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					                                                                                         Work Plan Template




                DIRECTIONS FOR COMPLETING A WORK PLAN

Introduction to the Work Plan Template
The Work Plan is a tool that will allow you to track the progress of your project and enable the
Foundation to assess the impact of our giving. During the application process the Foundation requires
completed Work Plans from organizations applying for grants under the Investments in Effective
Organizations and Public-Private Initiatives funding strategies. The completed Work Plan will become
part of the Grant Agreement between your organization and the Foundation and will be the basis of
progress and final reports.

Please work with your assigned program officer to complete the form and use it as a base line to report
against in your progress reports to release payments. Please discuss any changes to your Work Plan with
Foundation staff. Work Plans should be updated and submitted as part of your final report at the end of
the grant period. Please note that you will be e-mailed an electronic version of the Work Plan template.

Description of Work Plan
The work plan follows an outcome-based logic model to illustrate the project’s intended outcomes and the
activities and steps that are being proposed to achieve them. The intent of the work plan is to help the
Foundation and grantee have a common understanding of the project. By showing the expected effects of
the activities, it provides the basis for determining if the planned actions led to desired results and
identifying lessons learned.

Definition of Terms

        Current Need – The need or condition the project addresses. Baseline information and
        metrics of the current state of your organization in the areas that this project is intended to
        improve.

        Activities – The actions or steps needed to achieve your goal (for example: staff training,
        board development, program assessment).

        Milestones – The events and products that let you know you are on track to achieve your
        outcomes (for example: the completion of a plan, the groundbreaking for a construction
        project, completion of steps – (implemented steps in fundraising plan).

        Outcomes – The immediate and mid-term results you hope to accomplish. What will
        be different and how will success be measured described in terms of increase, decrease,
        number and percent. (for example: the increased number of donors and amount
        contributed)

        Community Impact The long-term change expected as a result of the project – related to your
        mission. How the successful completion of the project will benefit individuals and/or a
        community.



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                                                                                                 Work Plan Template




Template
Please select from one of the two Work Plan formats provided.


                            WORK PLAN TEMPLATE (OPTION A)
    Organization:
    Project Title:
    Project ID #:
    Grant Period:

Current Need or Condition: Please describe the need or condition the project addresses. Provide baseline
information and metrics of the current state of your organization in the areas that this project is intended to
improve.




Activities:                Milestones/Timeline                 Project                         Community
List the actions           Specify the events and              Goals/Objectives                Impact
or steps needed            products that let you               List the immediate              Describe how you
to achieve your            know you are on track               and mid-term results            hope the
goal and provide           to achieve your                     you hope to                     successful
a timetable.               outcomes For multi-                 accomplish?                     completion of the
                           year projects, describe             Describe in terms of            project will
                           project milestones for              increase, decrease,             benefit
                           each year of the project.           number and percent.             individuals and/or
                                                                                               a community.
                                                                                               How will you
                                                                                               measure success?




______________________________________________________________________________
Project Manager/Contact


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                                                                             Work Plan Template




  Check here confirming review and approval of Work Plan by Executive Director/CEO

______________________________________________________________________________
Executive Director/CEO’s Name, Title, and Date




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                                                                                     Work Plan Template




                       WORK PLAN TEMPLATE (OPTION B)
   Organization:
   Project Title:
   Project ID #:
   Grant Period:

   I.      Current Need or Condition: Please describe the need or condition the project
           addresses. Provide baseline information and metrics of the current state of your
           organization in the areas that this project is intended to improve.




   II.     Activities: List the actions or steps needed to achieve your goal and provide a
           timetable.




   III.    Milestones/Timeline: Specify the events and products that let you know you are on
           track to achieve your outcomes. For multi-year projects, describe project milestones
           for each year of the project.



   IV.     Project Goals/Objectives: List the immediate and mid-term results you hope to
           accomplish. Describe in terms of increase, decrease, number and percent.



   V.      Community Impact: Describe how you hope the successful completion of the
           project will benefit individuals and/or a community. How will you measure success?




