Johnson County Waste Reduction and Recycling Guide by yaofenjin

VIEWS: 10 PAGES: 32

									Johnson County Waste Reduction
and Recycling Guide

       Reduce.
       Reuse.
       Recycle.
       Compost.
       Buy recycled.




Iowa City Landfill and Recycling Center
3900 Hebl Avenue SW
Iowa City, IA 52240
319-356-5185
2008
Thanks for checking out the Johnson County Waste Reduction
and Recycling Guide. Besides useful information about recycling
options in Iowa City, Johnson County, and the communities of
Riverside and Kalona, this guide contains helpful information
about other waste disposal policies and services available at
the Iowa City Landfill and Recycling Center. If you have any
questions, please feel free to check out the landfill link on the
World Wide Web at www.icgov.org/landfill, call the landfill at 319-
356-5185, or call the recycling coordinator at 319-887-6160.

Specific questions about Iowa City curbside collection of
trash, recycling, and yardwaste may be directed to the Refuse
Department at 319-356-5180, or see http://www.icgov.org/garbage/
index.htm.

Individual communities in Johnson County may also have websites
with specific collection information for your community.

   http://www.coralville.org
   http://www.north-liberty.com
   http://www.solon-iowa.com
   http://www.hills-ia.org/
   http://www.tiffinia.net/
   http://www.university-heights.org/
   http://www.swisheria.org/
   http://www.lonetreeiowa.com/
   http://www.kalonaiowa.org/

Johnson County Refuse, Inc., owned by Steve and Kandy Smith,
can also provide information about recycling and refuse collection
in many small communities in Johnson County. http://www.
johnsoncountyrefuse.com/index.html or 319-665-4498.

                                                                     1
Table of Contents
Iowa City Landfill & Recycling Center Location and Hours .................5
Items Accepted at the Iowa City Landfill and Recycling Center ............6
Available Products ..................................................................................6
Johnson County Solid Waste Management Activities ...........................7
Landfill Reduction Goals ........................................................................8
Landfill bans set by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources............8
Amount and Composition of Garbage in Johnson County ....................9
Why does waste reduction, reuse, and recycling matter? ....................10
REDUCE… ......................................................................................... 11
REUSE… ............................................................................................12
RECYCLE… ........................................................................................13
CLOSE THE LOOP…buy recycled! ..................................................13
Waste Reduction and Recycling in Iowa City ......................................14
Off-site services ....................................................................................14
East Side Recycling Center...................................................................15
Johnson County drop-site recycling locations ......................................16
Other Services associated with the Landfill & Recycling Center .........17
     Salvage Barn
     Furniture Project
     ReStore
Household Hazardous Waste ................................................................19
     What is Household Hazardous Waste? ...........................................19
How to use the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility.........20
     Other HHW Services ......................................................................20
Acceptable Items...................................................................................21
     Prescription Medications ................................................................22
     Sharps and Non-Infectious Medical Waste ....................................22
Recipes for Alternative Cleaning Solutions ..........................................23
Reducing hazardous waste from home gardening ................................25
Home Composting ................................................................................26
Vermicomposting ..................................................................................27
Illegal Waste Dumping..........................................................................28
Other Recycling Options.......................................................................29
Eliminate Junk Mail ..............................................................................33




                                                                                                           3
                                            inclement weather or high winds.
                                            NOTE: the landfill will close in the event of a
                                            not given in this case.
Iowa City Landfill & Recycling Center Location and
Hours
3900 Hebl Avenue SW
2 miles west of Iowa City on Melrose
Avenue (County Road F-46)
Phone: 319-356-5185
Fax: 319-356-5186
www.icgov.org/landfill

Hours:
7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
                                            Not sure what to do when you get to the La
through Saturday                            If you’re visiting the Landfill & Recycling Ce
Closed on all major holidays.               the scale and when it’s your turn, pull up to th
At the discretion of landfill staff, the landfill may close on days with
                                            ask any questions you might have. The scalem
                                             winds.
exceptionally inclement weather or highdifferent materials.
NOTE: the landfill will close in the event of a tornado warning;
notification of closure is not given in this case.
                                            Landfill service area

Not sure what to do when you get            Johnson County
to the Landfill?                            City of Kalona
                                            City of Riverside
If you’re visiting the Landfill &           No waste will be accepted from outside this se
Recycling Center for the first time,        from other DNR-approved comprehensive pla
just join the line for the scale and        All wastes produced in this service must be di
when it’s your turn, pull up to the         Recycling Center (ICLF) unless written autho
silver silo to talk to the scalemaster      DNR-approved comprehensive plan areas has
and ask any questions you might have. The scalemaster will direct you
where you go with different materials.

Landfill service area
Johnson County
City of Kalona
City of Riverside
No waste will be accepted from outside this service area unless written
authorization from other DNR-approved comprehensive plan areas has
been received in advance.
All wastes produced in this service area must be disposed of at the Iowa
City Landfill & Recycling Center (ICLF) unless written authorization
from ICLF and the destination DNR-approved comprehensive plan areas
has been received in advance.

