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					                                         Santa Clara County Bar Association

                     Minority Programs Implemented Since 1989


•   Affiliate Seats Added to the SCCBA Board of Trustees: In 1989, the SCCBA by-
    laws were amended to provide permanent trustee positions on the Board of
    Trustees to representatives of the minority bar associations. This has resulted in
    an increase in the number of minority attorneys participating in the leadership of
    the SCCBA, including in positions of elected leadership. As noted in section I.,
    the following minority attorneys began their leadership careers in the Bar
    Association initially as representatives on the Board for one of the minority bar
    associations: Hon. Ed Davila (past president of La Raza, 1997 president of the
    SCCBA, and current Superior Court judge); Roberta Hayashi (board member
    Asian Pacific Bar Association, and 1996 president of the SCCBA); Christopher
    Arriola (past president of La Raza and 2006 president of the SCCBA); Julie
    Emede (past chair of the SCCBA Rainbow Committee and 2005 past president of
    the SCCBA); Anthony Reid (past president of Black Lawyers, served two elected
    terms on the Board and three years on the Board’s Executive Committee); Hon.
    Erica Yew (past president Asian Pacific Bar, one elected term on the SCCBA
    Board, member of the State Bar Board of Governors, District 3 and current
    Superior Court judge); Dorianne Romero-Philon (past president La Raza,
    currently serving an elected term on the SCCBA Board and has served on the
    Board’s Executive Committee); and David Epps (currently president of Black
    Lawyers and currently serving on the Board’s Executive Committee).
•   Barristers’ Leadership Program: Since 1994, this yearly program has trained
    and educated over 120 minority attorneys for leadership positions in the SCCBA.
    The SCCBA early leadership in implementing this program has resulted in
    voluntary bar associations and the State Bar of California implementing similar
    programs in subsequent years. Specifically at the SCCBA, six of these minority
    attorneys have served as presidents or other elected officers over the last thirteen
    years. One, in particular, James Scharf, has also served as a governor for District
    3 for the State Bar of California.
•   Minority Access Committee Established: The SCCBA was one of the first
    voluntary bar associations (along with the Bar Association of San Francisco) in
    California and the Country to establish a Minority Access Committee. The
    Committee, established, in 1991, was charged with increasing participation of
    minorities in the SCCBA. This Committee has successfully met that challenge
    through programs such as the Unsung Heroes’ Reception where 3-5 minority
    attorneys are recognized each year for their efforts to advance minorities in the
    profession. The particular emphasis of this Committee has been the yearly
    Unsung Heroes’ Reception which honors attorneys and organizations which have
    contributed to advancing minorities in the profession. The SCCBA has honored


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SCCBA: Minority Programs



    •   and recognized the contributions of over 75 minority attorneys and organizations
        at the Unsung Heroes’ Receptions. In addition, the Minority Access Committee
        regularly sponsors a workshop for minorities on applying for a judicial
        appointment. This has helped increase the number of minority applicants for
        appointments to the California Superior Court bench in Santa Clara County. In
        part, due to these efforts, over the last decade 13 minority attorneys have been
        appointed to the bench; of these 11 have been appointed since 2000.
    •    Rainbow Committee Established: The SCCBA established a gay, lesbian,
        bisexual and transgendered attorneys committee in 1993. Again, this was the first
        such committee established by a bar association in California. Subsequent to that,
        the Bar Association of San Francisco established a similar committee as did the
        State Bar of California. In addition, as noted previously, in 1999, the Board
        approved a trustee position for this committee. These efforts have resulted in
        greater participation of gay and lesbian attorneys on the SCCBA Board of
        Trustees, including an openly lesbian president of the SCCBA in 2005 and an
        openly gay secretary of the SCCBA in 2006. Currently, the SCCBA will file an
        amicus brief supporting the plaintiffs in the California Supreme Court same-sex
        marriage cases. As an aside, 17 years ago, the SCCBA was the first voluntary bar
        association in the country to hire an open lesbian as its executive director.
    •   2006 President’s Blue Ribbon Commission on Diversity in the Legal Profession in
        Silicon Valley. This Commission resulted in the participation of over 60 of the
        general counsel and managing partners of the significant corporations, law firms
        and public legal employers in Silicon Valley, including co-chairs, Supreme Court
        Associate Justice Carlos Moreno and Bruce Sewell, General Counsel and Vice-
        President of Intel, Inc. The Commission produced a report as described above
        and presented their findings and recommendations at a Diversity Conference on
        October 17, 2006. The Commission’s efforts highlighted for the Silicon Valley
        legal community the need for continued sustained effort and focus on advancing
        minorities in the legal profession. Implementation of selected recommendations
        of the Commission will also encourage increased participation in the SCCBA.
        Finally, it is difficult to determine cause and effect of certain activities and certain
        outcomes. Nevertheless, the SCCBA Board of Trustees recently appointed two
        Asian attorneys from large law firms in Silicon Valley to vacancies on the Board
        of Trustees. These attorneys and their law firms have not traditionally been active
        in the SCCBA. The interest of these two attorneys in serving on the Board of
        Trustees and the Board’s appointment of them as trustees, certainly reflect the
        current and historical efforts of the SCCBA in increasing minority participation.
    •   SCCBA Bay Area Minority Clerkship Program (BAMSCP): 1989 to present.
        BAMSCP has placed nearly 500 first year law students with participating
        employers over the past 18 years. This has increased the number of minority law
        students with valuable, marketable experience in the law firm hiring pipeline.
    •   2006 Diversity Job Fair: The job fair included 20 participating employers who
        interviewed over 125 second year law students and 10 attorneys with one to three
        years legal experience. The job fair exposed the minority law students to
        employers with whom they might not otherwise have had an opportunity to
        interview, including high technology companies such as Intel, Google, Sun


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SCCBA: Minority Programs



        Microsystems, eBay, and Adobe and law firms such as Fenwick & West:
        Bingham McCutcheon; Pillsbury Winthrop; White & Case; Wilson Sonsini, et. al.
    •   SCCBA Minority Access Committee: 1992 to present. The particular emphasis of
        this Committee has been the yearly Unsung Heroes’ Reception which honors
        attorneys and organizations which have contributed to advancing minorities in the
        profession. The SCCBA has honored and recognized the contributions of over 75
        minority attorneys and organizations at the Unsung Heroes’ Receptions. In
        addition, the Minority Access Committee regularly sponsors a workshop for
        minorities on applying for a judicial appointment. This has helped increase the
        number of minority applicants for appointments to the California Superior Court
        bench in Santa Clara County. In part, due to these efforts, over the last decade 13
        minority attorneys have been appointed to the bench; of these 11 have been
        appointed since 2000.




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posted:8/24/2011
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