Social Work - WUSTL Sustainability Pledge by liwenting

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									 Dept #         Crs #                                        Title




F20       124G-624G     Special Topics in Fashion Design: Sustainable Textile Design




F20       196-696       Design, Artisanship & Sustainability as a Cultural Catalyst
                                                                             Rating (1 = Sust.-
                                                                             focused, 2 = Sust.-
                               Description                                        related)




The study of textile is an exciting, rapidly evolving field and applicable
to many areas of art and design. It is also one fraught with
sustainability issues. Matters related to sustainability require us to act
quickly and cleverly to be effective and the need for sustainability-
based practice in every discipline is urgent. Typically textile design and
production occurs in a collaborative setting often across a variety of
locales. Designers, chemical engineers, marketing and business
professionals all play an important role in bringing a new textile to
market. Sustainable Textile Design will be a simulated experience
course. Students from various disciplines will learn essential
information about sustainable textiles, engage in research and then
collaborate to design and promote a sustainable textile product.                                   1


This course investigates the ways in which artisanship is a stimulus to
design thinking and innovation. The prerequisite to the course is a
sixteen day (December 26, 2010, to January 15, 2011) trip to India over
winter break where students will work closely with leading Indian
designers of textiles, products and architecture as well as accomplished
artisans working with methods both ancient and modern. We will
discuss how craft informs design and how design acts as a foce in
entrepeneurship and job creation. A major focus of our research will be
investigating how craft and design are catalysts for innovation in a
sustainable use of materials and water.                                                            2
      Dept          Crs                 Title

                          In the Amazon: Indigenous
                          Peoples and the Politics of
L48          111          Nature

                          Anthropology and the Modern
L48          204B         World




L48          361          Culture and Environment


                          Global Energy and the American
L97          353          Dream


L48          3322         Brave New Crops

                          From Deep Ecology to
                          Indigenous Ecological Identity:
                          Environmental Social
L48          3616         Movements and Anthropology


                          Freshman Seminar: Issues in
L82          181          Environmental Studies

                          Freshman Seminar: Engineering
L19          112          the Climate




L19          221A         Human Use of the Earth
                          Social Problems and Social
L98          120          Issues


                          Material Culture in Modern
L48          3056         China




L48          3201         Gender, Culture, and Madness
L41   419    Community Ecology


             Quantitative Reasoning in
L19   109A   Environmental Science




L19   444    Environmental Geochemistry


L48   306B   Africa: Peoples and Cultures


L48   3662   Primate Conservation Biology


             Political Economy of
L11   372    Development in Africa


             China in the Global Context: The
L97   130    Shanghai Experience




L30   321G   Philosophy of Science


L41   2951   Environmental Debates




L13   309    Writing the Natural World


             Introduction to Environmental
L82   294    Studies: Social Sciences




L82   370    Biological Conservation
L54   301B   Case Study: Hawaii

             Introduction to Environmental
L30   235F   Ethics
             Rediscovering the Child
             Interdisciplinary Workshops in
L98   416    an Urban Middle School

             Past Tense, Future Imperfect:
             The Rise and Fall of Societies
L48   132    and Global Civilization




L48   141    Medicine and Society




L48   260    Topics in Health and Community

             Nomadic Strategies and
L48   3053   Extreme Ecologies


             Contemporary Chinese Culture
L48   3055   and Society


L48   3283   Introduction to Public Health
             Modern Civil Conflicts and
L48   4045   Conflict Solutions

             Introduction to Environmental
L41   2950   Biology


             Experimental Ecology
L41   4193   Laboratory




L82   299    Directed Internship


L19   108A   Oceans and the Atmosphere
L19   118A   Geology of National Parks




L19   201    Earth and the Environment


             Land Dynamics and the
L54   201    Environment


             Topics in Philosophy and
L30   239    Environment


             Introduction to Environmental
L32   2010   Policy

             Freshman Seminar:
             Contextualizing Problems in
L90   162    Contemporary Africa
             Health, Healing and Ethics:
             Introduction to Medical
L48   3310   Anthropology
             Kill Assessment: An
             Investigation into Death,
             Genocide, and other forms of
L48   3691   Violence

             The AIDS Epidemic: Inequalities,
L48   4134   Ethnography, and Ethics

             Tobacco: History, Culture,
L48   4135   Science, and Policy

             "Terrorism" and "The Clash of
L48   4243   Civilizations"


             Cultures of Science and
L48   4454   Technology
             Infectious Diseases: Past,
L41   224    Present, and Future




L11   352    Health Economics


             Seminar on Work, Family, and
L11   582    Public Policy

             Development & Public Policy
L11   5997   Workshop


             Development and Public Policy
L11   5998   Workshop




L19   319    Physical Oceanography
             FOCUS: Global Culture and the
             Individual: Intercultural Skills for
L61   208    the 21st Century
             Freshman Seminar: African
             American Women's History:
             Sexuality, Violence, & the Love
L22   2250   of Hip Hop

             Freshman Seminar: Conquest
             Cultures: Colonialism, Violence,
L22   2560   and Memory in Latin America

             Sophomore Seminar: Slavery
             and Memory in American
L22   2674   Popular Culture




L30   233F   Biomedical Ethics

             Latino/a Experiences in the
L98   248    United States
L48   4882   Anthropology and Public Health

             Introduction To Global Climate
L19   111    Change In the 21st Century


             Problems in U.S. Environmental
L22   3032   History


             Case Study: Southwestern
L54   202    United States


             Environmental and Energy
L32   332B   Issues

             Deconstructing Black Manhood:
             The Gay Experience in the Black
L90   3255   Community


             Sociological Approaches to
L98   226    American Health




L48   142    Medicine and Society


L48   305B   Greater Central Asia in Crisis




L48   3874   International Public Health




L41   381    Introduction to Ecology




L41   4830   Bioenergy
             Green Machines: Plant
L41   4831   Physiology, Growth & Bioenergy




L19   219    Energy and the Environment


L90   3161   African-American Politics

             The Quest for Racial
L90   3542   Reconciliation

             Terror and Violence in the Black
L90   3880   Atlantic

             Sexual Health and the City: A
             Community-Based Learning
L90   406    Course


             Indigenous Peoples and
L48   3092   Movements in Latin America


             Public Health Research and
L48   3284   Practice




L48   3313   Women and Islam




L48   4363   Sex, Gender, and Power


L48   4366   Europe's New Diversities




L41   348    Emerging Infectious Diseases
             Seminar on Work, Family, and
L11   582A   Public Policy I


             Neighborhoods, Schools, and
L12   4289   Social Inequality


             The Education of Black Children
L12   4608   and Youth in the United States




L19   323    Biogeochemistry




L19   353    Earth Forces


             Earth's Atmosphere & Global
L19   408    Climate


L19   428    Hydrology




L19   430    Environmental Mineralogy


             Freshman Seminar: Race and
L53   112    Ethnicity in American Cinema

             Freshman Seminar: From the
             "City on a Hill" to 9/11: Religion
L22   2590   and Social Justice in America

             Poverty and Social Reform in
L22   3091   American History


L97   170    Is There a Global Culture?
             Just Do It! Skills That Turn
L32   227    Passion Into Policy
             Introduction to Cultural
L48   160B   Anthropology

             Race and Gender in Modern
L22   3756   U.S. History
             Race, Film and American
             Politics: An Examination of the
             Impact of Race and Mass Media
L32   250    on Society
                                             Description

As it turns out, James Cameron's Avatar is not so far from the truth. The Amazon region of South
America has long been home to indigenous peoples and civilizations, but has been radically
transformed by several hundred years of European colonization, the
What cultural anthropologists are learning about major issues of our time: cultures facing
destruction, communal societies, sex roles, poverty, political repression in the Third World--
sharpening the study of our own culture.
An introduction to the ecology of human culture, especially how
"traditional" cultural ecosystems are organized and how they change with
population density. Topics include foragers, extensive and intensive
farming, industrial agriculture, the ecolog

This lecture course explores the historical, cultural, and political relationship between America and
global energy, focusing on oil, coal, natural gas, biofuels, and alternatives. Through case studies at
home and abroad, we examine how cultural, environm
This course introduces students to the major issues surrounding the development and use in
genetically modified (GM) crops. Its focus is international, but with particular focus on the
developing world. A variety of experts, available locally or through


This course provides a survey of environmental social movements around the world and over
time, in the process challenging commonly held perceptions about environmentalism and
environmental movements. Specifically, it demonstrates that environmental soci

A survey of current environmental issues, including global warming, carbon cycling, degradation of
groundwater quality, declining biodiversity, deforestation and conservation policy, and
environmental law, among others. At each meeting a member of the Env
Geoengineering, the deliberate manipulation of the earth's climate, may be part of a solution to
the predicted future global warming. Is this advisable, or even possible? Discussions,lectures, and
readings used to learn how earth's climate works. Examinat

Examination of the impacts of a growing population on the Earth, including habitat destruction,
resource depletion, and air and water pollution. Population growth, landscape change, and the
distribution and uses of the water, mineral, and energy-producing
Survey of social problems and social issues in contemporary American society, such as racism,
poverty, sexism, crime, and war.

In this course, we will explore change and continuity from late imperial to postsocialist China
through an analysis of everyday material culture. Drawing upon material objects, historical texts,
ethnographic studies, and films, we will investigate values

This course will explore the relationships among gender constructs, cultural values, and definitions
of mental health and illness. Understandings of the proper roles, sensibilities, emotions, and
dispositions of women and men are often culturally and mor
Basic principles of community ecology, including species interactions, spatial and temporal
patterns of biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning. Analytical theory, statistical patterns, and
experimental approaches are emphasized. Intended for students w

Introduction to practical mathematical methods for understanding environmental aspects of our
planet, particularly how the environment changes with time through human interactions.
Emphasis on intuitive approaches in devising simple relationships for unde

Introduction to the geochemistry of natural waters and the processes that alter their composition.
Key principles of aqueous geochemistry and their application to describe the main controls on the
chemistry of pristine and polluted soil, surface, and grou
An anthropological survey of Africa from the classic ethnographies to contemporary studies of
development. Emphasis on the numerous social and economic changes African peoples have
experienced from pre-colonial times to the present.
This class will focus on the ecological diversity of primates and how these and other traits are
related to their present day abundance and distribution. In addition, the biological, abiotic and
anthropogenic factors related to extinction risk will be ex

The course explores poverty and economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The first half of
the course examines the causes of Africa's persistently slow growth and underdevelopment,
focusing on the relative importance of geography, Africa's unique hist

The course studies the transformation of political institutions, socioeconomic structure, and
cultural forms in modern China in the context of the global flow of people, ideas, and goods. It
chooses a local narrative approach and situates the investigatio

Pivotal concepts common to empirical sciences are examined and clarified. These include:
explanation, confirmation, prediction, systematization, empirical significance, and the relationship
of all these concepts to the structure of scientific theory. Exa
Solving major environmental problems requires understanding the range of interests, priorities
and perspectives surrounding each issue and developing solutions that satisfy all constituencies.
In this seminar you will research and discuss both sides of e

For students interested in the environment and natural sciences. This course brings together
essays from a wide range of communities including biology, physics, medicine, environmental
studies, creative writing and more. Readings and assignments are inten

Introduction to interdisciplinary environmental study in the social sciences and humanities. Topics
include: differing interpretations of "nature" and "environment"; contrasting understandings of
relationships between humans and their environments; key c

This course explores the science of understanding and conserving biodiversity. Fundamental
principles from genetics, evolution and ecology are applied to issues such as species preservation,
habitat restoration, refuge design and management. We get hands
Issues in environmental sustainability and hazards of the Hawaiian Islands. Volcanism,
earthquakes, tsunamis, issues related to agricultural encroachment on the subtropical rainforests.
Exploration of both scientific and societal contexts. Field work cond
A general survey of current issues in environmental ethics, focusing on problems such as the
obligation to future generations, protection of endangered species, animal rights, problems of
energy and pollution, wilderness, global justice, and business obli
This unique, service-learning course allows students to bring their knowledge and passion for
learning to urban children in the city of St. Louis. Students spend the first half of the semester in
studio classes on campus experimenting with the creative a

The past history of humanity is littered with the stories of societies whose peoples experienced
prosperity and fluorescence followed by decline and catastrophe. In the present, an age of
information and rapid change, public intellectuals offer broad and

This course provides the basic foundation in medical anthropology and cultural anthropology for
students enrolled in the Medicine and Society Program. The purpose of the course is to introduce
students to the central themes and theoretical approaches emp

A survey of current topics in community health and medicine, with an emphasis upon social
science approaches to issues affecting medicine and medical care in contemporary U.S. society.
Issues include ethical debates in health care delivery, social strati
This course will explore the archaeology and anthropology of nomadic pastoral societies in light of
their ecological, political, and cultural strategies and adaptation to extreme environments (deserts,
mountains, the arctic). The aim of the course is to

This course provides an introduction to emerging trends in Chinese culture and society. We will
explore processes of change and continuity in the People's Republic, examining the complexity of
social issues and the dynamics of cultural unity and diversit
This course provides a general introduction to the field of public health. It examines the
philosophy, history, organization, functions, activities, and results of public health research and
practice. Case studies include infectious and chronic diseases,

This is an upper-level/graduate level version of L48-204B.

This course introduces students to our major environmental problems, and gives examples about
how research in Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Math is necessary to solve these problems.

