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CEDS2007 Annual Repo.. - Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance

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									  2006 - 2007 COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA




                         Submitted to the:




                  U.S. Department of Commerce
               Economic Development Administration
                   Philadelphia Regional Office
                 The Curtis Center, Suite 140 South
                    Independence Square West
                   Philadelphia, PA 19106-3821




                              By the:




                 Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance
              1151 Oak Street, Pittston, PA 18640-3726
               (570) 655-5581, www.nepa-alliance.org




                          November 2007
                 2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                                          TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF TABLES ............................................................................................................................. iv

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS............................................................................................................... vi

SUMMARY AND INTRODUCTION............................................................................................... 1

CHAPTER 1 - BACKGROUND........................................................................................................ 2
 Population ........................................................................................................................................ 4
 Age .................................................................................................................................................... 4
 Per Capita Income........................................................................................................................... 9
 Per Capita Personal Income......................................................................................................... 10
 Median Household Income........................................................................................................... 11
 Civilian Labor Force ..................................................................................................................... 12
 Total Employment......................................................................................................................... 13
 Total Unemployment..................................................................................................................... 14
 Unemployment Rate...................................................................................................................... 14

CHAPTER 2 – ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS AND
OPPORTUNITIES............................................................................................................................ 16
 Out-Migration of Younger Population........................................................................................ 16
 Aging Infrastructure ..................................................................................................................... 17
 Shortage of Skilled Technical Labor ........................................................................................... 17
 Low Educational Attainment Levels ........................................................................................... 18
 Lack of Terminal Degree Programs ............................................................................................ 19
 Lack of Entrepreneurial Culture................................................................................................. 20
 Relevant Material from Other Government-Sponsored or Supported Plans ......................... 21
 Industry Clusters........................................................................................................................... 22

CHAPTER 3 – GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ................................................................................ 25
 Goal One: Increased Economic Growth and Diversification.................................................... 25
   Objective ..................................................................................................................................... 25
   Short-Term Strategies ................................................................................................................. 25
   Action Plan.................................................................................................................................. 25
   Evaluation Plan ........................................................................................................................... 26
 Goal Two: Improvement of Human Resources and Workforce Development ....................... 26
   Objectives.................................................................................................................................... 26
   Short-Term Strategy .................................................................................................................... 26
   Action Plan.................................................................................................................................. 26
   Evaluation Plan ........................................................................................................................... 27
 Goal Three: Improvement of the Environment ......................................................................... 27
   Objective ..................................................................................................................................... 27
   Short-Term Strategies ................................................................................................................. 27
   Action Plan.................................................................................................................................. 28
   Evaluation Plan ........................................................................................................................... 29


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                2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



   Goal Four: Improvement in Local Government Operations .................................................... 29
     Objective ..................................................................................................................................... 29
     Short-Term Strategies ................................................................................................................. 29
     Action Plan.................................................................................................................................. 29
     Evaluation Plan ........................................................................................................................... 30
   Goal Five: Improvement of Telecommunications ...................................................................... 30
     Objectives.................................................................................................................................... 30
     Short-Term Strategies ................................................................................................................. 30
     Action Plan.................................................................................................................................. 30
     Evaluation Plan ........................................................................................................................... 31
   Goal Six: Improvement of Transportation Systems .................................................................. 31
     Objectives.................................................................................................................................... 31
     Short-Term Strategies ................................................................................................................. 31
     Action Plan.................................................................................................................................. 31
     Evaluation Plan ........................................................................................................................... 32
   Goal Seven: Improvement of the Quality of Life ....................................................................... 32
     Objective ..................................................................................................................................... 32
     Short-Term Strategies ................................................................................................................. 32
     Action Plan.................................................................................................................................. 33
     Evaluation Plan ........................................................................................................................... 33
   Some Generalizations.................................................................................................................... 33

CHAPTER 4 – COMMUNITY AND PRIVATE SECTOR PARTICIPATION ........................ 35

CHAPTER 5 - STRATEGIC PROJECTS, PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES .......................... 37
 Economic Development Administration Vital Projects for Fiscal Year 2007-2008 ................ 37
   Humboldt Industrial Park - Northwest ........................................................................................ 37
   World Class Synchronous Data Center ....................................................................................... 38
   Workforce Development Training Center................................................................................... 38
   Packerton Business Park ............................................................................................................. 39
   Luzerne County Community College, Health Sciences Building............................................... 39
 Multi-Year Listing of Regional Vital Projects............................................................................ 40
   Wayne Business Park .................................................................................................................. 40
   East Stroudsburg University Business Accelerator Project ........................................................ 41
   Duryea Industrial Park ................................................................................................................ 41
   Mount Pleasant Corporate Center ............................................................................................... 42
   South Washington Street Economic Development Parkade ....................................................... 42
   Northeastern Pennsylvania Regional Enterprise Development Program.................................... 43
   Junior Achievement (JA) BizTown............................................................................................. 43
   Physical Therapist Assistant Certification Program.................................................................... 44
   Nursing Learning Resource Laboratory Equipment Upgrade..................................................... 44
   Rural Manufacturer Assistance Program .................................................................................... 45
   Pike County Fire/Emergency Training Facility Apparatus......................................................... 46
   Artspace/Scranton Community Housing..................................................................................... 46
 Economic Development Activities by County............................................................................. 47
   Carbon County ............................................................................................................................ 47


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                2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



       Lackawanna County .................................................................................................................... 47
       Luzerne County ........................................................................................................................... 50
         Hazleton Area.......................................................................................................................... 50
         Wilkes-Barre Area................................................................................................................... 51
         Pittston Area............................................................................................................................ 53
       Monroe County ........................................................................................................................... 54
       Pike County ................................................................................................................................. 55
       Schuylkill County........................................................................................................................ 56
       Wayne County............................................................................................................................. 57

CHAPTER 6 - COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY PLAN OF
ACTION ............................................................................................................................................. 58

CHAPTER 7 – PERFORMANCE MEASURES............................................................................ 63

APPENDIX A - THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE NORTHEASTERN
PENNSYLVANIA ALLIANCE AND MEMBERS OF THE CEDS STRATEGY
COMMITTEE ................................................................................................................................... 64

APPENDIX B - RESOLUTIONS FROM COUNTY BOARDS OF COMMISSIONERS IN
THE REGION ................................................................................................................................... 67  247H




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                2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                                            LIST OF TABLES

Table 1. Population for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties,
    2000 and 2006 ..............................................................................................................................5

Table 2. The Median Age of the Population in the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
    Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006........................................................................................5

Table 3. Population under 18 Years of Age for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
    Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006........................................................................................6

Table 4. Population 18 to 24 Years of Age for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
    Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006........................................................................................6

Table 5. Population 25 to 44 Years of Age for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
    Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006........................................................................................7

Table 6. Population 45 to 64 Years of Age for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
    Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006........................................................................................8

Table 7. Population 65 Years of Age and Over for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
    Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006........................................................................................8

