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					                                         MTSU College of Mass Communication Advising Guidebook: Your Guide to a Successful College Experience
    Middle Tennessee State University
         College of Mass Communication




                   Advising
             Guidebook

2008–2009
www.mtsu.edu/~mcadvise
                         1
Advising                                      Guidebook
TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                                                                08-09
Section 1
What It Means to Be a College Student
Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Academic Success Tips .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Advising Syllabus . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

                                                                                     Section 2
                                                                                     Student Support Services and Academic
                                                                                     Inventory
                                                                                     Frequently Dialed Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
                                                                                     Student Support Services and Resources . . . . . 9
                                                                                     Academic Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–11
                                                                                     College Vocabulary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Section 3
The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Degree
University General Education Core. . . . . . . . . . 14
The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Degree . . . . . 15
Why Is Your GPA Important? . . . . . . . . . . . 16–17

                                                                                     Section 4
                                                                                     Planning Your Degree: Graduating On Time
                                                                                     Four-Year Planner. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
                                                                                     Four-Year Checklist. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
                                                                                     Registering on RaiderNet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
                                                                                     Best Wishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
                                                                                     Calendar . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23–35




                                                          A Tennessee Board of Regents University
     MTSU is an equal opportunity, nonracially identifiable, educational institution that does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. AA240-0408



                                                                                 2
Section 1
 What It Means to Be a College Student




                                         What It Means to Be a College Student




 3
                               Welcome Blue Raiders!

Welcome, MTSU students, to the first day of your college career! You are one day closer to graduation! Your
college experience will be an exciting time in your life. These next four years will serve as an opportunity to start
building a foundation for the rest of your life. Your college experience is not just about earning a four-year degree.
It is about expanding intellectually, personally and socially. With growth, there will be growing pains; but without
taking risks, you will never know what you are capable of achieving.

To be a successful college student, one must recognize the many differences between high school and college.
Below is a table that illustrates these differences.

Teaching Expectations
                       High School                                                  MTSU

   Teachers intensively monitored you.                        Professors may provide less monitoring.
                                                              Professors may not remind you of incomplete
   Teachers reminded you of incomplete homework.
                                                              assignments.
                                                              Professors expect you to indicate your need for
   Teachers approached you if they believed you
                                                              assistance by contacting them during their office
   needed additional assistance.
                                                              hours.
   Teachers took time to remind you of tests and due          Professors expect you to read the syllabus to
   dates.                                                     determine upcoming tests and due dates.
                                                              Professors outline attendance policies in the syllabus
   Teachers carefully monitored your class attendance.
                                                              and expect you to monitor your own attendance.



                                       In college, you are responsible for your education
                                        (taking notes, keeping up with your assignments,
                                        communicating with your professors, and attending
                        NOTE            class).



Learning Environment
                       High School                                                   MTSU

   Teachers write information on the board to be              Professors may lecture nonstop, expecting you to
   copied in your notes.                                      identify important points in your notes.

   Teachers may be trained and certified in multiple          Professors are generally experts in particular content
   areas.                                                     areas.

                                                              Professors may not always follow the textbook. They
   Teachers present information to help you                   may provide background information, and you are
   understand the material in the book.                       expected to make connections between lectures and
                                                              your textbook.


                                       College is a learning environment in which you take
                                        responsibility for thinking through and applying what you
                        NOTE            have learned.

                                                          4
                                Academic Success Tips

What does it take to be a successful college student? There are many words to describe a successful student:
determined, motivated, and intelligent are a few. But beyond personal attributes, successful students are often
those who understand the policies and procedures of the University, get involved on campus, use time-
management skills, and know when and where to ask for help. Below are tips that your advisors think will help
you to be a successful college student.


1.   Attend Classes. You need to be engaged in the course content to learn. By going to class, you can meet
     classmates, get to know the professor, and stay current with assignments or changes.

2.   Be Prepared. Read materials before class. Be sure to study and complete assignments on time.

3.   Use Your Syllabus as a Guide to Plan Your Semester. Think of your syllabus as a contract between you
     and your professor. Read it and follow the timeline within it. Write assignments and test dates in your planner.

4.   Get Involved in MTSU and Campus Life. Join organizations, play sports, attend a concert or event. The
     more involved you are in campus life, the more opportunities may present themselves to you.

5.   Understand that Being a Student Is a Full-time Job. Earning your degree is challenging and requires your
     time and effort, but it is rewarding when you succeed. For each hour you spend
     in class, you should expect to spend two to three hours outside class for
     study and preparation.

6.   Balance and Budget Your Time. After you have completed your studies
     and assignments, reward yourself with fun time. Always take care of your
     physical and mental health. This includes eating healthily and getting enough
     rest—essential behavior for academic success and social health.

7.   Get to Know Your Professors and Advisors. Professors are a great source of information and advice and
     can be valuable references for graduate school or getting that first job. Visit your instructors after class and
     during office hours so they can get to know you. Also, make sure you visit your academic advisor; as he or
     she is focused on helping you succeed academically and is a great source of referral information.

