Start a Tutoring Company by xsg21443

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									                                Smart Start Tutoring Inc
                                   2010-2011 Application

II. Application Proposal
A. Contact Information

Name of Agency Head: Smart Start Tutoring Inc

Federal Employer Identification Number (FEIN) or Taxpayer ID Number (TIN): 34-
2050716

Contact Person Information

Name: Stacey Ellis
Title: Director
Mailing Address: 1440 Reed Canal Rd. Suite 104
City: Port Orange
State: FL
Zip Code: 32129
Telephone Number: 396-760-2340
Fax Number: 386-760-2341
Email Address: smartstarttutoring@gmail.com
Organization Website: http://SmartStartTutoring.com

Contact Person for SES (This person will be listed on the SES Approved Provider Directory. The
same contact person can not be listed for multiple companies.)

Name: Stacey Ellis
Title: Director
Mailing Address: 1440 Reed Canal Rd. Suite 104
City: Port Orange
State: FL
Zip Code: 32129
Telephone Number: 386-760-2340
Fax Number: 386-760-2341
Email Address: smartstarttutoring@gmail.com
Organization Website: http://SmartStartTutoring.com


B. Applicant Status

                Applying as a New provider      Applying as a Renewing provider
1. (1) The applicant indicated prior approval to offer SES in Florida. Provide the
   following information:
       o   School year(s):
           2008-2009
           2009-2010
           2006-2007
           2007-2008
       o Serving which school district(s):
           Brevard, Flagler, Hillsborough, Marion, Martin, Orange, Osceola, Palm Beach,
           Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Putnam, St. Johns, St. Lucie, Sarasota, Volusia
       o If approved in Florida, identify the Florida SES Provider ID Number(s):
           Smart Start Tutoring Inc., Smart Start Tutoring, Inc.
2. (2) Is the applicant an approved provider for SES in any other state?
       Yes       No

       o   If yes, identify the state(s):
       o   Under what business name(s):
3. (3) Has the applicant been removed as an approved provider in any state or
   district within a state, including Florida?
       Yes       No

4. (4) Has the applicant ever served as a provider in Florida under any business
   name and had a contract with a district terminated?
       Yes       No

       o   Identify the district(s): Orange
       o   If so, provide the school year and the reason(s) for termination:
           2009-2010 Second signature for amended page of contract was misplaced at the
           district level. We were unaware of the situation until it was too late to remedy.

 Service History

        Has the applicant conducted surveys of parents whose children received SES
        tutoring in the prior school year?
             Yes     No
             o If yes, do these results show that at least 50% of parents of participating
               students are satisfied with the services?
                   Yes       No       N/A
        Has the applicant's instructional program been subject to a state or self-
        administered evaluation?
             Yes     No
             o If yes, do these results demonstrate that the provider's instructional
               program has improved student achievement?
                           Yes      No       N/A

C. School District(s) to be Served

Applicant will not be able to add/delete districts once the application is approved.

*Applicants that select to serve students at Florida School for Deaf and Blind must be able to
provide transcription of materials into large print and Braille. In addition, tutors serving deaf
students must be fluent in American Sign Language.

School District(s) to be Served:
Alachua, Bradford, Brevard, Charlotte, Citrus, Flagler, Gilchrist, Hernando, Highlands,
Hillsborough, Indian River, Lee, Levy, Marion, Martin, Osceola, Palm Beach, Pasco, Pinellas,
Polk, Putnam, St. Johns, St. Lucie, Sarasota, Sumter, Union, Volusia


D. Applicant Classification of Eligible SES Providers

       For-profit company

E. Academic and Instructional Information

1. Subject Area(s): Check all that apply.

       Science
       Reading/Language Arts
       Mathematics

2. Additional Staff Qualifications: Check all that apply.

       Title I paraprofessionals
       Current State of Florida certified teachers
       Ability to communicate languages other than English
                Spanish
                Haitian Creole

3. Type of Instruction: Check all that apply.

       Individual tutoring
       Small group instruction (not to exceed a group size of five students per tutor)
       Large group instruction (not to exceed a group size of eight students per tutor)

4. Grade Levels to be Served: Check all grade levels you will serve for each subject area. (Note:
The curriculum described in the application must be appropriate for the grade levels indicated):
Mathematics
   K       1       2    3     4      5     6       7    8    9      10     11     12

Reading/Language Arts
   K       1       2    3     4      5     6       7    8    9      10     11     12

Science
   K       1       2    3     4      5     6       7    8    9      10     11     12



