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MOU Finger Lakes CC

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					 Memorandum of Understanding




Finger Lakes Community College

           and the
 State University of New York




         December 2000
                                                            CONTENTS




Market Niche/Distinctiveness .................................................................................................. 1


Projected Institutional Position and Benchmarks of Success .............................................. 2
1.0 Enrollment and Admission Selectivity............................................................................ 3
 1.1 Enrollment growth.............................................................................................................. 3
 1.2 Selectivity............................................................................................................................ 4

2.0 Student Outcomes............................................................................................................. 4
 2.1 Attainment of student goals ................................................................................................ 4
 2.2 Retention rates.................................................................................................................... 4
 2.3 Graduation and transfer rates............................................................................................ 6
 2.4 Success of transfer students at 4-year institutions ............................................................. 6
 2.5 Student/alumni satisfaction ................................................................................................ 7
 2.6 Employer satisfaction ......................................................................................................... 7
 2.7 Assessment planning........................................................................................................... 8

3.0 Faculty Development and Scholarship ........................................................................... 8
 3.1 Faculty recruitment ............................................................................................................ 8
 3.2 Faculty review: tenure and promotion ............................................................................... 9
 3.3 Quality and quantity of scholarship ................................................................................... 9

4.0 Intercampus Collaboration ............................................................................................. 9
 4.1 Joint academic programs ................................................................................................... 9
 4.2 Articulation agreements ................................................................................................... 10
5.0 Academic Program Directions ...................................................................................... 10
 5.1 New and revised programs............................................................................................... 10
 5.1.1General education .......................................................................................................... 11
 5.2 Distance education ........................................................................................................... 11
 5.3 Responsiveness to local/regional/state needs................................................................... 12

6.0 Infrastructure and Technology ..................................................................................... 12
 6.1 Facilities ........................................................................................................................... 12
 6.1.1Library............................................................................................................................ 12
 6.2 Academic technology........................................................................................................ 13

7.0 Mission Review Funding................................................................................................ 13


Appendix A............................................................................................................................... 15
                               Market Niche/Distinctiveness
                              Campus role within SUNY System

Finger Lakes Community College was created in 1965 under the sponsorship of Ontario
County and admitted its first students in September 1967. Its 250-acre campus is located in
the heart of the Finger Lakes Region and is approximately 45 minutes from Rochester. In
addition to its main campus in Canandaigua, there are instructional centers in Geneva,
Newark, and Victor. FLCC also offers significant numbers of college-level courses in area
high schools for seniors.

The College’s over 4,000 students are enrolled in both transfer AA and AS programs, as well
as numerous occupationally oriented AAS and certificate programs. FLCC also plays a vital
role in workforce development and offers over 4,000 courses through its Institute for
Workforce Development.

Finger Lakes Community College shares mission elements with all SUNY community
colleges. These include:

       Access - providing universal access to higher education by removing economic, social,
       geographic, and more recently, temporal barriers. This is perhaps the overarching
       raison d’être for community colleges.

       Transfer - the preparation of students for transfer to four-year institutions.

       Career preparation - preparing students for a first career, a career change, or career
       advancement.

       Basic skills and developmental education - assisting underprepared students to
       acquire the basic skills and knowledge that will allow them to advance to college-level
       work.

       Continuing education and community service - meeting the educational aspirations
       of educated adults, employees of local business and industry, professionals seeking
       continuing certification, and local workforce development needs. This mission
       element also includes programs, events, and services for community organizations and
       the general public.

