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STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME GUIDE

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					The accompanying Student Learning Outcomes is a work in progress, but one
that I have decided should be displayed in its current evolutionary draft status.

A number of colleges have requested copies of the latest draft for possible use in
developing new programs and/or revising current program. The inquires have
come from one or more of the following:

    1. The State’s Electrician Certification Licensing Program
    2. New electrical technology CTE credit programs that would be submitted
       for approval by the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office,
       and
    3. State Registered Apprenticeship Electrician Program

I worked with three community college electrical faculty to bring the guide to its
current evolutionary status. The faculty were; 1) John Hauck, Long Beach City
College, 2) Elmano Alves, Chaffey College, and 3) Justin Shores, Antelope
Valley College.

Please contact me with your comments regarding this document.

Currently I am looking for additional qualified resource people who would like to
work with me on writing other sections of this document...



Barry Noonan, Ph.D.
Apprenticeship Coordinator, and
  Specialist - Career Technical Education
Career & Technical Education Unit
Division of Economic Development and Workforce Preparation
California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office
1102 Q Street, 3rd Floor
Sacramento, CA 95811-6549

916.445.8026
bnoonan@cccco.edu
 COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIAN:
GUIDE—STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
(SLOS) FOR CTE, APPRENTICESHIP, AND
 ELECTRICIAN CERTIFICATION PROGRAM


    REVISED TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2010
             (NOONAN REVISIONS)
 Student Learning Outcome Guide
 Commercial and Industrial Electrician Curriculum




                                                  PREPARED BY


         Lead Expert Resource: John Hauck, Long Beach City College: Electrical Faculty
                Expert Resource: Justin Shores, Antelope Valley College: Electrical Faculty
                Expert Resource: Elmano Alves, Chaffey College: Electrical Faculty
Curriculum Writing Assistance: Barry Noonan, California Community College Chancellor’s
                               Office – Apprenticeship Coordinator and Specialist -
                               Vocational Education
              Editing Consultant: Katie Faires




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                 STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME GUIDE

    Topical list of specific student learning outcomes for each point in the
     COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIAN CURRICULUM OUTLINE

     Developed by the Electrical Joint and Unilateral Curriculum Committee.
     Approved by the California Apprenticeship Council (CAC) as the CAC’s
      statewide standard for commercial electrician curriculum.
     Curriculum outline approved September 2003, by the DAS’s special
      committee charged in the law with designating schools that have electrical
      curricula that meet the Commercial Electrician curriculum approved by the
      CAC.
     All of the “learning outcomes” listed in this document specific apply to the
      “commercial electrician” unless other wise stated.
Student Learning Outcome Guide
Commercial and Industrial Electrician Curriculum




                                            TABLE OF CONTENTS

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES GUIDE (LOG)....................................................... 7

I.      INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................. 7

II.     COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN .................................................................. 7

III.    PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS .................................................... 7

IV.     TOPICAL OUTLINE ............................................................................................. 7

V.      STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES ................................................................... 7

1.      SAFETY ............................................................................................................... 8

        1-A.      General Jobsite Safety Awareness .......................................................................... 8

        1-B.      Emergency Procedures.......................................................................................... 10

        1-C.      Compliance With OSHA And EPA Regulations .................................................. 10

        1-D.      Substance Abuse ................................................................................................... 11

2.      TOOLS, MATERIALS, AND HANDLING ........................................................... 12

        2-A.      Proper Tool Management ..................................................................................... 12

        2-B.      Proper Rigging Methods ....................................................................................... 12

        2-C.      Proper digging techniques..................................................................................... 12

        2-D.      Proper use of motorized tools (use of platform lifts, bucket trucks, and truck-
                  mounted cranes) .................................................................................................... 13

        2-E.      Proper material management ................................................................................ 13

3.      MATHEMATICS ................................................................................................. 14

        3-A.      Conduct Appropriate mathematical calculations to solve for unknowns ............. 14

4.      DIRECT CURRENT ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT THEORY: OHM’S LAW .............. 15

        4-A.      Definitions and Inventor ....................................................................................... 15


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     4-B.   Ohm’s Law: Direct Current Electrical Circuit Theory ......................................... 15

     4-C.   Basic Ohm’s Law formulas .................................................................................. 15

     4-D.   Ohm’s Law in Direct Current Series circuits, Parallel circuits, and Combination
            Circuits .................................................................................................................. 16

5.   CONDUCTORS USED FOR GENERAL WIRING/MOTOR APPLICATIONS .... 17

     5-A.   Task Listing: ......................................................................................................... 17

     5-B.   Types of Conductors and Insulators ..................................................................... 18

     5-C.   Conductors Used For Low Power Specialty Wiring Applications (Computers,
            data, signaling, fire, alarms, life safety) ................................................................ 19

     5-D.   Grounding ............................................................................................................. 19

     5-E.   Background Reasons for grounding and the N.E.C. ............................................. 19

     5-F.   Function of Effective Grounding .......................................................................... 19

     5-G.   Terms and Language of Grounding ...................................................................... 19

     5-H.   Basic Ohm’s Law Theory of Current Flow in AC Circuits .................................. 20

     5-I.   Electrical Faults and Short Circuits ...................................................................... 20

     5-J.   Electric Shock ....................................................................................................... 20

     5-K.   System and Equipment Grounding ....................................................................... 20

6.   MOTORS, MOTOR CONTROLLERS AND PROCESS CONTROLLERS ......... 23

     6-A.   Function, operation and characteristics of various types of motors (AC, DC, dual
            voltage, repulsion, universal, 3 phase, squirrel cage, synchronous) ..................... 23

     6-B.   Proper techniques for motor installations ............................................................. 26




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Student Learning Outcome Guide
Commercial and Industrial Electrician Curriculum




STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES GUIDE (LOG)

I.      Introduction
            a. The student learning outcomes are listed in this Guide so that the students
               know the knowledge and skill they are to master. ……..