Table 8. Per Capita Income for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania,
    1979, 1989, 1999 and Estimated for 2006 ...................................................................................9

Table 9. The Percentage of County Per Capita Income to that of Pennsylvania (PA) and the United
    States (US), 1979, 1989, 1999 and 2006......................................................................................9

Table 10. Per Capita Personal Income for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
    Pennsylvania Counties, 1999 and 2005......................................................................................10

Table 11. The Percentage of County Per Capita Personal Income to that of Pennsylvania and the
    United States, 1999 and 2005.....................................................................................................11

Table 12. Median Household Income for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
    Pennsylvania Counties, 1999 and Estimated for 2004 ...............................................................12

Table 13. The Percentage of Region and County Median Household Income to that of Pennsylvania
    and the United States, 1999 and 2004 ........................................................................................12

Table 14. United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania County Civilian Labor Force,
    2003 - 2006.................................................................................................................................13

Table 15. United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania County Employment, 2003 -
    2006 ............................................................................................................................................14


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                2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Table 16. United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania County Unemployment, 2003
    - 2006..........................................................................................................................................14

Table 17. United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania County Unemployment Rate,
    2003 – 2006................................................................................................................................15

Table 18. School Enrollment and Educational Attainment for the United States, Pennsylvania and
    Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties, 2000................................................................................18

Table 19. The Number and Percent of Firms with 1-9 Employees for the United States,
    Pennsylvania, the Northeastern Pennsylvania Region and Each of the Seven Northeastern
    Pennsylvania Counties, March 2003 – March 2005 ..................................................................20

Table 20. The Percent of Firms with 1-4 Employees for the United States, Pennsylvania, the
    Northeastern Pennsylvania Region and Each of the Seven Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties,
    March 2003 – March 2005 .........................................................................................................21

Table 21. Location Quotients of Targeted Industry Clusters for Pennsylvania and Northeastern
    Pennsylvania, 1998 and 2005.....................................................................................................23

Table A-1. The Board of Directors of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance as of July 1, 2007 ..65

Table A-2. The Members of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance Board of Directors Who are on
    the CEDS Strategy Committee...................................................................................................66




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                         ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance thanks the following individuals for their contribution
to Chapter 2, which describes the Events in Northeastern Pennsylvania from July 2006 to June
2007.

Toni Artuso                    Carbon County Economic Development Office
Andrew C. Skrip                The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce
Charles R. Wanyo               CAN DO, Inc.
Jane A. Ashton                 The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry
John L. Augustine, III         The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry
Lawrence M. Newman             The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry
Rosemary Dessoye               The Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce
James A. Cummings              Mericle Commercial Real Estate Services
Michelle E. Bisbing            Pocono Mountains Economic Development Corporation
Rachel Hendricks               Pike County Industrial & Commercial Development Authority
Frank J. Zukas                 Schuylkill Economic Development Corporation
Mark J. Scarbinsky             Schuylkill County Economic Development Office
Mary Beth Wood                 Wayne Economic Development Corporation




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          2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                SUMMARY AND INTRODUCTION

The 2006 - 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) Annual Performance
Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania is available for public inspection and documents the
progress achieved on economic development activities, adjusts the 2003 - 2008 five-year plan,
reports on the changing economic conditions in the region and identifies projects for Economic
Development Administration funding consideration.

This CEDS Annual Performance Report for 2006 - 2007:

   1. Is in compliance with 13 C.F.R. § 303.7.

   2. Provides an updated statistical analysis of the region and, in some cases, compares the
      region to the state and nation.

   3. Provides an update of economic development events in the region at the county level.

   4. Lists the current Board of Directors and members of the CEDS Strategy Committee in
      Appendix A.

   5. Provides resolutions from the seven County Boards of Commissioners supporting the
      plan in Appendix B.




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                                  CHAPTER 1

                                               BACKGROUND

This chapter provides some background information about Northeastern Pennsylvania and then
provides a more detailed analysis of its regional economy by comparing regional statistics with
those of the state and nation for Population, Age, Per Capita Income, Per Capita Personal
Income, Median Household Income, Civilian Labor Force, Total Employment, Total
Unemployment and Unemployment Rate.

The seven-county Northeastern Pennsylvania region contains an area of approximately 4,400
square miles. The major urban centers within this region are primarily concentrated in the 87
miles between Carbondale and Pottsville stretching from Carbondale in Lackawanna County
through the Wyoming Valley to Nanticoke and then following Interstate 81 south to Hazleton
and Pottsville. Major cities within this belt are Scranton and Wilkes-Barre.

As a result of people moving to the region from the states of New York and New Jersey, some of
the major geographic areas of this region, such as the Pocono Mountains, are rapidly changing
character. This is occurring as much of Northeastern Pennsylvania remains rural.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the estimated population of Northeastern Pennsylvania in
2006 was 1,007,529 while the 2000 counted population was 974,394. This population growth
was concentrated in Pike (25.7%), Monroe (19.5%), Wayne (6.7%) and Carbon (6.4%) counties.
Pike and Monroe counties are the two fastest growing counties in Pennsylvania with at least
10,000 in population. Overall, the region continues to experience a relatively high median age.
According to the 2000 Census, the median age in the U.S. was 35.3 years, in Pennsylvania it was
38.0 years and the average in the region was 40.0 years.

According to “County Business Patterns,” in Northeastern Pennsylvania, total employment
averaged 342,113 in 2005. As would be anticipated, the majority of jobs are concentrated in
Luzerne, Lackawanna, Monroe and Schuylkill counties; the four most heavily populated counties
in the region.

The Northeastern Pennsylvania region has diversified its economic base over the past thirty
years. In recent years, it has been extremely competitive and successful as a location for
warehousing and distribution centers, financial services operations, light assembly facilities, food
processors and plastics manufacturers. Employment reflects diversification efforts and is not
concentrated in any business sector.

Northeastern Pennsylvania’s economy continues to remain somewhat imbalanced by
demonstrating a high reliance on manufacturing among its western counties, (Carbon,
Lackawanna, Luzerne and Schuylkill) and a high reliance on the retail trade; services; arts,
entertainment and recreation; and accommodation and food services industries, which are
dominated in its eastern counties: (Monroe, Pike and Wayne).




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



One important area of economic interest is the travel development and tourism industry.
According to the 2007 Annual Report of the Pocono Mountains Visitors Bureau, Inc., there were
an estimated total travel expenditure of $1.1 billion, an estimated payroll of $772.3 million that
was paid to an estimated 25,740 employees in the tourism industry and an estimated $287.3
million in tax revenues as a result of tourism activities in Carbon, Monroe, Pike and Wayne
counties during 2006.