Design and interpretation of ecological experiments, with an emphasis on hypothesis testing,
sampling methodology, and data analyses. Sessions address fundamental ecological questions and
include field, greenhouse, and laboratory (microcosm) studies on

Internship with an environmental organization (commercial, not-for-profit, governmental, etc.)
where the primary objective is to obtain professional experience outside of the classroom.
Student must have a faculty sponsor, and must file a Learning Agreem
Basic concepts of the evolution and physical structures of the Earth's oceans and the atmosphere.
Dynamic aspects of the oceans (waves, tides, tsunamis) and atmospheric circulation (weather).
Role of biological processes (including anthropogenic) in defin
Survey of geologic processes occurring at the Earth's surface and its interior using national parks
and monuments as the prime venue for presentation. Volcanism and mountain-building; the work
of streams, glaciers, and wind; lake and coastline developme

Introduction to the study of the Earth as a dynamic, evolving planet. Emphasis on how internal and
surface processes combine to shape the environment. Themes: Earth's interior as revealed by
seismic waves; Earth history and global tectonics shown by chang

Use of case studies such as anthropogenic changes to the Lower Missouri River, effects of mining
in the Ozarks, and excessive uses of water in arid terrains in the Southwestern United States to
explore key issues associated with environmental sustainabili

Philosophical questions are central to study of the environment. Such questions span many
philosophical fields including metaethics, value theory, applied ethics, aesthetics, political
philosophy and philosophy of science. Given such a diversity of impor

This course provides an introduction to and overview of environmental policy. Subjects covered
include the policy process, the behavior of interest groups and political parties, and the actions of
policymakers like Congress and the President. We'll also

Africa is typically presented as a continent in constant turmoil in the U.S. and international media
present. This freshmen seminar challenges this simplistic and common myth by exploring the
historical and global roots of key issues facing contemporary
A cross-cultural exploration of cultures and social organizations of medical systems, the global
exportation of biomedicine, and ethical dilemmas associated with medical technologies and global
disparities in health.

Is violence best understood as a set of "random acts" marginal to society? Or, do societies need
violence to make culture systematic and hierarchy functional? This course is not about the
psychology of individual pathology; rather, we will think about v
In the year 2000, HIV became the world's leading infectious cause of adult death, and in the next
ten years, AIDS will kill more people than all wars of the twentieth century combined. As the
global epidemic rages on, our greatest enemy in combating HIV/
This course examines tobacco's important role in shaping the modern world over the course of the
last five centuries, from indigenous uses of tobacco in the New World to the politics of smoking in
the 20th century. Through in-depth historical and anthropo
This course is about conflicts in which violent means are deployed and moralistic terms are
invoked so as to give legitimacy to such means. The code words in the title are bracketed in order
to emphasize they are used in public discourses rhetorically, f

This seminar explores questions of theory, method, and ethics in the anthropology of science and
technology. How is biomedicine changing what it is to be human? How can technologies and
scientific practices be studied ethnographically? How are the poli
A variety of important infectious diseases are discussed. Attention is paid to the causative agent,
natural source, disease symptoms, mode of transmission, treatment, prevention, evolution,
eradication, and historical impact of each. Lectures and assigned

Analysis of consumer demand for health care, medical technology, and the role of health
insurance. Emphasis placed on behavior of the physician (whether he acts as an agent for the
consumer or on his own behalf); on the use of paramedics, preventive care

This course examines various topics in labor economics and the economics of the family, including
but not limited to, the allocation of time, family bargaining, and the economics of health. The
course meets once a week (every Monday, 12:00 - 1:30) for bo
This is a two-semester workshop covering topics in applied economics with presentations by
economics department faculty and scholars from other institutions. Students are expected to
participate in the seminar discussion.

This is a two-semester workshop covering topics in applied economics with presentations by
economics department faculty and scholars from other institutions. Students are expected to
participate in the seminar discussion. This is to be used when graduate

Ocean circulation, El Nino, dynamical tides, tsunami, coastal ocean, enclosed seas, paleo-ocean,
sedimentation, ice-atmosphere-ocean interaction, biology-carbon cycle. Prereq: Chem 111A,
Chem 112A,Physics 117A,Physics 118A, Math 132,Math 133; or permissio
The emergence of a global society continues to create vast changes in all cultures. How do these
changes impact our lives and the way we view ourselves and our place in the world? Students in
this FOCUS seminar will use the study of language, culture, a

Black women, much like their male counterparts, have shaped the contours of African American
history and culture. This course will explore the lived experiences of Black women in North
America through a focus on the critical themes of violence and sexuali

What was the Spanish Conquest? How has its unfinished projects of domination, acculturation,
and religious conversion been pursued since? Beginning with the military campaigns of Spanish
conquistadores in the sixteenth century and ending with literary rei

Sophomores receive priority registration.The history of slavery has long created a sense of unease
within the consciousness of many Americans. Recognizing this continued reality, this seminar
examines how slavery is both remembered and silenced within co

A critical examination, in the light of contemporary moral disagreements and traditional ethical
theories, of some of the moral issues arising out of medical practice and experimentation in our
society. Issues that might be discussed include euthanasia, g
Identity is a term that begins to give humans a sense of understanding who we are. In terms of
the Latino/a diaspora in the United States issues of ethnicity, gender, nation, class, sexuality and
race are key theoretical categories that aid us in theoret
Anthropological approaches to public health practice and research; role of anthropology in public
health systems; cross-cultural public health research; community vs. institutional bases of public
health advocacy.
Global climate and global climate change and their impacts on life and civilization. Integrated view
of global climate and the diverse forces that can alter global climate. Historical and potential
future consequences of global climate change on human lif

This course addresses the historical background and present -day conditions of a key problem in
U.S. Environmental history: evolving conceptions of the relationship between environment and
disease, both infectious and chronic. It takes up the juncture bet

Issues associated with the Mojave Desert's environmental sustainability. Investigation of the
fragile desert environment and its degradation from anthropogenic uses. Politics associated with
the Mojave National Preserve. Field work conducted during spring

This course considers the major issues in these increasingly important areas of public policy. We
will discuss the importance of political processes and actors on such phenomenon as pollution,
global warming and wilderness protection. This course emphas

In recent years, the American public has become more familiar with the phenomenon of black
men "on the down low," black men who have sex with men but who project a heterosexual
persona. The controversy about this behavior has revealed the extent to whic

The major objective of the course is to provide beginning students with the theoretical
(conceptual) and empirical tools necessary to understand how health and illness and health care
delivery in the United States are significantly influenced by the socia

This course is the required second-semester sequence of the introduction to medical anthropology
and cultural anthropology for students enrolled in the Medicine and Society Program. The course
builds upon material introduced in Anthropology 141, and prov
This course will focus on contemporary issues in the ex-Soviet republics of Central Asia and Iran,
Afghanistan, and Pakistan, but it will also include extensive reading on the social history of the
region, in order to enable understanding of the social dy

This course explores current topics in international public health using a case-study-based
approach, emphasizing public health issues affecting low-and middle-income countries;
introduction to the tools and methods of international public health research

This course explores the science of ecology, including factors that control the distribution and
population dynamics of organisms, the structure and function of biological communities, how
energy and nutrients flow across ecosystems, and what principles g

A broad overview of the flow of energy, captured from sunlight during photosynthesis, in
biological systems, and current approaches to utilize the metabolic potentials of microbes and
plants to produce biofuels and other valuable chemical products. An ov
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of plant physiology and biochemistry and
provides a broad overview of the flow of energy captured from sunlight during photosynthesis, in
plants and microbes. The first half of the course focuses on the

Examination of the topic of energy from many human-relevant perspectives. Humans use an
enormous amount of energy, at the rate of 18 terawatts. Where does this energy come from?
How long will it last? What are the consequences? Examination of energy resou
This course examines the historical and contemporary efforts by African Americans
to gain full inclusion as citizens in the U.S. political system. The course focuses on topics such as
the politics of the civil rights movement; African American politica
This course is based within African and African American studies, and it explores the quest for
racial reconciliation, with emphasis equally divided between the United States and racial strife in
other parts of the world. Although racial considerations a
From the period of bondage through the 21st century, terror and racialized violence have
consistently been used as a form of social control. This course is constructed to explore the
historical foundations of extreme threats of violence inflicted among po

In this community-based learning course students will partner with a St. Louis AIDS service
organization (ASO) or sexual health agency to explore how the interrelationships among gender,
class, race/ethnicity, and sexual identity shape sexual health decis

An overview of Amerindian peoples, cultures, and contemporary socio-political movements in core
indigenous regions of Latin America (the Maya highlands of Mexico and Guatemala, and the
Andes, Chaco, and Amazon of South America). Expressions of indigenous

In-depth exploration of current theory and methods involved in public health research and
practical applications. Emphasis on fundamentals of epidemiology, which forms the scientific
rationale for public health assessment, assurance, and policy developme

An anthropological study of the position of women in the contemporary Muslim world, with
examples drawn primarily from the Middle East but also from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the United
States. Students will examine ethnographic, historical, and literary

This seminar explores various ways anthropologists have conceptualized the intersection of sex,
gender, and power in their ethnographies. Key questions revolve around the processes through
which biological categories of sex become socially significant, a
Since the late 1980's, three major upheavals have transformed European senses of identity. The
demise of the Soviet Union has forced citizens of new "post-socialist' nations to forge new senses
of belonging and new strategies of survival. The rise of a

The questions of why new diseases are continuing to appear, and why old diseases are re-
emerging, are addressed in detail. Particular focus is on the role played by the natural
environment in these processes; how disease risk can be enhanced by environme
This course is a continuation of Econ 582, which examines various topics in labor economics and
the economics of the family, including but not limited to, the allocation of time, family bargaining,
and the economics of health. The course meets once a wee

A major purpose of the course is to study the research and policy literature related to
neighborhoods, schools and the corresponding opportunity structure in urban America. The
course will be informed by theoretical models drawn from economics, politica

This course provides an overview of the education of Black children and youth in the United
States. Covering both pre- and post-Brown eras, this course applies a deep reading to the classic
works of DuBois and Anderson as well as the more recent works of

Survey of biogeochemical interactions among Earth's crust, oceans, and atmosphere, including
perturbations due to human activities. Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur biogeochemical
cycles. Greenhouse warming of atmosphere from carbon dioxide and ch

Basic concepts regarding the forces that act upon the Earth, how geological materials react to
these forces, and the time scale over which they respond. Emphasis on physical concepts needed
to understand the geodynamical behavior of the Earth over a broad

Structure and dynamics of Earth's atmosphere. Basic factors controlling global climate of Earth.
Quantitative aspects of remote sensing of atmosphere. Remote sensing instrumentation.
Prerequisites: Math 233 and Phys 117A(or Phys 197); or permission of ins
Survey of principles that govern the flow of water in river and groundwater systems in deep
geologic environments. Basic equations of fluid flow, dynamics, and the characteristics of drainage
basins, rivers, floods, and important aquifers. Exploitation o

Topics connected with environmental mineralogy, some selected by students. Topics may include:
mineral dust such as asbestos, containment materials for nuclear waste disposal, environmental
ramifications of the processing and use of phosphate fertilizers,

From the early documentary roots of cinema through the Civil Rights movement and to the recent
democratization of the means of media production, questions of race and ethnicity have proved
crucial both to the content of American films and also to the pers

Recent debates surrounding post-9/11 Americans' fear of Islam may be dismissed as erratic
manifestations of a beleaguered minority of fundamentalists. At the root of their ideology,
however, lies a much more widespread and common American belief. From the
This course explores the history of dominant ideas about the causes of and solutions to poverty in
American society from the early republic to the end of the twentieth century. We will investigate
changing economic, cultural, and political conditions tha
Opponents of globalization have argued that a standardized, commercialized, and US-dominated
culture is supplanting local cultures around the world. This, they assert, will make the world into a
boring place in which local artists are squashed by nondesc
The course will focus on skills related to the democratic expression of political rights and
responsibilities. The course will balance background knowledge of the issues with application.
Students will explore how to use coalition building and advocacy

introduction
This course examines the different ways that race and gender have been constructed in U.S.
history from 1877 to the present. We will use both primary and secondary source materials to
examine how these concepts of identity have changed over time.

A study and examination of the role and impact that race, films and the mass media have on
American society, politics and political culture, including how it helps manipulate and shape public
opinion, including American values, voting behavior and politic
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 Dept #   Crs #                                    Title




A46       438     Environmental Systems I




A46       439     Environmental Systems II




A46       336A    Sustainability




A46       336B    Designing Sustainable Environments
             Sustainability in the Built Environment: Infrastructure, Landscapes and
A46   564J   Buildings




A46   336C   Biomimicry: Toward a Sustainable Design




A46   404    Advancing Integrated Sustainability
A46   462H   Information Modeling for Sustainable Design




A46   472    Sustainable Development




A46   657    Contemporary Practices of Sustainable Urbanism
A46   275    Service Learning Course: Environmental Issues




             Explore & Contribute: Collaboration Between Washington University and
A46   490A   Henry Elementary School




A46   568A   The Architecture of Science
                                            Description

This course outlines and addresses fundamental passive strategies that can be employed to
both respond to, and maximize, the possibilities of specific climates and context - to enable
building form to work with, not against, those ground and environmental conditions. A
proactive engagement of the environment at both the scale of the body (Micro) and the scale
of the building (Macro) will be outlined, establishing base strategies and rules of thumb for
fundamentally integrating passive systems to balance human comfort and sustainable
strategies, toward an enduring architectural response.

