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					FACULTY
Jerald H. Richards, chair
MaryCarol Hopkins, coordinator, anthropology program
Terry G. Pence, coordinator, philosophy and religious studies programs
Kristen Yount, coordinator, sociology program
Joan Ferrante, coordinator, applied cultural studies program
Prince Brown, Jr., director, institute for freedom studies
Anthropology
JoEllen Burkholder, Timothy D. Murphy, Sharlotte Neely, Barbara Thiel
Delores M. Walters
Philosophy
Rudy L. Garns, Nancy S. Hancock, Robert B. Kenney, Dennis D. Miller
Robert Trundle, Jr.
Sociology
Barbara A. Arrighi, Yuchi (Boni) Li,        J. Robert Lilly, Stephen C. Richards

CONTACTING THE DEPARTMENT
            The Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Philosophy is located in LA
216 and may be reached during business hours by phone at 859-572-5259. Visit the
department’s websites: Sociology—http:// www.nku.edu/~soc, Anthropology—
http://www.nku.edu/~anthro, or               Philosophy and religious studies—
http://www.nku.edu/~philos.
            Dr. Jerald H. Richards, chair richardsj@nku.edu

PROGRAMS OFFERED
    Majors
             Anthropology
             Philosophy
             Sociology
             Applied Cultural Studies

      Minors
                       Anthropology
                       Applied Cultural Studies
                       Archaeology
                       Native American Studies
                       Philosophy
                       Applied Philosophy
                       Religious Studies
                       Sociology

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES OFFERED
    ANT 100 Cultural Anthropology
    ANT 110 Introduction to Archaeology
    ANT 130 American Culture
      ANT 201 World Cultures

      ANT 202 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
      ANT 210 Introduction to Archaeological Method and Theory
      ANT 230 North American Indians
      ANT 231 Modern American Indians
      ANT 240 Peoples of Africa

      ANT 243 Peoples of East Asia

      ANT 245 Peoples of Latin America
      PHI 150 Introduction to Philosophy
      PHI 155 Introduction to Ethics
      PHI 160 World Religions
      PHI 165 Introduction to Logic

      PHI 170 Philosophy and Sexuality
      PHI 180 History of Classical and Medieval Philosophy
      PHI 185 History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy
      PHI 201 Ideas in Philosophy
      PHI 220 Health Care Ethics
      PHI 250 Eastern Philosophy
      PHI 330 Philosophy of Law
      PHI 350 Philosophy of Religion
      REL 181 Survey of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)
      REL 182 Survey of the New Testament
      REL 185 Survey of Christianity
      REL 186 Introduction to Judaism
      REL 290 Ideas in Religious Studies
      REL 325 African American Religious Experience in America
      REL 370 Religion and Science
      SOC 100 Introductory Sociology
      SOC 110 Introduction to Race and Gender
      SOC 205 Current Social Issues
      SOC 210 Analysis of Racism and Sexism in the United States
      SOC 245 Latin American Societies

PRE-MAJOR                  AND                SELECTIVE                  ADMISSION
REQUIREMENTS
    None

DEPARTMENT POLICIES
Assessment
       All graduating seniors in sociology, anthropology, applied cultural studies, and
philosophy are required to take part in their discipline’s assessment program during the
semester prior to graduation. The results will be used by the department faculty to determine
how the department’s major programs of study and curricula are serving students and the
programs’ goals. Students who do not participate in the assessment will not be allowed to
graduate unless prior approval has been obtained from the department chair.

SOCIOLOGY,ANTHROPOLOGY, AND PHILOSOPHY
        Study in these areas serves a two-fold purpose. First, it contributes to the general
education of students by increasing their insight into human institutions, behaviors, and
beliefs. Second, it provides students with preparation applicable to a variety of occupations
or to graduate work. Specific course requirements for each program are described below.

