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LIFE

[ ] buckeye life
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BUCKEYE LIFE

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LIFE

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game day

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game day
Game day is a fan-friendly experience at Ohio State with promotional events such as fan festivals and postgame autograph sessions. Fans are exposed to exceptional athletics on game day, as Ohio State represents one of the nation’s elite in athletic performance.

Buckeye squads are consistently vying for conference and national titles, in addition to producing All-America performers and scholar-athletes.

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LIFE

community
Ohio State student-athletes are community leaders, making an impact, not just on the local landscape, but on a global scale as well. The Ohio State University adheres to the motto, “Do Something Great.” Ohio State student-athletes are passionate about that philosophy, embracing their responsibility as role models. 48

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media [

EXPOSURE

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Ohio State student-athletes are consistently at the center of local, regional and national media coverage.

With the chance to speak to various media outlets, ranging from television to print, student-athletes are presented with the opportunity to act as an ambassador for their respective sport and team, as well as the University.

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LIFE

value city [ ]
ARENA
FROM FIELD OF GRASS TO FIELD OF DREAMS Ground was broken April 2, 1996 for Value City Arena at The Jerome Schottenstein Center and the building opened in November, 1998 - a testament to the vision of The Ohio State University Department of Athletics to provide modern, top-notch facilities for students, student-athletes, coaches, staff, supporters and fans - a commitment to excellence. First and foremost the home of the Ohio State University men’s and women’s basketball teams as well as men’s hockey, the $115 million multipurpose facility also hosts a wide variety of special events, concerts, family shows and touring productions. With no major public funding committed to the project, private support and contributions from alumni and friends were a critical element in the Jerome Schottenstein Center’s funding. Named as the result of a generous $12.8 million lead gift, the Center pays tribute to Jerome Schottenstein, late Columbus businessman, philanthropist and founder of Schottenstein Stores Corp. Additional building “partners” in the truest sense of the phrase include Huntington Banks, after which the venue’s luxurious second level The Huntington Club is named - the result of a $5 million gift; The Kroger Company which pledged $2.5 million to help create The Ohio State University Hall of Fame; and Nationwide Insurance, which contributed $1.5 million toward the venue’s extraordinary terrazzo floorscapes. Over $40 million was raised through naming gifts and private donations from loyal Buckeye supporters. Almost half came from the sale of 4,500 personal seat licenses and leases for the Center’s 54 luxury boxes. Bonds covered remaining costs. Although the University did receive $15 million from the state legislature for 50 an initial design study, no tuition money, student fees or University General Funds were used for the building. Since the opening of the Center, the three Ohio State sports played in this facility, Men’s and Women’s Basketball and Men’s Ice Hockey, have excelled beyond expectations. This year is sure to be no exception. Last year, the Women’s Basketball team ended their season as winners of the Big Ten title. Thad Matta and the Men’s Team also secured the Big Ten Title, won the Big Ten Tournament and went on to a berth in the NCAA Final Four. There is great anticipation as another highly touted recruiting class prepares to take the court for the 2007-08 season. On the ice at the largest collegiate hockey facility in the country, Head Coach John Markell enters his 13th season with the Men’s Ice Hockey squad. He has led the team to their fi rst NCAA appearances in program history, including trips to the national tournament in five of the last ten seasons. This year’s line-up of entertainment events featureseverything from the Monster Truck Nationals to Stars on Ice. The Jerome Schottenstein Center, a nationally renowned sports and entertainment center, continues its tradition of making memories. TICKETS For the latest event information, log on to www.schottensteincenter.com or call 1-800-ARENA-01. Tickets for athletic events and entertainment are available at The Ticket Office, located just inside the southeast rotunda - open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. and 9 a.m.-noon Saturdays, or by calling 1-800-GO-BUCKS. For entertainment events, tickets also are available via Ticketmaster. Charge-by-phone at 614-431-3600 or online at www.ticketmaster.com. Tickets for OSU basketball and hockey can be purchased online at www.ohiostatebuckeyes.com. DIRECTIONS/PARKING Value City Arena is accessible directly off Route 315. Exit at Ackerman and proceed east to designated lots or continue to Olentangy River Road (turn right). The Center features 4,000 on-site parking spaces, with an additional 5,000 available within a 5-7 minute walk. Free shuttles in addition to handicap accessible vans run from the Center’s Buckeye Lots for larger events. Handicap accessible parking is located both directly behind the center and at the Buckeye Lots alongside the van pick up.