                                                                                5
Items Accepted at the Iowa City Landfill and Recycling Center
(as of January 1, 2007)
Trash disposal:
$38.50 per ton (Iowa City residents)
    Minimum: $3 for any load less than 140 pounds
    (approximately $0.50 for each additional 20 pounds over
    140 pounds)
$43.50 per ton (Non-Iowa City residents)
    Minimum: $3.25 for any load less than 140 pounds

Other disposal or recycling:
Appliances                 $12.50 per appliance
                           $1 per cubic foot for large commercial appliances
                           $30 per crushed appliance
Asbestos—Friable           City: $100 per cubic yard
                           County: $105 per cubic yard
                           $100 minimum
Asbestos—Non-friable City: $100 per ton
                           County: $105 per ton
                           $100 minimum
Compostable materials      $24 per ton for commercial haulers or businesses
                           $2 minimum for untreated lumber
Contaminated soil          $15 per ton ($150 minimum)
Electronic waste           $5.00 per computer or TV with 18” screen or
                           smaller
                           $10.00 per computer or TV with larger than 18”
                           screen
                           $0.25/lb. bulk e-waste (including monitors)
                           *$2.00 minimum: miscellaneous without a monitor
Tires                      $0.07 per pound OR ($3 minimum)
Wood Waste                 $24 per ton must be clean and untreated ($2
                           minimum)

Free disposal for residents
Yard waste
Recycling: paper, glass, metal, plastic, cardboard
Scrap iron
Used oil
Household hazardous waste: by appointment only

Available Products
Bulk compost             $10 per ton; minimum charge $1 (200 lb.)
Bulk wood chip mulch     no charge; customer may need to load your own
Paints, cleaners, etc.   no charge; located at Swap Shop

6
    Johnson County Solid Waste Management Activities


    City         Hauler                    Garbage                              Recycling                      Yard Waste
    Coralville   City of Coralville        $10 per month AND                    included in garbage rates      $1 sticker for 33-gallon bag OR
                                           $1 sticker for 33-gallon bag OR                                     $20 annual sticker
                                           up to $45 for annual sticker
    Hills        Johnson County Refuse     $0.50 sticker for 15-gallon bag OR   $8.50/month on sewer bill      $1.25 sticker for 33-gallon bag
                                           $1 sticker per 33 gallon bag
    Iowa City    City of Iowa City         $9.90 per month (2 cans/week)        $3.10/month on utility bill    $1 sticker for 33-gallon bag OR
                                           $1 sticker for each add'l bag                                       $20 annual sticker
    Lone Tree    Johnson County Refuse     $1 sticker for 20-gallon bag         $4.50/month on utility bill    City contracts service
                                           larger bags require 2 stickers
    North
    Liberty      Johnson County Refuse     $0.95 sticker for 20-gallon bag      $4.05/month on utility bill    $1 sticker for 40-gallon bag
                                           larger bags require 2 stickers
    Oxford       Johnson County Refuse     $9.00 per month on utility bill      included in garbage rates      $1.25 sticker for 33-gallon bag
    Shueyville   individually contracted   varies by hauler                     varies by hauler               varies by hauler
    Solon        Johnson County Refuse     $1 sticker for 20-gallon bag         $4.50/month on utility bill    $1 sticker per bag
                                           larger bags require 2 stickers
    Swisher      Johnson County Refuse     $9.35/month for 1 container/week     included in garbage rates      $1.25 sticker for 33-gallon bag
                                           larger bags require 2 stickers                                      City picks up branches for no charge
    Tiffin       Johnson County Refuse     $1 sticker for 20-gallon bag         $4.20/ month on utility bill
                                           (50 lb. limit)
                                           larger bags require 2 stickers
    U. Heights   Johnson County Refuse     $1 sticker for 20-gallon bag OR      no fee for residents (paid     $1.25 sticker per 39-gallon bag
                                           (larger bags require 2 stickers)     for by City of U.H.)           No charge:
                                           $52 annual sticker for can                                          1 bundle brush/week
                                                                                                               2 day leaf pick-up in fall
                                                                                                               2 day Christmas tree pick up in
                                                                                                               January




7
Landfill Reduction Goals
Iowa’s Waste Reduction and Recycling Act of 1989 provided for the
prohibition of yard waste, oil, lead acid batteries, and tires from landfills.
It also established solid waste reduction goals of 25% by July 1, 1994,
and 50% by July 1, 2000. The waste reduction goals are based on the
amount of solid waste entering the landfill as of July 1, 1988. Since this
date the Iowa City Landfill has reduced its waste by approximately 35%,
meeting the 1994 goal. We continue to work towards the goal of 50%
and beyond.

Landfill bans set by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources
Appliances
Lead acid batteries (auto)
Oil
Tires
Yard waste

The ICLF takes these materials but does not landfill them. Recycling or
proper disposal options exist for each material. Citizens may bring ap-
pliances, batteries, oil, tires, and yard waste for disposal at any time; the
scalemaster will direct you where each item goes.

Special Wastes, including asbestos-containing materials and petro-
   leum-contaminated soil

Please call at least ONE WORKING DAY in advance if you have special
waste, including asbestos-containing materials and petroleum-contami-
nated soil for procedures and information.




8
   Amount and Composition of Garbage in Johnson County
  In 2006, the Iowa City Landfill took in 123,966.48 tons of trash. Based
Page 9 (in place of “estimated tons of material landfill in 2005…”)
  on the 2005 Department of Natural Resource’s statewide characterization
  of waste, the following breakdown is a good estimate of amounts of each
  type of waste.




   Some waste highlights:

              new Paper products, including tons of recyclable paper
(page 14: all33% text, new graph)
                  and unwaxed cardboard, City
Waste Reduction and Recycling in Iowa make up a full one-third of
                      materials going into the Iowa City Landfill.
In 2006, the City of Iowa City recycled approximately 2,027.5 tons of materia
              15% Plastics make up 15% of the waste stream. Much of
                      and 16,890 tons of material are recyclable.
curb-side collection thesenumerous drop-off sites located around the communit
(excluding the privately-owned City Carton site). For a list of the drop-off site
              11% Institutions such as schools and nursing homes,
16. Following is a monthly breakdown of recycling in Iowa City.
                      grocery stores, restaurants, and homes contribute
                      12,000 tons of food waste annually to the landfill.
                      With few exceptions, this material is compostable.
                          2006 Iowa City Recycling
                 8%   While some wood is treated with chemicals that make
           200        it unsafe to burn, much of the 9,068 tons of wood the
                      landfill receives each year could be used as fuel or
           150        ground for mulch.
  onnage




                                                                     DROP SITES
           100                                                                9
                                                                     CURBSIDE
Why does waste reduction, reuse, and recycling matter?
•    Waste reduction, recycling, and composting save landfill space.
     Every ton of material recycled saves landfill space, valued at
     approximately $25 per cubic yard. Each time a new area of the
     landfill, called a “cell,” is excavated and lined to receive waste, it
     costs millions of dollars. Saving space delays new cells, therefore
     saving money for the City and you.