SOCIOLOGY
        The primary mission of the sociology program is to provide undergraduate students
with an understanding of concepts and methods of the scientific study of society and social
relations. Sociology is both a perspective, a way of viewing society, and a set of techniques
for seeking answers to questions about social behavior; courses are designed to acquaint stu-
dents with both aspects of the discipline. The program seeks to develop students’ ability to
observe and think critically about their own and other societies and to become more sensitive
to behavioral and value differences among peoples.
        The program offers a major in sociology leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science.
A minor in sociology is also offered. SOC 100, 110, 205, 210, and 245 may be used to satisfy
the general education requirement in behavioral sciences, and other sociology courses serve
as components of interdisciplinary programs and majors in other programs. Sociology
courses are core components of the applied program in sociology and anthropology.

Bachelor’s Degree Program
        The major in sociology requires the successful completion of 39 semester hours in the
discipline, 18 of which must be at the 300 or 400 level. The curriculum consists of five
categories of courses. Students majoring in sociology are required to complete all courses in
category 1 (core courses) and at least one course from each of the remaining categories.
Together, these comprise 24 semester hours; the remaining 15 semester hours are to be
chosen as sociology electives. A grade of at least a C must be earned in the core courses, and
a grade-point average of at least 2.00 must be earned in all courses that comprise the major.

      1.               Core Courses (12 semester hours)
                               SOC 100 Introductory Sociology
                               SOC 320 Social Research
                               SOC 330 Sociological Theory
                               SOC 494 Senior Seminar
      2.               Social Institutions (minimum of 3 semester hours)
                               SOC 203 Sociology of Corrections
                               SOC 208 Police and Society
                               SOC 308 Social Organization
                               SOC 315 Marriage and the Family
                               SOC 355 Sociology of the Environment
                                SOC 430 Sociology of Religion
                                SOC 450 Medical Sociology
                                SOC 488 Sociology of Law
                                SOC 520 Sociology of Education
       3.              Power and Inequality (minimum of 3 semester hours)
                                SOC 250 Women in Society
                                SOC 300 Race and Ethnic Relations
                                SOC 301 World Patterns of Race and Ethnicity
                                SOC 307 Social Stratification
                                SOC 335 Popular Culture
                                SOC 425 Political Sociology
       4.              People, Places, and the Life Cycle (minimum of 3 semester
                       hours)
                                SOC 202 Juvenile Delinquency
                                SOC 213 Sociology of Aging
                                SOC 245 Latin American Societies
                                SOC 303 Social Psychology
                                SOC 318 Occupations
                                SOC 340 Population
                                SOC 400 Urban Society
                            5. Social Issues and Social Change (minimum of 3 semester hours)
                                         SOC 205 Current Social Issues
                                         SOC 305 Criminology
                                         SOC 332 Collective Behavior
                                         SOC 350 Women and Crime
                                         SOC 357 Sociology of Firearms
                                         SOC 360 Technology and Social Change
                                         SOC 380 Elite Deviance
                                         SOC 381 Deviance and Social Control
                                         SOC 420 Community Corrections
        All students majoring in sociology are required to prepare a portfolio for SOC 494
(Senior Seminar). The table of contents will specify the title of each entry and the course for
which the assignment was written. The portfolio must include a letter discussing its contents.
The contents must include five assignments that, when taken together, demonstrate that the
student has
    1.             understood the classical theoretical perspectives in sociology;
    2.             analyzed an issue with a sociological framework (theory, concept, and/or
perspective);
    3.             articulated a meaningful research question, specified a design, and
collected relevant data to answer that question;
    4.             explored an issue related to socio-cultural diversity;
    5.             understood conceptually the statistical analysis of sociological data.

Focus on Criminology
       The program in sociology offers a variety of courses for students interested in careers
as court administrators, criminal justice administrators, criminal justice research
administrators, social service professionals, police officers, corrections officers, probation
and parole officers, juvenile caseworkers, or substance abuse counselors. Suggested courses
for a major in sociology with a criminology focus are the following:
       SOC 202 Juvenile Delinquency
       SOC 203 Sociology of Corrections
       SOC 208 Police and Society
       SOC 305 Criminology
       SOC 350 Women and Crime
       SOC 357 Sociology of Firearms
       SOC 380 Elite Deviance
       SOC 381 Deviance and Social Control
       SOC 420 Community Corrections: Probation and Parole
       SOC 455 Comparative Criminal Justice
       SOC 488 Sociology of Law