As with national trends, employment in the manufacturing sector in the region continues to
decline. Historically, most of the decreases in employment were attributed to the decline in the
region’s needle trades, tobacco products and textile mill products manufacturing sectors. From
1998 to 2005, employment in the manufacturing sector declined by 14,051 jobs or 22.0 percent.
There was a decrease of 181 manufacturing businesses, which is 14.6 percent, during that period.
In recent years, other industries in the manufacturing sector have declined including furniture,
pressed and blown glass, and glassware manufacturing. This has been influenced by outsourcing,
as well as technology.

Despite this downtown; manufacturing is anticipated to continue as a prime contributor to the
region’s economic well being. Technology advancements will affect employment; however,
manufacturing is anticipated to have a strong presence.

Northeastern Pennsylvania’s business base is overwhelmingly dominated by small businesses.
According to “County Business Patterns,” a publication by the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2005,
there were approximately 23,654 businesses in the region and 74.6% of them employed between
1 and 9 people. The single largest industry sectors by employment are: 1) Services 2) Retail
Trade and 3) Manufacturing. The manufacturing sector is dominated by the fabricated metal
products, plastics and rubber products, food and chemicals industries.

Growth is projected to occur in several business sectors including healthcare, healthcare
administration, education and logistics.

Other economic indicators such as income levels and unemployment rates indicate relative levels
of distress.

According to the Pennsylvania Labor Market Information Database System, unemployment rates
in the region are higher than national and state averages. The 2006 unemployment rate in
Northeastern Pennsylvania was 5.4% and it was higher than the state (4.7%) and national (4.6%)
averages.

Significant development is occurring in several downtown districts in the region’s largest cities.
Major revitalization is underway in the cities of Scranton, Hazleton and Wilkes-Barre where
millions of dollars in private capital have been invested, resulting in thousands of new and
planned employment opportunities. Downtown amenities are important in building a knowledge-
based economy.

Over the past several years, significant attention and priority has been given to entrepreneurial-
related projects to help new to market businesses. Strong attention has also been placed on


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



establishing knowledge based, technology lead economic development. This is extremely
important from an economic development, youth retention and image-related perspective.

Some competitive strengths of this region include:

   •   Proximity to Major Markets
   •   Available Productive Labor Pool
   •   Quality of Life
   •   Natural Resources
   •   Cost of Living
   •   Educational Resources
   •   Cost of Doing Business

Some regional deficiencies are:

   •   Out-Migration of Younger Population
   •   Aging Infrastructure
   •   Shortage of Skilled Technical Labor
   •   Low Educational Attainment Levels
   •   Lack of Terminal Degree Programs
   •   Lack of Entrepreneurial Culture

Population

The Northeastern Pennsylvania region is an area of 4,476 square miles and consists of seven
counties. The population for each of the seven counties, along with the region, state and nation,
according to the 2000 Census and 2006 Population Estimates, both of which are provided by the
U.S. Census Bureau, is indicated in Table 1, on the next page.

The table indicates that Lackawanna, Luzerne and Schuylkill counties continue to have a
decrease in population and Monroe and Pike counties continue to have double-digit percent
increases. Population in the region increased by 3.40 percent and this was more than double the
percent increase in the state, but considerably less than the percent increase in the nation.

Age

The population of the Northeastern Pennsylvania region is aging as compared to the United
States and with the exception of Monroe County, the population of the region is aging more than
the population of Pennsylvania. Table 2, also on the next page, provides more detail. According
to the American Community Survey, there is not any median age information for Carbon, Pike
and Wayne counties because data are only available for places that have at least 65,000 in
population.




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            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Table 1. Population for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania
Counties, 2000 and 2006
Area                                                April 1, 2000       July 1, 2006        Change        Percent Change
                                                       Census             Estimate
United States                                       281,421,906         299,398,484       17,976,578           6.39%
 Pennsylvania                                        12,281,054          12,440,621        159,567             1.30%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania                           974,394            1,007,529          33,135             3.40%
    Carbon County                                      58,802              62,567            3,765             6.40%
    Lackawanna County                                 213,295             209,728           -3,567            -1.67%
    Luzerne County                                    319,250             313,020           -6,230            -1.95%
    Monroe County                                     138,687             165,685           26,998            19.47%
    Pike County                                        46,302              58,195           11,893            25.69%
    Schuylkill County                                 150,336             147,405           -2,931            -1.95%
    Wayne County                                       47,722              50,929            3,207             6.72%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1), Table GCT-P5. Age and
Sex: 2000;” <http://factfinder.census.gov> and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates
Program; <http://eire.census.gov/popest/estimates.php>.

Table 2. The Median Age of the Population in the United States, Pennsylvania and
Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006
Area                            April 1, 2000 Census                     2006 American Community Survey
United States                            35.3                                         36.4
 Pennsylvania                            38.0                                         39.6
    Carbon County                        40.6                                          n/a
    Lackawanna County                    40.3                                         41.6
    Luzerne County                       40.8                                         42.3
    Monroe County                        37.2                                         37.5
    Pike County                          39.6                                          n/a
    Schuylkill County                    40.9                                         42.0
    Wayne County                         40.8                                          n/a
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1), Table GCT-P5. Age and
Sex: 2000;” <http://factfinder.census.gov> and U.S. Census Bureau American Community
Survey; <http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DatasetMainPageServlet?_program=ACS&_
submenuId=&_lang=en&_ts=>.

In Table 3, on the next page, Monroe and Pike counties have a large percent increase in people
who are under 18 years of age with 5.17 percent and 4.27 percent, respectively, as compared to
the nation, state and region. This is occurring primarily from the continuing migration of people
from the New York City, Long Island and Northern New Jersey areas. However, the nation has a
positive percent change as compared to the state and region, which have negative percent
changes. Schuylkill County, at -9.29 percent, had the largest percent decrease in people who are
under 18 years of age in the region.




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            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Table 3. Population under 18 Years of Age for the United States, Pennsylvania and
Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006
Area                             April 1, 2000      Percent      July 1, 2006      Percent      Change        Percent
                                    Census          of Total       Estimate        of Total                   Change
United States                     72,293,812        25.69%        73,735,562       24.63%      1,441,750       1.99%
 Pennsylvania                     2,922,221         23.79%        2,804,873        22.55%      -117,348       -4.02%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania        218,800          22.45%         209,560         20.80%        -9,240       -4.22%
    Carbon County                   13,029          22.16%          12,627         20.18%         -402        -3.09%
    Lackawanna County               46,427          21.77%          43,447         20.72%        -2,980       -6.42%
    Luzerne County                  67,066          21.01%          62,481         19.96%        -4,585       -6.84%
    Monroe County                   37,128          26.77%          39,049         23.57%         1,921        5.17%
    Pike County                     12,352          26.68%          12,879         22.13%          527         4.27%
    Schuylkill County               31,351          20.85%          28,439         19.29%        -2,912       -9.29%
    Wayne County                    11,447          23.99%          10,638         20.89%         -809        -7.07%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1), Table GCT-P5. Age and
Sex: 2000;” <http://factfinder.census.gov> and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates
Program; <http://eire.census.gov/popest/estimates.php>.