_____________________________________________________________________________
Project Manager/Contact


  Check here confirming review and approval of Work Plan by Executive Director/CEO



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                                                                                   Work Plan Template




______________________________________________________________________________
Executive Director/CEO’s Name, Title, and Date

                             EXAMPLES OF WORK PLANS
Below you will find sample Work Plans for Public-Private Initiatives, Capital Campaigns, and Capacity
Building projects to use as a reference while you prepare your Work Plan.


                        Public-Private Initiative (Using Option A)

                              Paul G. Allen Foundation Grant
                                    Work Plan 2005-07
Current Need
 Public resources are too heavily weighted toward “deep-end” responses, sacrificing more
   cost-effective prevention and intervention.
 Public funding systems create disincentives to invest in smart, cost–effective youth
   interventions. In the State of Washington, the savings generated by cost-effective prevention
   accrue to numerous levels of government, so that no one level of government saves enough
   to cover the costs of the initial investment.
 Racially disparate impacts exist throughout the juvenile justice system. The impact of
   incarceration lands particularly hard on communities of color. There is an urgent need to
   strengthen capacity within communities of color to more effectively serve youth and families
   of color.
 The agencies serving youth in King County are not a system. Juvenile justice, mental health,
   chemical dependency, youth and family services, schools, and foster care are disconnected
   and uncoordinated.
 Those who will benefit from RIY’s services have the following profile. Most come from
   economically disadvantaged backgrounds. A disproportionate 53% of those committed to
   incarceration are youth of color. Of those most likely to re-offend and therefore most likely
   to receive RIY services, 70% live in high-risk home environments, 49% lack essential skills,
   43% use alcohol and drugs, 40% have mental health issues, 37% have significant problems
   with school and 65% engage in numerous high-risk behaviors.

Inputs and Activities
Inputs
 Local government funding for project director and deputy director and other administrative
   costs.- $236,000 per year. The City of Seattle and King county also contribute significant in-
   kind staff support.
 Steering Committee consisting of broad representation from state and local government and
   community partners.


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 Foundation support for intervention services expansion, capacity building and policy
   development - $1.7 million for 2005-06.
Activities
 Build regional partnership for juvenile justice reform through support of Reinvesting in
   Youth Steering Committee.
 Maintain expanded evidence-based interventions focused on high risk youth and families.
   - Support efforts to assure adequate referrals of eligible youth and quality assurance for
       fidelity of service delivery.
   - Support training of therapists, probation counselors, and other juvenile court staff in
       youth and family engagement and cultural competency.
 Obtain passage of state “Savings Reinvestment” legislation that will create a sustainable
   source of expanded funding for early intervention and prevention.
 Reduce racial disparities in juvenile justice by building capacity within community based
   agencies to address the needs of at risk youth of color.
   -           Complete multi-site evaluation of promising home-grown programs.
   -           Implement expanded program of cultural competency assessment, action plans
       and training for 14 community based agencies.
   -           Implement technical assistance program which brings “Elements of Successful
       Programs” / best practices to CBOs throughout King County.
 Connect juvenile justice, chemical dependency and mental health systems.
   - Support Multi-Systemic Therapy for dually diagnosed youth in the Reclaiming Futures
       program.

Milestones
 Evidence –based programs
   - Full Case loads for all therapies                                      April 30, 2005
   - Fully implemented quality assurance protocols for all therapies        April 30, 2005
   - Implement Engagement skills training                                   April 30, 2005
   - Implement cultural competency training to enhance engagement of        October 31, 2005
       youth of color
 Savings Reinvestment Legislation
   - Obtain passage of State “Reinvesting in Youth” legislation for state   May, 31, 2005 (or
       reimbursement to 3 counties for state savings resulting from local   April 30, 2006)
       investments in evidence-based programs.
   - Complete King County Savings Reinvestment Study                        July 31, 2005
 Capacity Building
   - Complete data collection for multi-site evaluation of promising        December 31, 2006
       home-grown programs
   - Complete final report for multi-site evaluation of promising home-     June 30, 2007
       grown programs
   - Complete Cultural Competency Action Plans for 4 CBOs (Phase 3)         June 30, 2005


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                                                                            Work Plan Template




   -   Complete Cultural Competency Action Plans for 4 CBOs (Phase 4)       November 30, 2005
   -   Complete all follow-up site visits for Phase 1-4 CBOs                December 31, 2006
   -   Conduct field tests for “Elements of Successful Programs”            July 31, 2005
       assessment for pilot agencies
   -   Implement TA for “Elements of Successful Programs” for pilot         October 31, 2005
       agencies
   -   Complete plan for full implementation of Assessments and TA for      October 31, 2005
       “Elements of Successful Programs”.