II.     Course Activities and Design
          a. The course activities and design are carefully developed to facilitate the
             student’s mastery of the learning outcomes. ……………………

III.    Prerequisite Knowledge and Skills
           a. There are certain math skills and a level of reading that one must have
              prior to being admitted to this course. A placement assessment exam will
              be used to determine if the student is ready to start this course.
           b. Evaluation
           c. Evaluation procedures will be discussed during the first class meeting.

IV.     Topical Outline
          a. This is a TOPICAL OUTLINE and is NOT necessarily the order in which
              the material will be taught.

        1.      CIRCUIT THEORY: OHM’S LAW
                 1.1.     Definitions, inventor
                 1.2.     Ohm’s Law/ Electrical Circuit Theory
                 1.3.     Basic Ohm’s Law Formulas
                 1.4.     Ohm’s Law in Direct Current Series Circuits, Parallel Circuits, and
                          Combination Circuits
V.      Student Learning Outcomes




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The Student Learning Outcomes listed in this “Learning Outcomes Guide” (LOG) for
the student are shown below
1. SAFETY
Instructional Goal: To understand the need for safety and for the student to apply
correct safety practices.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME:

1-A.   General Jobsite Safety Awareness
       1-A.1.   Why Safety is Important?
       STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
                1-A.1.1. State the 5 section numbers that deal with Construction
                         Safety as listed in the OSHA (Occupational safety and
                         Health Act) with respect to the Code of Federal
                         Regulations(CFR)
                1-A.1.2    Explain why an accident happened and how adherence to
                           the CFR would have prevented the accident given a list of
                           some of the most frequently cited serious violations, and
                           give the specific CFR section related to each accident.
                1-A.1.3    Explain why safety education is important as to an impact on
                           one’s own health, economic security, death, possible other
                           employees, the public, and to ones employer.
       1-A.2.   Key Factors Involved With Safe Work Practices

      STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
   {John and I need clarification from Diana Limon & Gregory Anderson)]

                1-A.2.1    List and discuss the following “key factors” that are involved
                           with “Safe Work Practices” in reference to Personal
                           Protective Equipment (PPE).


       1-A.3.   Develop Respect for Electricity

       STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
                1-A.3.1    Explain why it is important for a person, working with
                           electricity, to “develop a respect for electricity” with respect
                           to Installation Safety Requirements, Safety Related
                           Workplace Practices, Safety Related maintenance and
                           environmental requirements, and requirements for special
                           equipment as per OSHA 1926.400 Subpart K.




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Student Learning Outcome Guide
Commercial and Industrial Electrician Curriculum



        1-A.4.              Hazards Created by Poor Housekeeping on the Job

          STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
                      1-A.4.1      Explain the “hazards created by poor housekeeping on the
                                   job” in reference to proper storage of materials and debris,
                                   and good sanitation procedures as per OSHA Subpart D.

        1-A.5.         Maintain Safe Work Area and Tools
          STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
                      1-A.5.1      Explain what is meant by “Maintain safe work area.”
                      1-A.5.2      Explain what is meant by “Maintain safe tools” per OSHA
                                   Subpart I. Also, state how one “maintains safe tools,” with
                                   respect to the following:
                                   a)       General requirements
                                   b)       Hand tools
                                   c)       Power Operated Hand tools
                                   d)       Abrasive wheels and tools
                                   e)       Jacks and hydraulic tools
                                   f)       Air Tools
        1-A.6.        Be Aware of the Dangers of Falling Objects

        STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
                      1-A.6.1      Explain how one’s work environment should be set up to
                                   protect one from falling objects per the “Personal Protective
                                   Lifesaving Equipment” (PPE) per OSHA 1926 Subpart E.
                                   Explanation must include reference to:
                                   a)       Criteria for PPE
                                   b)       Occupational foot protection.
                                   c)       Head protection
                                   d)       Hearing protection
                                   e)       Face protection
                                   f)       Respiratory protection
                                   g)       Safety belts, lifelines and lanyards
        1-A.7.        Respect and Obey Job Safety Rules

        STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:




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                1-A.7.1    Consistently demonstrate the mantra of “respect and obey
                           job safety rules,” thus fulfilling the information presented
                           above in 1-A.1 “Why Safety is Important”.

1-B.   Emergency Procedures
       1-B.1    First Aid Training and CPR
       STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
                1-B.1.1    Meet the requirements of the Standard First Aid and
                           Personal Safety and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
                           certificates granted by the American Red Cross.

1-C.   Compliance With OSHA And EPA Regulations
       1-C.1.   Attend and/or Conduct Regular Safety Meetings

       STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
                1-C.1.1     Regularly attend and/or conduct employer scheduled safety
                            meetings per EPA regulations and OSHA Subpart C, CFR
                            1926.20 (b)(1), which details the employer’s legal
                            responsibility to initiate and maintain safety programs. Also,
                            state what CFR 1926.21 (b)(2) says about making sure that
                            each employee has appropriate safety instruction related to
                            their specific work requirements.
       1-C.2 General OSHA
       Requirements on the Jobsite
       (This is a repeat of 1-C.1.1
       above. Therefore, the “Student
       Will Be Able To:..” will not be
       repeated. (per John and Barry 3-
       23-06)
       STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:


       1-C.3.   The Guidelines for OSHA “Assured Equipment Grounding and GFCI
                Usage”

       STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
                1-C.3.1    Demonstrate ability to locate and correct any noncompliance
                           with the OSHA "Assured Equipment Grounding Conductor
                           Program" (AEGCP) per CFR 1926.404(b)(1)(iii) by
                           inspecting cords and devices for DAMAGE and/or DEFECTS
                           by performing the following three required tests:
                           a)     Visual Inspection Test: Inspect cords and devices
                                  for damage.