In Table 4, below, the Pocono Mountain counties of Pike, Monroe, Wayne and Carbon had the
largest percent increases in people who are between the ages of 18 and 24 with 99.96 percent,
45.98 percent, 34.34 percent and 22.24 percent, respectively. On the other hand, Schuylkill
County had a 7.57 percent increase. The increase in the Poconos is a result of people migrating
from the New York City, Long Island, Northern New Jersey and the Philadelphia areas.


Table 4. Population 18 to 24 Years of Age for the United States, Pennsylvania and
Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006
Area                             April 1, 2000      Percent     July 1, 2006      Percent       Change         Percent
                                    Census          of Total      Estimate        of Total                     Change
United States                     27,143,454         9.65%       29,454,784        9.84%      2,311,330         8.52%
 Pennsylvania                     1,094,449          8.91%       1,198,898         9.64%       104,449          9.54%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania         76,997           7.90%         93,119          9.24%        16,122         20.94%
    Carbon County                   4,038            6.87%         4,936           7.89%          898          22.24%
    Lackawanna County               18,897           8.86%         21,316         10.16%         2,419         12.80%
    Luzerne County                  25,895           8.11%         28,914          9.24%        3,019          11.66%
    Monroe County                   11,933           8.60%         17,420         10.51%         5,487         45.98%
    Pike County                      2,477           5.35%         4,953           8.51%        2,476          99.96%
    Schuylkill County               10,839           7.21%         11,660          7.91%          821           7.57%
    Wayne County                     2,918           6.11%         3,920           7.70%         1,002         34.34%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1), Table GCT-P5. Age and
Sex: 2000;” <http://factfinder.census.gov> and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates
Program; <http://eire.census.gov/popest/estimates.php>.

In Table 5, on the next page, only Pike, Monroe, Carbon and Wayne counties had an increase in
the population who are between 25 and 44 years of age with 27.87 percent, 16.25 percent, 6.15
percent and 3.79 percent, respectively. All of the other counties in the Northeastern Pennsylvania
region, along with the region itself, state and nation, had a decline in the number of people who



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            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



are between the ages of 25 and 44. Nationally, this is the only age group that had a decline in
population. At the state and regional level, this decline could be attributed to people leaving for
employment opportunities; and this is being addressed through the work of several organizations.


Table 5. Population 25 to 44 Years of Age for the United States, Pennsylvania and
Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006
Area                             April 1, 2000     Percent       July 1, 2006     Percent      Change         Percent
                                    Census         of Total         Estimate      of Total                    Change
United States                     85,040,251       30.22%         84,082,929      28.08%      -957,322        -1.13%
 Pennsylvania                      3,508,562       28.57%          3,224,626      25.92%      -283,936        -8.09%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania         268,060        27.51%           264,894       26.29%       -3,166         -1.18%
    Carbon County                   16,628         28.28%            17,651       28.21%        1,023          6.15%
    Lackawanna County                56,411        26.45%            50,794       24.22%       -5,617         -9.96%
    Luzerne County                  86,903         27.22%            79,848       25.51%       -7,055         -8.12%
    Monroe County                   39,964         28.82%            46,457       28.04%        6,493         16.25%
    Pike County                     12,823         27.69%            16,397       28.18%        3,574         27.87%
    Schuylkill County                42,526        28.29%            40,457       27.45%       -2,069         -4.87%
    Wayne County                    12,805         26.83%            13,290       26.10%         485           3.79%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1), Table GCT-P5. Age and
Sex: 2000;” <http://factfinder.census.gov> and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates
Program; <http://eire.census.gov/popest/estimates.php>.

Table 6, on the next page, indicates that the nation, state, region and all of the counties in the
region had large percent increases in people who are between the ages of 45 and 64. Pike and
Monroe counties led the way with a 34.45 percent and 34.16 percent increase, respectively. As a
result of the migration of people, many of whom could be people who had left when they were in
their twenties and thirties, the percent increases indicated in the table are occurring at the state,
regional and county levels.




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            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Table 6. Population 45 to 64 Years of Age for the United States, Pennsylvania and
Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006
Area                             April 1, 2000      Percent      July 1, 2006      Percent         Change         Percent
                                    Census          of Total       Estimate        of Total                       Change
United States                     61,952,636        22.01%        74,864,857       25.01%         12,912,221      20.84%
 Pennsylvania                     2,836,657         23.10%         3,326,901       26.74%          490,244        17.28%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania        233,118          23.92%          270,888        26.89%           37,770        16.20%
    Carbon County                   14,241          24.22%          16,682         26.66%            2,441        17.14%
    Lackawanna County               50,018          23.45%           56,277        26.83%            6,259        12.51%
    Luzerne County                  76,646          24.01%          84,695         27.06%            8,049        10.50%
    Monroe County                   32,626          23.52%          43,770         26.42%           11,144        34.16%
    Pike County                     11,633          25.12%          15,641         26.88%            4,008        34.45%
    Schuylkill County               35,754          23.78%           39,812        27.01%            4,058        11.35%
    Wayne County                    12,200          25.56%          14,011         27.51%            1,811        14.84%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1), Table GCT-P5. Age and
Sex: 2000;” <http://factfinder.census.gov> and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates
Program; <http://eire.census.gov/popest/estimates.php>.

Table 7, below, indicates that there were increases in the United States and in Monroe, Pike and
Wayne counties in the number of people who are at least age 65. In Pike, Monroe and Wayne
counties, there were percent increases of 18.64 percent, 11.46 percent and 8.60 percent,
respectively. These increases occur as a result of migration of people into the area and some of
these people could be converting their vacation homes into primary residences. On the other
hand, the decline in the population could be a result of people leaving for areas that are more
appealing to them for retirement.

Table 7. Population 65 Years of Age and Over for the United States, Pennsylvania and
Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties, 2000 and 2006
Area                              April 1, 2000       Percent       July 1, 2006       Percent        Change        Percent
                                     Census           of Total        Estimate         of Total                     Change
United States                      34,991,753         12.43%         37,260,352        12.45%        2,268,599       6.48%
 Pennsylvania                      1,919,165          15.63%         1,885,323         15.15%         -33,842       -1.76%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania         177,419           18.21%          169,068          16.78%          -8,351       -4.71%
    Carbon County                    10,866           18.48%           10,671          17.06%           -195        -1.79%
    Lackawanna County                41,542           19.48%           37,894          18.07%          -3,648       -8.78%
    Luzerne County                   62,740           19.65%           57,082          18.24%          -5,658       -9.02%
    Monroe County                    17,036           12.28%           18,989          11.46%           1,953       11.46%
    Pike County                       7,017           15.15%            8,325          14.31%          1,308        18.64%
    Schuylkill County                29,866           19.87%           27,037          18.34%          -2,829       -9.47%
    Wayne County                      8,352           17.50%            9,070          17.81%            718         8.60%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1), Table GCT-P5. Age and
Sex: 2000;” <http://factfinder.census.gov> and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates
Program; <http://eire.census.gov/popest/estimates.php>.