Focus on Society, Environment, and Technology
         The roles of behavior, culture, and social organization are central to the study of
human technology and environment and of their interrelationships. Students majoring in
sociology who have particular interest in issues and problems of the relationships of socio-
cultural factors and technology and environment should consider selecting courses
addressing those specific concerns. The focus area, in combining sociology and
anthropology, prepares students for close examination of factors associated with issues such
as global ecological problems, the role of technology in social and cultural change, and
resource utilization and management, among others. Suggested courses are the following:
         ANT 345 Environmental Anthropology
         SOC 340 Population
         SOC 355 Sociology of the Environment
         SOC 360 Technology and Social Change
         SOC 340, 355, and 360 may be used to satisfy existing requirements of the major in
sociology. With the recommendation of the student’s advisor and approval by the department
chair, the 3 semester hours in anthropology may be applied to fulfilling the requirements for
the bachelor’s degree in sociology.

The Minor in Sociology
       The sociology minor is 22 semester hours in the discipline. The core sequence (SOC
100, 320, and 330) is required with minimum grades of C. The remaining 12 semester hours
may be taken from any sociology courses. An overall grade-point average of at least 2.00 is
required in courses comprising the minor.

APPLIED CULTURAL STUDIES
       The applied cultural studies program (ACS) integrates the disciplines of sociology
and anthropology and strives to prepare students for a career and life in an
information-and-global society by giving them a strong background in research methods and
an appreciation for cultural diversity. The background in methods gives students the skills to
recognize and create high-quality information. An appreciation for cultural diversity within
and between groups ensures that students, in gathering that information, venture outside the
familiar and comfortable confines of their own social circles for input and feedback. These
skills are important because in an information society the majority of workers spend their
time processing, gathering, creating, and/or distributing information. Major seeks to produce
students who can work with business firms, public organizations, and agencies as
information gatherers, researchers, and program evaluators.
         The coordinator of the applied program works closely with students in the program to
help them find a career and to build a résumé while in college. For more on the applied
program, see our website at http:// www.nku.edu/~acs. On the website you will find a sample
résumé, a list of practicum projects, and a sample of agencies and corporations that hire
employees with the skills our graduates possess.
         The applied cultural studies program strives to develop
         1.     written, verbal, and communication skills;
         2.     computer skills (spreadsheet, power point, word processing, statistical
packages);
         3.     analytical abilities;
         4.     strong interviewing skills;
         5.     the ability to organize information and to communicate and present research
findings in a clear and useful manner;
         6.     experience with all phases of the research process, including data analysis and
reporting;
         7.     experience using the Internet as a research tool;
         8.     the ability to communicate effectively with persons of different social,
economic, and ethnic backgrounds.
         To accomplish these objectives, students take introductory and basic methods courses
in sociology and anthropology, applied courses in both disciplines, and individually selected
content courses dealing with cultural diversity. The capstone of the program is on-the-job
experience in gathering and analyzing data and reporting the results in an agency or
institution through the practicum courses. Practica are arranged for students in close
association with the program coordinator. An overall grade-point average of at least 2.00
must be maintained in courses for the major.

Bachelor’s Degree Program
      Requirements for the major in applied cultural studies leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Science are as follows:
Core Requirements
      Students are required to complete each of the following courses (21 semester hours):
      SOC 100 Introductory Sociology
      SOC 320 Social Research
      SOC 321 Applied Social Research
      ANT 100 Cultural Anthropology
      ANT 325 Applied Anthropology
      ANT 339-340 Ethnographic Methods
       MAT 205 Elementary Statistics

The Sociological Perspective
       Students must complete at least 6 semester hours from the following courses. Other
courses may fulfill the requirement for this area with written approval of the program
coordinator and the department chair.
       SOC 303 Social Psychology
       SOC 307 Social Stratification
       SOC 308 Social Organization
       SOC 315 Marriage and the Family
       SOC 318 Occupations
       SOC 322 Applied Sociology
       SOC 330 Sociological Theory
       SOC 335 Popular Culture
       SOC 340 Population
       SOC 355 Sociology of the Environment
       SOC 360 Technology and Social Change
       SOC 380 Elite Deviance
       SOC 400 Urban Society
       SOC 425 Political Sociology
       SOC 450 Medical Sociology
       SOC 488 Sociology of Law