Outcomes
 By 2007 sustainable investments in King County will have been expanded by $900,000 per
  year for intensive, cost-effective, culturally relevant, strength-based, family-focused
  treatments to meet the needs of troubled youth. The number of high risk youth and families
  receiving these interventions will increase by 378 per year.
 Youth receiving these interventions will experience less recidivism and improvements in
  their risk and protective factors.
 The selected multi-dimensional treatments will yield other benefits including reduced
  substance abuse, greater educational achievement, and reduced teen pregnancy.
 The capacity of community-based organizations in King County to serve youth of color will
  be enhanced.
 Evaluation of Evidence-based programs - The original evaluation plan for proven
  programs focused on faithfulness to program design during implementation, changes in
  disproportionality and simple outcome measures. The completed, comparison group based
  design provides for more rigorous evaluation of outcomes.
 Evaluation of Systems change – Evaluation will focus on qualitative assessments,
  achievement of major benchmarks for policy change and “lessons learned” from RIY’s
  multiple initiatives. Implementation is expected to get underway in early 2005.
Community Benefits
 Over-spending on King County and State juvenile and adult justice systems will be reduced
  by $2.3 million per year (excluding benefits attributable to other counties that result from
  Reinvesting in Youth’s savings reinvestment legislation).
 Court referrals will be reduced and public safety increased. There will be fewer crime
  victims and less victim-incurred costs.
 The paradigm by which cost-effective programs are funded will be changed through the
  recognition, capture, and reinvestment of the public dollar savings that result from closing
  down secure beds and avoiding the need for other "deep-end" expenditures.
 The disproportional involvement of youth of color in our juvenile justice systems will be
  reduced.
 The coordination among mental health, drug and alcohol treatment, juvenile justice and
  youth and family services will be increased.



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 Systems in King County for youth program evaluation and quality improvement will be
  enhanced.
                            Capital Campaign (Using Option B)
Current Need:
Describe the current conditions you are trying to improve.
The Anchorage Museum is expanding its physical space to accommodate its larger mission,
growing collections, and new partners in learning.

Larger Mission:
The expansion project builds on the Museum’s successful history of collecting and exhibiting the
art and history of Alaska and the circumpolar North by adding science to the mission - a natural
evolution in a land whose art, history and culture are deeply informed by the environment.

Growing Collections:
The Museum’s permanent collection of Alaska art and artifacts has grown. Current collections
exceed the present storage and display capacity. At present 21,600 art, ethnographic objects and
historical materials, and over 400,000 historical photographs that comprise the Museum’s
collections and they are growing at a rate of three to five percent per annum.

New Partners in Learning:
The Arctic Studies Center is the only U.S. government program to have a special focus on
northern cultural research and education, and is located in the Department of Anthropology at the
National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. In 1994, an office for Alaskan research
and outreach was established at the Anchorage Museum. There is currently no space in the
Anchorage Museum to house new exhibition and visible storage of over one thousand 19th
century Alaska Native artifacts which will return to Alaska on long-term loan from the
Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian and National Museum of
Natural History.

The Imaginarium has been a part of Anchorage since 1987, bringing hands-on teaching methods
in the natural and physical sciences to 104,000 annual visitors. As part of the expansion, this
outreach-driven institution will move to the Museum, helping to incorporate the sciences in the
Museum’s exhibitions and improving its outreach efforts through traveling programs in Alaska’s
rural communities. Educators will find exciting new programming for the thousands of students
who participate in Museum school trips.