While Finger Lakes Community College embraces these mission elements, it also achieves a
significant measure of distinctiveness from the College's implementation of its mission and its
environment. Among its unique characteristics are:

       A highly successful program of offering the College’s courses to area high school
       students in their own schools



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Memorandum of Understanding                                Finger Lakes Community College


       A residential “feel” made possible by availability of substantial dormitory space
       immediately adjacent to the campus and a full spectrum of student life activities
       available on campus in the evening

       Broad offerings in both transfer and career curricula (FLCC has 35 associate degree
       programs – an associate of arts, 12 associate of science, 22 associate of applied
       science, and 7 certificates)

       An extremely active Institute for Workforce Development that recorded almost 4,000
       course registrations in 1997 – 1998



               Projected Institutional Position and Benchmarks of Success

Finger Lakes is a comprehensive community colleges, offering six transfer associate degrees
(1 AA and 5 AS), and 38 occupationally oriented programs (7 AS, 22 AAS, and 9 certificate
programs). Many of the occupational programs contain curricular elements that provide
students with actual workplace experience.

The College has formed strong partnerships with area high schools. These take the form of an
exemplary Tech-Prep program, which grants advanced standing or credit for certain high
school experiences. FLCC also offers college-level courses to academically prepared students
in many area schools. This program has been a major contributor to FLCC’s strong
enrollments recently.

The College prides itself on providing an environment more like a residential college than a
commuter campus. Privately owned student housing adjacent to campus and a comprehensive
student life program that extends well into the evening create this ambiance.

The programmatic direction of the College is to expand the breadth of its offerings in career
oriented programs. Several new programs (Sports Tourism Studies and Massage
Therapy/Integrative Health) were approved in spring 2000, and additional ones are under
development.

The College is also planning an expanded effort in the area of distance education, and has
established a three-year plan to address this initiative. It is also working with the SUNY
Institute of Technology to bring baccalaureate degree programs to the FLCC campus.

Major challenges facing FLCC are the need to develop a comprehensive assessment plan and
meeting targeted enrollment growth. Recently, the College has aggressively pursued a
program offering college-level courses in area high schools. The degree to which this
enrollment source can be expanded will influence the College’s growth rate.




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Memorandum of Understanding                                            Finger Lakes Community College


1.0       Enrollment and Admission Selectivity

1.1       Enrollment growth

FLCC’s enrollment plan projects very limited growth during the first two years, but some
acceleration during the last three years, yielding a 2.14% increase in AAFTE over five years
(1999 – 2004). First-time full-time students remain unchanged during the first three years of
the plan, but accelerate enough during the last two years to realize a growth of slightly more
than 6%. The College's detailed enrollment projection is as follows:

                        Fall 1999     Fall 2000    Fall 2001    Fall 2002    Fall 2003    Fall 2004
                        (Actual)     (Approved)    (Planned)    (Planned)    (Planned)    (Planned)
 First-time full-time          789           789          789          805          821          837
 Transfer full-time            143           146          149          153          158          163
 Continuing/returning        1,306         1,345        1,368        1,382        1,401        1,422
 Total full-time             2,238         2,280        2,306        2,340        2,380        2,422
 Part-time                   2,289         2,346        2,417        2,489        2,539        2,590
 Total headcount             4,527         4,626        4,723        4,829        4,919        5,012
 AAFTE                       3,374         3,389        3,440        3,501        3,557        3,617

Note: Enrollment goals may be affected by external factors such as changing economic
conditions, demographic shifts, and fiscal constraints. Official enrollment targets that are the
basis for the University’s budget model are set annually through dialogue between campuses
and System Administration, and may differ somewhat from the above.

The Vice President of Academic Affairs in liaison with the Enrollment Management Team is
currently conducting a review of the strengths and weaknesses of all academic programs,
identifying enrollment targets and determining marketing strategies for each program.
Expansion of enrollment opportunities for moderately enrolled programs will also be
emphasized. Recommendations for the future of programs with historically low enrollments
will be developed.

In reviewing its enrollment plan, FLCC will have to make the judgement whether it can
continue to expand the number of high school seniors enrolled in the College’s courses, or if
that market is approaching saturation. If the latter is the case, the College may have to modify
its projected part-time student growth.