The Anthropological Perspective
       Students must complete at least 3 semester hours from the following courses. Other
courses may fulfill the requirement for this area with written approval of the program
coordinator and the department chair.
       ANT 275 Language and Culture
       ANT 312 Social Organization
       ANT 330 Women, Gender, and Culture: A Global Perspective
       ANT 345 Environmental Anthropology
       ANT 401 Culture Theory

Topics in Cultural Diversity
       Students must complete at least 9 semester hours from the following list of courses.
The 9 semester hours cannot be in only one discipline. Other courses may fulfill the
requirements for this area with written approval of the program coordinator and the
department chair.
       ANT 201 World Cultures
       ANT 231 Modern American Indians
       ANT 240 Peoples of Africa
       ANT 243 Peoples of East Asia
       ANT 320 Religion and Culture
       ANT 362 Japanese Culture and Society
       ANT 365 Modern Chinese Culture
Practicum Area
       Students must complete the following courses (7 semester hours):
       SOC/ANT 460 Practicum Preparation
       SOC/ANT 391-491 Research Practicum I and II

The Minor in Applied Cultural Studies
       A minor in applied cultural studies is awarded to students completing at least the
following:
    1.     Four courses: Introductory Sociology (SOC 100), Cultural Anthropology (ANT
100), Social Research (SOC 320), and Applied Anthropology (ANT 325) or Ethnographic
Methods (ANT 340).
    2.     Three diversity courses (The courses cannot be in one discipline).
                      ANT 201 World Cultures
                      ANT 231 Modern American Indians

                       ANT 240 Peoples of Africa
                       ANT 320 Religion and Culture
                       SOC 250 Women in Society
                       SOC 213 Sociology of Aging
                       SOC 300 Race and Ethnic Relations (or SOC/ANT 301
      World
                         Patterns of Race and Ethnicity)

ANTHROPOLOGY
        Anthropology is the investigation of humankind’s past and present. Specifically, it
includes the subfields of cultural anthropology (study of the great variety of societies and
cultures in the world today); archaeology (study of past societies and cultures); physical
anthropology (study of the origin and biological nature of humans); anthropological
linguistics (study of language and its relationship to culture); and applied anthropology (the
use of anthropological knowledge to help solve practically oriented problems). Through these
subfields, anthropology explains differences and similarities among all human groups, at all
times, and in all places.
        Courses in anthropology are designed to provide students with an appreciation and
broadened view of the diversity of past and present human cultures and an understanding of
the origin and biological nature of people and their near relatives. The anthropology program,
through its major and minor options, (1) prepares students for a variety of career
opportunities depending on individual student interest and coursework, (2) prepares students
to do graduate work in anthropology, and (3) provides a complementary program of study for
students majoring or minoring in other social and behavioral sciences or in interdisciplinary
programs. To meet these objectives, the program offers a major with the degree of Bachelor
of Science or Bachelor of Arts and three minors. In addition, anthropology students seeking
only the BA/BS degree who wish to obtain research jobs may prefer to major in the applied
cultural studies program or to pursue a double major. We recommend the Bachelor of Arts
for students who plan to seek a graduate degree. For more information see the anthropology
web site at http:// www.nku.edu/~anthro.
Bachelor’s Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science
       The major in anthropology leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, consists of
44 semester hours and requires the completion of the following:
    1.    Eight core courses:
          ANT 100 Cultural Anthropology
          ANT 110 Introductory Archaeology
          ANT 202 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
          ANT 202L Introduction to Physical Anthropology Laboratory
          ANT 210 Introduction to Archaeological Method and Theory
          ANT 275 Language and Culture
          ANT 312 Social Organization
          ANT 480 Advanced Anthropological Concept
A student must earn at least a C in each of these core courses, except ANT 480 in which a
student must earn an A.
    2.    Two topical courses, at least one of which must be at the 300 or 400 level
          ANT 231Modern American Indians
          ANT 301 World Patterns of Race and Ethnicity
          ANT 307 Museum Methods
          ANT 308 Cultural Resource Management
          ANT 320 Religion and Cultures
          ANT 325 Applied Anthropology
          ANT 330 Women, Gender & Culture a Global Perspective
          ANT 345 Environmental Anthropology
          ANT 350 North American Archaeology
          ANT 352 Archaeology of Mesoamerica
          ANT 354 South American Archaeology
          ANT 358 Anthropology and the Arts
          ANT 373 The Underground RR in the Ohio-Kentucky Borderlands
          ANT 380 Origins of Civilization
          ANT 392 Research: Archaeology
          ANT 394 Topics: Anthropology
          ANT 401 Culture Theory
          ANT 410 Archeological Theory
    3.    Two ethnographic area courses
          ANT 201 World Cultures
          ANT 230 North American Indians
          ANT 240 Peoples of Africa
          ANT 245 Peoples of Latin America
          ANT 270 Native Australia and Oceania
          ANT 360 Indians of Mexico and Guatemala
    4.    One course in methods
          ANT 215 Archaeological Field Methods
          ANT 307 Museum Methods
            ANT 335 Advanced Archeological Field Methods
            ANT 339 Introduction to Ethnographic Research
            ANT 340 Ethnographic Methods
            ANT 355 Advanced Archeological Field Methods
    5.      One course in theory
            ANT 401 Culture Theory
            ANT 410 Archaeological theory
   6.       Two elective courses in anthropology, at least one of which must be at the 300 or
400 level.
Note: Some courses are listed in more than one category, but a student may not use the same
course to fulfill the requirement in more than one category.