2004 Museum Metrics
    Public Programs (tours, lectures, symposia, classes, films): 900
    Paid Admissions (96,000) Free Admissions (Under 17, school tours, events) (78,000)
    Members (3,998)
    Volunteers (595 people, 36,018 hours)
    Staff, including the Imaginarium, (57)
    Exhibition Openings (19)


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       Collections (21,600 art, ethnographic items and historical materials) (450,00 historical
        photographs)
       Facility square footage (93,000 s.f. museum, 45,000 s.f. garage)
       Operating Budget ($5.7 million) (includes Imaginarium)
       Anchorage Museum Foundation Endowment (corpus is $10 million)
       Current Program/Spaces:
                     Galleries (used for Temporary Exhibitions and Permanent Art
                         Collections)
                     Back of house collections storage, exhibition preparation, offices
                     Library and Archives
                     Alaska Gallery (history exhibition)
                     Children’s Gallery
                     Two Classrooms
                     Atrium
                     Auditorium
                     Administrative offices
                     Museum Café
                     Museum Shop

Inputs and Activities
What are the resources needed to accomplish your project? What actions or steps will you
take to address the current need? Resources needed to accomplish project (for example:
staff, board, financial resources, and consultants).

Fundraising Actions/Steps
Please see attached timeline for fundraising actions/steps.

Fundraising Resources
Capital Campaign Director: Joy Atrops-Kimura, Grant writer, administrative support
Capital Campaign Committee (comprised of 13 individuals representing a variety of museum
constituents)
Campaign budget: $750,000 for $15 million campaign

Construction Actions/Steps
Please see attached timeline detailing construction phases.

Construction Resources
Kumin Associates, Incorporated, architect of record, leads the expansion design team. Kumin has
been at the forefront of developing architecture suited to cold regions during 26 years of practice
in Alaska. In addition to work in over 100 Alaskan communities, Kumin has provided services in
Antarctica and Russia.
Museum Architect David Chipperfield, based in London and Berlin, has won more than 20
national and international competitions, has earned many international awards and citations for
design excellence, and has designed many significant museums around the world.



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Project Advisor RISE Alaska, LLC provides professional construction program management and
project management services on major projects, multi-phased master plan developments, and
national building programs. Their experience includes many Alaskan landmark projects.
Charles Anderson Landscape Architecture provides award-winning landscape and site design
expertise ranging from park development, historic landscape restoration, ecological restoration,
interpretive centers and signage, and major civic and institutional landscapes. Earthscape, an
Anchorage-based landscape architecture firm, assists with development of landscape concepts,
winter city expertise, and local plant use.
Exhibit Designer Ralph Appelbaum Associates are planners, designers, and producers of award-
winning museum exhibitions, visitor centers, and educational environments.

Program Development Actions/Steps
Program Development for the purposes of this grant proposal, refers to the interpretive planning
for exhibits that will be occurring from 2005 through the second quarter of 2007. The timeline
associated with this is also included on the construction timeline.

Program Development Staff Resources
Patricia B. Wolf has served as the Museum Director from 1987 to the present. Pat has been
associated with the Museum for the past 30 years, as Curator of Education from 1974-1986. Pat’s
in-depth knowledge of the Museum and the community are an invaluable asset as we seek
private, corporate and foundation funding for the campaign.
Suzi Jones is Museum Deputy Director, a position she has held since 1997. From July l986 until
November 1997, Dr. Jones was a Senior Program Officer/Assistant Program Director for
Humanities Projects in Museums in Historical Organizations, Division of Public Programs,
National Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC. From l980 to l986, she served as the
Director of the Traditional Native Arts Program for the Alaska State Council on the Arts. A
folklorist by training, she received her PhD with honors from the University of Oregon in l978.
Marilyn R. Knapp, Curator of History, is responsible for Alaska history programs, collections and
exhibits in the Museum. From 1995 to 2003 she was professor of history at the University of
Alaska Southeast at Sitka. She has a MA degree from the University of Denver in History,
Museum and Archives Studies (1982) with an emphasis in Alaska studies.
Kathleen Baker-Hertel, Director, Library and Archives coordinates reference services, collection
development, exhibits development and staff research support, has a MA degree in history from
Duquesne University, 1998.
Walter Van Horn, Curator of Collections since 1977, has a BA in history and an MA in Museum
Administration from the Cooperstown Graduate Program 1972. He is responsible for the
administration of the Museum’s permanent collections and works actively with other Museum
departments and volunteers to further Museum goals and projects.
Aaron Micallef, Director, Education and Public Programs received a MA in Applied History and
Museum Studies from George Mason University in 1996. He has experience with the National
Museum of American History, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum and Monterey Bay
Aquarium. Activities he has coordinated at the Anchorage Museum include The Endurance:
Shackleton’s Legendary Antarctic Expedition, A T rex Named Sue and Indivisible: Stories of
American Community speaker series.