It is suggested that the College

      •   Carefully analyze its position on the growth curve of high school students taking
          college courses, and if necessary, reflect this in a future enrollment plan

      •   Investigate why the College fell short of its goals in first-time/full-time students
          (planned fall 1999 vs. official fall 1999) and modify the marketing plan accordingly

      •   Continue to develop new occupationally oriented curricula, particularly in areas of
          technology


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Memorandum of Understanding                                       Finger Lakes Community College


      •   Respond to the findings relative to the strengths and weaknesses of existing academic
          programs

1.2       Selectivity

FLCC is a participant in the Full Opportunity Program of the State University of New York,
and thereby guarantees open admission to all Ontario County residents who graduated from
high school during the past year, and to applicants who were released from active duty with
the Armed Forces during the past year.

As the College develops programs where the number of applicants exceeds the seats
available, it may be able to consider raising matriculation standards. Higher matriculation
standards will allow FLCC to counsel academically less well prepared students into programs
that will help them to meet the new standards or to select alternative programs. This strategy
offers the potential of raising academic standards and increasing student success and retention
while adhering to the philosophy of open access.


2.0       Student Outcomes

2.1       Attainment of student goals

A primary goal of community colleges is to help students develop and articulate educational
and career goals and then assist them in achieving them. The American Association of
Community Colleges regards this measure as the most important indicator of institutional
success. In order to accomplish this, careful tracking of student goals and academic
accomplishments is required.

 The College has collected data on goals from incoming students for a number of years
utilizing its Entering Student Survey. However, until 1997 those data were collected from a
sample that was not truly representative of the entire student body. For example, the survey
heavily over-sampled students who anticipated needing help from the Development Studies
Program. Since 1997, the College obtained a better sample, but to date, no tracking has been
done on those students. Therefore,

      •   Beginning with the entering class of 2000, FLCC will track students through their stay
          at the College on a semester-by-semester basis to determine if the are achieving their
          goals

      •   Utilize the data collected from the classes of 1997, 1998, and 1999 to make a similar
          determination

2.2       Retention rates

FLCC’s retention of first time, full-time non-EOP students, with a comparison to SUNY
community college averages is as follows:


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Memorandum of Understanding                                        Finger Lakes Community College



                                           Semester of Enrollment
 Initial            First               Second                 Third              Fourth
 Term          FLCC         SUNY    FLCC     SUNY        FLCC       SUNY     FLCC      SUNY
 Fall 1993     100%         100%   74.69%    81.24%     58.83%     61.61%   56.33%     54.72%
              (N=719)               (537)                (423)               (405)
 Fall 1994     100%         100%   77.57%    80.88%     55.28%     60.69%   50.51%     54.10%
              (N=691)               (536)                (382)               (349)
 Fall 1995     100%         100%   84.42%    81.70%     63.28%     62.25%   57.23%     55.80%
              (N=629)               (531)                (398)               (360)
 Fall 1996     100%         100%   83.41%    81.74%     65.88%     62.89%   60.82%     55.62%
              (N=633)               (528)                (417)               (385)
 Fall 1997     100%         100%   83.13%    80.62%     61.09%     62.17%
                                                                             N/A       N/A
              (N=735)               (611)                (449)

FLCC’s retention rate (percent of first-time, full-time freshmen returning for sophomore year)
was 65.88% and 61.09% (fall 1996 and fall 1997 cohorts) vs. the SUNY-wide community
college averages of 62.89% and 62.10%. The College’s placement testing, developmental
courses, and overall student support will hopefully help achieve rates consistently above the
SUNY-wide averages.

It would be informative if the College reported retention data in the context of student goals.
In that way, students intending to take only a few courses, or complete a certificate in a year,
would not be included as non-returning students the following year, yielding a more accurate
picture of retention.

FLCC is taking a number of steps to improve retention, including investigating the
implementation of first year seminar courses, limiting concurrent enrollment in developmental
and degree program courses, enhancing and expanding the orientation program, and
mentoring of students on academic probation.