Bachelor of Arts
       The major in Anthropology leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts consists of 52
semester hours and requires completion of the following:
       1.The above requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree
       2.a minimum of 8 semester hours in a modern foreign language (e.g., French,
Spanish, Russian, Chinese or Japanese)
       3.MAT 205 Elementary Statistics

Computer Competency Requirement
  Each student must demonstrate competency in the use of computers.
  This may be done in one of two ways:
                1. Complete CSC 150 with a grade of C or better
                2. Pass a test on computer use given by the anthropology faculty.

Areas of Emphasis
       The major may be completed with emphasis in a subfield of anthropology listed
below. This will better prepare students for various careers or for graduate work.

Cultural Anthropology
         Cultural anthropology students take courses covering a variety of world culture areas
and on specific aspects of culture such as environmental anthropology, religion, gender, and
the arts. These students prepare for careers in multicultural or international fields such as the
social and helping services, the travel industry, museum work, health and mental health
fields, international affairs and business, or for graduate work in cultural anthropology.

Archaeology
       The major with an emphasis in archaeology prepares students for careers in contract
archaeology, museum work, cultural resource management, and public archaeology, or for
graduate work in archaeology. Students interested in archaeology should discuss their
program of study with the archaeology adviser in the anthropology program.

Physical Anthropology
       An emphasis in physical anthropology may be obtained with anthropology courses in
human evolution and primates, and biology courses in genetics, anatomy and physiology, and
evolution.

Applied Anthropology
       The anthropology major with a focus on applied courses can be a start towards
developing a career in areas relating to the environment, ethnic relations, and community
work, among others. Combined with additional course work in applied sociology, it can lead
to employment in a number of fields.

Teacher Certification
         The anthropology major may serve as the nucleus for an area of concentration leading
to teacher certification (those pursuing teaching certification must have their program
approved by the education chair). Those adding certification to the major must take 6
semester hours of upper-level courses from four of the following: geography, history,
economics, political science, sociology, or psychology. (Psychology courses do not fulfill the
state’s social studies requirements for teacher education).

Focus in Society, Environment, and Technology
         The roles of behavior, culture, and social organization are central to the study of
human technology and environment and of their interrelationships. Students majoring in
anthropology who have particular interests in issues and problems of the relationships of
socio-cultural factors and technology and environment should consider selecting courses
addressing those specific concerns. The focus area, in combining anthropology and
sociology, prepares students for a close examination of factors associated with issues such as
global ecological concerns, the role of technology in social and cultural change, and resource
utilization and management, among others. Suggested courses are the following:
         ANT 345 Environmental Anthropology
         SOC 340 Population
         SOC 355 Sociology of the Environment
         SOC 360 Technology and Social Change
         ANT 345 may be also used to satisfy a topical course requirement in the anthropology
major.