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Student Learning Outcome Guide
Commercial and Industrial Electrician Curriculum



                                   b)       Electrical Tests:
                                            (1)      Continuity Test on the equipment-grounding
                                                     conductor to assure that there is a continuous
                                                     electrical path.
                                            (2)      Test performed on receptacles and plugs to
                                                     ensure that the equipment-grounding
                                                     conductor is connected to its proper terminal.
        1-C.4.        Use of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) to identify and Properly
                      Handle Hazardous Materials (e.g. Cleaning Fluids, Transformer Oils)

  STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:

                      1-C.4.1      Select from 8 labels, some of which meet OSHA Subpart D
                                   [Occupational Health and Environmental Controls (Hazard
                                   Communication)] labeling requirements, the labels that meet
                                   the three labeling criteria required in Subpart D. Then, for
                                   each correct label state how each label meets those
                                   requirements.
                      1-C.4.2      Take the labels that did not meet OSHA Subpart D container
                                   labeling standards, and demonstrate with the use of Material
                                   Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) what is needed for these labels
                                   to meet the OSHA labeling requirement of such
                                   nonconforming labels.

1-D. Substance Abuse
  Note for john and barry: no topics show in cac approved document. Maybe tie it to the
  safety training sessions + the dangers. Does osha cover it as a job hazard?
        1-D.1.        Substance Abuse

        STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO:
        (Note: This is a very important topic. Does OSHA cover “substance
        Abuse”? If so, then we need to use the OSHA material to write this section.
        If OSHA does not cover it, then we need to seek guidance from the folks
        who are helping us review this draft document.) Barry and John on 3-23-06




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2.     TOOLS, MATERIALS, AND HANDLING
(Note: This section 2.0 has not been assigned to a faculty member to do the draft
student learing outcomes. Therefore, what is shown below is the basic format we
are using in the LOG and also shows the outline as specified in the CAC
approved industry standards for General Electrician.) Barry Noonan 3-23-06


Instructional Goal:


STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME:

2-A.   Proper Tool Management

       2-A.1 …………
                2-A.1.1     Common hand and power tools
                2-A.1.2     Proper selection and application of hand tools
                2-A.1.3     Proper selection and application of power tools
                2-A.1.4     Proper care for tools
                2-A.1.5     Safe techniques for using ladders
                2-A.1.6     Defects that make tools unsafe to use
                2-A.1.7     Use of meters to take readings

2-B.   Proper Rigging Methods


 Student will be able to:
       2-B.1    BARRY NEEDS TO CHECK THIS FORMAT..
       2-B.2    2-B.1.1Proper knots
                2-B.1.1     Proper techniques for rigging and hoisting
                2-B.1.2     Safe capacities for lifting arrangements

2-C. Proper digging techniques
 Student will be able to:
      2-C.1     Identify: ?
                2-C.1.1     Depth and shape of holes for supporting poles
                2-C.1.2     Proper techniques for digging, grading and leveling trenches
                            for the installation of duct work




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Student Learning Outcome Guide
Commercial and Industrial Electrician Curriculum



2-D.    Proper use of motorized tools (use of platform lifts, bucket trucks, and truck-
        mounted cranes)
         Student will be able to:
        2-D.1         Identify …. ?
                      2-D.1.1

2-E.    Proper material management

 Student will be able to:
        2-E.1         Identify ?
                      2-E.1.1.
                      2-E.1.2.




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3.     Mathematics
(Note: This section 3.0 has not been assigned to a faculty member to do the draft
student learing outcomes. Therefore, what is shown below is the basic format we
are using in the LOG and also shows the outline as specified in the CAC
approved industry standards for General Electrician.) Barry Noonan 3-23-06



Instructional Goal:




STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME:

3-A.   Conduct Appropriate mathematical calculations to solve for unknowns

Student will be able to:
       3-A.1    Perform arithmetic operations
       3-A.2    Solve word problems
       3-A.3    Solve problems involving fractions
       3-A.4    Reduce fractions to lowest terms
       3-A.5    Convert decimals to fractions and back
       3-A.6    Calculate angles and sides of triangles
       3-A.7    Solve for Unknown angles and sides of triangle
       3-A.8    Metric prefixes and converting different prefixes
       3-A.9    Use powers of ten to perform math functions
       3-A.10   Convert from English to metric measurement systems
       3-A.11   Calculate algebraic formulas
       3-A.12   Calculate square roots
       3-A.13   Calculate ratio, percentages, and proportion
       3-A.14   Solve problems using direct and inverse relationships




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Student Learning Outcome Guide
Commercial and Industrial Electrician Curriculum

 4.       DIRECT CURRENT ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT THEORY: OHM’S LAW
Note: In this section on Ohm’s Law, it is important to note that only Direct Current
(DC) is the focus.
Instructional Goal:              To have an understanding and an ability to apply Ohm’s Law
                                 to direct current electrical circuits.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME:

4-A.    Definitions and Inventor

          Student will be able to:
        4-A.1         Define the following elements in Ohm’s Law:
                      4-A.1.1. Amp
                      4-A.1.2. Volt
                      4-A.1.3. Ohm the resistance
                      4-A.1.4. Watt
        4-A.2         Explain the history of the name Ohm’s LAW. State approximately
                      when the Law was first published.
        4-A.3         State which of the three elements of Ohm’s Law can, in high levels, be
                      dangerous or even fatal.