8.   Don’t Put Off until Senior Year Taking Classes that You Find Most Difficult. Take your courses in
     sequential fashion following prerequisite requirements, but do not put off taking classes that you expect to find
     the most difficult. Take the courses and work with your advisor to get additional help. Tutoring and mentoring
     services are available on campus so use these services.

9.   Ignore Rumors. Do not use hearsay or rumor as a guide for academic information. Talk with your advisor,
     read the catalog, or consult with an academic department to address your questions.

10. Explore and Use All University Resources. Use the Learning Resources Center, computer labs, help
    centers, tutors, and study skills workshops to support your studies.

11. Be Patient with Yourself. The first year at MTSU is full of changes, so give yourself time to adjust. Ask
    questions, get help, and accept responsibility to do your best academically and personally.

12. Have Fun. Enjoy your time at MTSU; make friends; attend games, concerts, plays, and lectures; and promote
    Blue Raider spirit and pride.




                                                          5
                         Academic Advising Syllabus
                                                Advisor: __________________________________________________
                                                Office: ___________________________________________________
                                                Phone: ___________________________________________________
                                                E-Mail: _______________@mtsu.edu
                                                Advising Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday

Advising Objectives
Academic advising is an integral part of your educational experience. Advisors provide support as you make
decisions regarding academic success, higher education, and lifelong learning. While they don’t make these
decisions for you, they model the process of making such decisions in the future.

At MTSU, academic advising can provide you with the opportunity to build a relationship with your advisors and
receive assistance in planning your educational career. It is extremely important that you know that academic
advising is a collaborative educational process in which you are an active participant. You and your advisor are
partners in ensuring your academic success. This advisor/student partnership requires the participation and
involvement of both the advisor and you over your entire educational experience at MTSU!

Both you and your advisor have clear responsibilities for ensuring the advising partnership is successful.


Advisor Responsibilities
You can expect your advisor to
• understand and effectively communicate the curriculum, graduation requirements along with university and
    college policies and procedures;
•   encourage and guide you as you define and develop realistic educational goals;
•   provide you with information regarding available resources and services on campus;
•   monitor and accurately document your progress toward meeting your goals;
•   be accessible for meetings with you via office visits, telephone, or e-mail;
•   assist you in gaining decision-making skills and in assuming responsibility for your educational plans and
    achievements;
•   assist and encourage you to work closely with your professors and faculty advisors; and
•   maintain confidentiality.*

* Due to the 1974 Family Education and Right to Privacy Act (FERPA), advisors cannot discuss a student’s
academic record with parents or others except in certain circumstances. If your parents claim you as a dependent
on their income tax and have an affidavit filed in the appropriate office, or if they have written permission from
you, advisors can discuss your academic record and any advising advice you were given.


Advisee Responsibilities
As an advisee, you are expected to
• schedule regular appointments or make regular contacts with your advisor during each semester;
•   be aware of degree requirements and how and where to find out about them;
•   come prepared to each appointment with questions or material for discussion (Make a list!);
•   ask questions if you do not understand an issue or have a specific concern;
•   keep a personal record of your progress toward meeting your goals and organize official documents so you
    can find them when needed;
•   keep any written documentation from your advising sessions organized in a folder along with other University
    correspondence, forms, etc.;
•   clarify your personal values and goals and provide your advisor with accurate information regarding your
    interests and abilities;
•   become knowledgeable about college programs, policies, and procedures and use the undergraduate
    catalog;
•   accept responsibility for your decisions; and
•   graduate on time.

                                                         6
  Section 2
Student Support Services and Academic Inventory




                                                  Student Support Services and Academic Inventory




           7
          Frequently Dialed Numbers


Admissions                                 CAB 208               615-898-2111
Off-campus Student Services                KUC 320               615-898-5989
Career and Employment Center               KUC 328               615-898-2500
Mass Comm. Career Coordinator              COMM 231              615-904-8154
Counseling Services                        KUC 329               615-898-2670
Disabled Student Services                  KUC 120               615-898-2783
Financial Aid                              CAB 218               615-898-2830
Health Services                              MHS                 615-898-2988
IT Help Desk                                 CAB                 615-898-5345
Housing and Residential Life               KUC 300               615-898-2971
Int’l Programs and Services                KUC 124               615-898-2238
Records                                    CAB 102               615-898-2600
Scheduling Center                          JUB 123               615-898-5800
Student Affairs                            KUC 212               615-898-2440
Testing Services                           KUC 327               615-898-2863
Withdrawal Office                          CAB 205D              615-898-2808
Women’s Center                             JUB 206               615-898-2193
Campus Operator                                                  615-898-2300


                            Please do not hesitate to call for help!
                            Did you know that MTSU has a
                             campus directory of all offices,
                  NOTE       students, and faculty?