We as architects have to analyze and address complex issues and relationships, synthesize
them, and then make them manifest through clear design strategies. Building systems must
reconcile: solar heat gain, glare control, daylight levels, thermal insulation, ventilation,
acoustics, air quality, structure and fabrication - all in relation to the scale and comfort of the
human body. The development of environmental systems into a clear, comprehensive, and
elegant design solution cannot be an afterthought; it must be a synthesized and integral part
of the design process, with a clear strategy that operates at multiple scales. Building upon the
passive strategies explored in Environmental Systems I, this course will lay the foundation for
the integration of active environmental systems with enclosure, space, and the requirements
for human occupation. This will be done hrough the study of climate, air, temperature, water,
light, sound, and energy. Each topic will be assessed against problems, principles, possibilities
and potential.
This course will focus on the study of sustainability as an integrated approach to ecological
awareness, building design and systems design. The seminar will focus on selected readings
that have fostered the development of the ecological movement in architectural practice.
Case studies of built projects and examination of current and future trends of sustainable
design will be discussed.
The seminar will introduce fundamental concepts of sustainability and sustainable
development. Emphasis will be placed on understanding natural systems, the development of
the built environment within natural systems, and the economic, social, ecological, ethical,
philosophical, political, psychological, aesthetic, and cultural issues that help shape design
decisions. Students will evaluate a range of methods that may be used to identify and select
sustainable solutions to design problems, improve existing solutions, and develop critical
thinking. The LEED Rating system will be presented within the context of its role in
professional practice and larger issues of human and environmental health, including how
LEED fits into the realm of high performance design and the effective use of the LEED Rating
System and principles of sustainability. The course will be divided into three phases: 1)
research current interpretations of sustainability in architecture, examining theories and
practices that encourage the development of ecological consciousness as the context of
Sustainable Design; 2) critical comparison of the underlying principles of sustainability and
design proposed by the different rating systems available today and evaluation of the ways of
This seminar will investigate the contemporary debates and practices with respect to the
design and development of sustainable cities, communities, and environments. With more
than three-quarters of the world´s population living in cities by 2050 together with cities being
the world´s largest consumer of resources, it will be the design of cities that frame the
essential understanding and practice of sustainability. Consideration will be given to the
indicators of sustainability, the ecological footprint, green infrastructure, environmental and
regenerative design, smart growth, social equity, air and water quality, climate change, and
sustainable energy and transportation practices as they relate to the development of cities.
The construction and operation of buildings consume the majority of the world´s natural
resources and energy, and contribute to expand the landfills. Buildings have diverse effects on
the environment during their entire life cycles. Although the tangible impacts are visible only
after construction begins, the environmental consequences can be prevented in the first
stages of design. The building form and envelope should respond to specific site conditions to
help achieve environmental sustainability in architecture. The seminar will be a collaborative
studio that welcomes students fo disciplines such as Biology, Engineering, and Architecture,
among others. The goal of this course is to create environmental awareness; understanding
building ecosystems, and increase the ability to design sustainable buildings from an
interdisciplnary perspective. Based on scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies
required to understand the relationships of the natural world, the students will analyze
alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing specific environmental problems. The
aim of this seminar is to prepare the students to participate in cross-disciplinary design teams
that can develop workig methods to study complex architectural problems and challenges,

This course welcomes students from all disciplines in the university. Students will learn to
apply and integrate into the built environment a holistic range of social, economic and
technical systems inspired and optimized by models in the natural world. A foundation in
natural and bio-mimetic systems will be overlaid with ananysis of corporate mission,
principles, and triple bottom line thinking in order to learn how to build defensible, value-
based arguments for implementation of well-designed sustainable systems. With the
expressed intent of achieving net positive outcomes for advancing integrated sustainability in
the built environment, the following topics will be addressed: the eco-structure, atmosphere,
water, food, materials and shelter, energy, transportation, culture, health, education,
governance, commerce, and public outreach. Lectures, case studies, readings, and discussions
will support real-world application exerciese. Complementing leading edge theory with
practical outcomes will be provided with the intention that students will develop valuable
skills to be incorporated in their other academic projects as well as their future employment
pursuits.
This course will focus on the principles of sustainable design as examined through Building
Performance Analysis (BPA) and applied Building Information Modeling (BIM) methodology.
The foundation for this course will be an introduction to BIM and BPA and the significance of
both for the future of sustainable architectural design practice supported by analytical
modeling. This emphasis on the suitability of building modeling for analytical purposes and on
the interpretation of such data will provide the basic knowledge necessary for the second
phase of this course, in which students will use a previous or current studio project for an in-
depth study of their building´s performance in the context of its chosen site. Exploring the
interaction between the simulated environment (climate, isolation) and the virtual building
with its physical characteristics (materials, assemblies, passive design strategies, heat transfer,
daylighting, embedded energy), we will attempt to confirm and test the principles of
sustainable design at the schematic level of project development. The model analyzed by each
team will provide sufficient comparative information for a design approach whose desired
goal is carbon neutrality in the lifecycle of the building. Students will be encouraged to

This seminar is an introduction to the basics of small- to medium-scale development. It will
begin with a series of introductory lectures covering the principles and tools of development,
such as creating a project performa, basic tax credits, TIFs, and financial structuring of a
project; exploring methods of implementing sustainable practices and designs into
development-driven projects through marketability, cost-savings, tax credits and other
incentives; and investigating the process of real estate development through the use of
sustainable ideas and practices in buildings. It will continue with a series of case studies in
which the class will examine models of existing developers in terms of these base elements.
Finally, students will be asked to develop a project in order to understand the architect-client
relationship and how to stimulate recognition of the value and importance of sustainable
design in real estate development.

This seminar will investigate those contemporary practices of Sustainable Urbanism that
exemplify a concern for locality, place, culture, community and authenticity. Sustainable
urbanism is understood not as a pre-defined goal or form, but as a contested territory
involving socially constructed processes, conflicting values and competing interests that
dictate urban change and the consumption of urban space all mediated through the practice
of urban design. To this end, different methodological approaches to urban sustainability will
be investigated, including LEED ND, ZED Cities, Regenerative Urbanism, The Natural Step, Eco-
Urbanity, Resilient and Smart Cities. The research project of the seminar will focus on the
Delmar Loop/ Parkview Gardens neighborhood, which was recently awarded a HUD/DOT
Sustainable Communities Grant with the intent that the students develop a Sustainable Urban
Design Plan and Code for the area. This course will be augmented with presentations by local
practitioners of sustainability plans and include an optional site vist to Portland, OR and/or
Vancouver, Canada to fully investigate and understand the respective city´s implementation
of sustainable urbanism.
This service learning experience allows Washington University students to bring their
knowledge and creativity about the many subjects they are studying to students at the
Compton-Drew Middle School, adjacent to the Science Center, in the City of St. Louis. This
course is for arts and sciences students of differing majors & minors, business, architecture &
art students, and engineering students from all engineering departments. The first third of the
semester students will: 1) begin learning the creative process of lateral thinking (synthesizing
many variables, working in cycles); 2) work with a team-mate to experiment with the design
of 2-D & 3-D hands-on problem-solving workshops about exciting environmental issues, for
small groups of students at Compton-Drew Middle School; 3) devise investigations for the
workshops about environmental issues embracing the sciences, the humanities, and the
community; 4) each student will work with the professor individually and in their team, as
well as seeking advice of faculty from a specific disicipline, through the semester in the
preparation of their evolving curricular plan.
Principal Esperansa Veal of Henry Elementary School is creating a remarkable place for her
students who live in the neighborhood of the Cochran Gardens Federal Housing Project in
downtown St. Louis. Principal Veal is clear in her conviction to provide each of her students
with both literal and academic nourishment, and is working unceasingly to make the Henry
School a safe and creative oasis for children ages pre-school through grade six. Her goal is to
have the Henry Elementary School students explore sustainable ways to live during the 21st
century. To this end we will emphasize ecological sustainability, environmental health,
personal responsibility, leadership and a comprehensive, high quality academic program. With
an emphasis on the environmental sciences, energy alternatives and conservation, recycling,
organic gardening and the food sciences, and the emerging ´green´ economy, students will
focus on developing the math, science, writing, and hands-on skills that will make them
successful leaders to make a difference in improving the environment for humanity. This
course invites undergraduate and graduate students from different fields of study to apply
their discipline to the goal of designing and teaching hands-on problem-solving projects for
students at the Henry Elementary St. Louis Public School,
This seminar will offer students in architecture and mechanical engineering an overview of
issues involved in the planning and design of facilities for science and the problem-solving
design process required in projects of this type. Science-based building uses include:
Laboratories, Scientific production facilities, and medical facilities. The course will examine the
problem-solving process issues of buildings designed for the sciences. It will show the
opportunities for integrating sustainable principles in the design. I propose 5 to 8 field-trips to
see interesting local laboratory facilities that provide good examples of functional design for
scientific uses listed above. Examples of potential local tours includ: WU´s Brauer, Earth &
Plantary Science, Green, and Whittaker Halls, WUSM´s Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, BJC
Hospital imaging facilities, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center´s laboratory and
greenhouses, or WU´s Goldfarb Hall greenhouses, and Missouri Botanical Garden herbarium
research lab. The course will review examples of buildings for science designed by notable
national and international architects, as well as interesting well-executed buildings of note,
and where sustainable design has been incorporated into the design. The objective of
Rating (1 = Sust.-
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                      1




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Dept #   Crs #                            Title
 B63     550X    Strategy and Social Reponsibility




 B63     350X    Markets, Business and the Environment




 B63     529     Management and Corporate Responsibility


 B63     502     Ethical Issues in Managerial Decision Making




 B63     500T    Social Entrepeneurship
 B63     520     Taylor Community Consulting Project


 B63     550I    Healthcare Management




 B63     550R    Olin Board Fellows Program
B63   561C   International Negotiations




B54   494    Business & The Environment
                                                      Description
focuses on the integration of Socially Responsible Business Practices with firm strategy.
This course will cover environmental management from the perspectives of government regulators and private
corporations. In the first half of the course, you will learn about innovative market-based approaches to
environmental policy, such as tradable pollution permits. You will also gain an understanding of the economic
underpinnings of a variety of market-driven non-governmental initiatives, such as eco-labeling and certification.
In the second half of the course, you will learn about proactive corporate endeavors through a series of case
                                                 as:
studies, arriving at answers to questions such‖ 'can firms shape regulation to secure competitive advantage?'
or 'what is the potential for product differentiation along environmental lines?' In short, you will gain a better
understanding of when it ―pays to be green. Throughout the course we will emphasize the interactions
among the public and private spheres of activity. Designing sound environmental policies, for example, requires
creating the proper incentives for regulated firms to reduce their pollution. The major theme of the course is
Corporate leaders are expected to maximize returns to shareholders, produce compelling products and services,
and create attractive work environments for their employees while at the same time adhering to the laws and
expectations of the communities and countries within which they operate. This course will explore real
situations in which the objectives of the corporation´s various constituencies -shareholders, employees and
communities are in conflict. It will also focus on situations in which societal concerns-environmental and health,
for example may be at odds with the immediate interests of important stakeholders. Through vigorous case
discussions, dialogues with industry leaders and role-play simulations students will wrestle with these often
ambiguous dilemmas, gain insights into the conflicts, and develop their own approaches and decision-making
Surveys a number of ethical standards or levels by which managers make decisions involving all functional areas
of business. Emphisizes discussion of cases and problem situations that confront managers and employees and
for which ethical dimensions are a significant part of their choices.
This course is ideal for students who want to learn to be social innovators. It covers the idea phase of ventures
and then moves to assessing the feasibility of funding, starting and growing student or community ideas. It
explores the possibility of adding to existing agency financial resources by using earned income concepts,
improved social value measurements, and other approaches that align with an agency´s primary mission. Case
studies, speakers, and student experiences comprise the teaching methods. Case situations include both US and
international problems and learning. This is a simulated experience course that is important for students who
wish to enter more advanced entrepreneurship action and out come coursework or the Social Innovation and
This course is designed to provide business assistance and expertise to St. Louis area non-profit agencies.
The goal of the course is to develop facility in applying basic tenets of general management to actual situations
and dilemmas that might be faced by health care managers, consultants, financiers, investors, innovators, or
providers business leaders, Olin work. Issues addressed will opportunitynotimpact their communities as board
As future in the course of their MBAs will have the unique include but to be limited to financial issues,
members for nonprofit organizations. The Board Fellows Program will offer a high-impact way for students to
serve their communities while gaining the valuable experience coupling their business acumen to the mission of
a nonprofit organization. As Board Fellows, students will develop skills for effective and thoughtful community
leadership and gain business and communication skills as they relate to: addressing nonprofit sector issues,
collaborating with other board members, and spearheading a project relevant to the board´s current initiatives.
International negotiations are more than just a language barrier -negotiating across cultural divides requires a
framework for understanding cultural differences. Cultural differences impact not only the process of the
negotiation itself, but also the preferences and positions of the parties. Different cultural perspectives result in
different negotiator selection criteria, can impact the significance of different types of issues, can create
misunderstandings over concerns with protocol, can result in very different bases of trust and comfort with risk,
impact preferences for different positions, affect negotiation strategies, and determine the nature of a
persuasive argument. This class is designed to help students build advanced skills in negotiation and dispute
resolution, in particular in an international context, by providing a framework for understanding the impact of
cultural differences on negotiation processes and outcomes. As demonstrated in the pre-requisite negotiations
class, a win/lose mentality frequently results in sub-optimal agreements, yet even the definition of winning can
The course will examine the relationship between environmental economics and environmental policy. The
course will focus on air pollution, water pollution, and hazardous wastes, with some attention given to
biodiversity and global climate change. The course will examine critically two prescriptions that economics
usually endorses: (1) "balancing" of benefits against costs (e.g., benefit-cost analysis) and the use of risk analysis
in evaluating policy alternatives; (2) use of market incentives (e.g., prices, taxes, or charges) or "property rights"
Rating (1 = Sust.-
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     related)       Offered
                 2 SP11




                 2 SP11




                 2 SU11


                 2 SP11




                 2 FL11
                 2 SU11


                 2 SP11




                 2 SP11
2 SP11




2 FL11
 Dept #     Crs #                  Title


                    Sustainable Technologies for
E33       380A      the Global Community




E33       439       Advanced Energy Lab
                    Special Topics: Energy and
                    Environmental Economics
                    and Risk Management
E33       590       Decision-Making