4-B.    Ohm’s Law: Direct Current Electrical Circuit Theory

 Student will be able to:

        4-B.1         Solve for the remaining values when given a circuit with partial values.

4-C.    Basic Ohm’s Law formulas

 Student will be able to:

        4-C.1         Solve for unknowns or unknown values using Ohm’s Law.
        4-C.2         State which formulas of Ohm’s Law are proportional and which
                      formulas are inversely proportional.
        4-C.3          Explain why when one value changes the rest of the values change.

        4-C.4         Use a mnemonic tag to solve for any unknown value.
        4-C.5         Select and write the formula for any given unknown in Ohm’s Law.
        4-C.6         Explain why E=IR is the most basic and simple Ohm’s Law formula.
                      Include in the explanation reference to the meaning ET=IT*RT




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4-D.   Ohm’s Law in Direct Current Series circuits, Parallel circuits, and
       Combination Circuits

Student will be able to:
       4-D.1     With respect to DC series circuits:
                 4-D.1.1   Select the appropriate Ohm’s Law formula for series circuits.
                           Solve for all of the unknown values given a series circuit with
                           partial values.
                 4-D.1.2   Explain how voltage, amperage, and resistance values
                           change in the DC series circuit when one or more
                           components are replaced, added or removed.
                 4-D.1.3   Describe several industry-based applications of DC series
                           circuits with respect to circuits designed for safety purposes,
                           alarm circuits.


Student will be able to:

       4.D.2 With respect to DC parallel circuits:
                 4-D.2.1   Select the appropriate Ohm’s Law formula for parallel
                           circuits. Solve for all of the unknown values given a parallel
                           circuit with partial values.
                           Explain how voltage, amperage, and resistance values
                           change in the DC parallel circuit when one or more
                           components are replaced, added or removed.
                 4-D.2.2   Describe several industry-based applications of DC parallel
                           circuits with respect to circuits designed for safety purposes,
                           distribution circuits, and motors.

Student will be able to:

       4.D.3     With respect to DC combination circuits, when given a combination
                 circuit:
                 4-D.3.1   Explain and demonstrate the isolation of each series path
                           and each parallel path. Apply the appropriate Ohm’s Law
                           formula for each isolation. Solve for the unknown value in
                           each isolation
                 4-D.3.2   Solve for Ohm’s Law total circuit values for voltage, current,
                           and resistance using the isolation values obtained.
                 4-D.3.3   Explain what happens to the combination circuit when one or
                           more components are added or removed.



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Student Learning Outcome Guide
Commercial and Industrial Electrician Curriculum

                      4-D.3.4      Explain several industry-based applications of combination
                                   circuits in relation to safety, motors, and generators.




 5.       CONDUCTORS USED FOR GENERAL WIRING/MOTOR APPLICATIONS

Instructional Goal: To have an understanding of the types of conductors and
insulators used in the electrical industry.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME:

5-A.    Task Listing:
        Here are the CONDUCTOR related tasks that a COMMERCIAL ELECTRICIAN
        must be able to perform.

          Student will be able to:
        5-A.1         Apply Article 310 of the NEC (NFPA 70) and NFPA 79 (Electrical
                      Standard for Industrial Machinery) use in “open-book mode” the NFPA
                      79 (National Fire Protection Association), Chapter 13 (is the Electrical
                      Standard for Industrial Machinery basically for working with electrical
                      motors), and the NEC Article 310. (john wants to really nail this one
                      down because we want the student to be very knowlegeable about the
                      title nfpa 70 and nfpa 79) (NOTE: Today 3-23-06 I reviewed this one
                      with John. It is fine. I did not want to try to take out the yellow highlight
                      for fear of the format going crazy, so the formatter person will take out
                      the yellow highlight and this statement I am now making). Barry
                      Noonan 3-23-06
          Student will be able to:
        5-A.2         Install conductors for :
                      5-A.2.1      Electrical distribution equipment
                      5-A.2.2      Select the proper size and type of conductor for a given
                                   application
                      5-A.2.3      Demonstrate the ability to properly install (pull) conductors.
                      5-A.2.4      Demonstrate ability to determine when voltage drop
                                   calculations are required due to voltage drop taking into
                                   consideration distance of cable run, temperature, and type of
                                   cable. Also, explain the effect of heat on insulators including
                                   heat generated by excessive current, and ambient heat.
                                   (CAC VI A 3)
                      5-A.2.5      Demonstrate ability to properly select proper voltage drop
                                   formula for specific given applications.


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                5-A.2.6   Demonstrate the special installation handling when using
                          aluminum conductors
                5-A.2.7   Demonstrate ability to make proper terminations.
                5-A.2.8   Apply rules governed by the National Electrical Code with
                          respect to conductors. Demonstrate ability to efficiently and
                          correctly use Article 310 of NEC.
                5-A.2.9   Demonstrate the ability to splice of cables using the
                          appropriate components and techniques for a specific
                          application.
                5-A.2.10 Demonstrate ability to properly use the Meg-Ohm meter to
                         test the installation integrity of newly installed as well as
                         existing conductors.