                                       8
         Student Support Services and Resources

   Academic Support Center. Provides academic advising services for MTSU students with undeclared majors
    and/or prescribed courses.                                                KUC 324       615-898-2339

   Office of Institutional Diversity. Ensures that diversity concerns remain in the forefront.
                                                                                         PH 107   615-898-5975

   Career and Employment Center. Provides career and employment information to students and alumni to
    assist them in the pursuit of their career goals.                      KUC 328       615-898-2500

   Disabled Student Services. Provides accommodations to students with disabilities.
                                                                                  KUC 120         615-898-2783

   MT Study Abroad Office. Facilitates opportunities for international educational experiences through high-
    quality academic programs.                                                      PH 207      615-898-5179

   Off-Campus Student Services. Serves as a liaison between students who live off-campus and the campus
    services available to them.                                                KUC 320      615-898-5989

   Center for Student Involvement and Leadership. Promotes a comprehensive array of both classroom and
    co-curricular opportunities designed to enhance personal growth, leadership skills, and community
    involvement.
                                                                                      KUC 306     615-898-5786

   University Writing Center. Provides free tutoring and workshops with individualized and group work in all
    areas of writing.                                                               PH 325     615-904-8237

   Mathematics Learning Center. Provides short-term tutoring with homework and/or test preparation.
                                                                               KOM 204         615-898-2669

   Student Computing Labs. BAS S137; KOM 350/351/360; LRC 101/101A/101B; James E. Walker Library




                                                        9
            Undergraduate Academic Inventory
College of Basic and Applied Sciences            Environmental Science and Technology
Majors                                               Energy Technology
    Concentrations                                   Environmental Health and Safety
Aerospace                                            Planning and Site Analysis
    Administration                                   Water and Waste Management
    Flight Dispatch and Scheduling               Industrial Technology
    Maintenance Management                           Industrial Systems
    Professional Pilot                               *Pre-engineering
    Technology                                       *Pre-architecture
Agribusiness                                     Mathematics
    Agricultural Communication                       Actuarial Science
    *Pre-Agricultural Engineering                    Applications of Math
Animal Science                                       Math Education
Agricultural Communication                           Professional Math
    Horse Science                                Nursing
Plant and Soil Science                           Physics
    Agricultural Communication                       Astronomy
    *Pre-Forestry                                    Medical Physics
Biology
    Animal Biology
    General Biology
    Genetics and Biotechnology
    Microbiology
    Physiology
    Plant Biology
Chemistry
    Professional Chemistry
Science
    General Science                              Jennings A. Jones College of Business
    Health Science                               Majors
         *Pre-chiropractic                            Concentrations
         *Pre-cytotechnology                     Accounting
         *Pre-dental                             Business Education
         *Pre-dental Hygiene                     Office Management
         *Pre-health Info. Management            Entrepreneurship
         *Pre-medical                            Information Systems
         *Pre-medical Technology.                Economics
         *Pre-nuclear Medicine Technology             Labor Relations
         *Pre-occupational Therapy                    Public Finance
         *Pre-pharmacy                           Finance
         *Pre-physical Therapy                        Business Finance
         *Pre-radiation Therapy Tech.            Financial Institution Management
         *Diagnostic Medical Sonography          Insurance
Computer Science                                 Real Estate
    Business Applications                        Business Administration
    Professional Computer Science                Management
Concrete Industry Management                     Marketing
Concrete Contracting
    Production, Sales, and Service
Construction Management Technology
    Electrical Construction Management
    Land Dev./Res. Building Con. Mgmt.
Engineering Technology
    Computer Engineering Technology                *These programs are not officially recognized
    Electro-Mechanical Engineering Tech.           concentrations within the degree programs and
    Mechanical Engineering Technology              do not lead directly to a degree at MTSU.

                                            10
College of Continuing Education and Distance
Learning                                            Foreign Languages
Majors                                                      French
    Concentrations                                          German
University Studies                                          Spanish
Liberal Studies (RODP only)                         Geoscience
Professional Studies (RODP only)                            Geography
    Information Technology                                  Geology
    Organizational Leadership                       History
                                                    Music
College of Education and Behavioral Science              Instrumental Music Education
Majors                                                        Instrumental Performance
     Concentrations                                      Jazz Studies
Criminal Justice Administration                               Music Industry
     Law Enforcement                                          Theory-Composition
     Homeland Security                                   Vocal/General Music Education
Interdisciplinary Studies                                Voice Performance
     *Grades K–6                                    Philosophy
     *Grades 5–8                                    Political Science
Special Education                                        Pre-Law
     *Mildly/Moderately Disabled                              Public Administration
     *Severely/Profoundly Disabled                  International Relations
Athletic Training                                   Social Work
Health Education                                    Sociology
     Health Science and Technology                  Anthropology
     Health Education and Lifetime Wellness         Speech and Theatre
     Community and Public Health                         Communications Disorders
Physical Education                                            Communication Studies
     Wellness and Exercise Science                            Theatre
Recreation and Leisure Services                     Organizational Communication
     Outdoor Recreation                             Global Studies
     Recreation Administration                           Globalization and Commerce
     Recreational Therapy                                     Globalization and Culture
Early Childhood Education                                     Globalization and Science
Family and Consumer Studies
     Family and Consumer Science Education          College of Mass Communication
     Child Development and Family Studies           Majors
Interior Design                                         Concentrations
Nutrition and Food Science                          Mass Communication
     Dietetics                                          Digital Media Communication
Textiles, Merchandising, and Design                     Photography
     Apparel Design                                          Electronic Media Communication
     Fashion Merchandising                              Journalism
Psychology                                              Advertising and Public Relations
     Pre-graduate school                                Media Design and Graphics
Industrial Organizational Psychology                Recording Industry
                                                        Music Business
College of Liberal Arts                                 Production and Technology
Majors                                                  Commercial Songwriting
    Concentrations
Art
    Graphic Design
    Studio
Art History
    Modern and Contemporary Art
    Medieval and Renaissance
    Non-Western
                                                    *These programs are not officially recognized
Art Education
                                                    concentrations within the degree programs and
English                                             do not lead directly to a degree at MTSU.
     Secondary English Teacher Licensure
                                               11
                                  College Vocabulary