                    Special Topics: Energy and
E33       595       Buildings




E35       415       Optimization




E35       437       Sustainable Energy Systems




E37       5420      HVAC Analysis and Design I


                    Sustainable Environmental
E37       5423      Building Systems


                    Thermo-Fluid Modeling of
E37       5424      Renewable Energy Systems


                    Engineering Practice and
E60       450       Professional Values
             Engineering Ethics and
E60   4501   Sustainability


             Biomedical Engineering
E62   401    Design




E62   402    Senior Design II

             Introduction to Energy,
             Environmental and Chemical
E63   146A   Engineering


             Introduction to
E63   262    Environmental Engineering


             Pollution Abatement and
E63   345    Waste Minimization


             Environmental Risk
E63   438    Assessment and Toxicology




E63   449    Sustainable Air Quality


             Measurement Techniques for
E63   563    Particle Characterization

T15   4360   Energy Alternatives
                                                                                     Rating (1 =
                                                                                    Sust.-focused, 2
                                     Description                                    = Sust.-related)   Last Offered
This course will provide the engineering tools needed to solve problems in the
developing world and within the global community. Emphasis will be on learning
and applying technologies that are appropriate for varying communities and the
challenges that                                                                                    1 SP2011
Laboratory experiments to illustrate the application of engineering fundamentals
to the study of advanced energy generation, storage, distribution, and delivery
systems. Modules include both lecture and laboratory components and explore
topics such as fo                                                                                  2 FL2011
This course teaches economic principles in energy and environmental
management decision-making. After evaluating public and private projects for
selection based on economic considerations in resource allocation, students use
principles of decision-makin                                                                       2 SP2011
There is a $2 Trillion US market in energy efficiency with paybacks of 4-5 years.
This course will be an introduction to energy use in the built environment and
means and methods for evaluating and harvesting these financial benefits. It will
be based o                                                                                         2 FL2011
Optimization problems with and without constraints. The projection theorem.
Convexity, separating hyperplane theorems; Lagrange multipliers, Kuhn-Tucker-
type conditions, duality; computational procedures. Optimal control of linear
dynamic systems; maximum                                                                           2 SP2011
We will survey the field of sustainable energy and explore current and future
contributions within electrical and systems engineering. Specific areas and
selected topics include energy distribution and storage, smart and robust power
grids, energy and bui                                                                              2 SP2011
Moist air properties and the psychrometric chart. Classic moist air processes
and design procedures for heating and cooling systems. Design of heating,
ventilating, and air conditioning systems for indoor environmental comfort and
health. Basics of hea                                                                              2 FL2011
Sustainable design of building lighting and HVAC systems considering
performance, life-cycle cost and downstream environmental impact. Criteria,
codes and standards for comfort, air quality, noise/vibration and illumination.
Life cycle and other investm                                                                       2 SP2011
Overview of sustainable energy systems. Fundamentals of energy conversion.
Renewable energy sources and energy conversion from wind, biomass, solar-
thermal, geothermal, and ocean/waves. Applications to energy storage, fuel
cells, green air and ground tran                                                                   2 SP2011
A participatory course exploring the professional and ethical responsibilities of
working as an engineer. These responsibilities range from personal and
corporate conduct to societal and global concerns. The course aims to challenge
your assumptions, ra                                                                               2 SP2011
This course introduces tools and skills required to understand, evaluate, and
resolve ethical problems in engineering practice. By studying both historic and
hypothetical engineering cases, as well as theory, the student will more fully
appreciate a prof                                                                   2 FL2011
A design project experience to prepare students for engineering practice.
Working individually or in small groups, students will undertake an original
design or redesign of a component or system of biotechnological significance.
The design experience will                                                          2 FL2011
BME 402 is a continuation of the BME 401 class. Working in small groups,
students will take a paper design completed in BME 401, and build a prototype.
The students will evaluate, optimize, and undertake the building of the design.
The design experienc                                                                2 SP2011

Key technical issues that face our society and some of the emerging technologies
that hold promise for the future are examined and discussed. Relationship to
chemical engineering principles is emphasized.                                      2 FL2011
The objective of this course is to introduce students to the field of
environmental engineering. The course will emphasize basic principles of mass
and energy conservation which govern physical, chemical and biological
processes. Applications include th                                                  2 SP2011
Strategies and methods for waste minimization and pollutant emission
reduction. Principles of green engineering. Environmental transport and fate
modeling. Design of heat and mass exschange networks for energy and waste
reduction. Prerequisite: ChE 320 or                                                 2 FL2011
Essentials of human and ecological toxicology. Relationship between toxicology
and risk assessment. Concepts of environmental exposures and their practical
applications. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of human and animal
studies. Estimations of                                                             2 FL2011
Introduction to sustainability and sustainable air quality. Systems science as an
organizing principle for air quality management. Setting of air quality goals.
Observing the status and trends. Establishing causal factors: energy use and
chemical proc                                                                       2 SP2011
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the principles and
techniques of particle measurement and characterization. Practical applications
of particle technology include air pollution measurement, clean manufacturing
of semiconductors, air                                                              2 SP2011

                                                                                    2 FL2011
Dept #   Crs #                          Title




W74      604D    Adoption and Assisted Reproduction




W74      623K    Advanced Patent Law




W74      635D    American Indian Law
W74   611C   Antitrust




W74   611D   Antitrust in the World Economy




W74   528E   Censorship And Free Expression: A Practitioner’s Guide




W74   603A   Children And The Law




W74   797J   Civil Justice Clinic: Child And Family Defense Project
W74   769E   Civil Rights And Community Justice Clinic




W74   651A   Complex Civil Litigation

W74   589A   Consumer Transactions




W74   643A   Copyright And Related Rights




W74   538D   Corporations
W74   649B   Critical Jurisprudence




W74   608C   Domestic Violence And The Law




W74   590D   Employment Discrimination




W74   613B   Employment Law
W74   706D   Energy Utility Law




W74   614B   Environmental Law




W76   663S   Environmental Litigation Seminar




W75   605N   Environmental Moot Court
W74   562C   Ethics And Professionalism In The Practice Of Law




W74   588A   Ethics Within Organizations




W74   548    Family Law




W74   526B   Family Mediation Theory And Practice
W74   602G   Feminist Legal Theory




W76   729S   Genetics Ethics, Law, And Policy Seminar




W76   803S   Immigration And Race Seminar




W74   609P   Individual Rights And The Constituion
W74   636A   Information Privacy Law




             Intellectual Property And Nonprofit Organizations
W74   711C   Legal Clinic




             Intellectual Property Licensing And Technology
W75   530D   Transfer Planning And Drafting




W75   530B   Intellectual Property Litigation
             Intellectual Property Moot Court Team – Patents &
W75   606M   Copyrights




W74   644A   Intellectual Property Protection Of Computer Software




W74   704B   Interdisciplinary Environmental Clinic




             International Justice And Conflict Resolution Field
W74   667A   Placement
W74   706A   Introduction To Energy Law And Policy




W74   557D   Labor Law




W74   561D   Lawyer Ethics




W74   563M   Legal Profession




W74   561B   Legal Ethics In Film


W78   627S   Legal Ethics Seminar
W74   691B   Natural Resources Law




W74   572A   Nonprofit Organizations Planning And Drafting




W74   624C   Products Liability Law




             Propertizing Thought Seminar: Intellectual Property
W76   801S   And The Workings Of The Human Mind




W74   718E   Public Education Law And Social Policy
W76   759S   Race, Public Education And The Law Seminar




W74   608D   Race Relations Law




             Regulating Sex Seminar: Historical And Cultural
W77   784S   Encounters




             Representation Of Non-U.S. Citizens In Immigration
W74   675B   Court Proceedings


W74   717A   Secrecy And Whistle-Blowing
W74   602D   Sexuality And The Law: Theory And Practice
W74   647E   Trademarks And Unfair Competition




W76   737S   War Crimes Seminar
                                                     Description
This 2 unit course, which adds to the family law curriculum, examines the ways that law constructs our
understanding of parenthood and the parent-child relationship. In particular, this course focuses on adoption
and assisted reproduction, two ways to create families without sexual procreation. Coverage of adoption entails
a review of its history as a child-welfare measure, examination of the adoption process, and consideration of the
legal consequences of adoption (including variations such as equitable adoption, stepparent adoption, and
second-parent adoption). Important and timely policy debates, such as adoptions by gays and lesbians,
transracial adoption, confidentiality versus disclosure of adoption records, and open adoption, all receive
attention. The course compares and contrasts adoption with its modern "alternatives"-- various forms of
assisted reproduction (donor insemination, in vitro fertilization, egg donation, traditional and gestational
surrogacy, and embryo adoption), methods of family creation used traditionally by infertile couples and,
increasingly, by single individuals and gay and lesbian couples. Again, sharply contested policy issues are
emphasized (such as parentage rules for children born from collaborative reproduction; the effect of private
Contemporary patent practice requires a mastery of a large and specialized body of legal doctrines and
concepts. The basic Patent Law course usually offers an overview of patent law that focuses on claim
construction, the validity requirements, infringement, defenses, and remedies. Advanced Patent Law has the
basic Patent Law course as a prerequisite, and it builds on the knowledge conveyed in the basic course.
Designed to prepare students for a career in patent law—whether as a prosecutor, litigator, or a transactional
attorney—it examines some of the topics introduced in the basic Patent Law course in greater depth and also
introduces a range of new topics. In any given year, it may address the exceptions and limitations to patent
rights (e.g., reverse doctrine of equivalents, experimental use exception, geographic limitations on US patent
rights), standing to sue for licensees and declaratory judgment plaintiffs, joint inventorship rules, double
patenting, patent misuse and antitrust concerns, Hatch-Waxman patent litigation (involving pioneer drug
companies and generic drug companies), administrative law issues (e.g., the role of the Patent and Trademark
Office (PTO) in crafting patent doctrine and policy), and reexamination and reissue proceedings at the PTO. In
law affecting American Indians. The course will begin by considering the status of Indian nations as sovereign
political entities within the United States and examining the legal and political relationships these nations have
with the U.S. and the several states. The course will then explore the development of federal Indian law over
the past two centuries. Particular attention will be given to the doctrines of tribal sovereignty, self-government,
and self-determination; treaty-based rights to land, water, wildlife, and other natural resources; the
preservation of Indian languages, cultures, and religions; issues of economic development, including the right of
Indian nations to operate gaming enterprises on their reservations; and jurisdictional conflicts between and
among the U.S., Indian nations, and the states over authority to regulate the activities of Indians and non-
Indians in Indian country. Special consideration will also be given to the evolution and modern status of Indian
governments, their laws, and legal systems. The course will conclude with a survey of various international laws
and the laws of other nations, including Canada and Australia, as they relate to indigenous peoples. The manner
of evaluating students will be discussed and determined by democratic vote of the students in the first two
Antitrust teaches the legal principles that are used in an attempt to make the market system work. The course
will focus on monopoly and competition, the role that competition plays in society and the ways in which courts
and agencies have applied the antitrust laws to further competitive goals. To put antitrust in perspective, the
course will emphasize historical development, economic theories and enforcement trends. The substantive law
taught in the course will cover horizontal restraints among competitors, vertical restraints between
manufacturers and dealers, monopolization and mergers. Economic principles will be examined in the course
under the assumption that the students have not studied economics prior to taking the course. Attendance and
preparation are expected.

Antitrust (or Competition Law, as it is known outside the US) is the body of law that is intended to make the
market system function fairly and efficiently. The course will focus on monopoly and competition, the role that
competition plays in society and the ways in which courts and agencies, in the US, EU, and other industrialized
nations, have applied those laws to further competitive and other goals. The substantive law considered in the
course will cover monopolization, abuse of dominance, horizontal restraints among competitors, vertical
restraints between manufacturers and dealers, mergers, and the interplay between antitrust law and the law
protecting intellectual property. The approaches to those issues taken by the US, EU, and other nations will be
compared and contrasted, as will the extraterritorial reach of the respective legal regimes.
This 2 unit course will examine one of the key battlefields of the nation's culture wars—the legal skirmishes over
so-called dirty words and dirty pictures that have tested the limits of free expression under the First
Amendment. The course will be taught by First Amendment practitioners and will focus not only on legal fights
and outcomes, but also on practical considerations, effects, and strategies. Topics covered will include
obscenity; vulgarity in political expression; indecency regulation in broadcasting, the Internet and other media;
art, nudity, and censorship; offensive expression, including political commentary and parody with explicit sexual
content; vulgarity and sexual expression in copyright and trademark law; child pornography; and other limits on
the First Amendment. The classes will cover pertinent judicial decisions, as well as some original litigation
materials and outside works regarding social and policy implications. There will be one writing assignment and a
final exam; both will focus on the practical application of the developing laws to problems that face real clients.
The writing assignment, which may also include a presentation on the topic to the class, will not be graded
anonymously.