F. SES Provisions

       1. 1. Student Capacity: Check all that apply.
              o Indicate the minimum number of students that the applicant would serve at
                  each site: 10


               o   Capacity to serve students with disabilities or plans developed under section
                   504 of the Rehabilitation Act       Yes    No
               o   Capacity to serve students who are English language learners (ELL)       Yes
                       No
               o   Capacity to serve students with visual impairments      Yes      No
               o Capacity to serve students with hearing impairments        Yes        No
       2. 2. Location of Services: Check all that apply.
               o       School Campus
               o       Provider facility
               o       Faith-based center (for example, church, temple, mosque, etc.)
               o       Community based center
               o       Student's home (on-line or computer based)
               o       Student's home with tutor present
               o       Public site such as public library (Describe): library, YMCA, community
                   center
               o       Other (Describe): Boys and Girls Clubs and other community
                   organizations
G. Operations

1. Day(s) Services will be Provided:

    Sun     Mon        Tues     Wed      Thurs      Fri    Sat


2. Length of each service session: Sessions held Monday – Friday and Sunday may not exceed
two hours per day. In addition, Saturday sessions may not exceed four hours. Cumulative
sessions may not exceed six hours per week.

       2 Hours
       1 Hour
       30 Minutes
       Other (Describe): 1.5
       Saturday Session: 2 hour(s) 0 min(s)

The applicant agrees to provide a minimum of 20 hours of tutoring per student.
    Yes     No

3. Times of Service

       Before school
       After school
       Weekends
       Summer

H. Cost of Service

1. Rate for Provision of SES: Per Student, Per Hour, Per Type of Instruction

**Note** The allowable range is between $5 and up to $70 per hour for each student and
per type of instruction.

RATE PER STUDENT PER HOUR:

       $70 Individual tutoring
       N/A In-home tutoring
       N/A Distance learning including computer-based instruction
       $60 Small group instruction
       $50 Large group instruction
III. Application Narrative
Applicants will provide a narrative response for each of the bulleted content requirements in the
online application. Applicants must access the online system at http://www.fldoe.org/flbpso. To
ensure an anonymous review of the application, the company name should not be included in this
section. The following content requirements must be included in the narrative:

A. Demonstrated Record of Effectiveness

   The provider must have a demonstrated record of effectiveness in increasing the
   academic achievement of students in subjects relevant to meeting the State’s academic
   content and student achievement standards [20 USC Section 6316(e); 34 C.F.R.
   §200.47(b)(1)(i)].

       Provide student achievement data that demonstrates that the applicant is effective in
       increasing academic gains in Reading, if applicable

       The goal of our program is to increase student achievement. Our company has
       successfully participated in SES for the past four years. Many of the students served in
       our program are considered low achieving and all are from low income families. At the
       conclusion of the 2008-2009 school year, our company collected achievement data by
       comparing pre and post tests and analyzing each student’s scores. When comparing pre
       and post test scores, the data indicates that 98% of our students made gains in reading.
       69% of our students made very significant gains, with a posttest score at least 25% higher
       than the pretest score. According to final score reports, 99% of our students that
       completed the program met at least one reading achievement goal on their Student
       Learning Plan. Of the students that completed the program, 73% met all of their reading
       achievement goals, including students with disabilities and ELL students. This data is
       compiled by examining Options posttest scores and curriculum based assessments that
       measure each student’s specific achievement goal written on the Student Learning Plan.
       Our company’s pre and post tests, which are created by Options Publishing
       (www.optionspublishing.com), are shown to be valid (strength of the tests was measured
       using external validity), reliable (estimated by using the test-retest method) and fully
       aligned to the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (each question corresponds to
       one or more specific standards). At the conclusion of their tutoring sessions, an increase
       of 50% or more was achieved on reading post tests by 71% of our students. Reading
       achievement increased significantly, with 79% of our students improving by at least one
       letter grade (10% percent) over their pretest scores. Our highly qualified tutors,
       exceptional planning and outstanding curriculum have had a positive impact on
       increasing academic gains. In addition, the most recent 2009 parent surveys indicated that
       100% of the respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with the quality of our services
       and 96% would like to use our company again next year.

       Identify the assessment used to document gains in Reading, if applicable
Our pre and post tests are created by Options Publishing and are titled “Reading
Predictors”. They measure the five areas of reading (phonics, phonemic awareness,
comprehension, vocabulary and fluency). The assessment is given on the student’s
current grade level, and is aligned with the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.
The pretest is used to diagnose and evaluate skill levels before beginning instruction. The
score is also used to help develop the Student Learning Plan and specific achievement
goals. The posttest is given after instruction to measure progress, document gains, and
show student growth. Our company has developed pacing guides for K-12 reading that
correlate to the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. Our tutors follow these pacing
guides and the Student Learning Plan to ensure the standards have been taught.
Completion of the curriculum by the student, as well as ongoing assessments that show
mastery of achievement goals, will demonstrate that these standards have been met.