What makes up a bachelor’s degree at MTSU?
       41 hours of a general education core with a foundation to support lifelong learning
       120 hours of credit, depending on college and major
       42 advanced hours (3000-4000)
       Major coursework                                         Navigating your way through college is
       Minors/electives                                          easier when you’re familiar with certain
                                                                  terms frequently used by faculty and
                                                       NOTE       University personnel.


 Prerequisite. Courses that are required prior to taking an advanced course.

 Corequisite. A course that must be taken simultaneously with another course.

 Dropping. To remove or ―drop‖ one or more courses from your schedule. You will still be enrolled in
            at least one course at MTSU.

 Withdrawing. You drop all courses and are no longer enrolled as a student at MTSU.

 Credit hour. A unit of academic credit; one hour a week for an academic semester. Most classes are
               3 credit hours. This means you will spend approximately 3 hours per week in the class.
               Classes with labs will typically have an additional credit hour for a total of 4 credit hours.

Weekday Abbreviations

        Monday          Tuesday         Wednesday            Thursday          Friday       Saturday
          M                T               W                    R                 F            S

                                             If your class meets on ―TR‖ you will go
                                              to class on both Tuesdays and
                               NOTE           Thursdays.




                                                       12
Section 3
 The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Degree




                                           The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Degree




   13
                   University General Education Core

COMMUNICATION (9 credits)                                        NATURAL SCIENCES (8 credits)
ENGL 1010: Expository Writing                                    Must be from different prefixes - choose 2
                                                                 ASTR 1030/1031: Exploring the Universe/Observing the
ENGL 1020: Research and Argumentative Writing                    Universe
COMM 2200: Fundamentals of Communication                         BIOL 1030/1031: Exploring Life
                                                                 BIOL 1110/1111: General Biology
HISTORY (6 credits) - choose 2                                   BIOL 2010/2011: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
HIST 2010: Survey of United States History I                     BIOL 2020/2021: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
HIST 2020: Survey of United States History II                    CHEM 1010/1011: Introductory General Chemistry I
HIST 2030: Tennessee History                                     CHEM 1030/1031: Chemistry for Consumers
                                                                 CHEM 1110/1111: General Chemistry I
HUMANITIES and/or FINE ARTS (9 credits)                          GEOL 1030/1031: Introduction to Earth Science
NOTE: One course must be in Literature; the other
two must have different course prefixes.                         GEOL 1040/1041: Physical Geology
ANTH 2210: Introduction to World Prehistory                      PHYS 2010/2011: Non-Calculus-Based Physics I
ART 1030: Orientation to Art                                     PHYS 2110/2111: Calculus-Based Physics I
ART 1910: Art History Survey I                                   PSCI 1030/1031: Topics in Physical Science
ART 1920: Art History Survey II
DANC 1000: Dance Appreciation                                    SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (6 credits)
                                                                 NOTE: The two courses selected must have different
ENGL 2020: Themes in Literature and Culture                      course prefixes.
ENGL 2030: The Experience of Literature                          AAS 2100: Introduction to African American Studies
HIST 1010: Survey of Western Civilization I                      ANTH 2010: Cultural Anthropology
HIST 1020: Survey of Western Civilization II                     ECON 2410: Principles of Economics, Macroeconomics
HIST 1110: Survey of World Civilization I                        GEOG 2000: Introduction to Regional Geography
HIST 1120: Survey of World Civilization II                       GS 2010 Introduction to Cross-Cultural Experience
HUM 2610: Foreign Literature in Translation                      HLTH 1530: Health and Wellness
MUS 1030: Introduction to Music                                  PS 1010: Foundations of Government
PHIL 1030: Introduction to Philosophy                            PS 2010: American Government and Politics
THEA 1030: Theatre Appreciation                                  PSY 1410: General Psychology
                                                                 RIM/EMC/JOUR 1020: Am. Media and Social Institutions
MATHEMATICS (3 credits) - choose 1                               SOC 1010: Introductory Sociology
MATH 1010: Mathematics for General Studies                       SOC 2010: Social Problems
MATH 1530: Applied Statistics                                    WMST 2100: Introduction to Women’s Studies
MATH 1630: College Mathematics for Managerial,
Social, and Life Sciences
                                                                 OTHER REQUIREMENTS
MATH 1710: College Algebra*                                      COMPUTER LITERACY (3 credits) – choose 1
MATH 1720: Plane Trigonometry                                    CSCI 1150: Computer Orientation
MATH 1730: Pre-Calculus                                          INFS 2200: Intro to Micro-computing
MATH 1810: Applied Calculus I                                    INFS 3100: Principles of Mgmt Information Systems
MATH 1910: Calculus I