5-B.   Types of Conductors and Insulators

       Student will be able to:
       5-B.1    Select the proper size and type of conductor and insulator for a given
                application.
       5-B.2    Demonstrate ability to splice cables using the appropriate components
                and techniques for a specific application.
       5-B.3    Explain why some materials are better conductors or insulators than
                other materials.
       5-B.4    Explain the basic atomic theory for copper and aluminum. Explanation
                must include reference to the Periodic Table and the importance of
                valence electrons with reference to conductors.
       5-B.5    Determine the proper conductor size for the required ampacity utilizing
                the National Electrical Code given a specific application problem.
       5-B.6    Describe “conduit fill/ capacity” and properly select correct conduit size
                and type for conductors to be used in specific application.
       5-B.7    State the NEC Article and title relating to Conductors.
       5-B.8    Determine proper equipment grounding conductor size.
       5-B.9    Identify which conduit types are an approved grounding method.
                Include: proper equipment grounding conductor size.
       5-B.10   Explain the temperature rating of conductors and component
                temperature ratings as it applies to conductor terminations (the
                equipment or item to which the conductor connects.)
       5-B.11   Describe "conductor derating factor" with respect to Table 310-16 of
                the National Electrical Code and reduction of conductor ampacity when
                installing more than three current carrying conduits in a raceway or
                conduit.


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Student Learning Outcome Guide
Commercial and Industrial Electrician Curriculum




5-C.    Conductors Used For Low Power Specialty Wiring Applications (Computers,
        data, signaling, fire, alarms, life safety)

 Student will be able to:
        5-C.1. (Note: John will do this one soon. ) Barry 3-23-06




5-D.    Grounding
        5-D.1         TASK LISTING: With reference to GROUNDING, listed below are the
                      related tasks that a COMMERCIAL ELECTRICIAN must be able to
                      perform.

 Student will be able to:
                      5-D.1.1      Apply Article 250 of the National Electrical Code to
                                   determine the proper ground for systems and equipment
                                   given a specific application.

5-E.    Background Reasons for grounding and the N.E.C.

 Student will be able to:
        5-E.1         Discuss how in the not to distant past electrical installations were not
                      electrically safe due to nonexistent or poor grounding practices.
                      (NOTE: Typist is to eliminate the yellow highlight) Barry 3-23-06
        5-E.2         Discuss the purpose of grounding and the role of the NEC (safe
                      working and living environment)

5-F.    Function of Effective Grounding

 Student will be able to:
        5-F.1         Explain what is accomplished when a system is “effectively grounded”.
                      Explanation must include reference to:
                      5-F.1.1      Relevant NEC article (250)
                      5-F.1.2      How unsafe currents are dissipated from the system

5-G.    Terms and Language of Grounding

 Student will be able to:
        5-G.1         Correctly define and explain the following terms:
                      a) Ground

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                b) Grounded
                c) Grounding path
                d) Grounding electrode
                e) Grounding electrode conductor
                f) Equipment ground
                g) Equipment grounding conductor
                h) Bonded
                i) Bonding conductors

5-H.   Basic Ohm’s Law Theory of Current Flow in AC Circuits

 Student will be able to:
       5-H.1    Define “impedance”. Also:
                5-H.1.1     State the effect of impedance on the “grounding path/
                            system ground”. (when you have a “fault” or “short” you
                            need a real low resistance for the unsafe current to go
                            through to ground)
                5-H.1.2     State the maximum “impedance” (ohms) that is allowed in
                            the grounding path/ system ground.. (25 ohms)

5-I.   Electrical Faults and Short Circuits

 Student will be able to:
       5-I.1    Define and explain the differences between “faults” and “short circuits”.
                Explanation must include reference to the stresses imposed on the
                system and the resulting damages that can occur.
       5-I.2    Calculate the fault and short circuit currents given a specific
                application.

5-J.   Electric Shock

 Student will be able to:

       5-J.1    Define and explain “electric shock”.

       5-J.2    Explain how a person can be shocked by electricity.

5-K.   System and Equipment Grounding
       5-K.1    Grounding Electrode System
 Student will be able to:




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                      5-K.1.1      Define the “grounding electrode system” and state the
                                   purpose of same.
                      5-K.1.2      Define the types of “grounding electrodes”.

             5-K.2. Grounded Conductor

          Student will be able to:
                      5-K.2.1      Describe a “grounded conductor” and state the purpose of it.
                      5-K.2.2      Describe the uses of the “grounded conductor” as a neutral
                                   wire.
                      5-K.2.3      Identify the article of the NEC specify which systems are to
                                   be grounded. Identification must include reference to:
                                   a.        Single phase systems
                                   b.        Three phase systems
                                   c.        Separately derived systems
                                   d.        Transformers
                                   e.        Generators and backup systems
                                   f.        Specialty System
                                             1)      Computers
                                             2)      Data and voice
                                   g.        Isolated systems
                                   h.        Equipment grounding
                                             1)      (Describe the purpose and application and how
                                                     it differentiates from “system grounding”.)

        5-K.3.        Grounding and the National Electrical Code

          Student will be able to:
                      5-K.3.1 Interpret and apply Article 250 (Grounding) of National
                                Electrical Code in relationship to:
                                     a. Use of conductors and metallic components as a
                                        grounding method.
                                        b. Use of conduit as a grounding conductor

                                        c. Short Circuits and Fault Current

          Student will be able to:
                      5-K.4.1      Define the term “short circuits”.
                      5-K.4.2      Define the term “fault currents”
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        5-K.4.3   Explain the term “listed short circuit rating of components”.
        (The formatting here is getting crazy to work with. The 5-K3 items
        are OK. The 5-K.4 needs a header showing 5-K.4. Also John is
        saying that in 5-K6 is a repeat of 5-K5. He would like to delete 5-
        K5, but since it is listed in the CAC approved standards, he is
        suggesting that we consider saying for 5-K5 something like “See
        5-K5 for this entry”. Also, the 5-K5 format below got crazy.)Barry
        3-23-06
5-K.5   Transformers Impact of Short Circuit and Fault Current Design
Student will be able to:
        5-K.4.1   Explain how the following relate to transformers: Define the
                  term “short circuits”. Define the term “fault currents”,
                  Explain the term “listed short circuit rating of
                  components”. (Note: Formatter is to show these “*” as
                  subpoints )Barry 3-23-06

5-K.5   Transformer Impedance

Student will be able to:
        5-K.6.1   Define “transformer impedance” and explain how this effects
                  the available short circuit current.
        5-K.6.2   Use appropriate formulas to calculate short circuit currents.
        5-K.6.3   Select the proper short circuit protective device for a given
                  application based on calculations.