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Aron Crowell, Director of the Arctic Study Center’s office in Anchorage, has a degree in
anthropology from George Washington University and a PhD from the University of California,
Berkley. He worked with Alutiiq communities of southern Alaska to develop the traveling
exhibition Looking Both Ways: Heritage and Identity of the Alutiiq People, which joins
anthropological and historical scholarship with the insights and perspectives of Alutiiq Elders,
educators and writers. Currently, he is collaborating with Alaska Elders on the Alaska Collections
Project that is documenting collections of Alaska artifacts at the National Museum of Natural
History and National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

Milestones
What events and products let you know you are on track to achieve your outcomes? What is the
timeline for reaching your milestones? (The events and products that let you know you are on
track to achieve your outcomes (for example: the completion of a plan, the groundbreaking for a
construction project).

Fundraising

Please see attached timeline.
Major milestones include:
     Quiet Phase completion: Achieve 80% of the $15 million goal ($12 million in pledges
        and gifts) prior to public announcement of the capital campaign in September 2005.
     Major Gifts Phase completion: Achieve 95% of the goal (an additional $2.25 million in
        pledges and gifts) by December, 2006.
     Community Gifts Phase completion: Achieve 100% of the goal (an additional
        $750,000 in pledges and gifts) by December 2007.

Construction Please see attached timeline.
Major Milestones include:
Facility Design phases: 8 Design Team Workshops – complete; Programming – complete;
Concept Design – complete; Schematic Design; Design Development; Construction Documents;
Final Design Review & Permitting
Facility Construction: Bid Award; New Building Construction; Transition to New Building;
Renovation of Existing Building; Substantial Completion
We plan to use the LEED NC 2.1 rating system in our building analysis and will pursue the
highest level of LEED certification our analysis, project constraints, and funding limitations
support. It is our intent to attain points in every LEED category. We will develop monitoring and
maintenance plans that will allow us to assess the performance of our green building.
Program Development.
Major milestones include:
Exhibits: Phase I Interpretive Philosophy Development – complete; Phase II Interpretive
Planning: Exhibit Design; Exhibit Fabrication; Exhibit Installation.

Outcomes
What will be the immediate and mid-term result of your activities? What specific measurements
indicate that you have been successful? (The immediate and mid-term result of your activities


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(for example: the systems or programs in place as a result of the grant, the increased percentage
of people participating in your program)

2011 Projected Museum Metrics
    Public Programs (tours, lectures, symposia, classes, films): 1,200 (Over 30% growth)
    Paid Admissions (124,000) Free Admissions (Under 17s, school tours, events) (106,000)
       (15% growth)
    Members (4,750) (19% growth)
    Volunteers (700 people, 42,000 hours) (18% growth)
    Staff, including the Imaginarium, (86.7) (53% increase)
    Exhibition Openings (25) (32% increase)
    Collections (25,500 art, ethnographic items* and historical materials) (465,000 historical
       photographs) * Not including long-term loan of artifacts from the Smithsonian
       Institution. (18% growth – 3% per year)
    Facility square footage (163,000 s.f. museum, 45,000 s.f. garage plus adjacent
       Municipality of Anchorage parking garage) (75% growth)
    Operating Budget ($8 million) (40% increase)
    Anchorage Museum Foundation Endowment (corpus is $25 million) (150% increase)
    Program/Spaces:
            o Galleries (Expanded Temporary Exhibit space and additional space for
                Permanent Art Collection)
            o Expanded and improved back of house collections storage, exhibition
                preparation, offices, including a conservation laboratory for evaluation and
                treatments of objects.
            o Library and Archives relocated and expanded to include more storage and a
                reading room.
            o Renovated Alaska history exhibition (Alaska Gallery)
            o Arctic Studies Center with exhibition and visible storage of over one thousand
                artifacts from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History
                and National Museum of the American Indian
            o General Science galleries to house Imaginarium exhibitions featuring hands-on
                learning activities
            o Round Room that will host planetarium presentations, and serve as a
                multipurpose room for everything from classes to camp-ins.
            o Two additional classrooms/activity rooms for a total of four.
            o Young Learner’s Discovery Gallery featuring hands on learning for children
                from birth to 7 years.
            o Relocated and enlarged Children’s Art Gallery
            o Atrium
            o Refurbished seats in Auditorium
            o Additional administrative offices
            o Expanded Museum Café with separate loading dock for service/food deliveries
            o Expanded Museum Shop