•    Save yourself money…if everyone were allowed to have unlimited
     trash picked up at the curb, the City would have to charge much
     more for trash collection and disposal.

•    Most of the materials we throw away are recyclable. So, we pay to
     purchase these materials, then we pay to throw them away.

•    Keeping materials in the “loop” by recycling means less excavation
     of new “virgin” materials such as ore for metals, bauxite for
     aluminum, trees for paper, and petroleum for plastics. This means
     less environmental degradation and energy use for excavation and
     processing; using less energy results in less global climate change.

•    Global climate change. Keeping materials out of the landfill reduces
     methane, a greenhouse gas 21 times stronger than carbon dioxide.
     Methane is produced as materials break down in oxygen-depleted
     environments, such as in the landfill. Less trash means less methane
     to contribute to global climate change.


So what can you do to help? Where are the recycling facilities nearest
you? What else can you do?

Read on…




10
REDUCE…
Waste reduction is the BEST way to keep materials out of the landfill,
keep the environment intact, and keep money in your pocket! Reduce or
eliminate the need to deal with waste by working to incorporate the fol-
lowing habits into your routine.

•   Use alternative cleaning solutions instead of chemicals (see pages
    23-24 for more information and recipes for alternatives)
•   Use tote bags at the store to reduce the use of disposable plastic or
    paper bags.
•   Purchase reusable items over disposable items:
	   m	   Plates, cups, and cutlery at home and work
    m	   Diapers
	   m	   Napkins
	   m	   Refill packets
•   Buy in bulk to avoid excess packaging (definitely avoid single-
    serving packaging!).
•   For special occasions, give one or two meaningful gifts instead of a
    host of things no one will use or play with.
•   Eliminate junk mail (see page 33 for more information!)




                                                                            11
REUSE…
Reusing and sharing items with others to reuse can keep tons of durable
goods out of the waste stream.

•    Use comics or material scraps to wrap gifts instead of purchasing
     wrapping paper (most of which cannot be recycled) or save gift bags
     to use next year.
•    Use rechargeable batteries.
•    Use both sides of paper (then recycle or compost it!).
•    Use a regular coffee cup or travel mug at work or school.
•    Reuse jars or coffee cans as storage containers for sewing supplies,
     board game pieces, nuts and bolts, etc.
•    Try your hand at crafts by making things out of material scraps.
     “Crazy quilts” made from odd-shaped pieces of material can be a
     great family project.
•    Visit the Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity ReStore to purchase
     reusable building materials, used appliances, and many other great
     finds! See page 18.
•    Visit the Salvage Barn to purchase reusable and historical building
     materials. See page 17.




12
RECYCLE…
Recycling can keep materials out of the landfill, conserve valuable
natural resources, and save the energy it would take to excavate and
process new resources.

•   Use City curb-side collection services or drop-off sites around town.
•   Take scrap metal to the Iowa City Landfill & Recycling Center or
    contact a scrap metal dealer.
•   Encourage friends and neighbors to recycle.
•   Take unwanted clothing and housewares to second-hand stores.
•   Organize a neighborhood garage sale.
•   Donate unwanted furniture to the Furniture Project. See page 17.
•   Donate historically significant building materials to the Salvage
    Barn. See page 17.
•   Donate reusable appliances and building materials to the ReStore.
    See page 18.




CLOSE THE LOOP…
buy recycled!
•   Purchase items that have high post-consumer recycled content
    (this means that the materials in the item have been reprocessed
    from other materials, such as those collected curbside in many
    communities across the country).
•   Buy recycled paper towels, Kleenex, and bathroom tissue.
•   Check out second-hand shops, garage sales, the ReStore, and the
    Salvage Barn!
•   Buy items that are not over-packaged.




                                                                        13
Waste Reduction and Recycling in Iowa City
In 2006, the City of Iowa City recycled approximately 2,027.5 tons of
        (page 14: all new text, new graph)
materials using curb-side collection and numerous drop-off sites located
        Waste Reduction and Recycling in Iowa City
around the community (excluding the privately-owned City Carton site).
        In 2006, the City of Iowa City recycled 16.
For a list of the drop-off sites, see pageapproximately 2,027.5 tons of materials using
       curb-side collection and numerous drop-off sites located around the community,
       (excluding the privately-owned City Carton site). For a list of the drop-off sites, see page
       16. Following is a monthly breakdown recycling in Iowa City.
Following is a monthly breakfodwn of of recycling in Iowa City.

                                              2006 Iowa City Recycling

                      200

                      150
            Tonnage




                                                                                                       DROP SITES
                      100
                                                                                                       CURBSIDE
                      50

                       0
                                                                                           Nov
                            Jan




                                                          June

                                                                 July
                                        Mar
                                              Apr
                                  Feb




                                                                        Aug
                                                                              Sept
                                                                                     Oct
                                                    May




                                                                                                 Dec

                                                          Month




Off-site services
Special events recycling
   The ICLF offers the use of
   recycling containers for special
   events. Please call the recycling
   coordinator for more information at 319-887-6160.
Household Hazardous Waste mobile collection events
   The ICLF offers mobile collection events for neighborhoods and
   surrounding communities. A two-month planning time is required.
   Please call the recycling coordinator at 887-6160 for more details or
   to plan a mobile event.
CESQG mobile collections
   The ICLF offers mobile collection events for qualifying small
   businesses in Johnson County, Kalona, and Riverside. Please call the
   landfill at 319-356-5185 for more information.
Education: waste reduction and recycling
   Please call the recycling coordinator at 319-887-6160 to arrange for
   waste reduction and recycling education presentations.