Provide student achievement data that demonstrates that the applicant is effective in
increasing academic gains in Mathematics, if applicable

The goal of our program is to increase student achievement. Our company has
successfully participated in SES for the past four years. Many of the students served in
our program are considered low achieving and all are from low income families. At the
conclusion of the 2008-2009 school year, our company collected achievement data by
comparing pre and post tests and analyzing each student’s scores. When comparing pre
and post test scores, the data indicates that 92% of our students made gains in math. 65%
of our students made very significant gains, with a posttest score at least 30% higher than
the pretest score. According to final scores, 97% of our students that completed the
program met at least one math achievement goal on their Student Learning Plan,
including ESE and ELL students. This data is compiled by examining Options posttest
scores and curriculum based assessments that measure each student’s specific
achievement goal written on the Student Learning Plan. Our company’s pre and post
tests, which are created by Options Publishing (www.optionspublishing.com), are shown
to be valid (strength of the tests was measured using external validity), reliable (estimated
by using the test-retest method) and fully aligned to the Next Generation Sunshine State
Standards (each question corresponds to one or more specific standards). At the
conclusion of their tutoring sessions, an increase of 45% or more was achieved on math
posttests by 67% of our students. Math achievement increased significantly, with 72% of
our students improving by at least one letter grade (10% percent) over their pretest
scores. Our highly qualified tutors, exceptional planning and outstanding curriculum have
had a positive impact on increasing academic gains. In addition, the most recent 2009
parent surveys indicated that 100% of the respondents were satisfied or very satisfied
with the quality of our services and 96% would like to use our company again next year.

Identify the assessment used to document gains in Mathematics, if applicable

Our pre and post tests, Math Achievement Predictors, have been developed by Options
Publishing to match the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. The math pre and
post tests assess number sense, measurement, geometry, and data analysis. For example,
the 4th grade math pretest includes several questions that align with the Next Generation
      Sunshine State Standard M.A.1.2.4- understands that numbers can be represented in a
      variety of equivalent forms using whole numbers, decimals, fractions, and percents. The
      assessment is given on the student’s current grade level, and is aligned with the Next
      Generation Sunshine State Standards. The pretest is used to diagnose and evaluate skill
      levels before beginning instruction. The score is also used to help develop the Student
      Learning Plan and specific achievement goals. The posttest is given after instruction to
      measure progress, document gains, and show student growth. Our company has
      developed pacing guides for K-12 math that correlate to the Next Generation Sunshine
      State Standards. Our tutors follow these pacing guides and the Student Learning Plan to
      ensure the standards have been taught. Completion of the curriculum by the student, as
      well as ongoing assessments that show mastery of achievement goals, will demonstrate
      that these standards have been met.

      Provide student achievement data that demonstrates that the applicant is effective in
      increasing academic gains in Science, if applicable

      Although we were approved to offer science for the 2009-2010 school year, there were
      no students enrolled in science.

      Identify the assessment used to document gains in Science, if applicable

      The assessment used to document gains in science is titled “Comprehensive Science
      Assessment” by Options Publishing. The pre and post tests assess the student’s aptitude
      in physical science, earth science, biology, scientific inquiry, and chemistry. These
      assessments have been developed by the publisher to match the Next Generation
      Sunshine State Standards.
B. High Quality, Research-Based Instructional Services

  The provider must document that the instructional services provided are high quality,
  research-based, and designed to increase student academic achievement [20 USC
  Section 6316(e); 34 C.F.R. §200.47(b)(2)(ii)(C)].

