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales
distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for
sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and
inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.

Sales Person/Retail Clerk (includes Retail Salesperson)
Sell merchandise, such as furniture, motor vehicles, appliances, or apparel in a retail establishment.

Sales Representative, Inside
Sells full product line to all types of customers via telephone. Responsible for quoting price and
delivery of all stock items and buyouts.

Sales Representative, Outside
Sells full product line to businesses within a geographical area. Maintains and expands sales to all
existing customers in the territory. Coordinates with Inside Sales and Branch Manager to solve
problems or customer issues.

Scheduling Clerk (includes Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerk)
Coordinate and expedite the flow of work and materials within or between departments of an
establishment according to production schedule. Duties include reviewing and distributing
production, work, and shipment schedules; conferring with department supervisors to determine
progress of work and completion dates; and compiling reports on progress of work, inventory levels,
costs, and production problems.

Shipper/Receiver (includes Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerk)
Verify and keep records on incoming and outgoing shipments. Prepare items for shipment. Duties
include assembling, addressing, stamping, and shipping merchandise or material; receiving,
unpacking, verifying and recording incoming merchandise or material; and arranging for the
transportation of products.

Shipping/Receiving/Warehouse Supervisor
Oversee the shipping and/or receiving areas. Prioritize shipments to meet production and shipping
schedules. Meet with or contact carriers to secure the best service and price. May help monitor
inventory levels. Maintain an orderly and efficient warehouse.



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                                                 2007 Wage & Benefit Job Descriptions (cont.)

Software Engineer (includes Computer Software Engineer; Systems Software; Systems
Engineer)
Research, design, develop, and test operating systems-level software, compilers, and network
distribution software for medical, industrial, military, communications, aerospace, business,
scientific, and general computing applications. Set operational specifications and formulate and
analyze software requirements. Apply principles and techniques of computer science, engineering,
and mathematical analysis.

Surface Grinder (includes Grinding, Lapping, Polishing, and Buffing Machine Tool Setter,
Operator, and Tender, Metal and Plastic)
Set up, operate, or tend grinding and related tools that remove excess material or burrs from
surfaces, sharpen edges or corners, or buff, hone, or polish metal or plastic work pieces.

Systems Administrator (includes Network and Computer Systems Administrator; Systems
Manager)
Install, configure, and support an organization's local area network (LAN), wide area network
(WAN), and Internet system or a segment of a network system. Maintain network hardware and
software. Monitor network to ensure network availability to all system users and perform necessary
maintenance to support network availability. May supervise other network support and client server
specialists and plan, coordinate, and implement network security measures.

Systems Analyst (includes Computer Systems Analyst)
Analyze science, engineering, business, and all other data processing problems for application to
electronic data processing systems. Analyze user requirements, procedures, and problems to
automate or improve existing systems and review computer system capabilities, workflow, and
scheduling limitations. May analyze or recommend commercially available software. May supervise
computer programmers.

Systems Engineer (includes Computer Systems Engineer/Architect)
Design and develop solutions to complex applications problems, system administration issues, or
network concerns. Perform systems management and integration functions.

Systems Hardware Tech.
Under general supervision, provides technical support and training on use of personal computers,
printers, peripheral equipment, and network systems hardware and software; resolves computer
application problems and trouble shoots hardware malfunctions; assists in maintaining and
administering the LAN network systems; provides support and installation for desktop computer
applications, Internet/Intranet including e-mail and World Wide Web; installs, configures, and
makes repairs to personal computer hardware and software systems; provides technical assistance
and training to system users; and performs other related duties as required.

Team Leader/Group Leader
Oversee a small group of employees within a department to ensure quality and timeliness in the
work area. Act as liaison between management and labor and is capable of filling vacancies due to
absenteeism or high production times.

Technical Manager
Coordinate activities of technical departments, such as taping, editing, engineering, and
maintenance, to produce radio or television programs.

Teller
Receive and pay out money. Keep records of money and negotiable instruments involved in a
financial institution's various transactions.

Tool and Die Maker
Analyze specifications, lay out metal stock, set up and operate machine tools, and fit and assemble
parts to make and repair dies, cutting tools, jigs, fixtures, gauges, and machinists' hand tools.




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                                                 2007 Wage & Benefit Job Descriptions (cont.)

Truck Driver, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer
Drive a tractor-trailer combination or a truck with a capacity of at least 26,000 GVW, to transport
and deliver goods, livestock, or materials in liquid, loose, or packaged form. May be required to
unload truck. May require use of automated routing equipment. Requires commercial drivers'
license.

Truck Driver, Light or Delivery Services (includes Driver, Straight Truck)
Drive a truck or van with a capacity of under 26,000 GVW, primarily to deliver or pick up
merchandise or to deliver packages within a specified area. May require use of automatic routing or
location software. May load and unload truck.

Unskilled Laborer (includes Laborer and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand)
Manually move freight, stock, or other materials or perform other unskilled general labor. Includes
all unskilled manual laborers not elsewhere classified.

Welder (includes Welder, Cutter, and Welder Fitter)
Use hand-welding or flame-cutting equipment to weld or join metal components or to fill holes,
indentations, or seams of fabricated metal products.




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