MINORS
Anthropology
        A minor in anthropology consists of 22 semester hours and requires the completion of
the following:
    1.     Six core courses: Cultural Anthropology (ANT 100), Introduction to Physical
Anthropology (ANT 202), Introduction to Physical Anthropology Laboratory (ANT 202L),
Introduction to Archaeology (ANT 110), Introduction to Archaeological Method and Theory
(ANT 210), and Language and Culture (ANT 275).
    2.     One topical course (e.g., ANT 231, 301, 307, 308, 312, 320, 325, 330, 345, 350,
352, 354, 358, 380, 392, 394, 400, 401, or 410).
    3.      One additional course in archaeology (e.g., ANT 110, 350, 352, 354, 380, or 410)
or in an ethnographic area (e.g., ANT 201, 230, 240, 243, 245, 360, 362, or 365).

Archaeology
        The minor in archaeology is designed to give students competence in prehistory,
archaeological methods, and research procedures. It can be valuable in preparing students for
graduate study in history, art history, or other disciplines. In conjunction with a major in
history, it prepares students for careers in such agencies as state historic preservation offices
or various regional offices, where knowledge of both history and archaeology is desirable.
The minor can also help prepare students for careers in contract archaeology or museum
work. It can provide a broadening of knowledge to students majoring in various disciplines
such as history, literature, or many others.
        The minor in archaeology consists of 21 semester hours and requires completion of
the following:
    1.       Three core courses: Cultural Anthropology (ANT 100), Introduction to
Archaeology (ANT 110), and Introduction to Archaeological Method and Theory (ANT 210).
    2.       One of the following methods courses: ANT 215, 307, or 355.
    3.       Three of the following: ANT 215, 307, 308, 335, 350, 352, 354, 355, 380, 392,
410. (215, 307, 355 may only be used if it was not used as a methods course)
    The minor is not open to students majoring in anthropology because an archaeology focus
is already available within the major in anthropology.

Native American Studies
       The minor in Native American Studies is designed to give students an overview of
American Indian life and cultures from prehistoric times to the present with a focus on North
America. Because of the overlap in courses, students majoring in anthropology who choose
to minor in Native American Studies must also have a second major or minor or an area of
concentration outside the anthropology program.
       The minor in Native American Studies consists of 21 semester hours and requires
completion of the following:
       1.      Five core courses: Cultural Anthropology (ANT 100), North American
Indians (ANT 230), Modern American Indians (ANT 231), World Patterns of Race and
Ethnicity (ANT/SOC 301), and North American Archaeology (ANT 350).
       2.      Two of the following: Archaeology of Mesoamerica (ANT 352), Indians of
Mexico and Guatemala (ANT 360), Plains Indians (HIS 416), or any appropriate course
approved by the department chair, for example, Museum Methods (ANT 307) or
Ethnographic Methods (ANT 340) if the student chooses a Native American emphasis, or
Topics in Anthropology (ANT 394) if a Native American focus or topic is emphasized.

PHILOSOPHY
       The philosophy program has three missions: (1) to serve students in the colleges of
Arts and Sciences, Business, and Professional Studies and Education with foundation courses
and an applied philosophy minor with internship opportunities, (2) to provide all students
with courses meeting certain general education requirements, and (3) to provide advanced
courses, a major, and a minor for those who want to specialize in philosophy.
        Consistent with these missions, courses in philosophy are designed to enable students
to increase the scope and depth of their understanding of and sensitivity to basic human
beliefs and values, to think creatively and critically about enduring questions of human
existence, to integrate the various fields of knowledge into a useful, meaningful whole, to
frame their ideas into a justified system of beliefs that provides order and direction in life, to
develop basic analytical and logical skills, and to acquaint themselves with the history of
philosophy.

Bachelor’s Degree Program
         The major in philosophy, leading to the Bachelor of Arts, is designed to meet the
needs of students who want to pursue graduate study in philosophy leading to a college
teaching career or an applied philosophy position (e.g., biomedical ethical consultant), to
enter professional schools where a major in philosophy is suggested as a desirable option
(e.g., law or the ministry), or to complement their primary major by adding a major in
philosophy. The philosophy major requires a minimum number of courses in order to meet
these diverse needs. The courses taken by students majoring in philosophy should be tailored
to meet specific needs; close consultation with philosophy faculty can accomplish this
purpose.