14
and recycle materials and
ill also use the space to
           local non-profit
t severalEast Side Recycling Center
        http://www.icgov.org/garbage/eastside.htm
e cardboard,
         The East Side Recycling Center, located at 2401 Scott Blvd. SE, was
7 plastic (except
         purchased by the City of Iowa City in 2006 to provide a site for citizens
         to reuse hosts the
s). The site alsoand recycle materials and to learn about waste- and stormwater-
        related issues. The City will also use the space to display urban
        stormwater best management practices and to host several local non-
        profit agencies that play a role in waste reduction in the community.
uilding,Currently, a recycling drop site is available. Anyone may recycle
         an oil waste
        cardboard,wood
for compost and paper/newspaper/magazines, brown/green glass, clear glass,
        #1-7 plastic (except Styrofoam and plastic bags), and metal (steel
        and aluminum cans). The site also hosts the Iowa Valley Habitat for
        Humanity’s ReStore (see page 18).

        Future Plans for Development
        The site will eventually offer a green environmental education building,
        an oil waste drop-off site, an electronic waste drop-off site, a pick-
        up station for compost and wood chips, the Furniture Project and the
        Salvage Barn.




                                                                                   15
Johnson County drop-site recycling
locations:
24-hour drop-off sites
Iowa City Landfill & Recycling Center,
3900 Hebl Avenue SW, Iowa City
   Newspaper/mixed paper/magazines
   Cardboard
   Glass (clear, brown and green)
   #1-#7 plastics
   Scrap metal
East Side Recycling Center, 2401 Scott Blvd. SE, Iowa City
    Newspaper/mixed paper/magazines
    Cardboard
    Glass (clear, brown and green)
    #1-#7 plastics
    Metal/tin cans
Hy-Vee, 1201 N. Dodge, Iowa City
   Newspaper/mixed paper/magazines
   Cardboard
   Glass (clear, brown and green)
   #1-#7 plastics
   Metal/tin cans
Hy-Vee Drugstore, at Rochester and 301 N. 1st Avenue, Iowa City
   Newspaper/mixed paper/magazines
   Cardboard
   #1-#7 plastics
Eastdale Plaza, 1st Ave. & Lower Muscatine, Iowa City
    Newspaper/mixed paper/magazines
    #1-#7 plastics
City Carton Recycling, Inc., 3 E. Benton, Iowa City
    Newspaper
    Mixed paper
    Cardboard, chipboard
    Glass (clear, brown and green)
    #1-#7 plastics
    Telephone books
    Magazines


16
Other Services associated with the Iowa City Landfill
& Recycling Center
Salvage Barn
351-1875
http://www.ic-fhp.org/salvagebarn.html
email: salvagebarn@ic-fhp.org.
Hours:
April through October: 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., each Saturday
November through March: 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., first and third
Saturdays of the month

The Salvage Barn is a project of the non-profit organization Friends of
Historic Preservation. The Salvage Barn sells salvaged architectural
materials ranging from hardware to staircases to clawfoot bathtubs! It is
located at the Iowa City Landfill & Recycling Center. See the website or
call for more information.

Furniture Project
358-6800
http://www.icgov.org/garbage/furnitureproject.htm

The Furniture Project is a program that collects and places good used
furniture, such as beds, dressers, tables and chairs, in local households
in need at no cost. The program is managed by Successful Living, a
local non-profit agency, and sponsored by the Iowa City Landfill and
Recycling Center. Charitable tax receipts are available for donations.

If you’d like to donate items to the Furniture Project, you may do one of
the following:
1. Call the Furniture Project/Successful Living to make an appointment
   to drop off furniture.
2. Call Furniture Project/Successful Living to schedule a pick-up
   service for donated furniture. An appointment is needed and the cost
   is $10.00.
3. Take donated furniture to the Iowa City Landfill and Recycling
   Center. If you wish assistance in unloading, or, would like a
   charitable tax receipt, be sure to come to the Landfill before 3:00
   PM. The regular landfill fee is waived for any furniture delivered for
   the Furniture Project.

                                                                            17
         City of Iowa City in 2006 to provide a site for citizens to reuse a
         to learn about waste- and stormwater-related issues. The City wi
ReStore display urban stormwater best management practices and to host
338-5687 agencies that play a role in waste reduction in the community.
http://www.ivhfh.org/restore/index.php
            Currently, a recycling drop site is available. Anyone may recycle
2401 Scott Blvd. SE, Iowa City
            paper/newspaper/magazines, brown/green glass, clear glass, #1-7
Sales hours: 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Thursday-Friday-Saturday
            Styrofoam and plastic bags), and metal (steel and aluminum cans
Donations hours: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday
           Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore (see page 18).
Visit the ReStore to find great bargains on donated new and used building
            Future Plans for Development
materials. Proceeds benefit the Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity’s
            The site will Johnson, Cedar, a green Counties.
home-building projects in eventually offerand Iowa environmental education bu
            drop-off site, an See the website for a list of what the
Donations are tax deductible. electronic waste drop-off site, a pick-up station
ReStore is currently accepting. Project and the Salvage Barn.
            chips, the Furniture



           Photo for page 18




18
Household Hazardous Waste
The Household Hazard Waste Regional Collection Center is located
at the Iowa City Landfill & Recycling Center. See the following
information on the web: www.icgov.org/documents/ichhmbroc.pdf

Make your home safer…
Proper disposal of household hazardous materials is important to the
safety of your home, as well as the environment. Reduce the risk of
poisonings, fires, and toxic chemical fumes by getting rid of unused or
unnecessary chemicals from your home. The collection facility accepts
items usually found in your basement and garage or under the kitchen
sink.