                                                           8
            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Per Capita Income

Per capita income in the seven-county Northeastern Pennsylvania region has historically been
lower than the state and nation. Table 8, below, provides some detailed information from 1979,
1989, 1999 and 2006 estimated.

Table 8. Per Capita Income for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
Pennsylvania, 1979, 1989, 1999 and Estimated for 2006
Area                       1979 Per Capita          1989 Per Capita          1999 Per Capita             2006 Per Capita
                              Income                   Income                   Income                 Income (Estimated)
United States                  $7,295                  $14,420                  $21,587                     $24,529
Pennsylvania                   $7,075                  $14,068                  $20,880                     $23,603
Carbon County                  $6,353                  $11,729                  $17,064                     $19,031
Lackawanna County              $6,107                  $12,358                  $18,710                     $20,970
Luzerne County                 $6,008                  $12,002                  $18,228                     $20,433
Monroe County                  $6,771                  $13,630                  $20,011                     $22,372
Pike County                    $6,869                  $13,785                  $20,315                     $22,645
Schuylkill County              $5,890                  $11,193                  $17,230                     $19,244
Wayne County                   $5,735                  $11,257                  $16,977                     $18,855
Sources: University of Virginia Geospatial & Statistical Data Center;
<http://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/collections/stats/ccdb>; Pennsylvania State Data Center:
<http://www.pasdc.hbg.psu.edu> and WITS (Workforce and Innovation Technical Solution)
<http://www.witstoolkit.com> 1

The method that should be used in comparing the per capita income between the nation, state and
counties over time is based on the percent that the county is to the state and the nation. Table 9,
below, provides these percentages. The percentages can then be compared over time to see
whether the gap, or difference, between the county and state or region has increased.

Table 9. The Percentage of County Per Capita Income to that of Pennsylvania (PA) and the
United States (US), 1979, 1989, 1999 and 2006
County                 1979 PA       1989 PA      1999 PA      2006 PA       1979 US      1989 US       1999 US       2006 US
Carbon County           89.8%         83.4%        81.7%        80.6%         87.1%        81.3%         79.0%        77.6%
Lackawanna County       86.3%         87.8%        89.6%        88.8%         83.7%        85.7%         86.7%        85.5%
Luzerne County          84.9%         85.3%        87.3%        86.6%         82.4%        83.2%         84.4%        83.3%
Monroe County           95.7%         96.9%        95.8%        94.8%         92.8%        94.5%         92.7%        91.2%
Pike County             97.1%         98.0%        97.3%        95.9%         94.2%        95.6%         94.1%        92.3%
Schuylkill County       83.3%         79.6%        82.5%        81.5%         80.7%        77.6%         79.8%        78.5%
Wayne County            81.1%         80.0%        81.3%        79.9%         78.6%        78.1%         78.6%        76.9%
Sources: University of Virginia Geospatial & Statistical Data Center;
<http://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/collections/stats/ccdb>; Pennsylvania State Data Center;
<http://www.pasdc.hbg.psu.edu> and WITS (Workforce and Innovation Technical Solution)
<http://www.witstoolkit.com> 2


1
  WITS is a joint venture between New Economy Strategies, Decision Data Resources and Experian/Applied
Geographic Solutions.
2
  ibid


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            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



According to Table 9, on the previous page, the percent of county per capita income to the state
and nation has decreased in Carbon County over time and has increased in Lackawanna and
Luzerne counties from 1979 to 1999 before falling. In Monroe and Pike counties, the percent
increased between 1979 and 1989 and then decreased in 1999 to a level that is close to the 1979
level before decreasing again to the 2006 level. Finally, Schuylkill and Wayne counties had a
decrease from 1979 to 1989, an increase from 1989 to 1999 and then a decrease from 1999 to
2006. In Schuylkill County, the percent in 1999 was lower than that in 1979. On the other hand,
in Wayne County, the percent in 1999 was higher than that in 1979 when the percent is based on
the state per capita income. When the percent is based on the national per capita income, the
percent in 1999 is equal to that in 1979. However, in both Schuylkill and Wayne counties the
percent in 2006 was lower than the 1979 percentage at both the state and national levels.

Per Capita Personal Income

Table 10, below, provides a comparison of 1999 and 2005 per capita personal income for the
nation, state, region and each of the seven counties in the region. Luzerne County had a 25.96
percent increase in per capita personal income, which exceeded the nation, state and region
percent increases of 23.38 percent, 25.06 percent and 22.93 percent, respectively. Finally, all of
the percent increases exceeded the inflation rate for the period, which was 17 percent.

Table 10. Per Capita Personal Income for the United States, Pennsylvania and
Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties, 1999 and 2005
Area                                                    1999               2005             Change        Percent Change
United States                                          $27,939            $34,471           $6,532            23.38%
 Pennsylvania                                          $27,937            $34,937           $7,000            25.06%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania                            $23,525            $28,919           $5,394            22.93%
    Carbon County                                      $22,386            $27,368           $4,982            22.25%
    Lackawanna County                                  $25,249            $31,291           $6,042            23.93%
    Luzerne County                                     $24,132            $30,397           $6,265            25.96%
    Monroe County                                      $22,819            $27,106           $4,287            18.79%
    Pike County                                        $22,273            $26,719           $4,446            19.96%
    Schuylkill County                                  $21,761            $26,610           $4,849            22.28%
    Wayne County                                       $21,855            $26,822           $4,967            22.73%
Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis; “Regional Economic Information System, Regional
Economic Accounts, Local Area Personal Income, Table CA1-3;”
<http://www.bea.gov/bea/regional/reis>.

In 1999, the United States and Pennsylvania each had a Per Capita Personal Income (PCPI) of
approximately $27,900. The Northeastern Pennsylvania region had a PCPI of approximately
$23,525. The difference is $4,375. In 2005, the United States had a PCPI of approximately
$34,500 and Pennsylvania had a PCPI of approximately $34,900. The Northeastern Pennsylvania
region had a PCPI of approximately $28,900. In 2005, the difference is $5,600 between the
region and nation and is $6,000 between the region and state. Therefore, the gap has widened
from 1999 to 2005.




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            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Table 11, below, provides the percentage of region and county per capita personal income to that
of Pennsylvania and the United States. The 1999 percentages for the state and nation are
identical because there is a very small difference between the state and national per capita
personal incomes. Between 1999 and 2005, the percentage of area per capita personal income
based on the state decreased in all areas with the exception of Luzerne County, where it
increased. During the same period, the percentage of area per capita personal income based on
the nation decreased in all areas with the exception of Lackawanna and Luzerne counties, where
it increased.