This course will examine the category of childhood, the competing interests of children, parents and the state,
and the law's attempts to mediate those interests. Topics to be covered include general approaches to
childrearing and family privacy; parent-child conflict, including child abuse and neglect; juvenile misconduct and
the juvenile justice system; and children's claims to autonomy.
The Child and Family Defense Project of the Civil Justice Clinic focuses on child and family advocacy,
representing children and parents in a variety of legal proceedings, including child protection, education, and
parental rights. The main practice area will be in child welfare matters, primarily representing children and
parents in St. Louis County Family Court child abuse and neglect proceedings. Student attorneys certified to
practice under Missouri Supreme Court Rule 13 will serve as lead counsel and have primary responsibility for the
clinic‘s clients with the goal of providing diligent, holistic, client-centered representation and developing as
competent, confident, and reflective attorneys. As lead counsel under faculty supervision, student attorneys will
appear as advocates at protective custody and other pre-trial hearings, initial appearance dockets, Family
Support Team (FST) meetings, trials, and/or dispositional proceedings. Throughout the course of the semester
students will also engage in client interviewing and counseling, case investigation, discovery, case negotiation,
legal research, motions practice, and trial preparation, with special attention to the particularized skills and
systemic knowledge needed as youth and family advocates and defenders. Consistent with our commitment to
The Civil Rights & Community Justice Clinic introduces students to civil rights practice and dispute resolution
from a community-based perspective. The course explores the intersectionality of poverty, work, health,
housing, and immigration. The course seeks to engage clinic students with the urban world in which they live
and to connect their professional lives with the lives of their clients and client communities. In the beginning of
the course, students receive 12-16 hours of training in interviewing, counseling, negotiation, and mediation.
This course provides opportunities for clinic students to 1) engage in client advocacy and dispute resolution on
behalf of workers, individuals displaced from or denied housing, individuals denied public health benefits, and
immigrants and refugees; 2) connect directly with clients and client communities; 3) grapple with professional
and ethical issues that arise in practice; and 4) develop the fundamental ability to learn from experience. The
Civil Rights & Community Justice Clinic endorses the ethic of community lawyering, i.e. representing clients with
recognition and respect for the needs and interests of the larger communities from which they come. Clinic
students work in teams on behalf of their client and client communities in conjunction with community legal
This course is designed to introduce students to class action litigation and other forms of complex litigation.
Students enrolling in this course should have taken the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Students will learn the
prerequisites required for filing class actions and review current cases that are impacting all facets of the civil
justice system nationally. In addition to the basics, students will use their background in civil procedure to
develop tactical approaches for advocating and defending these kinds of claims. Trial strategies and settlement
will also be considered. In addition to the class action device, joinder of claims, multi-district litigation and other
rules of civil procedure will be considered. This class is being taught by Mrs. Judy Cates, a trial practitioner with
30 years of experience. Prof. Cates is a former President of the Illinois Trial Lawyers Association, is admitted to
practice in several states and federal courts across the country, and is recognized as one of the best 100 trial
lawyers in the United States. Her practice has included filing class action lawsuits for plaintiffs, including a
consumer lawsuit against Publishers Clearinghouse. Prof. Cates has also defended class actions. In addition to
What are the rights and obligations of you and your clients as consumers? What will provide a real-world
the instruction offered by Prof. Cates, this course will have visiting lecturers who are the rights and obligations of
your retail business clients? The marketplace for consumer transactions is very different in several important
ways from the marketplace for commercial transactions. Although many of the rules governing marketplace

This course will focus on federal copyright law and related bodies of state, foreign, and international law
governing the protection of literary and artistic works, including technical works such as computer software,
architectural works, and databases, as well as more traditional literary and artistic works. The course materials
will include cases, statutes, international agreements, and hypothetical problems

This is a survey course on the creation and operation of unincorporated business associations and corporations.
The focus will be on how business law addresses the relationships between people, such as directors, who
control the affairs of an organization and those, such as shareholders, who have an interest in an organization,
but have limited control rights. The course will examine the economic logic of the legal rules that govern these
conflicts and it will emphasize how attorneys should think about planning and altering the structure of these
organizations to accommodate these concerns. While the primary goal of the course is to acquaint students
with the law of business organizations, the course also aims to provide students with an understanding of basic
business concepts.
This course is an introduction to contemporary Critical legal analysis, with an emphasis on Critical Legal Studies,
Feminist Jurisprudence, and Critical Race Theory. The class will examine selected common law, statutory and
constitutional doctrines and policies as analyzed, criticized, and/or reconstructed by legal scholars concerned
with issues of class, gender, and race, and with other variables that impact the distribution of social and material
power. Covered topics will include, for example, a critical deconstruction of contract doctrines such as duress
and unconscionability; a feminist analysis of the law of domestic violence; and a black scholar's critique of anti-
discrimination law. The emphasis will be on normative, rather than descriptive, analyses of existing law. The
assigned readings will be selected law review articles; assignments will be substantial. Attendance and
participation are required. Grades will be based on three 5 page written assignments, each covering
approximately one-third of the course and due 1-2 weeks after completion of that segment.
This two-credit interdisciplinary course will focus on the intersection of law and social work in relation to
domestic violence and the law, with particular focus on Missouri. The course is designed for law students who
may practice in this substantive area when they graduate/pass the Bar exam, social work students who may
practice in this area as court advocates or directors of domestic violence agencies, and law students and social
workers who may be doing public policy work in this area. This course will start with an overview of the nature
& dynamics of domestic violence, and include subjects such as power & control, types of abuse, dangers when
leaving, necessity for safety planning, and multiple oppressions. Thereafter, the course will lay the groundwork
for an analysis of the law with an historical perspective by covering the state of the law prior to the passage of
specialized criminal and civil laws, the necessity for these laws, and directed study of the laws that were passed
and why. One area of concentration in this analysis will be how the law can be used to change social conditions
and policy/practices of systems. In this analysis, we will cover Missouri's Adult Abuse Law (including Consents),
Missouri Domestic Assault Statutes, Full Faith and Credit, the Federal Violence Against Women Act and the

This course focuses on employment discrimination and legal efforts to prohibit its practice, with particular
emphasis on discrimination on the basis of race, sex, sexual orientation and disability and, to a lesser extent, age
and religion. The course will examine the relevant doctrine, focusing primarily on federal employment
discrimination statutes but also considering more expansive antidiscrimination protections under some state
statutes and local ordinances. The course will consider the basic legal frameworks for proving discrimination as
well as specific situations that may or may not fit into those frameworks, including the intersection between
race and sex, performances of gender, race and sexuality, pregnancy in the workplace, harassment, affirmative
action, and reasonable accommodation of individuals with disabilities.

This course examines the law governing the workplace, asking throughout what forms of regulation are most
appropriate. Should the terms of employment be left to the market and private contracting? Should
government intervene and specify minimum standards of employment? The course explores these questions in
regards to a series of concrete interests, such as job security, discrimination, privacy and other dignitary
interests, employee speech, wages and benefits, covenants not to compete, and health and safety concerns.
This 2 unit course will explore several legal topics that occur in the economic regulation of utilities (primarily
electric and natural gas utilities). One goal of this course will be to introduce students to the variety of
stakeholders that play an important role in this complex area of state and federal policymaking, explaining the
economic and legal relationships among these various entities. These entities include investor-owned energy
monopolies, deregulated energy providers, rural electric cooperatives, municipalities that provide utility
services or that grant franchise authority, independent wholesale power producers, large industrial and retail
customers, consumer advocates for residential consumers, low-income advocates, environmental advocates,
environmental regulators, state public utility commissions (PUCs), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
(FERC), and the quasi-governmental regional transmission organizations (RTOs). The other goal of this course
will be to provide real life examples of how administrative agencies navigate among numerous diverse
stakeholders, while also straddling quasi-judicial and quasi-legislative functions. While the course will touch on
issues involving constitutional law, business corporation law, property law, contract law and tort law, this will

Since its creation in the 1970s, modern environmental law has established a complex regulatory structure to
reduce pollution and protect public health and the environment. Today, as it emerges into its second
generation, environmental law is at the forefront of efforts to tackle climate change. This course will provide an
overview of the key federal environmental laws, including the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National
Environmental Policy Act, and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act
(a/k/a Superfund). It will also explore the dynamic, in-process efforts to employ environmental law to address
the monumentally-complex challenges of climate change.
Students in this seminar write an appellate brief on an actual trial court decision in a National Environmental
Policy Act (NEPA) case. I have chosen a NEPA case because this statute covers a wide range of environmental
issues and has been thoroughly considered in court decisions. Class element: The seminar will meet each week.
For the first few weeks we will read and study a casebook chapter on NEPA. After that the class will meet
weekly and may be divided into groups in some classes for group discussions. Writing element: Two drafts of
the brief are required. Additional revision of parts of a brief may also be required. Students may choose either
side of the case, and may choose the issue or issues they wish to appeal. Briefs are limited to ten pages. There
will be individual conferences on drafts. In addition, a written, two-page, double-spaced research progress
report is required periodically, and brief summaries of each class discussion and conferences are also required.
The seminar requires continuous and reasonable progress in meeting seminar requirements throughout the
semester. The emphasis in the seminar is on writing and presentation, and its purpose is to teach writing skills in
organization, composition and style. An additional purpose is to introduce students to substantive problems in a


Students must attend the informational meeting at the beginning of the semester, along with a brief writing
seminar and an oral argument seminar. Students work in teams of two for the preparation of an appellate brief
and the presentation of a minimum of two oral arguments concerning an environmental law issue. Semi-finalists
are selected based on their written brief score and oral argument scores from the two preliminary rounds. The
winning team represents the law school in the National Environmental Moot Court Competition. This course is
graded on a credit/no credit basis. [Students should keep in mind the limitations regarding credit toward their
degree for competition work (as a participant or board member): 1) a maximum of 4 total credits from
competitions; 2) only one competition per semester. Students should also keep in mind that these credits count
toward the 19 maximum allowed in non-law and non-classroom component classes.
This 2 unit course will provide students with the practical skills necessary to identify ethics issues, both routine
and complex, and help them identify the resources available to properly resolve those issues. In addition, the
course will focus on professionalism in the practice of law and its importance in improving the public perception
of lawyers. Students will benefit from an understanding of the importance of ethics and professionalism to their
individual legal careers. While they may ultimately practice law in any number of different work settings and
specialize in various substantive practice areas, ethics and professionalism will be a daily part of their practices.
The course will therefore begin with an analysis of the legal profession and the interplay between (i) defining
minimum standards below which behavior may not fall, (ii) establishing standards of ideal behavior toward
which attorneys should aim but cannot realistically expect to reach, and (iii) giving "practical advice" that
conforms to the lawyer's ethical responsibility. This analysis will also examine the lawyer's dual and somewhat
contradictory role in society (i.e., citizens want lawyers to be understanding and socially responsible, but the
same people freely admit that, when they have a problem, they want a lawyer who will play "hardball"). Finally,
The goal of this course is to introduce both law students and business students to the ethical and legal problems
that can arise within organizations. Initially, the course will focus on understanding the different possible
structures of organizations and on understanding how decision making authority can be distributed across those
structures. The course will then turn to an analysis of how and why organizational actors can make ethically and
legally problematic decisions and how those decisions can diminish the performance of an organization and can
even threaten the existence of an organization. Once students understand the genesis of these issues and their
potential consequences, the course will address how to improve communication between organizational actors.
This segment will focus on teaching non-attorneys the nature of the lawyer-client relationship and it will
educate future attorneys on the concerns and roles that non-attorneys have when they act within
organizational settings. The course will conclude with applied examples of common problems that arise in
organizational settings such as understanding the difference between compliance with the law and compliance
with ethical obligations, the ability of organizations to impose duties that go beyond legal requirements,
This course examines the state‘s role in regulating family and other intimate relationships, with a particular
emphasis on adult relationships. Topics include the law of marriage and divorce, nonmarital cohabitation,
property division and alimony/spousal support at divorce, private ordering of property rights at divorce, child
custody, and child support.
This course will use a combination of lecture, discussion, videos, demonstration, and role plays to introduce
students to the theory and practice of family mediation. Students will receive a thorough grounding in the
fundamentals of the family mediation process. The course will focus on the development of the analytical and
interpersonal skills necessary for attorneys to be successful in family mediations, whether as advocates or
mediators. The course will address a wide spectrum of family issues and contexts, including divorce, child
custody and parenting plans, child support, division of finances and property, domestic violence, family
dynamics, child development, the psychological effect of divorce on children, LGBT legal issues, end of life and
health care issues, trusts and estates, guardianship, client representation and advocacy, ethics (both for the
mediator and the attorney), cross cultural factors, collaborative law, and the utilization of social services and
court programs. The course will introduce students to various styles of family mediation and will focus on
emerging issues in the field to prepare students to provide education, guidance, and preparation for their future
clients in mediation, and to serve as mediators in the family arena. The course develops analytical frameworks
In this course, we will read feminist theory, queer theory, and other critical theory in order to examine
constructions of gender and the roles legal systems play in those constructions. We will explore some of the
general themes and debates that have emerged as theorists attempt to understand and critique the law‘s
explicit and implicit constructions of gender as they relate to various groups of women and men. These themes
and debates will include the promise and limits of equal protection doctrine, attempts to challenge the gender
neutrality of social norms, intersectionality and the meaning of gender, and the benefits and harms of identity
politics. We will also explore specific applications of theory to law and social policy, including topics related to
work and wealth distribution, intimate and familial relationships, identity performance and constraints on
agency, and the regulation of sexuality. Throughout the semester, students will be expected to engage in their
own theoretical analyses, both in writing and orally, during class discussion

In this seminar, students will learn about legal, ethical, and policy issues raised by developments in genetics.
Besides informing students about an increasingly important area in law and science, the seminar will help them
develop skills in critical and interdisciplinary analysis. The first part of the seminar will cover general material on
genetics issues as well as guidelines for research and writing. Potential paper topics include genetic
discrimination, genetic testing (including direct-to-consumer tests), gene patenting, genetics and personalized
medicine, coverage of health care for genetic conditions, genetics research, and issues related to state-
sponsored and private eugenics. Students will write a 25-30 page paper for the seminar, including a first and
final draft. Students will also lead a class discussion of their paper topic. In individual meetings, the professor
will help students plan their research, writing, and class presentations.