What is Household Hazardous Waste?
Many products used in homes contain hazardous materials. Improper
disposal of these products may result in injury to people, pets, or
wildlife; cause fires; or contaminate groundwater. Products are
considered hazardous when they contain one or more of the following
characteristics:
• Toxic – able to cause severe injury or death when inhaled, ingested
    or absorbed through the skin. Examples include mothballs and
    pesticides.
• Corrosive – capable of burning or destroying living tissue or material
    by a chemical reaction. Examples include bleach, drain cleaner,
    oven cleaner, and pool chemicals.
• Reactive – capable of exploding when exposed to heat, sudden
    shock, pressure, or incompatible substances. An example is a mixture
    of chlorine bleach and ammonia.
• Combustible – capable of being easily set on fire. Examples include
    thinner, nail polish, and aerosol products. Most problems associated
    with the use, storage, and disposal of a household hazardous material
    can be avoided by following these steps:
    m Read the label before you buy the item. Look for safer, non-
        toxic alternatives and avoid labels with words like DANGER,
        WARNING, and CAUTION.
    m Buy only the amount you need. Use the product according to
        label directions and completely use it up. Give unused portions to
        someone who can use it.
    m Store the item properly. Keep items in their original, labeled
        containers and store away from children and pets.
    m Dispose of hazardous products safely by calling the Household
        Hazardous Waste Collection Facility at the Iowa City Landfill &
        Recycling Center at 356-5185 to make an appointment.


                                                                          19
How to use the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility:
The facility accepts hazardous materials free of charge from both urban
and rural residents of Johnson County. Residents of the communities of
Kalona and Riverside are also eligible to use the facility at no cost. The
facility is open by appointment only. Follow these steps:

•    Take a quick inventory of items you want to dispose.
•    Call the landfill office at 356-5185 (M-Sa, 7:00-4:30) to make an
     appointment.
•    Appointments are scheduled Tuesdays, Thursdays or Saturdays, 7
     a.m. to 1 p.m.
•    Keep items in original containers; never mix materials together.
•    Label unmarked containers.
•    Transport materials in sturdy, leak-proof containers, preferably in the
     trunk or truck bed. Cushion glass or breakable containers.
•    Arrive at your appointment on time, pull up to the collection facility,
     and remain in your vehicle.
•    Landfill staff will be ready to serve you.
•    Fill out the short survey.

THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR THIS SERVICE.


Other HHW Services
Landfill staff is available to schedule HHW mobile collection events
for groups such as neighborhood associations, Scout troops, church
or community groups, and communities or subdivisions in Johnson
County. Please call the recycling coordinator at 319-887-6160 for more
information regarding HHW mobile collection events.

Small businesses may call the Landfill at 356-5185 for more information
about using the HHW collection facility or to discuss mobile collections.




20
Acceptable Items:
Hazardous products can be found throughout the home. Look in the
kitchen, bathroom, basement, and garage for the following items:

Bathroom                      Kitchen                    Lawn/Garden
toilet bowl cleaner         floor care products          weed killer
mildew remover              furniture polish             pesticides
abrasive cleaners           metal polish                 bug spray
disinfectant                oven cleaner                 fertilizer
hair remover                stain remover
prescription medications    drain cleaner
sharps (see page 20)
non-infectious medical waste (see page 20)


Workshop                 Garage                    Miscellaneous
paint                    brake fluid               photo developers
adhesives                transmission fluid        pool chemicals
glue                     engine degreaser          shoe polish
resin                    battery acid              art supply chemicals
solvents                 lighter fluid             moth balls
strippers                kerosene                  nail polish and remover
varnishes, stains        gasoline                  syringes
thinners                                           re-chargeable batteries

Dispose of empty containers (fuel, pesticide, paint) and non-hazardous
wastes as trash.

Items NOT Accepted
There are a few materials the collection facility cannot accept:
Propane cylinders
Ammunition and explosives
Radioactive materials
Infectious medical waste
Fire extinguishers

Call 319-356-5185; Landfill staff will help you find a place to dispose of
these items.



                                                                         21
Prescription Medications
Expired or unused medications may be disposed of with household
hazardous waste by calling the Household Hazardous Waste Collection
Facility at the Iowa City Landfill & Recycling Center at 356-5185 to
make an appointment.

Sharps and Non-Infectious Medical Waste
Americans use over one billion sharp objects in their homes. If not
disposed of in puncture-resistant containers, they pose a risk to trash
handlers and to the environment. To help prevent injury, illness, and
pollution, please follow these steps when disposing of sharp objects.
Place:
• Needles
• Syringes
• Lancets and other sharp objects
in a hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly secure
lid. The container should be clearly marked, puncture resistant, and
leakproof. Usable containers include coffee cans with reinforced or
taped lids, commercial sharps containers, or plastic detergent bottles
with screw caps. Contact your local pharmacy for a commercial sharps
container.

Sharps may be disposed of as household hazardous waste by calling the
Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility at the Iowa City Landfill
& Recycling Center at 356-5185 to make an appointment.

Please place non-infectious medical waste, such as:
• Soiled bandages
• Disposable sheets
• Medical gloves
in securely fastened plastic bags before you put them in the garbage can
with other trash.




22
Recipes for Alternative Cleaning Solutions
Air Freshener
•   Leave open boxes of baking soda in refrigerators, closets and
    bathrooms.
•   Open doors and windows for good ventilation. Use stove fan when
    cooking.
•   Use flowers, herbs and spices to add subtle fragrances to indoor air.

All-Purpose Household Cleaner
1 quart warm water        1 tsp. liquid soap
1 tsp. borax              squeeze of lemon or splash of vinegar
This solution can be used for a multitude of cleaning jobs including
countertops, floors, walls, rugs and upholstery.