      Describe the curriculum(s) that will be used in Reading, if applicable

      The entire curriculum of the proposed program is from Options Publishing and its
      subsidiary, Triumph Learning. We chose this curriculum for reading because of the high
      interest materials, correlations to the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, and the
      quantitative research which documents its effectiveness in increasing student
      achievement. Throughout the lessons, instructional support and accommodations for
      diverse learners, students with disabilities, and ELL students are included. It also
      addresses oral language development, guided and independent reading, word study, and
      writing skills. The program follows research-based NCTM standards: diagnose, instruct,
      practice and assess. The curricula that will be used for reading in grades K-5 are titled
      “Just Right Reading” and “Phonics Options” by Options Publishing. Our company chose
      these curricula because they are research based and designed to increase academic
      achievement for at risk learners. Students can practice the five essential reading strategies
(phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency) with
captivating, colorful, and high interest fiction, fantasy, and informational text at a
comfortable reading level. The "Just Right Reading" curriculum introduces concepts and
vocabulary and provides exercises for practice. High frequency words are repeated
naturally in selections to build fluency, while comprehension practice assists readers in
gaining meaning from fiction and nonfiction text. Each lesson includes a phonics review,
photos and diagrams that support the text graphically, and supportive questioning to
check students' comprehension. The curricula that will be used in Grades 6-12 are the
“Coach Triumph Learning Ladders” and “Buckle Down”. Comparing and contrasting,
understanding sequence, recognizing cause and effect, using context clues, identifying
main ideas and details, drawing conclusions, interpreting figurative language,
distinguishing between fact and opinion, determining author’s purpose, and identifying
problems and solutions are skills covered in the curricula.

Provide research supporting the use of the curriculum(s) in Reading, if applicable

In 2005, Options Publishing conducted research at schools in Florida, California, and
New York using their reading for in-school intervention, summer school remediation and
English Language Learners summer school. The teams that collected the data and
research results concluded that reading scores improved more than five points in just one
year of implementing the Options programs. Out of 616 summer school students, only 12
failed to show progress, 488 students showed progress, while 116 fully met targeted
achievement goals as measured by the AIMS Web Assessment. Full results of the
Intervention Results Studies and all high quality reading, math and science (grades K-12)
studies can be found at http://www.optionspublishing.com or http://triumphlearning.com.
Our curricula separates the learning skills and strategies into challenging, but manageable
steps. Our proposed reading curricula from Options Publishing contributed to reading
score increases in Levy County Florida. In 2009, thirty-nine 3rd grade students who
failed the FCAT were placed in a summer remediation program. Each student needed
remediation in order to progress to 4th grade. An Options Publishing pretest was given at
the beginning of the program. At the end of the program, the SAT-10 and the Options
posttest were administered to measure growth. Of the thirty-nine students, 62% (26
students) went on to 4th grade. In East Moline, Douglas Whisker conducted an
experiment involving two groups of sixth-grade readers: those given reading strategies
only, and those given reading strategies and the Coach book as part of a test-readiness
program. The students who used Coach met or exceeded Illinois Reading Assessment
standards at higher rates (70.2% vs. 48.5%) and obtained higher mean scores (234.17 vs.
193.18)—both statistically significant increases. The 2004 efficacy research involved 33
elementary, middle, and high schools in Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts,
Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas, and looked at performance in Reading/Language
Arts; the number of students who met or exceeded standards increased in every
instance—sometimes by as much as 50-100% (Options website, 2010).

Describe the curriculum(s) that will be used in Mathematics, if applicable

The entire curriculum of the proposed program is from Options Publishing and its
subsidiary, Triumph Learning. We chose this curriculum for math because of the high
interest materials, correlations to the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, and the
quantitative research which documents its effectiveness in increasing student
achievement. Throughout the lessons, instructional support and accommodations for
diverse learners, students with disabilities, and ELL students are included. The program
follows research-based NCTM standards: diagnose, instruct, practice and assess. Each
unit opens with a manipulative activity to introduce the unit concept. Each unit has a
take-home literature selection to connect math concepts with students' everyday lives and
ongoing built in assessments. For grades K-5, we chose “Math Options” created by
Options Publishing because of the high interest materials, correlations to the Next
Generation Sunshine State Standards, and the quantitative research which documents its
effectiveness in increasing student achievement. For students who require remediation in
math, “Math Options” teaches problem solving skills using real life, motivating, hands-on
activities and literature. For grades 6-12, we chose “Foundations in Math” created by
Options Publishing. Number sense, algebra and functions, measurement and geometry,
statistics, data and probability, and problem solving are skills covered in the curricula.

Provide research supporting the use of the curriculum(s) in Mathematics, if applicable

In 2005, Options Publishing conducted research at schools in Florida, California, and
New York using our proposed math curriculum for in-school intervention, summer
school remediation and English Language Learners summer school. The teams that
collected the data and research results concluded that scores improved more than five
points in just one year of implementing the Math Options programs. Out of 616 summer
school students, only 12 failed to show progress, 488 students showed progress, while
116 fully met targeted achievement goals as measured by the AIMS Web Assessment.
Lessons are built on the principles established by the National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics, provide the in-depth coverage recommended in its “Curriculum Focal
Points,” and align with national mathematics education standards (NCTM, 2006). The
2004 efficacy research involved 33 elementary, middle, and high schools in Florida,
Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas, and looked at
performance in Math; the number of students who met or exceeded standards increased in
every instance—sometimes by as much as 50-100% (Options website, 2010).