Currently, the level of first to second year retention stands at approximately 60%, which is
well above national community college averages. As a part of continuing efforts of the
institution’s Enrollment Management Team (EMT), the College already took a number of
positive steps during 1999 – 2000 to address and improve retention. The College plans to

   •    Improve upon its retention rate, which is already above national and SUNY averages

   •    Continue to identify the major factors contributing to attrition, perhaps through
        expanded phone surveys of students who are eligible to register but do not

   •    Continue to improve both remedial and ongoing academic support programs to reduce
        attrition attributable to poor prior academic preparation or the inability to keep pace
        with current academic demands




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Memorandum of Understanding                                          Finger Lakes Community College


2.3       Graduation and transfer rates

The graduation rate of FLCC students (first-time, full-time) and comparative SUNY-wide
community college averages appear below:

                        Cumulative Percent of Initial Cohort Receiving an Associate Degree
 Initial Term                                 (Status as of Fall 1998)
 and Size (N)       Two Years or Less               Three Years                   Four Years
 of Cohort         FLCC         SUNY           FLCC           SUNY          FLCC           SUNY
 Fall 1994
                   17.55%       12.17%        31.16%        26.06%        33.47%        30.75%
 (N=775)
 Fall 1995
                   19.50%       12.78%        35.48%        27.19%         N/A           N/A
 (N=682)
 Fall 1996
                   22.12%       12.83%         N/A           N/A           N/A           N/A
 (N=678)

FLCC’s two-year and three-year graduation rates of 17.55% and 31.16% (fall 1994 first-time,
full-time cohort) compare favorably to the SUNY community college averages. It should be
noted that the rates for FLCC are based on a denominator that includes students who have
academic goals other than graduation (e.g., transfer after one year of study). So most
community colleges, including FLCC, are concerned about using graduation rates as
indicators of institutional effectiveness when they are not examined in the proper context. In
order to obtain a more balanced picture of institutional effectiveness vis-à-vis graduation, the
College will make efforts to

      •   Determine its graduation rate as a percentage of students who enter the College
          aspiring to receive an associate degree or certificate

      •   Establish an appropriate goal for the success rate of students whose stated goal is
          attaining a FLCC degree or certificate, a goal based on the unique features of the
          College and its students as determined by the institution’s Enrollment Management
          Team

2.4       Success of transfer students at 4-year institutions

An important measure of educational quality at a community college is the success of former
students at upper division colleges. The College already collects data regarding student
transfer via an alumni survey. It also utilizes detailed information furnished by Institutional
Research at System Administration on former FLCC students who transferred to other SUNY
institutions. System can now also supply data on transfers to independents (via Student Loan
Clearinghouse records) allowing FLCC to develop an even more complete picture.

The fall 1997 – fall 1998 persistence of former FLCC students attending an upper division
SUNY institution on a full-time basis was 71.43%. The average for full-time community
college transfers was 73.02%.

In order to enhance the success of FLCC students at transfer institutions, the College plans to



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Memorandum of Understanding                                        Finger Lakes Community College


      •   Develop a more detailed analysis of the success of transfer students within SUNY,
          e.g., changes in GPAs in specific programs and in specific disciplines

      •   Establish specific goals for transfer success and institute appropriate actions to achieve
          them. In point of fact, the College already exceeds the SUNY-wide persistence rate
          and intends to improve upon its rates of transfer success

2.5       Student/alumni satisfaction

FLCC has not participated in the SUNY Student Opinion Survey (SOS). This instrument
provides valuable insight into how students perceive their college on a number of important
dimensions, including the quality of the academic experience, student growth, career
preparation, library services, advising, and faculty and staff relations, to name a few.
Furthermore, these findings can be compared to the perceptions that other community college
students have of their institutions. Such information has been effectively used in planning by
many of the participating colleges. Schools that have participated in more than one
administration of the SOS can also detect trends and measure the effects of certain initiatives
taken since the last administration.

It is recommended that

      •   FLCC participate in the next (fall 2000) administration of the Student Opinion Survey
          and use the results to assist in the College’s planning process

The College previously conducted a variety of local student opinion surveys, will continue to
do so, and will report these findings each year in the Annual Report of Assessment Activities
as prepared by the Coordinator of Institutional Assessment.