Degreaser (engine and tool)
Use a water-based cleaner in place of kerosene, turpentine or commercial
degreaser.

Degreaser (kitchen)
Use a non-chlorinated scouring powder with abrasive scouring pad or fine
steel wool.

Disinfectant
Use ½ cup borax in 1gallon hot water. To inhibit mold and mildew, do
not rinse off borax solution.

Drain Opener
½ cup baking soda      1 cup vinegar            boiling water
Dissolve baking soda and vinegar in boiling water, and pour the solution
down the drain. Continue to flush with hot tap water until the clog
breaks.

Floor Cleaner
VINYL: ½ cup vinegar or ¼ cup borax with 1 gallon water. Polish with
club soda.
WOOD: damp mop with mild vegetable oil soap.

Furniture Polish
Use mineral oil or mixture of 2 Tbsp olive oil, 1 Tbsp white vinegar and 1
qt. warm water; apply and wipe dry.
Glass Cleaner
¼ cup vinegar in 1 quart warm water. (Do not use this as a windshield
wiper solution as it may damage the pump - use plain water for this
purpose.)
                                                                            23
Insect Repellent
ANTS: wash counter, floors, etc., with a mixture of ½ vinegar and ½ water. You
can also grow pennyroyal, southernwood or tansy around your home.
FLEAS & TICKS: add 1 tsp. vinegar to 1 quart water per 40 lbs. pet weight to
bathe pet.
MOSQUITOES: plant tansy or basil around your yard. Burn citronella candles
or wear citronella. Encourage natural predators such as dragonflies.
Mildew Cleaner
Scrub with baking soda or borax; for extended mold inhibition, do not rinse off.
Oven Cleaner
•    Scrub with 2 tbsp. or more of baking soda or borax in 1 gallon water, using
     very fine steel wool. Wear gloves. For very baked-on spots, try scrubbing
     with pumice (available at hardware stores).
•    As a last resort, use a non-aerosol oven cleaner that says “no caustic fumes”
     and “no lye.”
Rug and Upholstery Cleaner
Use the All-Purpose Household Cleaner.
Scouring Powder
Use baking soda or a non-chlorinated commercial scouring powder.
Spot Removers
ALL PURPOSE: Mix ¼ cup borax in 2 cups cold water; soak stain, wash as
usual.
BLOOD: pour 3% hydrogen peroxide solution directly on stain, rinse with water,
wash
INK: Apply a paste of lemon juice and cream of tartar; allow it to dry, wash as
usual.
Stain Removers
RUST: scrub with lemon juice mixed with salt
GRASS: scrub with 70% isopropyl alcohol and wash thoroughly
BLOOD: sponge immediately with cold water or club soda.
CHOCOLATE: before washing, soak in club soda, rub shortening into stain, and
wash as usual. Apply milk to stain to keep it from setting.
PERSPIRATION: sponge stains with white vinegar or lemon juice; or soak in
water with two dissolved aspirins.
STAINLESS STEEL SINKS: rub with olive oil to remove streaks
Toilet Bowl Cleaner
Scrub with baking soda or mild detergent.
Tub/Tile Cleaner
Use scouring powder or baking soda.
WARNING: Borax is the most caustic of the cleaners on this list. Store it with
special care in cabinets out of the reach of children and use it well diluted.
Latex gloves are advisable.
24
Reducing hazardous waste from home gardening
Studies have shown that synthetic pesticides, herbicides, and
fertilizers are a significant source of hazardous waste from
households. You can reduce the amounts of these chemicals
on your lawn by using organic gardening techniques. Organic
gardening methods include:
• using natural predators and other biological controls
• planting pest-resistant, climate-friendly and native species
• using natural fertilizer
• using least-toxic pesticides selectively and only when
    necessary

Check the internet or your local library for sources with valuable
information on synthetic chemical free gardening.




                                                                     25
Home Composting
What is compost?
Compost is organic material broken down through the decay of plant or
vegetable matter such as that from kitchen scraps and grass clippings. It
improves the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil and can
be used as a soil amendment in flower beds, vegetable gardens, around new
trees or shrubs, or for starting seeds. Compost also helps conserve moisture,
prevents erosion and reduces weed growth.
How do I make compost?
1. First you need a compost bin. It can be made from snow fence, woven
   wire, blocks of brick, pallets, or even from a barrel with the bottom cut
   out and holes in the side for circulation.
2. Aim for a carbon to nitrogen ratio of 25 to 1. For a carbon source, add
   6 inches of leaves, shredded cardboard, or other woody materials. To
   speed decomposition, chop or shred the materials.
3. Add water until the materials are saturated.
4. For a nitrogen source, add 2-3 inches of grass clippings, vegetable
   scraps, garden waste, or manure.
5. To ensure rapid bacteria multiplication, mix the 2 layers. Then cover it
   with 2 inches of dirt. This adds microorganisms and controls odors.
6. Repeat the layering/watering process until pile is 4 feet high.
7. Mix /turn the pile weekly and periodically sprinkle it with water to keep
   it moist. Within 3-6 months the compost pile is ready to use.
8. You may want to have several piles going at once ensure compost is
   ready when you need it.
Compostable materials
         Brown (carbon) Green (nitrogen)
         wood chips                 grass clippings
         sawdust                    garden trimmings
         dried leaves               fresh hay
         chopped cornstalks         kitchen scraps
         shredded cardboard         vegetable trimmings
         straw                      tea bags, coffee grounds
NOTE: Composting meat, fats, oils, greases, or dairy products may attract
animals or pests. If you choose to compost these materials, cover the pile
with leaves, grass clippings, or a thin layer of dirt to avoid pests and odors.
How is compost applied?
•   Add 1-2 inches of compost to top 6-8 inches of topsoil; mix in to
    improve soil quality.
• Apply a 3-6 inch layer of compost around base of new trees or shrubbery.
• Use compost as a mulch to add nutrients and improve soil structure.
See www.mastercomposter.com for more information


26
Vermicomposting
Vermicomposting is the use of worms to break down organic materials
such as food waste from the kitchen. Red worms (eisenia foetide), which
are related to earthworms (lumbricus terrestris), digest organic material
into excellent compost. Red worms naturally live in decaying leaf
matter, compost piles, or manure just above the ground’s surface.