Describe the curriculum(s) that will be used in Science, if applicable

Our science curriculum, Florida Science Coach by Options Publishing, thoroughly covers
each science theory, process, and concept included in the Next Generation Sunshine State
Standards. Grade-specific, in-depth instruction and practice questions give students the
skills and practice they need. The curriculum builds both science skills and problem-
solving capabilities. The leveled instruction includes accommodations and supplemental
materials for students with disabilities and English Language Learners with ongoing
assessments built into the curriculum.

Provide research supporting the use of the curriculum(s) in Science, if applicable
      Our science curriculum, “Florida Science Coach”, was developed and based on scientific
      research into how students learn. The curriculum is built upon principles of explicit,
      systematic instruction. One of the instructional strategies built into our proposed science
      curriculum is scaffolding. Scaffolding is an instructional technique whereby the teacher
      models the desired learning strategy or task, then gradually shifts responsibility to the
      students. Activities in our science curriculum always include modeled examples.
      According to William, Hall and Lauer (2004) in the study titled Teaching Expository
      Text Structure to Young At-Risk Learners, Journal of Educational Psychology (97, 538-
      550), low-achieving students benefit from scaffolded instruction, with the teacher
      modeling strategies and guiding practice. Our science curriculum is also high interest,
      builds on what the student already knows, and incorporates hands on activities.
      Performance of low-achieving students improves when they become actively engaged in
      learning and spend more time on learning tasks (Lauer, 2004).
C. Services Consistent with Florida's Next Generation Sunshine State Standards
and Instructional Program of School District

  The provider must ensure that supplemental educational services are consistent with the
  instructional program of the local educational agency and aligned with State academic
  content and student academic achievement standards [20 USC Section 6316(e); 34
  C.F.R. §200.47(b)(1)(ii), (b)(2)(ii)(A); 34 C.F.R. §200.47(b)(2)(ii)(B)].

      Describe how the proposed curriculum(s) aligns with Florida’s Next Generation Sunshine
      State Standards

      Options Publishing has meticulously correlated the Next Generation Sunshine State
      Standards (NGSSS) into our proposed curricula. In fact, the curriculum materials have
      been specifically written to correlate with the NGSSS. Each program has the content
      standards listed specifically by page number. Our company has developed pacing guides
      for K-12 reading, math and science that correlate to the NGSSS. Our tutors follow these
      pacing guides and the Student Learning Plan to ensure the standards have been taught.
      Each lesson in the pacing guide has been created to focus on specific skills and standards,
      which are listed by benchmark at the beginning of each lesson. Completion of the
      curricula by the student, as well as ongoing assessments that show mastery of
      achievement goals, will demonstrate that these standards have been met. When students
      have difficulty with a specific benchmark, supplemental materials are included in the
      curricula to ensure each standard is met. The following is a summarized sample of
      alignment of the proposed curriculum with the NGSSS. READING/LANGUAGE ARTS:
      Page 27 of Just Right Reading (JRR) B correlates with the benchmark LA.1.1.3.1
      (identifying phonemes). MATH: Page 29 of Math Options 2 correlates with the
      benchmark MA.2.G.5.2 (telling time). SCIENCE: Pages 42-45 of Florida Coach Science
      Grade 8 correlates to the benchmark SC.A.1.3.1 (physical properties of matter). These
      standards also directly correlate with the state grade level expectations of the Florida
      Department of Education. The Individual Education Plans and accommodations of our
      students with special needs are incorporated into the creation of the student’s
      individualized SLP. The tutor will modify and supplement instruction and lessons to
      ensure that both the NGSSS and the IEP goals and objectives are being taught and
      achieved.

      Provide an example of how the proposed program aligns with at least one district’s
      instructional program