                                                  RIM majors must take MATH 1710:
                                                    College Algebra* or higher
                                                  Science courses ending in 1030/1031
                                        NOTE        are for nonscience majors



                                                            14
The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Degree at MTSU

At MTSU, degree programs are designed to enable you to graduate in four years. In order to accomplish this,
there will be some planning required on your part.

Your degree is completed when you’ve met all the requirements and you have enough semester credit hours.

Every class you take is measured using semester credit hours. These are basically the number of hours you are
expected to be in class every week for a particular class. Most classes are worth three semester credit hours, so
taking a 15-hour course load means you are in classes approximately 15 hours per week.


                             Academic Classification

                                                   Freshman: 0–29 semester hours
                                                   Sophomore: 30–59 semester hours
                                                   Junior: 60–89 semester hours
                                                   Senior: 90 semester hours and above

Academic Status
The University will keep track of your overall and semester GPA to determine if you’re in good academic standing,
on probation, qualify for honors and scholarships, etc. Here’s how to understand GPA calculation.


What is your Grade Point Average (GPA)?                                         Grade Values
• Total number of grade points.                                                  A               4 points per credit hour
• Divide total points by total of all attempted hours.                           B+           3.33 points per credit hour
• That’s your GPA!                                                               B               3 points per credit hour
• Use the same formula for each semester. For your cumulative GPA,               B-           2.67 points per credit hour
  add all your attempted hours.                                                  C+           2.33 points per credit hour
                                                                                 C               2 points per credit hour
                                                                                 C-           1.67 points per credit hour
                Careful! Fs are still attempted hours and                       D+           1.33 points per credit hour
                 count heavily against you.                                      D               1 points per credit hour
                A grade of W does not count against                             D-           0.67 points per credit hour
    NOTE         your GPA.                                                       F               0 points per credit hour


                                        Example GPA Calculation
                                                                       Attempted Credit       Grade
                  Course       Grade    Grade Value     Multiply
                                                                            Hours             Points
                ENGL 1010         B          3               X                3                 9
                ART 1030          A          4               X                3                 12
                MATH 1710         C          2               X                3                 6
                UNIV 1010         A          4               X                3                 12
                PSCI 1030         B-        2.67             X                3                8.01
                PSCI 1031         C          2               X                1                 2

                                                             Totals:       16         49.01

                       Divide: Grade Points 49.01 by Total Attempted Hours 16 = 3.06 GPA



                                                        15
                      Why Is Your GPA Important?


Candidacy
Many of our academic programs require that students meet certain academic milestones before taking upper-
division coursework. This process is called candidacy.

Students majoring in Mass Communication with a concentration in the Department of Electronic Media
Communication or the School of Journalism must complete the following courses earning a grade of C or better
before applying for candidacy. Students applying for candidacy must have an overall cumulative GPA of at least
2.50 and earn 45 credit hours before applying.


Mass Communication Candidacy Courses

EMC/JOUR 1020: American Media and Social Institutions
JOUR 2710: Media Writing or writing equivalent
ENGL 1010: Expository Writing
ENGL 1020: Research and Argumentative Writing
MATH___?___: any math course to satisfy general core requirement
Concentration specific course(s) (See below)




                                       Concentration Specific Candidacy Courses

  If your concentration is:                         Then you will take____ in addition to the above courses
  Electronic Media Communication (Media
                                                    EMC 2410, 3120
  Production
  Electronic Media Communication (Media
                                                    EMC 2410, EMC 3120
  Management)
  Electronic Media Communication (Digital
                                                    EMC 3120, ART 1610, ART 1620
  Animation)
  Electronic Media Communication (Media
                                                    EMC 2410 and EMC 3120
  Journalism)
  Digital Media Communication                       ART 1610, CSCI 1150
  Photography                                       PHOT 2050, PHOT 3040, PHOT 3110
  Journalism                                        JOUR 3090
  Advertising/Public Relations (Public Relations)   PR 3040
  Advertising and Advertising/Public Relations
                                                    ADV 3020
  (Advertising)
  Media Design and Graphics                         GRAF 3010



                                 Students concentrating in Electronic Media who earn a B or
                                  better in ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020 do not have to take
                                  JOUR 2710 or its equivalent (EMC 2220, EMC 3020, or
                    NOTE          EMC 3060).


                                                      16
                      Why Is Your GPA Important?

Students planning to major in Recording Industry should remember that this major is competitive. Students
obtaining the highest candidacy scores (using the formula below) are accepted as full majors and are allowed to
complete the remaining courses to fulfill degree requirements. There is an appeal process for students who do not
make candidacy by the formula. A designated number of seats for each concentration will be granted each
semester to students admitted by appeal.