This interdisciplinary seminar examines the origins and consequences of immigration policy in U.S. history,
paying particular attention to the intersections of immigration law and racial construction in the late-nineteenth
and early-twentieth centuries. The seminar will meet weekly for the first half of the semester to discuss
assigned readings, which will include cases, statutes, and secondary scholarly literature dealing with Asian,
Latino, and European immigration. Seminar attendance and preparation are required, and students will be
expected to write a one-page reaction paper to the reading assignment each week. As we work through the
historical immigration cases and literature, we will also explore questions about the relationship between law
and group identity formation, racial construction, state formation, and nation-building processes. The course
will introduce students to some of the major historical and theoretical debates and trends that have dominated
the study of immigration

This course investigates the scope and meaning of race equality, sex equality, implied fundamental rights, and
economic justice under the Reconstruction Amendments. We will pay particular attention to the development
of the Fourteenth Amendment‘s liberty and equality guarantees and to current controversies including abortion,
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affirmative action, and gay rights. We will ask substantive questions regarding constitutional doctrine: For
example, which forms of discrimination does, or should, ―equal protection prohibit? Another category of
questions will focus on interpretive methods: What is the appropriate role of text, structure, history, and
prudence in constitutional interpretation? In discussing these questions, we will examine how political and
social change has influenced the resolution of constitutional disputes and how non-judicial actors, as well as
courts, have constructed constitutional meanings.
This 2 unit course serves as an introduction to the emerging and somewhat nebulous field of "information
privacy law." The course will trace the origins of privacy from the famous 1890 Harvard Law Review article "The
Right to Privacy" by Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis to the modern problems of privacy in the information
age. Particular emphasis will be placed upon modern policy problems involving privacy, including Fourth
Amendment law, health privacy, privacy on the Internet, privacy in the home, and the conflict between privacy
and the First Amendment protections of free speech and press. Attendance and participation are essential.
The IP/NPO Legal Clinic will provide law students with opportunities to work with qualified IP counsel in
providing early stage legal advice to innovators both within the University and in the wider community, to
collaborate in interdisciplinary experiential learning activities, and to provide IP and nonprofit legal services to
clients who might otherwise not have access to competent legal counsel. Four students will work primarily with
nonprofit organizations on a wide range of issues, including formation, governance and tax exemption. The IP
Clinic's activities will be devoted to four program areas, each of which will involve teams of two students, who
will: 1) Participate in interdisciplinary innovation and entrepreneurship courses, such as the Olin School‘s
Hatchery course; 2) Work with St. Louis area IP attorneys to provide early stage legal advice to other innovators
and entrepreneurs at the University and in the wider community, with a particular focus on business incubators
in the St. Louis area; 3) Work with established non-profit organizations, such as the St. Louis Volunteer Lawyers
& Accountants for the Arts and 4) Work with area research organizations, such as the Missouri Botanical
Garden, on projects involving genetic resources, biotechnology, and the protection of traditional medicinal and
This course will explore the issues and techniques involved in (1) planning for intellectual property and
information technology licensing and technology transfer transactions, and (2) drafting supporting legal
documents. You will develop an understanding of how to draft clear and comprehensive legal documents for
these types of transactions through a series of weekly drafting assignments. This course will be based on real-
world examples. Drafting assignments may include client letters, software development agreements, electronic
rights licenses, institutional and end-user licenses, patent licenses, non-disclosure agreements, trade secret
licenses and trademark assignments and licenses, copyright transfers, and various on-line contracts. Regular
attendance and class participation are required. The grade for the course will be based on the drafting
assignments and class participation. Although there is no formal prerequisite, you will find it helpful to have had
or be enrolled in: Law and Business of Intellectual Property Licensing & Technology Transfer (formerly IP
Licensing & Technology Transfer); Trademarks & Unfair Competition; Copyright and Related Rights; Internet
Law; Intellectual Property Litigation; Survey of IP, Patent Law; and Trademark Practice. This course will not be

This applied skills course will offer practical experience in dealing with pretrial and trial litigation issues unique
to patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret litigation. Students enrolling in this course will find it helpful to
have had or be enrolled in Evidence; Trademarks & Unfair Competition, Copyright & Related Rights and/or
Patent Law. The course covers IP litigation from the initial cease-and-desist letter through appeal. Students draft
pleadings other litigation-related documents for a wide variety of state and federal intellectual property
disputes, and inter parties proceedings in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
[Students do not register online for this course.] Second-year and third-year JDs will be selected for this moot
court competition by tryouts in the fall semester. Those selected will prepare briefs and participate in the Giles
Sutherland Rich Memorial Moot Court Competition, held in Chicago during the spring semester. Team members
will receive two hours of academic credit, graded on a credit/no-credit basis, to be posted in the spring
semester. While there are no formal pre-requisites or co-requisites for this moot court competition, preference
will be given to students who have taken and/or are enrolled in patent- or copyright-related courses. [Students
should keep in mind the limitations regarding credit toward their degree for competition work (as a participant
or board member): 1) a maximum of 4 total credits from competitions; 2) only one competition per semester
Intellectual property (IP) protection for computer software continues to evolve, with recent case law impacting
how software may be protected with copyrights, patents and trade secrets. While software has taken a central
role in our information and automation-driven lives, the legal mechanisms that can be used to protect software
innovation have not always kept up with this fast-moving technology. Some have argued that certain types of IP,
such as patents, are not well-suited to software inventions, while others argue that only the process of granting
and enforcing patents needs to be improved. There are many sides to the debate, but in the meantime IP
lawyers routinely use existing IP laws to protect their clients' software innovation, while the U.S. Patent and
Trademark Office (USPTO) continues to grant software patents, and the courts regularly render decisions on
infringement and validity of IP rights for software. The present course will provide an overview and background
regarding the legal mechanisms that may be used to protect software, including copyrights, patents and trade
secrets. A review of real-world commercialization and disputes involving software patents, copyrights and trade
secrets will be presented and discussed, and the students will have an opportunity to analyze and debate

Clinic participants engage in complex, multi-party litigation and advocacy as part of an interdisciplinary team:
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generally, law students are partnered with students from the engineering, arts & sciences, medical, business, or
social work schools. Students develop their lawyering skills acting as the ―first-chair in their cases and through
extensive interaction with experienced Clinic attorneys. The Clinic‘s cases tackle some of the most challenging
and important water, air, and environmental justice problems in the nation. In addition, students will learn a
great deal about public interest law, as most of the clients are non-profit organizations and under-represented
communities. The experience is universally helpful to the practice of law; previous experience or interest in
environmental issues is not required.

This course will provide students opportunities to learn international criminal law and practice, and conflict
resolution theory and practice, working with lawyers practicing before international courts and tribunals, with
international judges, and with lawyers in international conflict resolution offices such as the UN - with oversight
from Washington University law faculty. Students will engage in extensive legal research and fact investigation;
draft legal memoranda relevant to cases under submission by the courts and policy reports for government
offices; interview clients, witnesses, and relevant constituencies; and participate in negotiations, mediations,
hearings, trials, and other proceedings. The course will enhance students learning in international and
comparative criminal law, practice, and procedure; conflict resolution theory, policy, and practice; and
professional responsibility. This course will provide opportunities for students to develop advanced skills in legal
research and writing, fact investigation, interviewing and counseling, negotiation and dispute resolution,
litigation, and policy making in international arenas.
Energy markets and regulation have undergone significant changes in the past 20 years in the United States in
attempts to improve reliability, to reduce costs, and to address environmental impacts, while meeting increased
demand. Focusing on electric power, this 1 unit short course will introduce students to energy economics and
the principles and practices of public utility regulation. The class will trace the historical development of the
regulated electric industry and examine the current structure of and issues facing the electric industry, such as
wholesale and retail competition, renewable energy and energy efficiency, and environmental effects.
This course focuses on the National Labor Relations Act, which governs union organizing, collective bargaining,
and the use of economic weapons (strikes, lockouts, pickets, and boycotts) in workplace disputes over wealth
distribution, power and voice. The course has an explicit focus on class conflict and the law's role in regulating
worker protest: it concerns itself with abuses of employer power, the formation of a social movement (labor
unionism) as a response to those abuses, and the law's efforts to protect, channel and constrain collective
activities by workers


Lawyers are often required to choose a course of action from among competing interests and duties. Lawyers
may have obligations to a tribunal, clients, other persons involved in a matter, and also to themselves, their
firms, and their families. This course will explore the issues most commonly encountered by practitioners and
how they can and do resolve such issues. We will study the rules-based parameters of lawyer conduct, but will
also consider other standards governing professional responsibility and liability, and the personal, ethical, and
moral dilemmas that confront lawyers. Attention will also be paid to the particular issues which face the
prosecutor and defense counsel in the criminal arena. Guest lecturers will address areas of particular importance


The goal of this course is to help prepare students for the ethical dilemmas they will face as practicing lawyers.
The course will examine the nature and types of lawyer regulation, client-attorney relationships, confidentiality
rules, conflicts of interest, duties to courts, adversaries and third parties, client solicitation and billing, and
access to legal services. The course will primarily address the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct but also
will consider ethical duties under common law and other sources of authority. Most of the classes will focus on
the skills of identifying and solving the ethical dilemmas lawyers face in practice and on the professional values
of providing competent legal representation, improving the legal profession, and promoting justice and fairness.

The goals of this course are to provide: (1) a working knowledge of the structure, content and interpretation of
the ABA Model Rules of Professional Responsibility; and (2) an understanding of how to research an ethics
question given the idiosyncratic professional standards governing each jurisdiction. The course requires
students to view motion pictures each featuring actors portraying lawyers in various circumstances. The
fictional lawyer‘s behavior then serves as a starting point for examining various ABA Model Rules of Professional
Conduct. Class discussion initially would focus on the acts within the film and lead to a problem based
examination of the relevant ABA rules extending to other related ethics topics.

The class meets several times at the beginning of the semester to examine basic concepts in legal ethics and
meets several times at the end of the semester for students to make short presentations about their papers.
The objective of this 2 unit course is for students to develop a basic understanding of the legal structures
governing natural resource management in the United States. The course will be taught by focusing on real-
world resource problems that touch upon the following areas of the law: water allocation, wildlife protection,
mineral extraction, natural resource damages, environmental mitigation and banking, carbon sequestration, and
land conservation. A particular focus will be placed on new and evolving areas of the law.
This 2 unit applied skills course will examine the characteristics of nonprofit organizations. The course will
examine the types of nonprofit organizations, the formation of a nonprofit organization and related operational
issues including the responsibilities of directors and officers. Obtaining and keeping tax-exempt status, and
charitable giving will be covered. The unique issues of religious, higher education and health organizations will
be addressed

This 2 unit course will look at the various tort, contract and statutory remedies available to people seeking
compensation for injuries sustained from allegedly defective products. We will examine a host of issues
involving liability for defective products, including food products, tobacco, prescription drugs/medical devices
and more. We will look at the government‘s role as protector of the public, whether compliance with
government requirements and regulations should be a defense in product suits, and the growing viability of
statutory defective merchandise/advertising theories of recovery. The course will primarily cover tort theories
of recovery, i.e., negligence and strict tort liability, and will focus on both section 402A of the Restatement (2nd)
of Torts as well as sections 1-21 of the Restatement (3rd) of Torts, Products Liability. The course will meet twice
a week and will occasionally involve lectures from practicing lawyers
The notion that law treats human thought as a resource that can be commodified and subjected to property
rights is likely to be greeted at first impression with either skepticism—law doesn‘t really do that—or
revulsion—law shouldn‘t do that. Focusing principally, but not exclusively, on intellectual property law, this
seminar will question both of these responses. Whether intellectual property law treats human thought as a
propertizable commodity and whether it should, of course, hinge on what it means to propertize thought. What
is the relationship between the property rights generated by intellectual property and the workings of the
human mind? These definitional questions will loom large in this seminar. One of the premises of the seminar is
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that intellectual property law already propertizes thought in an indirect manner on a routine basis. Trademark
law protects a trademark owner‘s interest in ―good will, a phenomenon which is nothing but the collective
mental impressions that consumers have about a product. Copyright law clearly restricts freedom of speech
insofar as public performance of a copyrighted work requires the copyright owner‘s permission, and freedom of
speech and thought are tightly interconnected. Patents that recite human, mental steps at the point of novelty

This course will focus on recent legal and policy debates in public education, grades K-12, including: 1)
educational equity issues, 2) the financing of public schools, 3) tracking & testing, 4) bilingual education &
immigrant matters, 5) gender equity issues and 6) alternatives to traditional public schools (vouchers & the
charter school movement) and other potential reforms. Depending on time, other debates may be explored.
The course will meet once a week and will occasionally involve guest appearances by scholars, lawyers, and
policy makers in K-12 education. Attendance is required. Classes cannot be video or audio taped without the
professor‘s prior approval. Laptops and other computerized devices are prohibited. Students interested in
mentoring students at a local high school on a regular, scheduled, and weekly basis, will also have the option of
signing up for an additional credit hour as a Supervised Practicum with the professor, and will meet with the
professor on a regular basis to discuss the issues of public education law and social policy in the context of the
high school student whom is being mentored.
This 4 unit seminar will be part course-seminar and part service learning. It will meet twice a week in the spring
semester. During the first half of the seminar law students will meet regularly at the law school (TuTh 1:00p-
2:30p) to discuss the intersection of race, class, education and law in the United States. While most of the focus
will be on public education at the elementary and secondary levels, students are free to explore these issues in
higher education as well. Reading materials will focus on whether the right to an education should be
guaranteed under the United States Constitution, whether states should be obligated to provide an adequate
education and if so, how adequacy is determined, whether it is possible for all students to be educated on a
equal basis, how public education is and should be funded, what remedies should exist, if any, when the state
fails to provide an adequate education and the role that race, ethnicity and class should play in the integration
of public school students. Law students will also meet weekly with a group of high school students. Law
students will mentor these students, lead workshops on race, class and education matters and will eventually
link up with adjunct professors to help prepare the high school students to argue a summary judgment motion,