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LUXURY SUITES There are 54 suites that encircle the arena bowl at club level. For more information on purchasing or renting a luxury suite, please contact Justin Doyle at 688-5860 or visit www.schottensteincenter.com. HALL OF FAME Sponsored by Kroger, this interactive site highlights the best in Ohio State University Athletics. The 1,370 square foot Hall of Fame contains pictures of all inductees to the Hall of Fame as well as a video presentation on the history of Ohio State Athletics. Fans can see Archie Griffin’s Heisman Trophy (the only player to win two), Jesse Owens’ 1935 Big Ten Championship bronzed shoe (where he set three world records and tied a fourth in a span of 70 minutes), the bronzed 1960 National Championship basketball and the 1997 Rose Bowl trophy. The Hall of Fame also features interactive kiosks containing information about favorite sports, teams and players. But if you stop there you’ll miss the historical time line wrapping the Terrace Level concourse walls - displaying decade-by-decade the rich tradition and history of Ohio State Athletics. Guests can frequently be seen discovering favorite athletes or sports moments depicted on artistic pictorials ringing the entry-level concourse. MERCHANDISE STORE The “Official Team Shop” is located at Section 131 on the entry-level concourse. The Team Shop features the latest in Buckeye apparel, gift ideas and accessories. Merchandise also is available online at www.hangonsloopy.com. FRED TAYLOR ROOM Located just inside the Northeast Rotunda the Fred Taylor Room was the result of a generous donation from many of the players who played under Coach Taylor at Ohio State. As basketball coach from 1959-1976, Taylor earned a record 297 wins and seven Big Ten championships. Five teams earned NCAA berths and four teams advanced to the Final Four (1960 - National Champions, ’61, ’62 and ’68). A Buckeye tree on the wall bears the names of all the men who played for him. TOURS/MEETING SPACE Check on availability of tours and meeting space by calling 614-688-3939.

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• 17,500/ 18,500/ 21,000: Maximum capacities for ice hockey, basketball and concerts respectively • 700,000+: Total square footage of the Center • A million: average number of visitors annually • 4 ½ hours: approximately how long it takes for Value City Arena to be converted from hockey to basketball configuration • 3 ½ hours: approximately how long it takes to convert from basketball to hockey configuration • 2 ½ hours: A record set for the double-header on February 2, 2002 when the arena switched from Men’s Basketball vs. Northwestern to Men’s Ice Hockey vs. Michigan State

WHAT IS TERRAZZO? A unique feature of the Center is the terrazzo (a composite of marble or stone chips set in mortar and polished) floor anchored by six “Larger than Life” floorscapes that earned artist Alexis Smith the “Job of the Century” Award from the National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association. Images were selected from photographs in the University archives. 8,350 gallons of epoxy were used to secure over 5 miles of 1/16” zinc wire strips painstakingly bent by hand and placed over the drawn lines. Color numbers were marked in each section (paint-by-number style). 115 tons of aggregates (stones, mother of pearl, glass, etc…) were prepared in shades mixed according to the exact specifications of the artist. The floor around the hockey player contains a high percentage of Mother-of-Pearl chips that cause it to sparkle like ice. The floors were ground down three to five times to bring out the color. A diamond polish was added and the floors were sealed and polished. Each rotunda took about six weeks to complete. The John Havelicek floorscape, located in the Southwest entry just outside the Center’s auxiliary gymnasium, features the only pieces of non-scarlet and gray (blue) terrazzo to represent the opponent’s jersey. The basketball in John Havlicek’s hand is approximately 13 feet in diameter. Havlicek was a starter from 1960-1962. He accumulated a record of 78-6, played in three-consecutive Final Fours, the 1960 National Championship team and was a 1962 All-American. After his career with The Ohio State University, he played for the Boston Celtics and eventually entered the NBA Hall of Fame. The 1916 Women’s Basketball Club terrazzo floorscape, located in the Southeast rotunda spotlights the uniform styles of the early 1900’s. Women’s basketball became a varsity sport in 1965. The Averill Roberts (1990-93) terrazzo pays tribute to a player that helped take the women’s team to the 1993 Final Four. The hockey terrazzo located in the Northwest rotunda is the only floorscape that faces out toward the exterior doors rather than into the arena. The stick and puck extend down the escalator hallway. The player’s face is Benji Wolke (1998), the stick depicted belongs to Perry Pooley (1984 All-American and 1984 Academic All-American) and the body is a composite of several players from the 1980-1982 teams. Men’s Ice Hockey became a varsity sport in 1963-1964; it advanced to the NCAA Frozen Four in 1998. The inclusion of basketball and hockey in the Schottenstein Center terazzo floorscapes seems logical, but why baseball? Baseball was the FIRST varsity sport at The Ohio State University - the image depicted in the Northeast rotunda of the 1890 baseball team actually features Buckeye basketball coach Fred Taylor, who played first base for the Buckeyes and became Ohio State’s first All-American baseball player in 1950.

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LIFE

[TRAINING ROOM & WEIGHT ROOM]

value city arena

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[NEW PRACTICE FACILITY]

value city arena
The next transcendent chapter for the men’s and women’s basketball programs is a state-of-the art practice facility which is scheduled for completion in Autumn 2010. The new complex will be more than 40,000 square feet and will house 22 staff members. Once completed, the facility will be the only one of its kind in the country with two separate, dedicated practice gyms for each team. This new facility will transform the opportunities for collaboration, team development, and communication among coaches and student-athletes. elements of the new facility: • Four practice floors with spectator seating • Grand Lobby celebrating the history and accomplishments of Ohio State Basketball • Training/rehabilitation rooms for both men’s and women’s teams • Teaching theaters for both teams • Private corridor to locker rooms and strength and conditioning areas • Two team offices suites, including the head coach office, assistant coach offices, large reception area, conference rooms, work areas and break rooms • Balcony area overlooking each practice gym • Video edit and storage space

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posted:7/30/2009
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