Docstoc

Essentials of Business Communication - Download as PowerPoint

Document Sample
Essentials of Business Communication - Download as PowerPoint Powered By Docstoc
					Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-1   1
        Six Categories of Informal
                 Reports
•   Information Reports
•   Progress Reports
•   Justification/Recommendation Reports
•   Feasibility Reports
•   Minutes of Meetings
•   Summaries

    Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-2
                Report Formats

• Letter format
    Letterhead stationery. Useful for informal
    reports sent to outsiders.
• Memo format
    Memo style. Useful for informal reports
    circulated within organizations.


 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-3
                Report Formats

• Manuscript format
    Plain paper, manuscript form. Useful for
    longer, more formal reports.
• Prepared forms
    Standardized forms. Useful for routine
    activities, such as expense reports.


 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-4
 General Guidelines for Writing
           Reports

• Define project.
• Gather data.
• Organize data.
• Write first draft.
• Edit and revise.

 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-5
      Where to Gather Data for
              Reports
• Look in company records.
• Make personal observations.
• Use surveys, questionnaires, and
  inventories.
• Conduct interviews.
• Search databases and other electronic
  resources.
 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-6
        Organizing Report Data

• Indirect Strategy                • Direct Strategy
  • Problem                            • Problem
  • Facts                              • Recommendations
  • Discussion                         • Facts
  • Recommendations                    • Discussion


 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-7
       Making Effective Report
             Headings
• Use appropriate heading levels.
• Strive for parallel construction.
• Use first- and second-level headings for
  short reports.
• Capitalize and underline carefully.
• Keep headings short but clear.

 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-8
       Making Effective Report
             Headings
• Don't enclose headings in quotation
  marks.
• Don't use headings as antecedents for
  pronouns.
    For example, avoid:
    Inserting Hypertext Links. These links . . . .


 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-9
     Being Objective in Writing
             Reports

• Present both sides of an issue.
• Separate fact from opinion.
• Be sensitive and moderate in language.
• Cite sources carefully.



 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-10
          Information Reports

Introduction
   • Explain why you are writing.
   • Describe credibility of data methods and
     sources.
   • Provide background.
   • Identify report purpose.
   • Offer a preview of the findings.

Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-11
          Information Reports

Findings
   • Organize chronologically, alphabetically,
     topically, by importance, or by another
     method.
   • Group similar topics together.
   • Use appropriate headings.



Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-12
          Information Reports

Summary
   • May include or omit summary.
   • If included, summarize findings or
     highlight main points.




Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-13
              Progress Reports

• Describe the purpose and nature of an
  unusual or nonroutine project.
• Provide background information if
  necessary.
• Summarize work already completed.
• Describe work currently in progress,
  including personnel, methods, obstacles,
  and attempts to remedy obstacles.
 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-14
              Progress Reports

• Forecast future
  activities in relation
  to the scheduled
  completion date.
• Include
  recommendations
  and requests.


 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-15
Justification/Recommendation
            Reports

• Use direct organization for nonsensitive
  topics and recommendations that will be
  agreeable to readers.
• Identify the problem or the need briefly.
• Announce the recommendation, solution,
  or action concisely and with action verbs.


 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-16
Justification/Recommendation
            Reports

• Present a discussion of pros, cons, and
  costs.
• Explain more fully the benefits of the
  recommendation or steps to be taken to
  solve the problem.
• Conclude with a summary specifying the
  recommendation and action to be taken.
 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-17
             Feasibility Reports

• Prepare a feasibility report when
  examining the practicality and advisability
  of following a course of action.
• Announce your decision immediately.
• Describe the background and problem
  necessitating the proposal.
• Discuss the benefits of the proposal.
 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-18
             Feasibility Reports

• Describe the problems that may result.
• Calculate the costs associated with the
  proposal, if appropriate.
• Show the time frame necessary for
  implementation of the proposal.



 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-19
               Meeting Minutes

• Include name of the group, the date, the
  time, the place, the name of the meeting.
• List names of attendees and absentees.
• Describe disposition of previous minutes.
• Record old business, new business,
  announcements, and reports.
• Include the precise wording of motions.
 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-20
              Meeting Minutes

• Record the vote and
  action taken.
• Conclude with the
  name and signature
  of the individual
  recording the
  minutes.

Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-21
                     Summaries

• Compress data from a longer publication,
  such as a business report, a magazine
  article, or a book chapter.
• Indicate the goal or purpose of the
  document being summarized.
• Highlight the research methods (if
  appropriate), findings, conclusions, and
  recommendations.
 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-22
                     Summaries

• Omit illustrations, examples, and
  references.
• Organize for readability by including
  headings and bulleted or enumerated
  lists.
• Include your reactions or an overall
  evaluation of the document if asked to do
  so.
 Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-23
    Ten Keys to Designing Better
            Documents
•   Analyze your audience.
•   Choose an appropriate type size.
•   Use a consistent type font.
•   Generally, don't justify right margins.
•   Separate paragraphs and sentences
    appropriately.

    Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-24
    Ten Keys to Designing Better
            Documents
•   Design readable headlines.
•   Strive for an attractive page layout.
•   Use graphics and clip art with restraint.
•   Avoid amateurish results.
•   Develop expertise with your software
    program.

    Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-25
                           End


Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 6e   Ch. 9-26 26

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:53
posted:8/23/2011
language:English
pages:26