      The districts our company serve have pacing guides or focus calendars in place for each
      grade level. The pacing guides and focus calendars have been developed to correlate the
      Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS) with specific courses taught in the
      districts and are designed to meet the needs of teachers, students, and the community.
      Planning and delivering instruction based on the instructional program of each district
      ensures coverage of all appropriate NGSSS. Our proposed program is aligned with the
      NGSSS, which align to the district pacing guides or focus calendars. Our company will
      adhere to the district instructional program by using Options curriculum which is
      carefully updated every school year by our curriculum specialist to ensure that the
      connection between tutoring and each district’s pacing guides or focus calendars are
      closely aligned. For example, the lesson on page 52 in Options "Just Right Reading D"
      explains and defines comparing and contrasting and asks the student to identify items in
      sentences that are being compared or contrasted, then tell how they are alike or different.
      This exercise aligns with Volusia County Schools' 4th grade Curriculum Map section
      titled “Reading Process” which reads: compare and contrast elements in multiple texts
      (e.g., setting, characters, problems). Page 23 of "Math Options 2" has an exercise that
      asks the student to count pennies, nickels and dimes and find the correct amount, which
      aligns with Volusia County Schools' 2nd grade Curriculum Map section titled “Money”
      which reads: recognize and skip count to find the value of a group of coins, using a single
      currency, up to $1.00. Another example can be found in our science text, "Florida
      Science Coach". On pages 58-61, the physical properties of matter are discussed and a
      practice exercise is included. This aligns with Volusia County Schools' 3rd grade
      Curriculum Map section titled “Scientific Process and Inquiry of Matter” which reads:
      define and give an example of what matter is and name the physical properties of matter
      that can be measured. Skills, exercises and concepts throughout the program are aligned
      with each district’s instructional program.
D. Measurable Achievement Goals

  The provider must set measurable achievement goals for each student in consultation
  with each student’s parents and the school district. [20 USC Section 6316(e); 34 C.F.R.
  §200.46(b)(2)(i)(A)]

      Describe how the provider will work with the school district and parents to develop
      measurable achievement goals for each student

      Our company will work closely with the school district and parents to develop specific
      and measurable achievement goals for each student in the program. We will contact
      parents early and request input before and during the development of the Student
      Learning Plan. Parents can describe their child’s strengths and weaknesses which guide
      in the development of the achievement goals. The parents and school district personnel
      are essential in developing personalized and measurable achievement goals. The district
      can provide recent assessment and achievement data. Teachers and school facilitators
      who know the student personally can provide information on specific learning gaps and
      areas of concern. For example, at a recent meeting to develop a Student Learning Plan,
      the parent stated the student “can read, but doesn’t understand what she’s reading”. The
      school facilitator was present and provided copies of the student’s most recent reading
      unit test. The test indicated the student missed questions related to comprehension,
      specifically main idea and supporting details. With a most recent FCAT reading score of
      Level 2, as well as our own pretest indicating a weakness in comprehension, the team
      concluded the student needed remediation in reading comprehension. A specific and
      measurable achievement goal was written as follows: By the end of tutoring sessions, the
      student will recall main ideas and supporting details from a grade level reading selection
      by answering multiple choice questions with 80% accuracy.

      State the name of the pre- and post-assessment that will be used in Reading, if applicable

      Our pre and post test assessments by Options Publishing, titled “Reading Predictors”,
      measure the five areas of reading (phonics, phonemic awareness, comprehension,
      vocabulary and fluency). The assessment is given on the student’s current grade level,
      and is aligned with the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and our company’s
      proposed curricula. The pretest is used to diagnose and evaluate skill levels before
      beginning instruction. The score is also used to help develop the Student Learning Plan
      and specific achievement goals. The posttest is given after instruction to measure
      progress, document gains, and show student growth.

      State the name of the pre- and post-assessment that will be used in Mathematics, if
      applicable

      Our pre and post assessments for math, “Math Achievement Predictors”, have been
      developed by Options Publishing to align with the Next Generation Sunshine State
      Standards. The math pretests and posttests assess number sense, measurement, geometry,
      and data analysis. For example, the 4th grade math pretest includes several questions that
      align with the Next Generation Sunshine State Standard M.A.1.2.4- understands that
      numbers can be represented in a variety of equivalent forms using whole numbers,
      decimals, fractions, and percents.

      State the name of the pre- and post-assessment that will be used in Science, if applicable

      The assessment used to document gains in Science is titled “Comprehensive Science
      Assessment”, by Options Publishing. The pre and post tests assess the student’s aptitude
      in physical science, earth science, biology, scientific inquiry, and chemistry. These
      assessments have been developed by the publisher to match the Next Generation
      Sunshine State Standards.
E. Reports of Student's Progress

  The provider must measure the student's progress, and regularly inform the student’s
  parents and teachers regarding the progress of the student in improving academic
  achievement as outlined in the student learning plan [[20 USC Section 6316(e); 34
  C.F.R. §200.46(b)(2)(i)(B), (ii)].