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           o   Landscaped two-acre park featuring a gathering spaces, an ice rink/tidal pool,
               and a large promenade that can host community performances, and new Museum
               programs and activities.

Community Benefits
What long-term change will the project result in? Describe the long-term benefits to the
community.

       A larger Museum facility that includes the Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the
        Imaginarium, please see above list for new and enlarged spaces.
       The Anchorage Museum is a key repository for significant art and historical objects
        representing Alaska. Expanded back of house collections space will enable the Museum
        to continue to serve Alaskans through accessioning important items of art, artifacts and
        archival materials for at least the next twenty years.
       New programs and exhibits will use a variety of educational methods to reach children
        with different learning styles. They will be inquiry-based, interactive, and intellectually
        stimulating. The net effect will be to improve historical, artistic, and scientific literacy
        among our younger visitors.
       Alaska’s art, history and science will come alive for adult visitors, because the
        information will be presented through a variety of perspectives (from the artist or
        craftsperson, to Native elder or history’s participant), and in a more interactive way -
        featuring audio and video elements and displays.
       The study of Alaska’s history is now a mandated course for secondary students
        statewide. The renovated and re-imagined Alaska Gallery, already an important resource
        for educators and students, will present a broader view of Alaska’s heritage and those
        who shaped this land, from Alaska’s Native peoples to Norwegian fisherman and
        Filipino cannery workers, from gold rush stampeders to pipeline workers.
       Scholars, journalists and students from around Alaska and the world rely on the
        Anchorage Museum’s Archives/Library of historical materials, including 10,000 books
        and 450,000 historical photographs. The expansion will give the Archives and Library
        additional storage and public space for research. Updated technology will make
        collections of Alaska materials accessible to worldwide audiences and will enable the
        Archives and Library to link with the library and archival materials of the Smithsonian.
       Gallery space devoted to temporary exhibitions in the new wing will enable the Museum
        to present more exhibitions from around the world, such as Shackleton and A T Rex
        Named Sue. New gallery space will enable the Museum to regularly display more of its
        permanent collection of art and artifacts and it will provide more exhibition opportunities
        for Alaska artists in juried shows, solo exhibits and group shows. Finally, the new space
        will enable the Museum to organize more exhibitions like Science Under Sail or Fred
        Machetanz: A Northern Adventure that begin here and travel to other museums within
        Alaska and Outside.
       Tourism is an important part of Anchorage’s economy. The expanded Anchorage
        Museum will encourage more tourists to stay longer in Anchorage, increasing revenues
        into the economy.



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         Located within blocks of the Alaska Center for the Performing Arts and Town Square,
          the expanded Museum and public park will help to create a powerful cultural nucleus for
          the city, one that will improve opportunities for collaboration.




                                Capacity Building (Using Option A)
Organization: Insights Teen Parent Program
Project Title: Two-Year Capacity Building/Fundraising Plan
Project ID #: 7440
Grant Period: October 1, 2005 to October 1, 2007

Current Need or Condition: Please describe the need or condition the project addresses. Provide baseline
information and metrics of the current state of your organization in the areas that this project is intended to
improve.
   This project addresses Insights need to diversify its funding base:
 80% of our annual income this year is projected to come from government contracts (restricted funding).