Vermicomposting at home:
Red worms prefer darkness, so keep worms in a dark
container with a lid. A shallow plastic storage bin about 8-12
inches deep with drainage holes works best. The best bedding
for red worms is shredded newspaper; white paper can also be
used but avoid glossy advertisements and magazines. Keep
the newspaper moist but not soggy. The bedding should be at
least 6 inches deep after moistening. Holes on the bottom of the bin will
allow excess water to drain out. This water, or “compost tea,” can be
used as a natural concentrated fertilizer for plants.

Worms have gizzards and need a small amount of gritty material to help
grind up food waste, so add several cups of soil to the bin. Two thousand
worms weighing about two pounds can digest up to one pound of food
waste per day. Any plant food waste can be put into the bin, but avoid
placing animal products (meats, bones, cheese, dairy) into the bin. Stick
to the one pound of food per day so as not to overload the system.

What can I feed my worms?
vegetable trimmings or peelings     apple cores
banana peels                        spoiled leftovers (except dairy or
coffee grounds with filter          meat)

NOTE: Too much citrus fruit scraps or peelings may be harmful to your
worms—it’s better to avoid feeding citrus fruit scraps to worms.

Where can I get worms?
Red worms can be purchased online, at many local bait shops, or at the
D&D Worm Ranch in Swisher, Iowa. D&D Worm Ranch is currently the
only commercial vermicomposting facility in Iowa.
       D&D Worm Ranch
       Deb Hoffman
       1450 Squirrel Ridge Rd NW
       Swisher, IA 52338
       319-857-478
       www.dndwormranch.com

                                                                         27
Illegal Waste Dumping
Illegal dumping is an offense that can carry fines up
to $10,000 with jail time.

What is it?
Illegal dumping is the disposal of waste anywhere
other than the landfill. This includes anything from
yard waste to residential waste, old appliances to
junk cars, tires to demolition waste.
Why does it matter?
According to the organization Keep Iowa Beautiful:
Besides costing Iowa taxpayers millions of dollars each year for cleanup,
illegal dumping also poses a threat to both the environment and public
health and safety. Objects dumped along roadways can be hazardous to
travel. Hazardous waste streams can seep into the ground and eventually
into water sources. Dumping sites can become breeding grounds for in-
sects and rodents. And, they diminish the beauty and quality of life near
these areas. See www.keepiowabeautiful.com.

How do I report illegal dumping or littering?
Call the No Litter Hotline
You can now help Keep Iowa Beautiful by reporting littering and illegal
dumping to the 1-888-No-Littr (665-4887) hotline. The hotline also
offers information on how to adopt a roadway, park, river, lake or other
public area.
County and rural communities
Contact the Sheriff’s Office routine business line at 319-356-6020.
Coralville
Contact the Coralville Police Department at 319-248-1800.
Coralville Lake
Contact the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at 319-338-3543.
Iowa City
Contact the Iowa City Police Department’s routine business line at 319-
356-5275.
Lake MacBride
Contact the Environmental Protection Division at 319-653-2135.
For more information see the following websites
http://www.iowadnr.com/waste/sw/illdump.html
www.keepiowabeautiful.com


28
Other Recycling Options
The following pages contain information about where to take specific
items or materials for reuse or recycling. Please call the recycling
coordinator at 319-887-6160 with any questions.

Aluminum cans (redeemable)
Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity, accepts donated redeemable
   aluminum cans; 338-5687, http://www.ivhfh.org/cans.php
Can Shed LLC, www.canshed.com
   Iowa City: 611 Hollywood Blvd., 319-887-7055
   Cedar Rapids: 4121 16th Ave. SW, 319-366-1300
Aluminum cans (non-redeemable)
Johnson County drop-off sites (see page 16)
Appliances
IC Landfill & Recycling Center: recycling and disposal of old or broken
    appliances
ReStore (Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity): see page 18 for informa-
    tion on how to donate working appliances
Architectural Salvage
Salvage Barn at IC Landfill & Recycling Center: 351-1875 (see page 17)
Auto Salvage
Johnson County Auto Recyclers
1160 Hwy. 1, Iowa City, 338-1003
4042 Izaak Walton Rd SE, IC, 351-9581
Russell Company, 2750 S. Riverside Dr., Iowa City, 338-8679
Batteries, automotive (lead acid)
IC Landfill & Recycling Center (see HHW information on page 19)
Firestone Tire & Service Center, 231 E. Burlington St., Iowa City, 338-
    5649
Sears Automotive Center, 1491 27th Ave, Coralville, 625-2728
Batteries, household (including Ni-Cad, Lithium, rechargeable)
IC Landfill & Recycling Center (see HHW information on page 19)
++note: alkaline batteries may be thrown away with regular trash.
Cellular telephones
IC Landfill & Recycling Center (see HHW information on page 19)
Check with local cellular stores

                                                                          29
Clothing
Goodwill Stores
    985 E. Pepperwood Plaza, Iowa City, 337-3548
    2551 Heartland Pl., Coralville. 545-6581
Salvation Army, 1116 Gilbert Court, Iowa City, drop box in parking lot
    open 24 hours
See “Consignment” in the telephone book

Computers & Electronics
Fostering Technology, Inc.,
   http://www.fosteringtechnology.org/index.html
   (computers only)
IC Landfill & Recycling Center (see e-waste information on page 6)
Midwest Electronic Recovery, 100 3rd St. N, Walford, 319-845-2001,
   www.ewasterecycle.com
WiderNet Project (University of Iowa), 319-335-2200,
   http://www.widernet.org/
   (computers only)