The results of the 1998 SUNY Alumni Outcomes Survey, which sampled 50% of the classes
from 1991 and 1994, reveal a high level of satisfaction among responding FLCC graduates.
Their overall rating of the College of 4.35 on a five-point scale is very positive, and compares
favorably to the average for all SUNY community colleges of 4.30. The College fared well
both on an absolute scale and in comparison to system means in many areas, including
opportunities for student/faculty interaction (4.02 vs. 3.76), and opportunities for student
involvement (3.76 vs. 3.54). Perhaps the most telling response is the fact that 81.8% of the
responding alumni would recommend FLCC without any reservations.

2.6       Employer satisfaction

As part of the information reported by the Coordinator of Institutional Assessment for the
Annual Report, data collected through employer satisfaction surveys will be presented.
The College is currently conducting a Community Needs and Interests Analysis that will, in
part, collect responses from twenty area employers who currently recruit FLCC graduates
and/or take advantage of special programs offered by the College. This initiative will see
feedback regarding their overall opinions/image of FLCC, assessment of the variety and
quality of programs offered by the College, perceived strengths and weaknesses, strength of


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Memorandum of Understanding                                        Finger Lakes Community College


consideration given to FLCC graduates, and characteristics, education, and skills they seek in
prospective employees with two-year degrees. They will also be asked how FLCC can better
assist them in their employment needs.

2.7       Assessment planning

In January of 2000, the College’s Board of Trustees, on the basis of the recommendation of
the President, and Vice President of Academic Affairs, and the input of College committees
and constituencies, approved a formal institutional assessment plan. The plan calls for an
Annual Report on Assessment activity that will be prepared each May-June by the
Coordinator for Institutional Assessment and eventually approved by the Board of Trustees.

      •   As part of the overall assessment plan, the College will include a comprehensive
          review of all academic programs on a five-year cycle


3.0       Faculty Development and Scholarship

3.1       Faculty recruitment

The educational profile of FLCC’s teaching faculty is typical of many community colleges,
with the preponderance (approximately 80%) holding a master’s degree. A few faculty (about
5%), generally in specialized areas, hold a baccalaureate, while the remaining 15% have a
doctorate or terminal degree in their field.

      •   While teaching ability will continue to be the prime criterion for selecting new faculty,
          the College should attempt to increase the number of faculty holding doctorates

Approximately 41% of the College’s faculty (by headcount) are full-time, and full-time
faculty deliver 64.5% of the instruction (1997 data). These data compare favorably to SUNY
community college means of 31.6% full-time faculty by headcount and 59.7% of instruction
delivered by full-time faculty. Furthermore, FLCC has a student/faculty ratio of 14.76, which
is well below the SUNY community college average of 17.09%.

The College anticipates some significant retirements of senior faculty over the next five years.
Recruiting skilled replacement faculty will be challenging since community colleges
nationally face the same scenario, thereby creating sharp competition for talented candidates.
In the event that the College does begin to experience difficulty in attracting qualified faculty
members, it would be beneficial to have a contingency plan in place. Using distance learning
courses originating at other colleges could be used to fill gaps in certain disciplines such as
computer science where hiring new faculty can prove problematic.

Many of the College’s adjunct faculty teach in the Gemini Program (college courses in the
high school). In order to maintain the quality of these courses, it is suggested that




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Memorandum of Understanding                                        Finger Lakes Community College


      •   The College engage in ongoing training of adjunct faculty, and create ways to
          integrate them more fully into the culture of their respective departments and the
          institution as a whole

3.2       Faculty review: tenure and promotion

Faculty evaluation at FLCC is defined by the collective bargaining agreement. Department
chairs conduct annual reviews until continuing appointment is granted. These appointments
are renewed on a seven-year cycle during which annual reviews by the chair continue.

Faculty submit portfolios to a faculty committee when they wish to be considered for
promotion. Portfolios must contain the results of student evaluations.