                                            Candidacy Formula
                                     (Math 1710 or higher math grade x 3)+
                                       (RIM candidacy course GPA x 4)+
                                             (Cumulative GPA x 3)+
                                           (Total credit hours x .05) =

                                               Candidacy Score


                                                       Every Fall and Spring semester, 60 music business
                                                        students, 50 production and technology students, and
                                                        30 commercial songwriting students are accepted into
                                          NOTE          candidacy.



Students should submit an application for candidacy during the semester in which all candidacy courses and 45
hours of coursework will be completed (typically the third semester). Additionally, all high school deficiency
courses and Academic Enrichment prescribed courses must be in process or complete when applying for
candidacy.



                               Recording Industry Candidacy Courses

                               RIM 1020: American Media and Social Institutions
                               RIM 3000: History of the Recording Industry
                               RIM 3010: Audio for Media
                               RIM 3600: Survey of the Recording Industry
                               MATH 1710: College Algebra (or higher math)




                                    Production and technology and commercial songwriting
                                     majors should take RIM 1230 or MUTH 1110 along with
                       NOTE          the candidacy courses above.




                                                       17
Section 4
Planning Your Degree: Graduating On Time




                                           Planning Your Degree: Graduating On Time




    18
                                 Four Year Planner
                     Fall __________                                           Spring _________

 Course                                     Hours             Course                                Hours
 RIM/EMC/JOUR 1020: American Media            3




                            Total Hours: _______                                      Total Hours: _______


                     Fall __________                                            Spring _________

 Course                                     Hours             Course                                Hours




                            Total Hours: _______                                      Total Hours: _______


                     Fall __________                                            Spring _________

 Course                                     Hours             Course                                Hours




                            Total Hours: _______                                      Total Hours: _______


                      Fall __________                                           Spring _________

 Course                                     Hours             Course                                Hours




                            Total Hours: _______                                      Total Hours: _______

        • EMC and JOUR majors MUST earn 80 hours
          outside the College of Mass Communication.        Total Earned Hours: _______ (120)
        • Of the 80 hours, 65 hours must be in the
NOTE      liberal arts and sciences.
                                                            Upper Division Hours: ______ (42)

                                                       19
                                 Four-Year Checklist

Freshman Year
1.  Meet with academic advisor at least once a semester




                                                                                       1
       to review progress and plan coursework.
2.    Visit Career and Employment Center to connect careers to majors.
3.    Get involved in campus activities.
4.    Visit the Writing Center and math labs for tutoring
       assistance, if needed.
5.    Read MTSU e-mail on a regular basis.

                                                        Sophomore Year
                                                        1.  Review degree plan with academic advisor.
                                                        2.  Apply for candidacy after meeting requirements.
                                                        3.  Get involved with organizations associated with
                                                             major.
                                                        4.  Become familiar with Study Abroad and/or
                                                             National Student Exchange, depending on major.
                                                        5.  Read MTSU e-mail on a regular basis.


Junior Year
1.  Review degree plan with academic advisor.
2.  File upper-division form.
3.  Participate in Study Abroad or National Student
     Exchange (for a semester or a year).
4.  Visit major department or Cooperative Education
     for internship information.
5.  Attend the Career Center’s résumé writing workshops.
6.  Stay involved on campus.
7.  Read MTSU e-mail on a regular basis.

                                                        Senior Year
                                                        1.  Review degree plan with academic advisor and
                                                             request a graduation check.
                                                        2.  Participate in internships related to major and
                                                             career aspirations.
                                                        3.  Seek leadership position in campus organization.
                                                        4.  Post résumé on Career Center Web site and
                                                             schedule interviews.
                                                        5.  Apply for graduation at beginning of senior year.




                                                       20
                          Registering on RaiderNet

Step 1: Log into PipelineMT using your password and user name.




Step 2: Click on the RaiderNet tab.

Step 3: Click on Personal Information.
        Check the information for any changes to your address or phone number,

Step 4: Click on Student and Financial Aid, then Registration, then Add or Drop Classes.

Step 5: Click Class Search.

       You should see
       Subject
       Course number
       Title
       Schedule type
       Credit range, etc.




Step 6: Across from Subject, use the scroll bar to locate the course you wish to search for. For
example, let’s search for AAS-African American Studies and locate the course number.

Step 7: Across from Course Number, type the 4-digit course identification number. For
example, 2100 to search for AAS 2100.

Step 8: Push Enter or click Search.

Step 9: The next page should display all AAS 2100 courses offered in the current semester
(CRN number is call number).

Step 10: To register for the selected course, place your cursor in the box located under Select
and left-click the mouse. This should place a check in the box. If there is a C instead of a box,
this section is closed and you must choose another section.

Step 11: Scroll to the bottom of the page and locate the Register button. Left-click Register to
enroll in the course.
              An error message means you may not take the course this semester.
              If you get a ―Web registered‖ message, you are enrolled in the course.
              For scheduling assistance, contact the Scheduling Center at (615) 898-5800.