Table 11. The Percentage of Region and County Per Capita Personal Income to that of
Pennsylvania and the United States, 1999 and 2005
Area                                        1999                   2005               1999                   2005
                                        Pennsylvania           Pennsylvania        United States          United States
Northeastern Pennsylvania                  84.2%                  82.8%              84.2%                  83.9%
 Carbon County                             80.1%                  78.3%              80.1%                  79.4%
 Lackawanna County                         90.4%                  89.6%              90.4%                  90.8%
 Luzerne County                            86.4%                  87.0%              86.4%                  88.2%
 Monroe County                             81.7%                  77.6%              81.7%                  78.6%
 Pike County                               79.7%                  76.5%              79.7%                  77.5%
 Schuylkill County                         77.9%                  76.2%              77.9%                  77.2%
 Wayne County                              78.2%                  76.8%              78.2%                  77.8%
Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis; “Regional Economic Information System, Regional
Economic Accounts, Local Area Personal Income, Table CA1-3;”
<http://www.bea.gov/bea/regional/reis>.

Median Household Income

According to Table 12, on the next page, Carbon County had the highest percent increase in
median household income with 13.00 percent and it was followed by Pike County with a 12.91
percent increase and Wayne County with a 12.57 percent increase. These three counties
exceeded the percent increases for the nation, which was 5.57 percent, and the region, which was
10.73 percent. Finally, only Carbon County had a percent increase that equaled the rate of
inflation for the period, which was 13 percent.




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            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Table 12. Median Household Income for the United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern
Pennsylvania Counties, 1999 and Estimated for 2004
Area                                                     1999              2004             Change        Percent Change
                                                                         Estimated
United States                                          $41,994            $44,334           $2,340            5.57%
 Pennsylvania                                          $40,106            $47,314           $7,208            17.97%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania                            $37,281            $41,280           $3,998            10.73%
    Carbon County                                      $35,113            $39,678           $4,565            13.00%
    Lackawanna County                                  $34,438            $37,545           $3,107             9.02%
    Luzerne County                                     $33,771            $36,968           $3,197            9.47%
    Monroe County                                      $46,257            $49,918           $3,661             7.91%
    Pike County                                        $44,608            $50,368           $5,760            12.91%
    Schuylkill County                                  $32,699            $36,115           $3,416            10.45%
    Wayne County                                       $34,082            $38,365           $4,283            12.57%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3), Table P53. Median
Household Income in 1999;” <http://factfinder.census.gov> and U.S. Census Bureau Small Area
Income and Poverty Estimates Program; <http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/saipe/saipe.cgi>.

Table 13, below, provides the percentage of region and county median household income to that
of Pennsylvania and the United States. Between 1999 and 2005, the percentage of area median
household income based on the state decreased in all areas. However, during the same period, the
percentage of area median household income based on the nation increased in all areas. An
interesting note is that the percentage of median household income to that of the state and nation
exceeds 100 percent in Monroe and Pike counties. This is as a result of the migration of people
who work in New York City and the surrounding areas into those two counties.

Table 13. The Percentage of Region and County Median Household Income to that of
Pennsylvania and the United States, 1999 and 2004
Area                                        1999                   2004                1999                  2004
                                        Pennsylvania           Pennsylvania        United States          United States
Northeastern Pennsylvania                  93.0%                  88.8%              87.2%                  93.1%
 Carbon County                             87.6%                  83.6%               83.9%                 89.5%
 Lackawanna County                         85.9%                  82.0%               79.4%                 84.7%
 Luzerne County                            84.2%                  80.4%              78.1%                  83.4%
 Monroe County                            115.3%                 110.2%              105.5%                112.6%
 Pike County                              111.2%                 106.2%              106.5%                113.6%
 Schuylkill County                         81.5%                  77.9%               76.3%                 81.5%
 Wayne County                              85.0%                  81.2%              81.1%                  86.5%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3), Table P53. Median
Household Income in 1999;” <http://factfinder.census.gov> and U.S. Census Bureau Small Area
Income and Poverty Estimates Program; <http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/saipe/saipe.cgi>.

Civilian Labor Force

According to Answers.com, the civilian labor force is, “all members of the population aged 16 or
over in the United States who are not in the military or institutions such as prisons or mental
hospitals and who are either employed or are unemployed and actively seeking and available for



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            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



work.” According to Table 14, below, the civilian labor force of Northeastern Pennsylvania
averaged 498,800 in 2006. This was up from the 2003 average of 460,900. Percentage wise, the
size of Northeastern Pennsylvania’s civilian labor force increased at the rate of 3.79 percent
between 2003 and 2006. During this same period, Pennsylvania’s increased by 2.22 percent and
the United States’ grew by 3.36 percent. Luzerne County, with an increase of 2.19 percent, was
the only county that had a percent change that did not exceed Pennsylvania’s and the United
States’.


Table 14. United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania County Civilian
Labor Force, 2003 - 2006
Area                                                      2003             2006          Change        Percent Change
United States                                         146,510,000      151,428,000      4,918,000          3.36%
 Pennsylvania                                          6,169,000        6,306,000        137,000           2.22%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania                             480,600          498,800          18,200           3.79%
    Carbon County                                       29,900           30,800             900            3.01%
    Lackawanna County                                   103,800          106,200           2,400           2.31%
    Luzerne County                                      155,300          158,700          3,400            2.19%
    Monroe County                                       74,300           80,000            5,700           7.67%
    Pike County                                         24,200           26,300            2,100           8.68%
    Schuylkill County                                    69,500           71,500           2,000           2.88%
    Wayne County                                        23,600           25,300            1,700           7.20%
Source: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Department of Labor and Industry; Center for
Workforce Information and Analysis; PA Workstats; <http://www.paworkstats.state.pa.us>

Total Employment

Table 15, on the next page, indicates that employment in Northeastern Pennsylvania in 2006
consisted of 472,000 residents. This was up 4.87 percent from the 450,100 average for 2003.
During this period, Pennsylvania’s employment increased by 3.30 percent and the United States'
rose by 4.86 percent. Lackawanna County, with a 3.28 percent increase, and Luzerne County,
with an increase of 3.24 percent, were the only two counties that had a percent change that did
not exceed Pennsylvania’s and the United States’.




                                                          13
            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Table 15. United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania County
Employment, 2003 - 2006
Area                                                      2003             2006          Change        Percent Change
United States                                         137,736,000      144,427,000      6,691,000          4.86%
 Pennsylvania                                          5,818,000        6,010,000        192,000           3.30%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania                             450,100          472,000          21,900           4.87%
    Carbon County                                       27,700           29,000            1,300           4.69%
    Lackawanna County                                    97,700          100,900           3,200           3.28%
    Luzerne County                                      145,200          149,900          4,700            3.24%
    Monroe County                                       69,900           75,800            5,900           8.44%
    Pike County                                         22,700           24,700            2,000           8.81%
    Schuylkill County                                    64,500           67,500           3,000           4.65%
    Wayne County                                        22,400           24,200            1,800           8.04%
Source: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Department of Labor and Industry; Center for
Workforce Information and Analysis; PA Workstats; <http://www.paworkstats.state.pa.us>

Total Unemployment

According to Table 16, below, the unemployment of Northeastern Pennsylvania averaged 26,900
in 2006. In comparison to the 2003 unemployment of Northeastern Pennsylvania of 30,300
people, there was a decrease of 3,400 people. Percentage wise, Northeastern Pennsylvania’s
unemployment fell at the rate of 11.22 percent between 2003 and 2006. During this same period,
Pennsylvania’s decreased by 15.67 percent and the United States’ fell by 20.21 percent.