      •   FLCC is to be congratulated on incorporating student evaluations in the tenure and
          promotion process and is urged to continue this practice

3.3       Quality and quantity of scholarship

Although FLCC’s mission is focused on teaching and service, the College does support the
quality and quantity of its collective scholarship effort in a variety of ways.
FLCC operates a Teaching Center for Teaching Excellence. The primary mission of the
Center is to support the teaching and learning process as central activities of the institution.
The Teaching Center strives to serve the pedagogical needs of the faculty and professional
staff who are dedicated to the cognitive and affective development the students.

A major goal of the Teaching Center is to encourage classroom research and teaching
innovations. The Center offers faculty and staff the opportunity to share information ,
teaching skills, and instructional resources. The goals and objectives of the Teaching Center
are accomplished through workshops, sharing sessions, peer mentoring, support groups,
support for self-initiated investigation and learning, teleconferencing,

      •   Scholarship is an area that helps maintain a vibrant faculty, and the College is urged to
          continue its efforts to obtain additional extramural funding and examine internal
          allocations to incrementally enhance its efforts


4.0       Intercampus Collaboration

4.1       Joint academic programs

Jointly registered programs often create seamless transfer for students; they also assure
students of a place at an upper division college if certain conditions are met. Besides
facilitating transfer, these programs can be effective recruitment instruments. FLCC is to be
congratulated on developing such agreements with SUNY Brockport and Geneseo, as well as
independent colleges such as Keuka, Roberts Wesleyan, and St. Bonaventure.




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Memorandum of Understanding                                      Finger Lakes Community College


In order to further strengthen its position, it is suggested that FLCC

      •   Examine its programs and determine which offerings would most effectively be served
          by joint registrations; it will then develop such agreements and incorporate them into
          FLCC’s marketing plan. This approach will be implemented wherever possible during
          the development of new programs.

Hopefully FLCC will be successful in partnering with additional SUNY campuses in this
initiative. Also, in view of the existing and projected shortage of teachers in New York State,
SUNY System Administration encourages all community colleges to

      •   Develop new jointly-registered teacher education programs with SUNY baccalaureate
          institutions that have established teacher education programs

4.2       Articulation agreements

FLCC has done an excellent job in creating articulation agreements with upper division
institutions. The College Catalog lists over 75 agreements with 14 SUNY institutions, 1
CUNY college, and 14 independent colleges. It is suggested that the College

      •   Continue to review articulation agreements on a regular schedule to keep them current
          and to ensure seamless transfer for AA and AS graduates

      •   Ensure that current and new articulation agreements include any curricular changes
          that reflect the Provost’s recommended implementation of the Board of Trustees
          resolution on general education (see General education, below)


5.0       Academic Program Directions

5.1       New and revised programs

FLCC has seen a significant expansion of its AS and AAS degree programs in the past five
years. The expansion includes the addition of AS degrees in Environmental Studies (fall
1998), Fine Arts (fall 1997), Music Recording Technology (fall 1997), Human Services (fall
1996), Music (fall 1996), and Physical Education (fall 1996) and AAS degrees in Computer
Networking Technology (fall 1998), Financial Services (fall 1996), and Paralegal (fall 1995).

The College received approval in February and March 2000 to offer new AS degree programs
in Sports Tourism Studies and an AAS in Massage Therapy/Integrative Health, both of which
are scheduled to commence in the fall 2000 term. In addition, a new program proposal for an
AS in Biotechnology was approved by the Curriculum Committee, and will be sent to System
Administration immediately after Board of Trustee Approval.

Over the next five years the College will review a variety of program options. The Science
and Technology Department is considering developing a curriculum in Aviation Technology


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Memorandum of Understanding                                       Finger Lakes Community College


in cooperation with the company that manages and operates the local airport. The Social
Sciences Department has begun development of a program in Child Care, and the
Conservation Department is reviewing the possibility of developing some type of program in
Wine Production/Viticulture. These programs would be offered in the AAS degree format.