Last year government contracts were 83% of the budget so we made some progress in diversifying funds in
Year-One of this project.

The overall goal is to make Insights less vulnerable to current economic shortfalls and government funding
cuts so we can maintain current staffing and keep our programs in tact. This will maintain fully staffed,
best-practice services required to meet the myriad and changing needs of the vulnerable, poor families we
serve - pregnant and parenting teens and their young children in the Portland-area.

Our plan is to decrease Insights’ dependence on government/restricted funding by:
increasing the number of and amounts given by individual donors;
by having 2 annual events and raising more money at events; and
by increasing donations from businesses, corporations, community organizations, churches, etc.

 Part of the plan includes working to get local coverage of our work in print, radio and TV news, to raise
community awareness and interest in our work and increase in-kind and cash donations, volunteers and
board members.




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Activities:        Milestones/Timeline                 Project                Community
List the actions   Specify the events and              Goals/Objectives       Impact
or steps needed    products that let you               List the immediate     Describe how
to achieve your    know you are on track               and mid-term results   you hope the
goal and provide   to achieve your                     you hope to            successful
a timetable.       outcomes For multi-                 accomplish?            completion of the
                   year projects, describe             Describe in terms of   project will
                   project milestones for              increase, decrease,    benefit
                   each year of the project.           number and percent.    individuals
                                                                              and/or a
                                                                              community. How
                                                                              will you measure
                                                                              success?
Year 2:                                                                       The success of
3/1/5-2/28/06      To get 50 Renewals                  To increase the        this plan in
                   and 65 new Donors                   number of              Year-Two
Individual         with an average gift                individual             will be
donor gifts        of $50 (thru appeal                 donors and to          measured by
Under $200         letters, house                      maintain and           tracking each
(year-round)       parties, newsletters                upgrade current        area of
                   and personal                        donor giving in        fundraising
                   contacts)                           this category          and the dollars
                   Goal: $5,750                                               earned in each
                                                                              category listed
                                                                              in the plan.
                                                                              Successful
Major                                                                         completion of
Individual         To get 10 renewals                  To increase the        the plan will
Donor Gifts        6 upgrades and 12                   number of major        benefit the
Over $200          new donors                          donors and to          teen parent
(year-round)       Average gift $400                   maintain and           families we
                   Projected Goal:                     increase current       serve and the
                   $11,200.00                          donor giving.          community at-
                                                                              large. The
                                                                              vital, free
“Ask Event”                                                                   services we
(April 2006)       2nd Annual free                     To increase cash       provide to
                   fundraising lunch                   and pledges at         decrease the
                   in April 2006 with                  this event from        side-effects of
                   gifts and multi-year                to $25,000             poverty and
                   pledges from 85                                            early
                   new and old                                                parenting
                   donors. Goal in                                            while
                   cash and pledges:                                          increasing the
                     $25,000.00                                               self-esteem
                                                                              and self-



                                               Page 15 of 18
                                                                                Work Plan Template