Corrugated Cardboard
Johnson County drop-off recycling sites (see page 16)

Electronics
Fostering Technology, Inc.,
   http://www.fosteringtechnology.org/index.html
   (computers only)
IC Landfill & Recycling Center (see e-waste information on page 7)
Midwest Electronic Recovery, 100 3rd St. N, Walford, 319-845-2001,
   www.ewasterecycle.com
WiderNet Project (University of Iowa), 319-335-2200,
   http://www.widernet.org/
   (computers only)

Furniture/Housewares
Furniture Project (see page 17)
Goodwill Stores
      985 E. Pepperwood Plaza, Iowa City, 337-3548
      2551 Heartland Pl., Coralville. 545-6581



30
Salvation Army, 1116 Gilbert Court, Iowa City, drop box in parking lot
open 24 hours
See “Consignment” in the telephone book

Glass
Johnson County drop-off recycling sites (see page 16)

Magazines
Iowa City Public Library, 123 S. Linn St., Iowa City, 356-5200, www.
icpl.org
Local doctor/dentist offices
Systems Unlimited, 156 1st Avenue S., Iowa City, 338-9212, ask for
Rosemary
Johnson County drop-off recycling sites (see page 16)

Metals (tin cans)
Peterson’s Iron & Metal Co., 420 First Avenue, Coralville, 351-1331
    Any metals, especially aluminum, copper, and tin.
Ace Auto Recyclers, 2752 S. Riverside Dr., Iowa City, 338-7828. (all
metals)
Russell Salvage & Recycling, 2750 S. Riverside Dr., Iowa City, 338-
8679
Johnson County drop-off recycling sites (see page 16)

Newspaper
Johnson County drop-off recycling sites (see page 16)

Oil, (used automotive) and Oil Filters
IC Landfill & Recycling Center

Jiffy Lube (up to 2 gallons)
Hwy. 6 West, Coralville, 351-0045
1335 Hwy. 1 Este, IC, 358-9798

Paint (to reuse)
Potential users:
Regina High School, 2150 Rochester Ave, Iowa City, 338-5436, please
call first
University of Iowa Arts Department, 335-2694
IC Community Theatre, 414 Fairgrounds, 338-0443
Systems Unlimited, 1556 1st Avenue S., Iowa City, 338-9212, please call
first

Paint (disposal)
IC Landfill & Recycling Center (limit 20 gallons) (see HHW disposal,
pages 19)


                                                                         31
Do-it-yourself:
• DO NOT pour paint down the drain or throw it in the trash in liquid
   form.
• Small amounts of latex (water-based) paint can be dried in its
   container or spread on cardboard lined with newspaper and left to dry
   in well-ventilated area away from any ignition sources. When dried,
   throw it away as trash.
• If paint has separated and cannot be mixed, place liquids in small
   amount of absorbent material in cardboard box, such as clay-based
   kitty litter or shredded newspaper.
• Let material dry in well-ventilated area away from any ignition
   sources. Let sludge at bottom dry, too. Once all dry, it can be thrown
   away as trash.
Pallets
IC Landfill & Recycling Center
Styrofoam (packing peanuts, etc.)
Mailboxes of Iowa City, 319-354-2113
Plastic containers (#1-#7)
Johnson County drop-off recycling sites (see page 16)
Plastic Grocery Bags
Hy-Vee —     1720 Waterfront Drive, Iowa City, 354-7601
             1201 N. Dodge, Iowa City, 354-9223
             812 South 1st Ave, Iowa City, 338-9758
             Lantern Park Plaza, Coralville, 351-5523
Wal-Mart & Wal-Mart Super Center —
             1001 Hwy. 1 W., Iowa City, 337-3116
             2801 Commerce Dr., Coralville, 545-6400
Televisions & Electronics
IC Landfill & Recycling Center (see e-waste information on page 5)
Midwest Electronic Recovery, 100 3rd St. N, Walford, 319-845-2001,
www.ewasterecycle.com
Tires
IC Landfill & Recycling Center [$0.07 per pound OR ($3 minimum)]
Firestone Tire & Service Center, 231 E. Burlington St., Iowa City, 338-
5649, $2/tire
Linder Tire Service ($2 per tire, prices subject to change)
    632 S. Riverside Dr., Iowa City, 337-4163
    55 Commercial Drive, North Liberty, 626-8980
Toner Cartridges
Iowa Recycling Association, 2742 SE Market St., Des Moines, 50317,
515-265-1596, contact for postage-paid return envelopes. http://www.
iowarecycles.org/

32
Eliminate Junk Mail
Request to have your name removed from the following lists. When
contacting these firms, be sure to give all the spelling variations of your
name.

Mailing lists:
National Demographics and               ADVO Systems, Inc.
Lifestyles                              Director of List Maintenance
List Order Service                      239 West Service Road
1621 18th Street, #300                  Hartford, CT 06120-1280
Denver, CO 80202                        1-510-489-6577

Mail Preference Service                 Donnelly Marketing
Direct Marketing Association            1235 North Avenue
PO Box 9008                             Nevada, IA 50201
Farmington, NY 11735-9008

Reverse phone book publications:
Haines and Company, Inc.
Criss-Cross Director
2382 E. Walnut Avenue East
Fullerton, CA 92631

R.L. Polk and Company
List Services
6400 Monroe Blvd.
Taylor, MI 48180
1-800-873-7655

Catalogs:
http://www.catalogchoice.org

Coupon Mailings, ads, samples:
Val-Pak Coupons: 800-825-7257
Carol Wright: 800-345-5866

Credit card offers/applications:
800-OPT-OUT (800-567-8688)




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