This course explores the intersection of race relations and legal institutions in the United States. It focuses both
on the transhistorical continuity of certain understandings of race, and on the evolution of others. In the first
half of the course, we consider the theoretical and doctrinal principles that underlie historical issues such as
Indian Nation sovereignty, slavery and Reconstruction, and the civil rights era. In addition, we will consider early
"legal" definitions of race in American law, and explore the role of race in citizenship, naturalization, and
immigration law and policy. For the remainder of the course, we explore competing conceptual models of the
American racial legal order, and examine current jurisprudence on racial issues that arise within the context of
employment, education, intimate association, the distribution of electoral power, and/or the administration of
criminal justice
Emphasizing culture, society, and the ways both change over time, this seminar examines sexuality and law as
discourses and as regulatory instruments. In particular, the seminar considers how law does and does not
regulate sexual practice, norms, and values and how, in turn, these sexual forces shape law. This explicitly
interdisciplinary course uses materials from law, literature, and popular culture and contrasts conventional legal
analysis with feminist and other alternative frameworks, including queer theory, social constructionism,
intersectionality theory, and symbolic interactionism. Possible topics covered include sexuality during slavery
and bondage, the medicalization of sex, traditional marriage and various alternatives, pregnancy, sexual
initiation and education, sex research, and sexual citizenship. Professor Susan Appleton from the School of Law
and Professor Susan Stiritz from the WGSS Program co-teach the seminar. Enrollment includes a mix of law
students and WGSS students from Arts & Sciences, Social Work, and other schools. Law students become
acquainted with sources, methodologies, and frameworks that highlight the dynamic relationship between
culture and law, privacy and legal regulation, and power and sexual citizenship. WGSS students become

The course will combine black-letter statutory and regulatory law with practical skills necessary to represent
non-U.S. citizens in immigration court proceedings. The course will be centered around the immigration court
proceedings involving hypothetical "clients." Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to those
clients through fact patterns and assist them: seek release from detention on bond; respond to the immigration
charges the U.S. government has brought against them; explore what relief might be available to them; and
present an argument to the immigration court.
This course explores the confidentiality obligations and whistleblowing options that arise in a variety of
relationships, including those between lawyers and clients and between employees and employers, in both the
public and private sector.
TBA
This course will be an introduction to U.S. trademark and unfair competition law, focusing on the federal system
under the Lanham Act. The course will address issues of current interest, such as: protection of Internet domain
names; trademarking celebrities; conflicts between trademark protection and the copyright and patent laws;
and trademark dilution.

There are now more than five functioning international and hybrid criminal tribunals. This seminar will focus on
the jurisprudence of these war crimes tribunals and the International Criminal Court, studying their methods of
legal reasoning, substantive law and procedures. Students will read cases from the tribunals and prepare a
substantial research paper addressing a problem in international criminal law. The seminar will meet regularly
except during a three week period in March during which students will work on their first drafts. The seminar‘s
purpose is to permit students to deepen their knowledge of international criminal law while at the same time
offering extensive guidance in how to write (and rewrite) an excellent research paper. Instruction
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Dept #    Crs #                    Title




M79      653A     Medical Ethics




                  Public & Community Health: The
M79      654B     Other Delivery System




M08      551      Community Health and Research




                  Environments that Impact
M01      5162     Participation in Daily Life




M01      5250     Disability and Social Policy




                  Community Health and
M01      5264     Occupational Therapy




                  Applied Skills for Daily Living: OT
M01      528B     Practice I




                  Applied Skills for Daily Living: OT
M01      528C     Practice II
             Intervention Models in
M01   5291   Occupational Therapy Practice




             Child and Youth Disability: Clinical
M01   5520   and Public Health Approaches

             Medical Spanish and Hispanic
             Culture:Increasing Participation
             and Performance in Minority
M01   580    Population




             Counseling Parents of Hearing-
M89   457    Impaired Children




M02   602    Professional Issues and Skills 1




             Moderators of Health, Wellness
M02   626    and Rehabilitation




M02   653    Health Fitness and Prevention
                                                                              Rating (1 = Sust.-
                                                                              focused, 2 = Sust.-    Last
                                Description                                        related)         Offered

This course is an exploration of the ethical issues which confront
administrators in health administration. The topics are drawn from
ethical situations found in traditional medical care (e.g., euthanasia,
informed consent, the doctor-patient relationshi                                                2 FL2011

Students are introduced to public health as a professional discipline and
to community health as a set of services that are part of a community's
health and human service infrastructure. Attention will be given to how
these are vital dimensions of the Am                                                            2 FL2011

As a survey course, this class will provide the student with an
understanding of social and behavioral factors at the level of the
community and system that effect the public health; including
preventions, interventions and policies that improve the publi                                  2 FL2011

This course provides an in depth understanding of the psychological,
social, political, physical, and cultural elements of the environment that
influence participation, well-being and quality of life. Disability, as the
consequence of environmental barri                                                              2 SP2011

The emergence of disability as a minority group with significant public
health and social welfare concerns has implications for many aspects of
society. This course allows the student to explore disability issues with
an emphasis on the more personal aspe                                                           2 SP2011

This course examines community health, wellness, and education
practices through occupational therapy for groups, communities, and
population. Practice models are explored for promoting health,
occupational performance and public health across the lifesp                                    2 SP2011

This laboratory course provides experiences designed to integrate
information from the concurrent theory and practice course. Students
explore intervention strategies and methods surrounding participation
and continuity of care across ages and environment                                              2 FL2011

Separated into 4 modules, students receive experiential laboratory
activities designed to integrate information form the occupational
therapy theory and practice course. Students explore intervention
strategies and methods surrounding continuity of care                                           2 SP2011
Divided into content modules, students explore core concepts of OT
practice related to motor learning, cognition, physiological and psycho-
social issues. Models of assessment and intervention are explored and
applied to cases. Students have opportunities                                2 FL2011

This course is designed to assist the health professionals toward a more
balanced understanding of the interaction of health professions and
public health. The course will introduce clinical aspects of emotional
development of children and adolescents an                                   2 FL2011

This course will teach students basic vocabulary and communication
skills in Spanish. It will also focus on developing an understanding and
appreciation for the culture of the many different Spanish speaking
countries. We will discuss the availability and                              2 FL2011

Helps teachers of the deaf interact more effectively with parents and
caregivers of hearing-impaired children. Students will develop a
repertoire of interviewing and counseling skills to help address the needs
of both the hearing-impaired individual and                                  2 SP2011

An introduction to the profession of physical therapy, the APTA,
professional behavior and clinical activites such as documentation and
quality improvement. Includes ethics, legal issues and policies that guide
professional behavior. Students will learn                                   2 FL2011

Designed to explore inividual attitudes toward health, illness, disability
and death. Empasizes the effect of these attitudes on individual goals,
motivation, expectations, interpersonal relationships and exercise
adherence. Investigates individual heal                                      2 FL2011

Emphasis will be on critiquing and designing fitness and wellness
programs for well and special populations. Programs will focus on those
for employee fitness, diabetes, arthritis, obesity and the elderly.
Students will participate in and evaluate group                              2 SP2011
Dept #   Crs #                                         Title



S15      5005    Research Methods

S15      5011    Human Behavior

S15      5012    Social, Economic & Political Environment

S15      5015    Social Justice & Human Diversity

S15      5038    Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups

S15      5039    Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities

S15      5040    Social Welfare Policies & Services

S15      5999    Evidence-Based Practice Skills for BSW Graduates
                 Theoretical and Empirical Bases for Practice with Children, Youth and
S20      1011    Families

S20      1022    Domestic Violence: Theories, Problems & Issues

S20      2010    Theories & Issues in Aging

S20      3022    Health Behavior & Health Promotion

S20      4011    Differential Diagnosis

S20      5011    Economics of Social Welfare

S20      5013    Poverty & Inequality in America

S20      5014    Social Justice: Exploring the Reality of America's Promise

S20      5017    Organizational Behavior & Theory

S20      5030    International Social Development

S20      6023    American Indians and Leadership

S30      5453    Principles of Clinical Interventions in Health

S30      5502    Applied Behavior Therapy
S30   5503   Cognitive Behavior Therapy

S30   5702   Applied Group Work Practice

S30   5703   Working with Groups on Problem-solving Tasks

S30   5902   Applied Psychosocial Practice

S30   6011   Brief Outcome Therapy

S30   6211   Treatment of Mental Disorders

S30   6212   Promoting Recovery for Persons with Serious Mental Illness

S30   7001   Introduction to Family Therapy

S30   7206   Theories & Practice of Family Therapy

S30   7325   Social Work Practice with Children in Families

S30   7326   Social Work Practice with Youth in Families

S30   7327   Social Work Practice in the Continuum of Care

S30   7502   Intervention Approaches for Treating Couples

S30   7815   Social Work Services in Public School Settings

S30   7818   Social Work, Education, & the Exceptional Child

S30   9125   Social Work Practice & Services in Health Care

S30   9150   Death & Dying

S30   9453   Substance & Alcohol Abuse

S30   9455   Biopsychosocial Assessments & Interventions with Older Adults

S31   4000   Social Work & American Indians

S31   4010   Social Work Practice in Early Childhood

S31   4100   Social Work Practice with Immigrants and Refugees

S31   5122   Intervention Approaches with Women
S31   5141   Human Sexuality
             Training in Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation: Skills for Multicultural Social
S31   5185   Work Practice

S31   5200   Spirituality and Social Work

S31   5230   Child Welfare Practice
             Social Work Practice with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender
S31   5243   Populations
             Designing Sustainable Social Policies & Programs: A Systems Dynamic
S40   5660   Approach

S40   5742   Health Administration and Policy

S40   5771   Policy & Services for Children & Youth

S40   5780   Social Policy & Aging

S40   5809   Women’s Issues in Social Welfare & Social Work Practice

S40   5842   Social Policy Analysis & Evaluation

S40   5861   Social & Economic Development Policy

S40   5886   Disaster & Vulnerable Populations

S48   5012   Mental Health Policy

S50   5019   Personnel Management & Supervision

S50   5020   Board Governance & Volunteer Management

S50   5030   Budgeting & Fiscal Management

S50   5050   Evaluation of Programs & Services

S50   5052   Leadership, Planning, & Decision Making

S50   5060   Social Entrepreneurship

S50   5066   Marketing, Resource Development, & Community Relations

S50   5067   Developing Programs for Children & Youth

S50   5068   Development of Programs & Services for an Aging Society
S50   5153   Juvenile Delinquency: Program Strategies & Interventions

S55   5000   Research Methods

S55   5001   Foundations of Public Health: Health Behavior & Health Promotion

S55   5002   Foundations of Public Health: Epidemiology

S55   5003   Foundations of Public Health: Biostatistics

S55   5004   Foundations of Public Health: Health Administration & Health Policy

S55   5005   Foundations of Public Health: Environmental Health

S55   5010   Cross-cutting Themes in Public Health

S55   5011   Epidemiology Methods

S55   5012   Cancer Epidemiology

S55   5015   Readings in the Cross-cutting Themes of Public Health

S55   5102   Global Health

S55   5105   Infectious Disease Epidemiology

S55   5230   Applied Linear Modeling

S55   5240   Program Planning, Implementation & Evaluation
             Transdisciplinary Problem Solving:: Chronic Disease, Policy and Prevention
S55   5305   for Public Health

S55   5315   Transdisciplinary Problem Solving: Tobacco Control in Public Health
             Transdisciplinary Problem Solving: Strategies for Eliminating Health
S55   5320   Disparities

S55   5325   Transdisciplinary Problem Solving: Child Maltreatment
             Transdisciplinary Problem Solving: Implementing Public Health Interventions
S55   5330   in Developing Countries

S55   5901   MPH Culminating Experience

S60   5016   Community Development Practice: Basic Concepts & Methods

S60   5017   Revitalization of Depressed Communities
S60   5018   Organizing, Coalition Building & Lobbying

S60   5056   Development Practice in International Settings

S60   5075   The City – The New Frontier

S60   5077   Urban Development Seminar

S60   6079   Community Development & American Cities

S65   5031   Law for Social Workers

S65   5037   Domestic Violence and the Law

S65   5047   Pharmacology for Social Workers

S65   5050   Group Model Building: Special Topics

S65   5055   Asset Building: Theory, Innovation, Research, Policy and Practice

S65   5081   The American Jewish Community: Organizations & Service

S65   5082   Foundations of Geographic Information Systems

S70   5102   Integrative Foundation Practicum Seminar

S80   5003   Biostatistics

S80   5230   Applied Linear Modeling

S81   5014   Grantwriting

S81   5027   Art Therapy Skills

S81   5047   Intervention Approaches with HIV+ Individuals & Families

S81   5048   Motivational Interviewing

S81   5049   Cognitive Processing Therapy

S81   5050   MSW Research Seminar I

S81   5051   MSW Research Seminar II

S81   5066   Teen Outreach Program (TOP)
             Understanding & Practice with At-Risk and Incarcerated Populations and their
S81   5067   Families

S81   5068   Assertive Community Treatment Practice

S81   5069   Dialectical Behavioral Therapy

S81   5070   Interpersonal Therapy

S81   5410   Spanish for Social Service Providers
                                                            Description
1. Students will understand the basics of social work and public health research. Core research concepts are presented
including specification, design, data collection, measurement, survey design, bias, qualitative and quantitative research,
clinical research (multi-subject and single subject), use of computers in data retrieval, data management and data analysis,
research implementation, interpretation, in the social environment. The course examines several influences on life course
This course focuses on human behavior and dissemination.
development, including biological/physiological, environmental, relational, and cognitive influences on human behavior. The
effect of age, race, gender, social that the social, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, and physical and mental
This course examines the impact class, culture, economic, and political environments have upon individuals, groups, and
communities, particularly diverse populations distinguished by race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation,
religion, physical or mental ability, age factors compels us toThe underlying premise of information aboutitdifferent cultures,
The mandate of EBP to consider client and national origin. identify the best available the course is that is essential for
social class, sexual orientation, poverty, gender, and other factors essential to practice. It is critical that social workers have
the ability to assess clients' values, preferences, and characteristics that are relevant to the issue at hand. This is partly a
This course has three primary goals:

1) Students will gain introductory practice skills inskills neededof organizations practice with individuals,substantive areas
This course develops social work knowledge and the context for social work and communities. Main families and groups.
include task group work, organizational capacity, community assessment, program development and evaluation, and
community practice strategies. Evidence-based practice skills are skills. Main substantive areas include history application of
This course develops social work policy knowledge and practice brought together in this course, stressing the of social work
and social welfare policies and programs in the United States, social policy analysis, and social work policy practice skills for
social justice and social change. Students understand how political and social conditions andwork practice, but withouttime are
This course is open only to individuals with prior education and training in generalist social values (or ideology) of a explicit
training in EBP. These people include graduates of BSW and MSW programs who have not benefited from explicit curricular
focuscourse exposes students to theoreticallyto supplement pre-existing social work knowledge andthe assessment, students
This on EBP. The purpose of this course is based, empirically supported interventions that guide skills of BSW treatment
planning, intervention selection, implementation, and evaluation of outcomes in social work practice with children youth and
families (CYF). seminar on reducing the incidence and impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) through social work practice.
This course is a
 The course emphasizes men’s violence against women and will examine theoretical contributions to understanding why men
are violent in intimate a broad range of theories and contemporary will provide a meaningful to social work practice with older
This course examines relationships. At the same time the course issues in aging that relate opportunity to examine violence
adults and their families. Domains of inquiry include biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives of aging and
older adults. There is a critical examination of the social constructions of old age, social work values and ethics, and social


Whether they practice in direct present fundamentals of social and behavioral social as a framework for using evidence-based
The purpose of this course is to mental health or general social service settings,scienceworkers commonly encounter children, approaches i
adolescents and adults experiencing mental health problems. Evidenced-based research suggests that one in four persons will
experience a significant psychiatric disorder over the course of their lifetime. Unfortunately, mental disorders often go and
The objective of this course is to help MSW students understand the economic aspects of social welfare policy, problems
programs. We will use basic economic theories and concepts to understand the behavior of individuals and groups as they
participate in the markets for goods and services; the implied role of the government when markets don’t function well; and
Focuses on the extent and causes of poverty in the United States, the effects of poverty on individuals and families, and the
search for solutions.

This course is designedorganizational behavior and theory.have emphasis is primarily to juxtapose these principlessecondarily
This course introduces to explore the civic principles that The shaped America, and on knowledge building and with the reality of Americ
on skills building. It includes key principles to structure your understanding of organizations and the identification of tools to
analyze organizational behavior. It offers practice in using these analytical tools to enhance your capacity toall their citizens.
Social welfare is the major institutional vehicle through which societies assure a minimal level of living for understand
Building on both the core curriculum and the foundational courses in the Social and Economic Development concentration,
the content of this course focuses on achieving a fuller understanding of thegroups. political, Native leadership theoretical
This course is available for American Indians and members of other ethnic social, Multiple and economic dynamics of
frameworks will be analyzed, including gender differences and cross cultural leadership styles. It explores both historical and
contemporary American Indian leadership concepts, and tribal perspectives combined with practical examples of American

This course will familiarize students with practice methods such as cognitive behavioral, psychosocial, applied group work and behavioral th

Focuses on the application of behavioral techniques. Includes problem identification, specification and assessment, establishment of change
Emphasis on the acquisition of direct practice skills using case examples, video and role-plays, with patients with depression, anxiety and per

Builds on the theoretical foundation and focuses on the basics of group work practice, including how to select members, how to begin and te

Discusses a variety of task-oriented groups (e.g., community groups, task forces, committees, boards, and commissions). Focuses on skills in

Discusses psychological dynamics, psychopathology, and psychotherapy, based on modern psychosocial theory. Further develops knowledg

This course will focus on the time efficient treatment of individuals, groups and families through focused psychotherapy and case manageme

Focuses on treatment of persons with mental illness. Includes advanced skills in diagnosis (DSM-IV); treatment interventions for specific di

Recent clinical trials have demonstrated efficacy for a number of psychosocial interventions for persons with serious mental illness designed

Introduces systems approaches and interventions. Presents an overview of major theoretical approaches and techniques associated with each




Focuses on child development, major intervention approaches used with children, beginning practice skills for working with children and the

Focuses on social work with youth, including assessment, relationship-building and intervention skills. Areas of conceptual emphasis includ

Reviews different models of social work practice within the continuum of health and long-term care for older adults. Emphasis on skill deve

Focuses on techniques used in treating couples who seek help for problems they are experiencing in their relationships.

Focuses on school social work services primarily in urban areas. Emphasis on service delivery models that stress collaboration and coordina

Focuses on understanding the characteristics, family and social context of the exceptional child, emphasis on educational settings. Practice a

Builds on the use of individual, group, and family approaches to social work practice in health care settings. Emphasis is on the context of p

Covers concepts and clinical skills that help social workers deal effectively with dying and grieving people and other loss situations. Attentio

Focuses on factors that contribute to the abuse of drugs and alcohol. Emphasizes issues and perspectives relating to epidemiology, preventio




Provides a solid grounding in early childhood development including normative milestones, key risk factors, and major disorders; screening

Familiarizes students with the basic knowledge and skills for social work practice with refugees and immigrants. An historical view of intern

Focuses on nonsexist ways to counsel women. Explores power and politics in the therapeutic relationship. Examines treatment modalities an
Explores theories of human sexuality underlying the practice of sexual therapy. Reviews the etiologies of male and female dysfunctions and

This course is designed to increase students' self-awareness, knowledge and skills needed to effectively carry out multicultural SW practice w

Explores the intersection between spirituality/religion and the profession of social work. Empirical literature associated with spirituality will

Focuses on child maltreatment and the system of care designed to help families and children when child maltreatment occurs. Learn about th

Focuses on developing the on designing sustainable skills necessary for effective, evidence-based practice with gay, lesbian, bisexual and tran
The focus of this course is knowledge and practice policies and programs by using principles and practices of modeling
dynamic systems in the sciences, engineering, social sciences, business, and social work. The course will cover model
structure and its relationships to prior knowledge and assumptions, measurable quantities, and ultimate use in solving

Examines the American health care system from economic, political, and cultural perspectives. Focuses on medical care expenditures and pa

Explores social policies and practice major aging policies in the and delivery of social services to children and youth. Explores limitations in
This course provides an overview of affecting the development United States in a comparative and critical framework that
addresses issues of income security, employment, health, and other concerns of older adults. It reviews the origins of policies
and programs as well as the actors and constituencies involved in and affected by them. Specific consideration is given to: the

Examines a variety of women's issues in the social services arena and the social work profession. Focuses on women in American society, w

Evaluates the effectiveness of various state and federal policies regarding health, mental health, child welfare, aging, and income maintenanc

Focuses on wide-spread suffering and loss from natural and human-caused disasters is rising. Disasters disrupt every aspect of alternative po
The risk of selected topics in development policy at local, state, national, and international levels, emphasizing implications of
individual and community life, with especially deep-cutting and serious consequences for vulnerable populations. This course
examines disasters as related to race, ethnicity, national origin, class, gender, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability,

Acquaints students with current state and national laws and regulations that affect mental health service delivery. Future trends in mental hea

Examines methods and procedures critical to the design and operation of a modern personnel management system. Includes job analysis; job

Examines the roles and the effectiveness of board members and volunteers in not-for-profit (NFP) organizations, particularly social service o

Focuses on planning agency expenditures, keeping track of money, and evaluating expenditures. Topics include budgeting process and proc

Examines issues and methods for evaluation of programs and services in both organizational and community contexts. Strengths and weakne

Focuses on planning and leadership in human service organizations and community groups.

This course is ideal for students who want to learn to be social innovators. It covers the idea phase of ventures and then moves to assessing th

Examines how organizations develop and maintain support from the community. Three interrelated topics are addressed: marketing services

Focuses on knowledge, skills and tools necessary to write grants and develop programs for agencies working with children, youth and familie

Teaches the skills for assessing community needs and developing and implementing program interventions for the growing aging society. Inc
Reviews the nature and scope of juvenile crime, theories of causation, historical and contemporary juvenile justice policy. Examines practice

Focuses on evaluation at a variety of levels (individual, group, organization, community). Includes problem assessment, specification and m

The purpose of this course is to present fundamentals of social and behavioral science as a framework for using evidence-based approaches i

The purpose of this course is to present fundamentals of Epidemiology as a framework for using evidence-based approaches in addressing po

This course provides an introduction to quantitative data analysis as it is applied in public health. Biostatistics is one of the core disciplines o


The purpose American health present a broad economic, political, and cultural perspectives. facing contemporary society.
Examines theof this course is tocare system fromsurvey of the major environmental health issues Focuses on medical care expenditures and pa
The course provides an overview of physical, chemical, and biological environments and their effects on humans’ physical,
psychological, and social health. The material is presented in the context of local and global environments and populations.

The purpose of this course is to introduce public health students to the crucial and timely cross-cutting themes in public health. The course w

This course extends the concepts and methods of epidemiology from S55-5002, providing an in-depth exploration of concepts and skills in e

This course provides an overview of the epidemiology of cancer. It covers theories of carcinogenesis, patterns of incidence and mortality, si


This course provides an overview of key issues and diseases in international health, with particular emphasis on those
affecting low-income countries. The Disease Control Priorities Project provides the framework through which the course
addresses cross-cutting themes and conditions affecting large proportions of the world’s population. The biology,




This course focuses on statistical modeling and analysis methods relevant to epidemiological and clinical research, as well as applied researc

This course focuses focusing on program evaluation, outcomes research, cost effectiveness research, methods for executing and evaluating h

Students will be exposed to a wide range of perspectives from diverse disciplines about the various causes and potential solutions to key pub

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and disease in the United States. The reduction of tobacco use by more than half is one

Individuals and families living in poverty are in frequent contact with organizations providing a range of social services. Their use of public


The objective of this 8-week for students to develop an understanding of transdisciplinary perspectives and apply systematic problem solving
The purpose of this course is course is to train students to develop and implement household-level and community-level
interventions that can mitigate public health challenges faced by communities in developing countries. This course is
designed in partnership with the IKP Centre for Technologies in Public Health (ICTPH) and will be taught within ICTPH field

Following successful completion of their coursework, all MPH students will take an examination on the core material of the MPH. Acceptab

Reviews various conceptual models of community work and their utilization for problem analysis, intervention strategies, and program imple

Examines major economic, sociological, and political forces that generate poverty conditions for geographically isolated and/or culturally es
Offers an opportunity to investigate covered in International Social Development and SED social workers can use community organizing, coa
This course will build on the topics the practical application of such beliefs, explores how policy. It is structured as an
advanced graduate seminar with each student working toward a practice intervention plan. Particular emphasis will be on
developing a deep understanding of development practice strategies with communities, households, and individuals with an

Focuses on economic, structural factors, and social forces that under grid the building, rebuilding, and revitalization of cities, neighborhoods


: Throughout recent American history there has been considerable attention paid to the distinct law, business, social work and
The Urban Development Seminar is an interdisciplinary course open to students in architecture,problems of poverty of place, public policy.
of poor rural regions and poor neighborhoods in large cities. In part this concern reflects the realities of American politics.
Political representation is local, reflecting the votes of residents of neighborhoods and regions, not interest groups. The goal of




Acquaints students with the major categories of pharmacological agents used in medical practice. Emphasizes the mechanism, action, and co


Covers theory, innovation, research, policy development in the US and other countries. Multiple theoretical approaches are
covered that undergird the nature and scope of asset-development and policy development. Provides students with
knowledge and skills needed for social work practice in asset-building policy as a complement to income support policies.

Provides students with a comprehensive overview of the development, core values and institutional structure of the contemporary American

This course will familiarize students with the basic knowledge of geographic information systems (GIS) and their application to social work

This seminar provides an opportunity for students to integrate theoretical and research-based knowledge gained in the classroom with the app

This course provides an introduction to quantitative data analysis as it is applied in public health. Biostatistics is one of the core disciplines o

This course focuses on statistical modeling and analysis methods relevant to epidemiological and clinical research, as well as applied researc

How to analyze organizational strengths and weaknesses, define needs, and research funding sources. How to craft a proposal to fit a particu

In this theory-based experiential lab, students will become acquainted with beginning literature in art therapy and will develop a beginning un

This seminar discusses medical, social, and societal impact of HIV/AIDS and specific evidence-based psychosocial interventions with gay m

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a clinical method to help people resolve ambivalence about change by evoking intrinsic motivation and co

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) is an evidence-based treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. This course will provide students wit

Pre-requisites: S15-5005, and student has met Statistics pre-requisite for MSW program, or completion of the S80-4000 Statistics course wit

Prereq: S80-5000 or equivalent & S15-5005

This skills lab will provide students with knowledge of and basic facilitation skills in the Teen Outreach Program (TOP), an evidence-based
This course focuses on knowledge and skill building for practice with a specific marginalized, at-risk population in American society. The fo

This course will help students gain the knowledge and skills to work in Assertive Community Treatment (ACT), a prevalent and fast-growing

Prereq: S15-5038    An introduction to Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), an evidence based practice.

Prereq: S15-5038    An introduction to Interpersonal Therapy (IPT), an evidence based practice.

This course focuses on developing intermediate oral, writing, listening, and comprehension Spanish language skills to help the social service
Rating (1 = Sust.-focused,
     2 = Sust.-related)




             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             2

             1

             2

             2

             2
2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2
2

2

2

2

2

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

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