Table 16. United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania County
Unemployment, 2003 - 2006
Area                                                    2003            2006          Change         Percent Change
United States                                         8,774,000      7,001,000      -1,773,000          -20.21%
 Pennsylvania                                          351,000        296,000         -55,000           -15.67%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania                            30,300          26,900          -3,400           -11.22%
    Carbon County                                       2,200          1,800            -400            -18.18%
    Lackawanna County                                   6,100           5,400           -700            -11.48%
    Luzerne County                                     10,100          8,800           -1,300           -12.87%
    Monroe County                                       4,400          4,200            -200             -4.55%
    Pike County                                         1,400          1,600            200              14.29%
    Schuylkill County                                   4,900           4,000           -900            -18.37%
    Wayne County                                        1,200          1,100            -100             -8.33%
Source: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Department of Labor and Industry; Center for
Workforce Information and Analysis; PA Workstats; <http://www.paworkstats.state.pa.us>

Unemployment Rate

The rate of unemployment in Northeastern Pennsylvania, as indicated in Table 17, on the next
page, averaged 5.4 percent in 2006 as compared with 6.3 percent in 2003. Pennsylvania’s rate
decreased by 1.0 percentage points, going from 5.7 percent to 4.7 percent, while the United
States’ rate decreased by 1.4 percentage points, going from 6.0 percent to 4.6 percent. The
unemployment rate also decreased in all of the Northeastern Pennsylvania counties with the


                                                          14
            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



exception of Pike County. Percentage wise, Northeastern Pennsylvania’s unemployment rate fell
at the rate of 14.29 percent between 2003 and 2006. During this same period, Pennsylvania’s fell
by 17.54 percent and the United States’ fell by 23.33 percent. Northeastern Pennsylvania’s
unemployment rate continues to be higher than that of the state and nation.


Table 17. United States, Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania County
Unemployment Rate, 2003 – 2006
Area                                                           2003        2006        Change       Percent Change
United States                                                  6.0%        4.6%         -1.4           -23.33%
 Pennsylvania                                                  5.7%        4.7%         -1.0           -17.54%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania                                    6.3%        5.4%         -0.9           -14.29%
    Carbon County                                              7.3%        5.9%         -1.4           -19.18%
    Lackawanna County                                          5.9%        5.0%         -0.9           -15.25%
    Luzerne County                                             6.5%        5.5%         -1.0           -15.38%
    Monroe County                                              5.9%        5.2%         -0.7           -11.86%
    Pike County                                                5.8%        6.0%          0.2            3.45%
    Schuylkill County                                          7.1%        5.6%         -1.5           -21.13%
    Wayne County                                               5.1%        4.2%         -0.9           -17.65%
Source: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Department of Labor and Industry, Center for
Workforce Information and Analysis; PA Workstats; <http://www.paworkstats.state.pa.us>




                                                          15
              2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                                     CHAPTER 2

    ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS AND OPPORTUNITIES

This chapter provides additional detailed information about the regional deficiencies that were
presented in Chapter 1 along with relevant material from other government-sponsored or
supported plans and a brief discussion about the state-identified targeted industry clusters at the
regional level.

Out-Migration of Younger Population

From April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006, the population grew by 3.40 percent in the region as a whole.
However, in the three of the four most populous counties in the region, Lackawanna, Luzerne
and Schuylkill counties, there was a population decline. Two of the counties in the region, Pike
and Monroe, continue to lead the state in annual population percent increase in counties that have
at least 10,000 people.

Pike and Monroe counties also lead the region in the percent increase of people who are under 18
years of age from April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006. All of the other counties in the region, along
with the region itself, state and nation all had decreases. On the other hand, all of the counties,
along with the region, state and nation, experienced increases in the population between 18 and
24 years from April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006.

In the population 25 to 44 years of age group, the region, state and nation experienced a
population decline during the period. However, within the seven-county Northeastern
Pennsylvania region, Pike and Monroe counties experienced a 27.87 percent and a 16.25 percent
increase, respectively. Carbon and Wayne counties experienced a 6.15 percent and a 3.79 percent
increase. However, Lackawanna, Luzerne and Schuylkill counties experienced a decline.

The 45 to 64 years age group increased in all of the areas. This could mean that people from the
Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Hazleton and Pottsville areas are leaving when they are in their mid-20s
to the larger metropolitan areas and are returning when they approach their mid-40s after they
discover that the region provides a quality of life that is better than what they are currently
experiencing.

Therefore, as a result of the out-migration that is occurring at the age 25 to 44 group, there is a
“brain drain” that is affecting Northeastern Pennsylvania. Efforts, such as “Work & Play in
Northeast PA,” and POWER!, Professionals Organized & Working to Enrich the Region, a
network that was organized by the Great Valley Technology Alliance as a means of retaining
young professionals in the region, are attempting to entice the younger people to stay in
Northeastern Pennsylvania after they complete their formal education. 3



3
    Information about POWER! was obtained from the Web site, http://www.nepapower.com/about.asp



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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Aging Infrastructure

According to state reports that are provided to the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal
Highway Administration, there were 150 bridges that are either structurally deficient or
functionally obsolete in the seven-county Northeastern Pennsylvania region. There are 22,291
total bridges in Pennsylvania and 42.9 percent of them are either structurally deficient or
functionally obsolete. These bridges need to be either upgraded or replaced in order for goods to
be transported and markets to remain open and functional.

Northeastern Pennsylvania’s major arterial highways, such as Interstates 80 and 81, continue to
have improvements. A major need is the widening of Interstate 81 from Milepost 164, the
Nanticoke exit in Luzerne County, to Milepost 197, the Waverly exit in Lackawanna County,
from two to three lanes in each direction. This is needed because the current amount of traffic
has exceeded the capacity of the highway. Truck transportation has increased considerably from
the additional logistics facilities that have come to the region and Interstate 81 continues to serve
as a major North - South route from New England and New York State to the Southeast.

The availability of broadband continues to improve in the region. A major announcement
occurred in June 2007 when it was announced that the fiber-optic cable was going to be run from
the Wall Street District of New York City to the planned Penn Regional Business Center in
Monroe County. This could be a major step in broadband becoming available throughout the
Northeastern Pennsylvania region.

Many outlying areas of the Northeastern Pennsylvania region have private well water and septic
systems. Depending on how close an industrial site is from a public water and wastewater
system, development could occur in some of these outlying areas. Another factor would be
whether the industrial site is served by adequate roads and/or railroads.