      Describe the procedures that will be used to track the student’s progress on the goals
      identified in the Student Learning Plan

      Our company has established several complementary procedures to ensure that a
      student’s progress is appropriately documented and reported. Every student in our
      program will receive a monthly progress report. This report, which is completed by the
      tutor and approved by our NCLB manager, will track the student’s progress on the goals
      identified in the Student Learning Plan. Ongoing built in assessments in our proposed
      curriculum will help the tutor monitor progress. For each achievement goal, the tutor will
      report on the activities they worked on toward that goal. For example, if a student has an
      achievement goal related to reading comprehension, the tutor might report, “The student
      read a grade level selection. Then, we used a story board to retell the main idea and
      supporting details”. The progress toward each goal is reported as a percentage. The report
      will show, in graph form, the initial assessment results, the progress toward the goal, and
      the final goal percentage.

      Describe the process for reporting students’ progress on the goals of student learning
      plans to parents

      The parent will receive a copy of the progress report each month, or more often when
      requested. If the tutor does not come in contact with the parents personally, a report will
      be given to the student or mailed to the home. In addition to the monthly written reports,
      tutors will be expected to communicate with parents via phone or in person throughout
      the program in a meaningful and understandable way to provide brief summaries of
      short-term progress. This will allow parents to ask questions and will allow tutors to
      ensure that parents have read and understood the report. This process is described in
      detail to parents during the development of the Student Learning Plan.

      Explain how progress reports will be provided in the parents’ native language

      Bilingual tutors on staff will facilitate written and oral communication of the progress
      reports to parents and guardians in their native language. If necessary, we will hire an
      outside source for translation of uncommon languages used by parents.

      Describe the process for reporting students’ progress on the goals of student learning
      plans to the classroom teacher

      The tutor is responsible for personally distributing the progress report to the student’s
      teacher before or after school hours. If the teacher is not available, the report will be
      delivered directly to the school.
F. Capacity and Resources

  The provider must have the capacity and resources to provide supplemental services to
students [20 USC Section 6316(e); 34 C.F.R. §200.47(b)(1)(iii)].

    Describe the activities that must take place to ensure services begin by October 15th

    Our company has maintained a high quality SES program for the past four years with a
    strong infrastructure. We carry full coverage insurance including general liability,
    professional liability, errors and omissions, auto liability, workman’s compensation, and
    child abuse insurance. As shown in our financial soundness affidavit, resources are
    available to make sure training, books, manipulatives, rent, insurance, payroll and
    incidentals are paid in full prior to October 15th. We have the most up-to-date computers
    with high speed internet access which enables us to have access to the county and state
    NCLB/SES information systems. We have been in business for five years and are in
    compliance with local, state and federal health, safety and civil rights laws and
    ordinances. To ensure service begins by October 15th, our company has a timeline in
    place. We will begin hiring and re-hiring district coordinators on May 1st. We advertise
    for tutors on Craigslist, at local colleges and at job fairs. Applicants are interviewed, and
    if hired, they are given access to the district’s fingerprinting and/or drug testing sites.
    Training for district coordinators will begin May 30th. We will begin the hiring/interview
    process for tutors on June 20th. Our tutor training will begin on July 31st. All
    fingerprinting and background clearance is completed by September 1st. Our company
    will have adequate curriculum materials on hand to begin the program and will order
    more materials as needed. Once we receive the list of students from each county, our
    team will set up SLP meetings. Parents will be notified of the times and location of these
    meetings via phone calls and letters within five days of receiving our list. Our goal is to
    have all SLPs written, signed and approved by October 5th, with all tutoring beginning
    by October 15th.

    Describe the professional development provided to all instructional staff throughout the
    school year

    Our NCLB team includes our director, NCLB manager, regional coordinators, district
    coordinators, lead tutors and tutoring staff. Our tutoring staff, all of whom are highly
    qualified by the FLDOE, are responsible for tutoring the students and reporting to the
    lead tutors. Lead tutors are placed at each location in order to monitor the tutors and
    students and deal with the day-to-day issues. Lead tutors report to our NCLB district
    coordinators, who are responsible for coordinating the schedules and supplies for the
    schools within their district. District coordinators are highly qualified with educational
    experience and a bachelors degree or higher. Our district coordinators report to our
    NCLB manager and our regional coordinators, who are responsible for ensuring
    understanding and implementation of SLPs. The NCLB manager has 17 years of teaching
    experience and four years of experience with SES and NCLB. Ultimately, the company
    director, who will ensure start up activities occur according to the timeline by monitoring
    each step on a weekly basis, is responsible for all communication and decision making.
    The director holds an MBA and is a former public school teacher with ten years of
    experience. Our coordinators and tutors are initially trained in a two-day workshop. On
    the first day, coordinators and tutors are trained by the curriculum representative on the
use of materials, assessments, pacing guides, Next Generation Sunshine State Standards,
instructional methods, key strategies, and data interpretation. The second day involves
training on administrative requirements such as recordkeeping, student session logs,
attendance rosters, progress reports and accountability. Also included on this training day
is a review of FERPA guidelines, code of ethics, child abuse reporting, specific district
requirements, federal, state, local health, safety and civil rights laws. All staff sign
acknowledgments of these procedures along with confidentiality agreements. Once the
training is successfully completed and security clearances have been confirmed, tutors are
assigned to specific schools and students. Monthly telephone conference calls and
personal contact with statewide staff take place to discuss the program, receive individual
feedback on tutoring sessions and paperwork, and ensure high quality program
implementation and compliance. Regularly scheduled and mandatory staff development
seminars will take place for coordinators and tutors throughout the active SES tutoring
season to address specific tutoring challenges to build upon original training concepts.
Topics will include behavior management, increasing time on task, and strategies proven
to be effective with diverse learners. Lead tutors will also monitor and give ongoing
support and feedback to improve tutor skills in working with students. Our staff conducts
unannounced observations and audits documents to ensure high quality instruction is
provided and that the program is implemented with fidelity. Monthly emails are sent by
the director to remind staff of deadlines, expectations and company announcements.