                                                       21
                                       Best Wishes!

Congratulations on the start of your academic career! The faculty and staff of the College of Mass
Communication are here to support you throughout your college experience—from orientation to graduation and
beyond. If you need help along the way, please do not hesitate to ask for it. Faculty and staff members are
committed to excellence and genuinely want to help you succeed. Again, welcome to MTSU, and . . .




        Go Big Blue!




                                                    22
                                               August 2008
  Sunday          Monday        Tuesday   Wednesday Thursday    Friday   Saturday

                                                               1         2


 3               4              5          6        7          8         9


10              11              12        13        14         15        16


17              18              19        20        21         22        23


24              25              26        27        28         29        30
Convocation
                Classes Begin
Murphy Center

31



                      Notes                              Assignments




                                               23
                                          September 2008
Sunday   Monday         Tuesday       Wednesday Thursday                   Friday   Saturday

         1              2                 3                       4        5         6
          Labor Day
         Univ. Closed


7        8              9             10                      11          12        13


14       15             16            17                      18          19        20


21       22             23            24                      25          26        27


28       29             30

                                       October 2008
                                  S   M    T   W   Th    F   Sa
                                                1   2    3    4
                               5       6   7    8   9   10   11
                              12      13  14   15  16   17   18
                              19      20  21   22  23   24   25
                              26      27  28   29  30   31




              Notes                                                   Assignments




                                              24
                                                          October 2008
Sunday      Monday           Tuesday Wednesday Thursday                            Friday      Saturday

                                                1                         2        3            4


5           6                7                  8                        9        10           11
                                                                                               Fall Break
                                                                                               No Classes

12         13             14               15                            16       17           18
     Fall Break No Classes


19         20             21               22                            23       24           25


26         27             28               29                            30       31
                                                                                   Halloween

                                           November 2008
                                      S     M  T W Th F             Sa
                                                                     1
                                       2    3    4    5    6    7    8
                                       9   10   11   12   13   14   15
                                      16   17   18   19   20   21   22
                                      23   24   25   26   27   28   29
                                      30




                 Notes                                                        Assignments




         NOTE:   Schedule your advising appointment early to avoid delays in scheduling.
                 Begin thinking about classes for next semester.




                                                          25
                                                    November 2008
Sunday      Monday           Tuesday           Wednesday Thursday                       Friday      Saturday

                                                                                                     1


2           3               4                   5                      6               7            8
 Daylight
 Savings

9           10             11                  12                      13            14             15
                                                    Priority Registration


16          17             18                  19                      20            21             22
                              Priority Registration


23          24             25                  26                      27            28             29
                                                                        Thanksgiving - No Classes
                                                                            University Closed


30
                                             December 2008
                                           S  M  T W Th       F   Sa
                                              1  2  3   4     5    6
                                           7  8  9 10 11     12   13
                                          14 15 16 17 18     19   20
                                          21 22 23 24 25     26   27
                                          28 29 30 31




                 Notes                                                      Assignments




                 NOTE: RIM Majors—Attend open advising during priority registration.



                                                    26
                                                    December 2008
Sunday   Monday             Tuesday             Wednesday Thursday                     Friday          Saturday

         1                  2                     3                     4             5                  6
                                                 Last Day of           Study Day          Final Examinations
                                                   Classes             No Classes


7        8                  9                   10                     11           12                13
                                  Final Examinations                                                   Commencement



14       15               16                    17                     18           19                20


21       22               23                    24                     25           26                27
                                                     Christmas Holiday - University Closed



28       29               30                    31
              Christmas Holiday - University Closed

                                                 January 2009
                                           S    M   T W Th F      Sa
                                                            1 2    3
                                            4    5  6   7   8 9   10
                                           11   12 13 14 15 16    17
                                           18   19 20 21 22 23    24
                                           25   26 27 28 29 30    31




               Notes                                                        Assignments




               NOTE: Have you registered for your Spring 2009 classes yet?
               Remember to confirm your schedule or pay your fees to prevent your schedule from being purged.


                                                      27
                                                  January 2009
Sunday    Monday         Tuesday        Wednesday Thursday                      Friday   Saturday

                                                                 1              2         3
                                                               New Years Day
                                                                Univ. Closed


4        5               6                7                     8              9         10


11       12              13             14                     15              16        17
         Classes Begin
                                                               Classes Begin


18       19              20             21                     22              23        24
         ML King Day
         Univ. Closed

25       26              27             28                     29              30        31

                                        February 2009
                                    S   M   T W Th F      Sa
                                    1    2  3   4  5  6    7
                                    8    9 10 11 12 13    14
                                   15   16 17 18 19 20    21
                                   22   23 24 25 26 27    28




               Notes                                                 Assignments




                                                28
                                                 February 2009
Sunday    Monday           Tuesday Wednesday Thursday                     Friday   Saturday

1         2                3                 4                   5        6          7
         Groundhog Day