FLCC is also working on a cooperative agreement with SUNY College of Technology at
Utica-Rome that would ultimately bring three baccalaureate programs and a master’s degree
program in various engineering technology fields to the FLCC main campus. The colleges
have targeted fall 2000 to offer courses in the first of the baccalaureate programs: Mechanical
Engineering Technology. FLCC is also working on an agreement with RIT’s Packaging
Science program. One or two beginning courses would be taught at the Canandaigua campus
and an additional 12 to 15 credits could be earned during the student’s two years at FLCC by
commuting to RIT (but at FLCC tuition rates). The student would then be on the same track
for graduation as a student who entered RIT as a freshman.

      •   These and any other academic programs the College develops in the future will be
          reviewed for consistency with mission, demonstrated market need, and evidence of
          academic quality. As the College adds new programs it will continue to review
          existing programs for relevancy and sufficient enrollment strength. When appropriate,
          the College will consider deactivation and/or discontinuance.

      5.1.1   General education

FLCC changed its General Education requirement for students transferring to SUNY
institutions in order to comply with the SUNY Board of Trustees resolution. Students will be
able to complete 30 credits in all 10 competencies (they must fulfill at least 21 credits in 7
competencies) in the AA in Liberal Arts and Sciences and the AS in Liberal Arts and
Sciences before transferring. Discipline-specific AS degree programs are currently being
revised to comply with a minimum of 21 credits in 7 of the competencies. These curricular
changes should be in place for the fall 2000 entering class.

      For its part, System Adminstration will act to support seamless transfer by requiring that
      upper division SUNY units fully accept FLCC’s general education credits, and that upper
      division programs are structured to allow students to complete the three remaining
      competencies and other requirements within four semesters of full-time study

      Note: Articulation agreements will continue to be needed to address all requirements that
      fall outside of the general education rubric. It is only through these agreements that
      community college graduates can be assured of completing their baccalaureate degree in
      two additional years of full-time study.

5.2       Distance education

FLCC began its first distance learning courses through the SUNY Learning Network (SLN) in
fall 1999. This is Phase I (1999 – 2000) of a three-step approach to using this new pathway to
deliver education. The first step served to expose as many interested faculty as fiscally



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Memorandum of Understanding                                     Finger Lakes Community College


possible to this new technology, with the strongest response coming from the Business
Department.

A faculty task force is reviewing Phase I, especially as it relates to logistical issues such as
compensation (overload vs. release time) and timing (should course preparation be done in the
summer for both fall and spring). Phase II (2000 – 2002) will involve an expansion of course
offerings (at least eight are planned for fall 2000) as well as the involvement of more
departments in the program. Phase III (2000 – 2003) will entail a close examination of
programs that might be suited to offer entirely via distance learning.

5.3      Responsiveness to local/regional/state needs

FLCC plays an important role in supporting the educational needs of the community. The
Institute for Workforce Development is the College’s center for training executives, managers
and employees of local area businesses, government agencies, and non-profit organizations.
The Institute handles approximately 4,000 course registrations per year. It is one of eight
nationally designated Supplier Training Centers, and is sponsored by Kodak, Xerox, Garlock
Sealing Technology, and Parker Hannifin. The Institute is also responsible for real estate,
insurance, travel agency and computer certification programs. The College is encouraged to
continue this proactive stance in responding to area needs.


6.0      Infrastructure and Technology

6.1      Facilities

With respect to facilities the primary challenge facing the College and its sponsor over the
next several years involves the institution’s expansion and enrollment growth. Almost three
years ago, the College developed a Master Plan that was tentatively approved by the College
Trustees and the Board of Supervisors. The plan was submitted to the Construction Fund, and
several projects were funded or encumbered.

Projects included in the local and state-approved Master Plan that will be implemented over
the next several years are: Infrastructure improvements; Enrollment Services modifications; a
Multipurpose Auditorium; Reconfiguration of administrative offices; Cafeteria and Student
Development space modifications; and a new classroom building wing.