Describe a process for supervising and monitoring tutors to ensure the proposed program
is implemented with fidelity

Our company is committed to ensuring that our program is implemented ethically and
with fidelity. All employees and tutors receive extensive training on our company’s
ethical standards and practices. This training occurs on the second day of our two day
tutor training program. Our tutor handbook, which all tutors receive, includes behavior at
provider fairs, effective instruction, reporting child abuse, drug and alcohol use, ensuring
student safety at all times, quality of tutoring, dress code, and student confidentiality. All
employees will sign a statement that they have received the ethics training and will abide
by ethical business practices. All tutors will receive a copy of their school’s or tutoring
site’s emergency procedures. Observation of tutoring sessions will occur daily (every
tutoring session). A lead tutor at each school will arrive early to supervise students before
tutoring begins. Students will be delivered to the tutor to begin each session. Lead tutors
oversee individual tutors during every session and ensure that tutors are following our
procedures, ensuring student safety, providing quality tutoring and effective instruction,
and behaving in an ethical manner. The lead tutor also stays after the tutoring session is
completed to be sure all students are picked up by an authorized adult (photo ID
required). District coordinators and the director will make monthly unannounced visits to
ensure tutors are in compliance with all ethical business practices and laws. All incidents
will be reported to the director immediately. Feedback will be given by the district
coordinator or director in writing and will include corrective procedures. Action will be
taken to resolve any situation and may include additional training, use of support
materials, or adjustments in tutoring scheduling. If the issue is not resolved or if the
director determines it to be appropriate, immediate termination will occur.
G. Compliance with Applicable Federal, State, Local Health, Safety, and Civil
Rights Laws

  The provider must comply with applicable federal, state, and local health, safety, and
  civil rights laws and regulations, to provide supplemental services to students [20 USC
  Section 6316(e); 34 C.F.R. §200.47(b)(2)(iii)].

      Describe the training for instructional staff related to health, safety, and civil rights laws
      and regulations

      During initial training for instructional staff, there is a review of FERPA guidelines, code
      of ethics, child abuse reporting, specific district requirements, federal, state, local health,
      safety and civil rights laws. All staff is given handouts and sign acknowledgments of
      understanding. When a student is assigned to a tutor, the tutor is given a Health
      Information sheet which is filled out by the parent. This includes any health problems and
      concerns, as well as the name of the student’s physician should an emergency occur. All
      tutors are required to carry a cell phone in case of emergency.

      Describe a process to intervene if problems are identified

      Our company has procedures in place to prevent problems before they arise. Lead tutors
      oversee individual tutors during every session and ensure that tutors are following our
      procedures, ensuring student safety, providing quality tutoring and effective instruction,
      and behaving in an ethical manner. The lead tutor also stays after the tutoring session is
      completed to be sure all students are picked up by an authorized adult (photo ID
      required). District coordinators and the director will make monthly unannounced visits to
      ensure tutors are in compliance with all ethical business practices and laws. All incidents
      will be reported to the director immediately and in writing within 24 hours. All staff are
      supplied with incident and abuse reporting forms to use when necessary. If a problem is
      identified, our company will act immediately. The reaction will depend on the specific
      issue. Feedback will be given by the district coordinator or director in writing and will
      include corrective procedures. Action will be taken to resolve any situation and may
      include additional training, use of support materials, or adjustments in tutoring
      scheduling. If the issue is not resolved or if the director determines it to be appropriate,
      immediate termination will occur.

								
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