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Student Learning Outcome Guide
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 6.       MOTORS, MOTOR CONTROLLERS AND PROCESS CONTROLLERS

Elmano Alves Chaffey College

Instructional Goal: Understand and professionally work with motors, motor controllers
and process controllers.

6-A.    Function, operation and characteristics of various types of motors (AC, DC,
        dual voltage, repulsion, universal, 3 phase, squirrel cage, synchronous)
        6.A.1.        Function, operation and characteristics of various types of motors (AC,
                      DC, dual voltage, repulsion, universal, 3 phase, squirrel cage,
                      synchronous): 1) Physical parts of various motors.
          Student will be able to:
                      6.A.1.1.     Given a cross cut of AC and DC motors, locate the following
                                   parts:
                                   a.       Stator
                                   b.       Series and shunt field windings
                                   c.       Rotor
                                   d.       Commutator (DC only motors)
                                   e.       Slip Ring
        6-A.2         Function, operation and characteristics of various types of motors (AC,
                      DC, dual voltage, repulsion, universal, 3 phase, squirrel cage,
                      synchronous): 2) Utilize information sheets, plans, schematics, and
                      motor nameplates to gain information.

          Student will be able to:
                      6-A.2.1      When given a specific motor to troubleshoot, repair or
                                   replace, use the “information sheets”, plans, schematics and
                                   motor nameplate to troubleshoot the motor and recommend
                                   appropriate action. Also:
                                   a.       State at least four of the information points that you
                                            took into consideration when forming your
                                            recommended action.
                                   b.       Describe what can happen if the correct
                                            recommendation is not made on each of the four
                                            information points.
        6.A.3.        Function, operation and characteristics of various types of motors (AC,
                      DC, dual voltage, repulsion, universal, 3 phase, squirrel cage,
                      synchronous): 3) Motor losses.
          Student will be able to:


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         6-A.5.1    Define “motor losses”. For each of the following types of
                    motors, list at least three reasons for “motor losses”:
                    a.     AC Motor
                    b.     DC Motor
                    c.     Dual Voltage Motor
                    d.     Repulsion Motor
                    e.     Universal Motor
                    f.     3 Phase Motor
                    g.     Squirrel Cage Motor
                    h.     Synchronous Motor
6-A.4    Function, operation and characteristics of various types of motors (AC,
         DC, dual voltage, repulsion, universal, 3 phase, squirrel cage,
         synchronous): Starting and operating characteristics.

Student will be able to:
         6.A.4.1.   With respect to a motor’s “starting and operating
                    characteristics”, explain the importance of knowing the
                    application for which the motor is being used.
         6.A.4.2.   Define “soft start” and “hard start or across the line”.
         6.A.4.3.   With respect to variable speed AC motors, describe how
                    voltage and frequency changes can affect the operational
                    characteristics of the motor.
         6.A.4.4.   Also, describe the need for circuit breakers and/or fuses to
                    protect such motors.
NOTE: ELMANO and I STARTED HERE ON 3-14-05:

6-A.5 Methods to identify windings in DC motors.
Student will be able to:

         6-A.5.1    Given a clear view of the interior of a DC motor, identify the
                    following:

                    a.     Shunt field windings

                    b.     Armature windings

                    c.     Series field windings

         6-A.5.2    Also, state which of these field windings has a viewable
                    physical appearance that is different from the other windings,
                    and state why the windings are different.


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        6-A.6         Means for providing for field failure, current limit, voltage and speed
                      control.

          Student will be able to:

                      6-A.6.1      With respect to “means for providing for field failure,” name
                                   the type of device (Desired Response: “Field Loss
                                   Detector”) that makes the motor safely react to the field
                                   failure. Also, give two examples of such a device (Desired
                                   Response: 1) a relay, and 2) a solid state type relay).

                      6-A.6.2      With respect to “current limit”, name the type of device that
                                   monitors and controls for current levels. (Desired Response:
                                   “Current Limiter”). Also, give at least three examples of
                                   “current limiter” devices (Desired Response: 1) fuse, 2) solid
                                   state component or device, 3) circuit breaker)

                      6-A.6.3      With respect to “voltage and speed control”, name the type
                                   of device that monitors and controls voltage and speed
                                   control. Also, give two examples of such a device (Desired
                                   Response: 1) Rheostat that the operator person increases or
                                   decrease the level of resistance or voltage, 2) computer
                                   control, and 3) “TACH” Tachometer Feedback Loop)

                      6-A.6.4      With respect to “voltage and speed control”, name the type
                                   of device that monitors and controls voltage and speed
                                   control. Also, give two examples of such a device (Desired
                                   Response: 1) Rheostat that the operator person increases or
                                   decrease the level of resistance or voltage, 2) computer
                                   control, and 3) “TACH” Tachometer Feedback Loop)

        6-A.7 Block diagrams to demonstrate power supplies, armature, field and control
                 features
          Student will be able to:

                      6-A.7.1      Draw and label a block diagram showing power supply,
                                   armature, field and control features. Also, explain the
                                   function of each “block” and explain how each “block”
                                   interrelates with the other blocks.

        6-A.8         Torque, locked rotor current, no-load speed, and slip

          Student will be able to:

                      6-A.8.1      Define “torque” and measure the torque developed by a
                                   motor. Also, use appropriate tables and formulas to



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                           determine a given motor’s torque both in the “lbf-in”
                           measurement and metric system (N-m).