Activities:        Milestones/Timeline                 Project                Community
List the actions   Specify the events and              Goals/Objectives       Impact
or steps needed    products that let you               List the immediate     Describe how
to achieve your    know you are on track               and mid-term results   you hope the
goal and provide   to achieve your                     you hope to            successful
a timetable.       outcomes For multi-                 accomplish?            completion of the
                   year projects, describe             Describe in terms of   project will
                   project milestones for              increase, decrease,    benefit
                   each year of the project.           number and percent.    individuals
                                                                              and/or a
                                                                              community. How
                                                                              will you measure
                                                                              success?
Third Annual                                           Increase               efficacy of
 Auction           275 supporters in                   attendance from        teen parents
(10/28/05)         attendance                          200 to 275, and        and their
                   Projected Goal:                     income from            attachment to
                   $25,000.00                          $14000 to              their children
                                                       $25,000                will not be cut
                                                                              nor lost. Our
                                                                              community
Corporate                                                                     will spend
and Church                                             New proposals          fewer dollars
gifts (year-       $15,000                             and personal           on issues like
round)                                                 contacts to            juvenile
                                                       increase corp-         justice, child
Foundation                                             orate and church       welfare, drug
Grants(year        $290,000                            gifts.                 treatment,
round)                                                                        housing/home
                                                       To increase # of       less programs.
Total                                                  requests to in-        As in Years 1
                   Year 2 TOTAL:                       crease grant           and 2 success
                   $371,950.00                         income                 of the plan in
                                                                              Year-3 will
YEAR 3                                                                        again be
3/1/6-2/28/07                                                                 measured by
                                                                              tracking each
Individual                                                                    area of
donors gifts                                                                  fundraising
under $200         To get 64 renewals                  To increase the        and the dollars
(year-round)       and 85 New donors                   number of              earned in each
                   with an average gift                individual             area.
                   of $50 (thru appeal                 donors and to          Successful
                   letters, house                      maintain or            completion of
                   parties, newsletters                increase the           the plan will
                   and personal                        giving levels of       benefit



                                               Page 16 of 18
                                                                                Work Plan Template




Activities:        Milestones/Timeline                 Project                Community
List the actions   Specify the events and              Goals/Objectives       Impact
or steps needed    products that let you               List the immediate     Describe how
to achieve your    know you are on track               and mid-term results   you hope the
goal and provide   to achieve your                     you hope to            successful
a timetable.       outcomes For multi-                 accomplish?            completion of the
                   year projects, describe             Describe in terms of   project will
                   project milestones for              increase, decrease,    benefit
                   each year of the project.           number and percent.    individuals
                                                                              and/or a
                                                                              community. How
                                                                              will you measure
                                                                              success?
                   contacts                            current donors.        Insights and
                    Total: $7,450                                             the teen
Major                                                                         families we
Individual                                                                    serve and the
Donor Gifts        To get 11 renewals,                                        community at
Over $200          7 upgrades and 13                   To increase the        large. The
(year-round)       new donors; (thru                   number of major        vital, free
                   appeal letters,                     donors and to          services we
                   house parties,                      maintain or            provide to
                   newsletters and                     increase the           decrease the
                   personal contacts                   giving levels of       side-effects of
                   average gift $400                   current donors.        young
                    Total: $12,400                                            parenting and
Third annual                                                                  poverty while
“Ask Event”                                                                   increasing the
April 2007         To get 110 gifts                                           self-esteem
                   and multi-year                      To increase            and self-
                   pledges                             dollars raised at      efficacy of
                   Projected Total:                    this event from        teen parents
                      $35,000                          $25,000-35,000         and their
Fourth annual                                                                 attachment to
Auction                                                                       their children
October 2006                                                                  will not be cut
                   300 supporters in                   Increase               nor lost. Our
                   attendance                          attendance from        community
Corporate          Projected goal:                     275 to 300 and         will spend
and church             $35,000                         income from            fewer dollars
gifts                                                  25,000 to 35,000       on issues of
                   Increase gifts to                                          juvenile
                   $20,000                             New proposals          justice, child
                                                       and contacts to        welfare, drug
                                                       increase               treatment,
Foundation                                             corporate and          housing and



                                               Page 17 of 18
                                                                                Work Plan Template




Activities:        Milestones/Timeline                 Project                Community
List the actions   Specify the events and              Goals/Objectives       Impact
or steps needed    products that let you               List the immediate     Describe how
to achieve your    know you are on track               and mid-term results   you hope the
goal and provide   to achieve your                     you hope to            successful
a timetable.       outcomes For multi-                 accomplish?            completion of the
                   year projects, describe             Describe in terms of   project will
                   project milestones for              increase, decrease,    benefit
                   each year of the project.           number and percent.    individuals
                                                                              and/or a
                                                                              community. How
                                                                              will you measure
                                                                              success?
Grants                                                 church gifts.          homeless
                                                                              programs
                   $300,000                            To increase # of
                                                       requests sent to
                                                       foundations to
                                                       increase grant
Total:                                                 income


                   Year 3 Total:
                    $409,850




                                               Page 18 of 18

				
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