The Major in Philosophy (30 semester hours)
        PHI 165 Introduction to Logic
        PHI 180 History of Classical and Medieval Philosophy
        PHI 185 History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy
        One course in ethics from the following:
        PHI 155 Introduction to Ethics
        PHI 220 Health Care Ethics
        PHI 302 Ethics and Science
        PHI 307 Business Ethics
        PHI 335 Great Traditions in Ethics
        At least 12 semester hours in 300- and 400- level courses.
        No more than 12 semester hours of 100-level courses may be applied toward
satisfying requirements for the major.

MINORS
Philosophy
        Requirements for a minor in philosophy are 21 semester hours in courses in
philosophy including no more than 12 semester hours of 100-level courses.
Applied Philosophy
        Requirements for a minor in applied philosophy are 21 semester hours of courses in
philosophy including Introduction to Philosophy (PHI 150); Introduction to Logic (PHI 165);
12 semester hours of relevant course options; and Applied Philosophy Internship (PHI 396).
Relevant course options and applied philosophy internships are to be determined in consul-
tation with a philosophy faculty member.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES
        Religious studies is the scholarly examination of the widespread and diverse
phenomena of human religious experience, the expression of these experiences in systems of
belief and in institutions, and their impact upon the interaction with culture and society.
Religion embodies some of humanity’s most profound and enduring attempts to answer
perennial questions about the nature of ultimate reality, and about human nature and destiny.
An important dimension of religious studies at NKU is its incorporation of cognate courses
from other disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, sociology, history, geography,
and literature.
        Religious studies provides a factual and analytical understanding of religion;
sympathetic understanding of a wide range of religious traditions, cultures, and values; and
an introduction of the relevant literature, vocabulary, and methods used in the scholarly study
of religion. This sort of an appreciation of religion is an important component in an
individual’s liberal education. It is also relevant to many professions and fields including
education, law, medicine, nursing, ministry, and human services, and to students interested in
graduate study in religious studies.

The Minor in Religious Studies
         Offered by the Philosophy Program, the minor in religious studies is designed for
students who are especially interested in religious studies or who wish for career purposes to
add to their general education background. The minor requires 21 semester hours, including
at least 6 hours from each of the following categories:
A.       Religious Traditions and Sacred Texts
         PHI 160 World Religions
         REL 181 Survey of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament)
         REL 182 Survey of the New Testament
         REL 185 Survey of Christianity
         REL 186 Introduction to Judaism
         PHI 201 Ideas in Philosophy (when topic applies)
         REL 290 Ideas in Religious Studies (when topic applies)
         PHI 250 Eastern Philosophy
         PHI 394 Topics in Philosophy (when topics apply)
         REL 394 Topics in Religious Studies (when topic applies)
B.       Philosophical Perspectives
         PHI 201 Ideas in Philosophy (when topic applies)
         REL 290 Ideas in Religious Studies (when topic applies)
         REL 250 Religion and Ethics
         REL 260 Human Religious Experience
         REL 330 Contemporary Religious Thought
         PHI 350 Philosophy of Religion
         REL 370 Religion and Science
         PHI 394 Topics in Philosophy (when topic applies)
         REL 394 Topics in Religious Studies (when topic applies)
C.       Historical, Literary and Scientific Perspectives
         PHI 201 Ideas in Philosophy (when topic applies)
         REL 201 Ideas in Religious Studies (when topic applies)
ENG 215 Greek and Roman Mythology
HIS 300 The Ancient Near East and Greece
   to the Macedonian Conquest
HIS 301 The Hellenistic World and Rome to the Death of Constantine
HIS 305 Reformation Europe
ENG 315 The Bible as Literature
ANT 320 Religion and Culture
REL 320 Religion in America
REL 325 African American Religious Experience in America
GEO 330 Geography of Religion
PHI 394 Topics in Philosophy (when topic applies)
REL 394 Topics in Religious Studies (when topic applies)
SOC 430 Sociology of Religion

				
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