                6-A.8.2    Explain what “locked rotor current” means, and describe
                           what happens to the current in a “locked rotor condition.”

                6-A.8.3    Define “no-load speed” and describe what happens to the
                           speed in a “no-load speed” condition. Also, contrast what
                           happens in a “field loss condition” vs. a “no-load speed
                           condition.”

                6-A.8.4    With respect to “slip”, state what kind of motors [Writer is
                           looking for “synchronous motors”] can have “slip”. Also
                           explain the relationship between “slip” and torque.

       6-A.9    Reasons for low voltage starting
        Student will be able to:

                6-A.9.1    Explain why “low voltage starting” is important in certain
                           applications. Also, explain why “soft start motors” and
                           “variable speed drives” may not be the appropriate design
                           choice for a given application.

       6-A.10   Function, operation and characteristics of stepping motors
        Student will be able to:

                6-A.10.1 Explain the difference between “stepper motors” and regular
                         motors. Explanation must include reference to the number
                         of windings. Also explain:

                           a.      How the “stepper motor” is used to accomplish given
                                   outcomes.

                           b.      Give at least two examples of the use of “stepper
                                   motors” in industry

6-B.   Proper techniques for motor installations

       6.B.1.   Necessary calculations for electrical requirements per Code
        Student will be able to:

                6.B.1.1.   Use the Code Tables to make correct calculations.

       6.B.2.   Correct power factor
        Student will be able to:

                6.B.2.1.   Define “power factor”. Also:


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                                   a.       Explain how inductance and capacitance affect the
                                            power factor.

                                   b.       Given a problem with “power factor”, actually measure
                                            the reactive power, apparent power, reactive power
                                            and the real power and then calculate for the “power
                                            factor” compensations.

NOTE: THIS IS WHERE ELMANO AND I STOPPED TODAY 3-21-05)

        6.B.3.        Proper wire type and size

          Student will be able to:

                      6.B.3.1.
        6.B.4.       Appropriate connections
          Student will be able to:

                      6.B.4.1.

        6.B.5.        How various motors can be made to run at different speed or in
                      reverse direction. I, Barry, drafted the following to try to fit the format
                      to see if it would look ok. The content will be changed by Elmano
                      during the teleconference.

          Student will be able to:

                      6.B.5.1.     With respect to schematics:
                                   a.       Given one or more schematics showing a motor,
                                            explain how to make a motor run at different speeds.
                                            Also, draw on the schematic.

                                   b.       Given one or more schematics containing a
                                            motor…….

                      6.B.5.2.     With respect to “connections to reverse or change speeds,”:

                                   a.
                                   b.

        6.B.6.        Identify unmarked motor leads
          Student will be able to:

                      6.B.6.1.

                      6.B.6.2.

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6-B.7.   Steps for proper handling of motors

 Student will be able to:

         6-B.7.1   With respect to “Checks for mechanical defects”, xxxx

         6-B.7.2   With respect to “Factors to be checked when a motor arrives
                   at jobsite,” xxx

         6-B.7.3   With respect to “Methods for putting a motor into storage,”
                   xxxx




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[IMMEDIATELY BELOW IS THE OUTLINE FROM CAC APPROVED DOCUMENT]
    XII. MOTORS, MOTOR CONTROLLERS AND PROCESS CONTROLLERS
A. Function, operation and characteristics of various types of motors (AC, DC, dual
voltage, repulsion, universal, 3 phase, squirrel cage, synchronous)
     1. Physical parts of various motors
     2. Utilize information sheets, plans, schematics, and motor nameplates to gain
        information
     3. Motor losses
     4. Starting and operating characteristics
     5. Methods to identify windings in DC motors
     6. Means for providing for field failure, current limit, voltage and speed control
     7. Block diagrams to demonstrate power supplies, armature, field and control
        features
     8. Torque, locked rotor current, no-load speed, and slip
     9. Reasons for low-voltage starting
     10. Function, operation and characteristics of stepping motors
B. Proper techniques for motor installations
     1. Necessary calculations for electrical requirements per Code
     2. Correct power factor
     3. Proper wire type and size
     4. Appropriate connections
     5. How various motors can be made to run at different speed or in reverse
        direction
        a. Schematics
        b. Connections to reverse or change speeds
     6. Identify unmarked motor leads
     7. Steps for proper handling of motors
        a. Checks for mechanical defects
        b. Factors to be checked when a motor arrives at jobsite
        c. Methods for putting motor into storage
C. Function, operation and characteristics of motor controllers, circuits and devices
    1. Ways and means of starting and stopping motors
    2. Operation of magnetic coil
    3. Use of magnetic starters and controllers

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   4. Correct sizing of magnetic starters and controllers
   5. Difference between starters and contactors
   6. Function, operation and characteristics of overload protective devices
      a. Thermal overload
      b. Magnetic overload
   7. Schematics for various control circuits
   8. Two-wire control circuits
   9. Three-wire control circuits
   10. Interlocking methods
   11. Reversing and sequential controllers
   12. Jogging, inching, plugging
   13. Multiple start-stop controls and selector switches
   14. Phase failure relays
   15. Various manual and automatic speed control techniques
   16. Function, operation and characteristics of variable frequency drives
   17. Function, operation, characteristics and installation procedures for
       programmable logic controls
      a. Function of central processing unit
      b. Memory types and sizes
      c. User and storage memory
      d. Back-up batteries
      e. Peripheral devices
    18. Ladder diagrams
    19. Function, operation and characteristics of timers, counters, sequencers
    20. Utilize appropriate manuals and information for start-up, maintenance and
         testing
    21. Utilize schematics for manual starters, automatic starters, speed regulators and
         controllers
D. Function, operation and characteristics of switches and relays
    1. Schematics including switches and relays
    2. Installation and connection methods for various switch types
    3. Installation and connection methods for various relays
    4. Function, operation and characteristics of electronic sensor and pilot devices