      6.1.1   Library

FLCC is a member of LAIP and has expressed interest in joining the SUNYConnect initiative.
The College can now begin planning its participation since a vendor for the project has been
selected. SUNYConnect is an important initiative for all community colleges, but particularly
for the smaller ones; it will make available to students resources that had generally been
accessible only on the largest campuses.




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Memorandum of Understanding                                      Finger Lakes Community College


A major renovation of the Library was completed at the end of the summer of 1996. It added
a third floor and expanded the lower floors. Among the features it added were individual and
small group study spaces, a Writing Center, and an electronic classroom for hands-on
computerized library instruction.

6.2       Academic technology

FLCC makes over 250 microcomputers available to students in classrooms and labs. There
are dedicated labs for instruction in business, computer science, office technology, and the
engineering technologies, to name a few. But FLCC shares the challenge faced by most
institutions in higher education: how to keep pace with the increasing use of classroom
technology and how to keep that technology reasonably up-to-date.

The acceleration of technological change makes it essential that the College incorporate a
multi-year technology plan within its strategic planning efforts, and that the technology plan
be carefully coordinated with the academic planning process.


7.0       Mission Review Funding

Finger Lakes Community College has received a $267,804 Mission Review funding award to
facilitate changes in and enhancements to campus mission. This competitive award was based
on the academic merit of Finger Lake’s proposal to:

      •   Implement and evaluate the activities of the WRITE PLACE, synthesizing a number
          of the College’s best practices into a cohesive program that supports the improvement
          of writing across the curriculum.

This award is contingent upon the College meeting the reporting and other requirements
detailed in Appendix A. These reports will enable System Administration to better evaluate
the strength and plausibility of future Mission Review funding proposals.




                                            * * * *




                                                13
Memorandum of Understanding                                   Finger Lakes Community College




This Memorandum of Understanding was developed jointly by Finger Lakes Community
College and the State University of New York System Administration to provide guidance for
planning the campus’ future and a framework for gauging the achievement of its goals.
Recognizing that individual institutions and the State University as a whole must be able to
respond to changing circumstances, both Finger Lakes Community College and System
Administration will work together to realize the goals and objectives articulated in this
document.




                                             14
Memorandum of Understanding                                    Finger Lakes Community College



                                         Appendix A

                                  Mission Review Funding

Finger Lakes Community College has received a $267,804 Mission Review funding award to
facilitate changes in and enhancements to campus mission. This competitive award was based
on the academic merit of Finger Lake’s proposal to:

   •   Implement and evaluate the activities of the WRITE PLACE, synthesizing a number
       of the College’s best practices into a cohesive program that supports the improvement
       of writing across the curriculum.

This award will be made in three installments of $89,268. First year funding is contingent
upon an agreed-upon Memorandum of Understanding, the hiring of the director, the staffing
of the center with Writing Fellows, the convening of an Advisory Board, and the
implementation of a requirement that students select at least one writing intensive course in
addition to their two required English courses. Second and third year funding is contingent
upon the University meeting the reporting requirements detailed below.

Reporting

At the conclusion of each year for which Finger Lakes receives Mission Review funding, it
will submit a report containing a narrative section describing:

   •   The membership of the Advisory Board;
   •   The established standards for the evaluation of student writing assignments;
   •   The nature of the special projects supported by the WRITE PLACE, including the
       amounts allocated and the source and extent of additional leveraged funding used;
   •   A summary of the annual symposium sponsored by the WRITE PLACE;
   •   Evidence of increased collaboration and linkages, encouraged by this initiative,
       between and among local schools and businesses and two- and four-year colleges in
       the SUNY System to raise the writing skills of students.

and a data section indicating:

   •   The number of students who were provided with support by the WRITE PLACE;
   •   The assessed levels of writing proficiency of FLCC students, showing historic levels
       and the improvement in student performance on second year writing assignments as a
       result of this initiative;
   •   Feedback from four-year college faculty and community leaders on the Board
       regarding the success of FLCC graduates, and other evidence of trends in academic
       success of FLCC graduates when they transfer to SUNY four-year colleges; and
   •   Trends in student retention.




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