8         9                10          11                       12       13        14
                                                                                   Valentines Day



15       16                17          18                       19       20        21
         President's Day



22       23                24          25                       26       27        28




                                            March 2009
                                   S   M      T W Th F     Sa
                                   1    2     3  4   5 6    7
                                   8    9    10 11 12 13   14
                                  15   16    17 18 19 20   21
                                  22   23    24 25 26 27   28
                                  29   30    31




               Notes                                                 Assignments




                                                 29
                                                                    March 2009
Sunday      Monday           Tuesday             Wednesday Thursday                        Friday           Saturday

1           2               3                         4                        5           6                 7


8           9              10                    11                           12        13                  14
 Daylight                                                                              University Holiday
                                                      Spring Break — No Classes        University Closed
 Savings

15          16             17                    18                           19        20                  21
                            St. Patrick's
                                 Day

22          23             24                    25                           26        27                  28


29          30             31

                                                      April 2009
                                            S    M      T W Th       F   Sa
                                                            1   2    3    4
                                             5    6     7   8   9   10   11
                                            12   13    14 15 16     17   18
                                            19   20    21 22 23     24   25
                                            26   27    28 29 30




                 Notes                                                             Assignments




                 NOTE: Schedule your advising appointment early to avoid delays in scheduling!
                 Begin thinking about classes for next semester.


                                                           30
                                                                      April 2009
Sunday    Monday           Tuesday Wednesday Thursday                                    Friday   Saturday

                                                  1                         2            3         4


5         6               7                      8                         9            10        11
                                       Priority Registration



12        13             14                 15                             16           17        18
 Easter                                Priority Registration


19        20             21                 22                             23           24        25


26        27             28                 29                             30
                                                  Last Day                 Study Day
                                                 of Classes                No Classes
                                                 May 2009
                                       S    M     T W Th          F   Sa
                                                                  1    2
                                        3    4     5    6    7    8    9
                                       10   11    12   13   14   15   16
                                       17   18    19   20   21   22   23
                                       24   25    26   27   28   29   30
                                       31




               Notes                                                            Assignments




              NOTE: RIM Majors—Attend open advising during priority registration.


                                                       31
                                                                        May 2009
 Sunday          Monday        Tuesday          Wednesday Thursday                     Friday         Saturday

                                                                                       1               2
                                                                                           Final Examinations



3               4              5                     6                      7         8               9
                                    Final Examinations
                                                                                                     Commencement


10             11              12               13                          14       15              16
Mother's Day     S1 – May
               Classes Begin

17             18              19               20                          21       22              23


24             25              26               27                          28       29              30
                                                                                      Final Exams
               Memorial Day
                                                                                     S1 – May Term
                No Classes

31
                                                     June 2009
                                           S    M      T W Th      F   Sa
                                                 1     2  3   4    5    6
                                            7    8     9 10 11    12   13
                                           14   15    16 17 18    19   20
                                           21   22    23 24 25    26   27
                                           28   29    30




                     Notes                                                       Assignments




                                                          32
                                                              June 2009
                                       Wednesday
 Sunday        Monday   Tuesday                                    Thursday    Friday   Saturday

               1        2                   3                       4          5        6


7              8        9              10                          11         12        13


14             15       16             17                          18         19        20


21             22       23             24                          25         26        27
Father’s Day


28             29       30

                                            July 2009
                                  S    M      T W Th      F   Sa
                                                 1   2    3    4
                                   5    6     7  8   9   10   11
                                  12   13    14 15 16    17   18
                                  19   20    21 22 23    24   25
                                  26   27    28 29 30    31




                    Notes                                               Assignments




                                                 33
                                                                    July 2009
Sunday     Monday          Tuesday Wednesday Thursday                              Friday   Saturday

                                                1                         2        3         4
                                                                                            Independence
                                                                                                Day

5         6                7                    8                        9        10        11


12       13              14                15                            16       17        18


19       20              21                22                            23       24        25


26       27              28                29                            30       31

                                            August 2009
                                       S   M   T   W  Th       F    Sa
                                                                     1
                                       2    3    4    5    6    7    8
                                       9   10   11   12   13   14   15
                                      16   17   18   19   20   21   22
                                      23   24   25   26   27   28   29
                                      30   31




                Notes                                                         Assignments




         NOTE: Have you registered for your Fall 2009 classes?
         Remember to confirm your schedule or pay your fees to prevent your schedule from being purged.

                                                     34
                                                    August 2009
Sunday    Monday         Tuesday Wednesday Thursday                    Friday    Saturday

                                                                                  1


2         3              4             5                     6        7          8
                                                                                Commencement


9        10              11          12                      13       14        15


16       17              18          19                      20       21        22


23       24              25          26                      27       28        29


30       31
                                   September   2009
                               S    M T W       Th F    Sa
                                        1  2     3  4    5
                               6     7  8  9    10 11   12
                              13    14 15 16    17 18   19
         Classes Begin        20
                              27
                                    21 22 23
                                    28 29 30
                                                24 25   26




               Notes                                              Assignments




                                               35

				
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