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Student Learning Outcome Guide
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      5. Function, operation and characteristics of control transformers
          a. Leads of control transformers
          b. Proper sizing of control transformers
E. Mechanical connections to utilize motors
     1.     Operation of mechanical clutches and magnetic drives
     2.     Direct and offset drives
     3.     Proper pulley sizes required
F. Process control systems and devices
     1.     Operating requirements followed by manual and automatic controllers
     2.     Function, operation, characteristics and installation of:
          a. Closed loop and open loop systems
          b. Feedback control
          c. Proportional control
          d. Integral control
          e. Derivative control
     3.     Block diagrams including control systems and devices
     4.     The function, operation, and characteristics of sensors and transmitters

TRANSFORMERS
Justin Shores, Antelope Valley College

NOTE: The content in section 14 is identical as in the CAC approved General
Electrician… but below the formatting has been adjusted to fit the format used by
CCCCO.

Instructional Goal: To have an understanding of xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx..

14.1. Function, operation, and characteristics of transformers

Student will be able to:

          14.1.1 With respect to electrical principles involved in transformer operation:
                 a. Explain how the energy from the “primary windings” (Normally a higher
                    voltage) is transferred to the “secondary windings (Normally the lower
                    voltage). Explanation must include reference to:
                             1.) How the wires are insulated from each other, yet transfer
                                 electrical motive force (EMF) to the secondary windings.
                             2.) The “core” and state the purpose it plays in the transfer of
                             EMF.


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       14.1.2 . With respect to transformer classifications and applications:
              a. State the names of the two basic applications (types) of transformers
                 and state what each type does to transfer of EMF. State the technical
                 name of each (“step up” and “step down”) as well as a common on the
                 job vernacular title (“boost” or “buck”).

               b. Name and discuss the two types of “cores” used in transformers.
                  Discussion must include reference to the following:
                   Which surrounds which? (Curriculum writers’ notes: In the “shell
                     type” of transformer, the “core” surrounds the windings. Whereas,
                     in the “core type” of transformer the windings surround the “core”.)

       14.1.3 With respect to transformer losses:
               a. Explain how the type of material used in the construction of the core
                   impacts the extent of “transformer losses” or “Hysteresis losses”.

                 b. Define “Hysteresis Losses” and explain how Hysteresis Losses can
                    have the exact opposite financial impact on the Power company vs
                    commercial customer that uses “primary metering”. (Curriculum
                    writers’ hint : Hysteresis= Loss of transfer of energy are directly
                    related to the efficiency of the transformer. The friction developed
                    between magnetic particles causes the losses.)

[For section 14, we stopped the reformatting adjustment attempts here on 2-14-05]
Student Will be able to:

       14.1.4 With respect to “ ratios for voltage and amperage with respect to turns.”

Student Will be able to:
      14.4.1 WE WILL RETURN TO THIS ONE LATER. 3-5-05

       14.1.5 Three phases transformers (This item has been added by CCCCO)
       Student will be able to:

              a. With respect to “delta configurations”:
        1) Draw the symbol for a “delta configuration” and then draw a schematic of a
delta-delta configuration.

              c. With respect to “wye configurations”:
                        1.) Draw the symbol and then draw a schematic of the “wye
                            configuration. “
        1) Identify a “wye configuration”

14.2    Selection and installation of transformers
       14.2.1 Nameplate information
              Student will be able to:



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Student Learning Outcome Guide
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                 a. List and explain the three key pieces of information (hint: size, voltage,
                 and configuration) provided on the transformer name.

        14.2.2 Techniques for sizing transformers (one and three phase)
               Student will be able to:
               14.2.2.1
        14.2.3 Determining if given transformer meets voltage, current and impedance
               requirements.
               Student will be able to:
               14.2.3.1

        14.2.4 Calculating voltages and currents for load and windings
               Student will be able to:
               14.2.4.1

        14.2.5 Determining whether to use wye or delta wiring schemes
               Student will be able to:
               14.2.5.1


        14.2.6 Steps for receiving and preparing transformer for installation
               Student will be able to:
               14.2.6.1

        14.2.7 Necessary tests to assure proper operation
               Student will be able to:
               14.2.7.1

        14.2.8 Proper techniques for connecting power and load conductors
               Student will be able to:
               14.2.8.1

        14.2.9 Methods for determining proper types and values of electrical protective
        devices
              Student will be able to:
              14.2.9.1

        14.2.9 Proper grounding procedures


14.3      Distribution Systems

        14.3.1 Functions, operation and characteristics of various types of distribution
               systems
               Student will be able to:
               14.3.1.1


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       14.3.2 Criteria for selecting particular type of distribution system
               Student will be able to:
               14.3.2.1
State what is the key technical factor (?) in correctly sizing a transformer for a given
application. (hint: current)

[ON 3-14-05 WE WILL GO BACK TO 14.1.4 AND COMPLETE IT]


       1.    nameplate information
       2.    techniques for sizing transformers (one and three phase)
       3.      determining if given transformer meets voltage, current, and impedance
               requirements
       4.    calculating voltages and currents for load and windings
       5.    determining whether to use wye or delta wiring schemes
       6.    steps for receiving and preparing transformer for installation
       7.    necessary tests to assure proper operation
       8.    proper techniques for connecting power and load conductors
       9.      methods for determining proper types and values of electrical protective
               devices
       10.   proper grounding procedures

C. Distribution systems

       1.     functions, operation and characteristics of various types of distribution
              systems

       2.    criteria for selecting particular type of distribution system




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