The housing stock in the seven-county Northeastern Pennsylvania region is one of the oldest in
the state. According to 2000 U.S. Census Bureau Sample Data, Schuylkill County has the oldest
median year housing structure built in the state, which is 1940 and before. Lackawanna (1942)
and Luzerne (1946) are ranked as the third and tied for the fifth oldest median year housing
structure built, respectively. Both Carbon County and Pennsylvania have the same median year
housing structure built, which is 1957. Finally, both Monroe and Pike counties have the youngest
median year housing structure built in the state, which is 1981, and Wayne County has the
second youngest median year housing structure built in the state, which is 1976. In comparison,
the median year housing structure built in the United States is 1971.

Shortage of Skilled Technical Labor

In the Northeastern Pennsylvania region, there is a shortage of skilled technical labor. Through
the three local investment boards (Pocono Mountains, Luzerne-Schuylkill and Lackawanna
County), colleges and universities, such as Penn State Hazleton, Penn State Schuylkill, Penn
State Wilkes-Barre, Penn State Worthington Scranton, Lackawanna College, Luzerne County
Community College, Northampton Community College, Lehigh Carbon Community College and
Johnson College, and the local career technical schools, the shortage is being addressed by


                                                         17
            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



providing educational programs that train the local workforce in using the latest technology
possible. Bachelor’s degree programs in the various technology-related fields are being offered
by four-year colleges and universities in the region. As technology continues to evolve, there will
be a continual need for this type of training.

Low Educational Attainment Levels

There are 17 colleges and universities located in the Northeastern Pennsylvania region,
including: Baptist Bible College and Seminary, East Stroudsburg University, Johnson College,
Keystone College, King’s College, Lackawanna College, Lehigh-Carbon Community College,
Luzerne County Community College, Marywood University, Misericordia University,
Northampton Community College, Penn State Hazleton, Penn State Schuylkill, Penn State
Wilkes-Barre, Penn State Worthington-Scranton, the University of Scranton and Wilkes
University. There are 46 public school districts, many private schools and seven Vocational
Technical schools in the region.

A measure of education is by looking at the educational attainment level by county and
comparing it to the state and nation, and this is illustrated in Table 18, below.

Table 18. School Enrollment and Educational Attainment for the United States,
Pennsylvania and Northeastern Pennsylvania Counties, 2000
Area                                    Population      Population     Population     Population 25     Population     Population
                                         18 to 24        18 to 24       25 Years       Years and         25 Years       25 to 34
                                          Years-          Years-       and Over-      Over-Percent      and Over-        Years-
                                        Percent Not       Percent        Percent      High School         Percent       Percent
                                        Enrolled in      Enrolled      with Less       Graduate or         with           with
                                        School and      in College     Than a 9th        Higher         Bachelor’s     Bachelor’s
                                        Not a High          or           Grade                          Degree or      Degree or
                                          School         Graduate      Education                          Higher        Higher
                                         Graduate         School
United States                              9.8%           34.0%           7.5%            80.4%            24.4%         27.5%
 Pennsylvania                              7.1%           39.0%           5.5%            81.9%            22.4%         29.1%
  Northeastern Pennsylvania                6.2%           36.0%           5.3%            81.1%            16.4%         21.1%
    Carbon County                          7.8%           21.9%           6.1%            79.0%            11.0%         15.1%
    Lackawanna County                      5.3%           45.4%           5.2%            82.0%            19.6%         27.6%
    Luzerne County                         6.4%           37.1%           5.9%            81.1%            16.4%         22.1%
    Monroe County                          5.2%           43.8%           3.7%            83.8%            20.5%         23.9%
    Pike County                            5.2%           23.2%           2.5%            86.8%            19.0%         18.8%
    Schuylkill County                      8.0%           21.3%           6.6%            77.2%            10.7%         13.4%
    Wayne County                           6.6%           19.1%           5.4%            80.7%            14.6%         15.5%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3), Table GCT-P1. Language,
School Enrollment and Educational Attainment: 2000;” <http://factfinder.census.gov>

According to the table above, in the 18 to 24 years of age group, the region had a lower
percentage of people not enrolled in school and not a high school graduate than the state and
nation. There were a higher percentage of people not enrolled in school and not a high school
graduate in Carbon and Schuylkill counties than the region and state; and there were a higher


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



percentage of people not enrolled in school and not a high school graduate in Luzerne and
Wayne counties than the region. All of the counties in Northeastern Pennsylvania had
percentages, which were below the nation.

In the region, the percentage of people who are age 18 to 24 and enrolled either in college or
graduate school was higher than the nation but lower than the state. In Lackawanna and Monroe
counties, this percentage was higher than the region, state and nation. In addition, the enrollment
percentage was higher in Luzerne County than the nation.

Carbon, Luzerne and Schuylkill counties each had a higher percentage of people 25 years of age
and over who do not have a high school education than the region and state. Wayne County had
a percentage that was higher than the region. However, none of the percentages exceeded the
nation.

In the percent of the population who were age 25 years and over and were at least a high school
graduate group, the region had a percentage that was higher than the nation and lower than the
state. Lackawanna, Monroe and Pike counties each had percentages that exceeded the region,
state and nation; and Luzerne County tied the regional and exceeded the national percentage.

There were no counties in Northeastern Pennsylvania that had a percentage in population who
were age 25 years and over with at least a Bachelor’s Degree that exceeded the state and national
averages. However, Lackawanna, Monroe and Pike counties each had percentages that exceeded
the regional percentage and Luzerne County tied the regional percentage.

Finally, none of the counties exceeded the state percentage in population who were age 25 to 34
years with a Bachelor’s Degree or higher. Only Lackawanna County exceeded the national
percentage in population who were age 25 to 34 years with a Bachelor’s Degree or higher and
this was by only 0.1 percent; and Lackawanna, Luzerne and Monroe counties had a percentage
that exceeded the regional percentage of 21.1 percent.

Lack of Terminal Degree Programs

In the seven-county Northeastern Pennsylvania region, there is not a critical mass of terminal
degree programs in certain fields, especially in engineering, sciences and technology-related
fields. By having this degree available, people could look into the possibilities of returning to
school on a part-time basis to obtain the degree and then stay in the region for employment.
However, in recent years, significant progress has been made. Within the past year, there was a
major announcement that a new medical school was going to be established in Scranton. The
first class is stated to begin study in fall 2009. There is also discussion about establishing a law
school at Wilkes University. Currently, at Wilkes University in Wilkes-Barre, a Doctorate of
Education (Ed.D.) and a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree is offered. At Marywood
University in Scranton, a Ph.D. degree in Human Development is offered. At Misericordia
University in Dallas, a doctoral degree in Physical Therapy is offered and courses towards a
doctoral degree in Occupational Therapy are scheduled to start in fall 2008. East Stroudsburg
University of Pennsylvania has an agreement with Indiana University of Pennsylvania to offer
courses that can be used towards a Ed.D. degree in Administration and Leadership Studies that is


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



awarded by Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The participation of academia is a prerequisite
in enhancing economic growth in the region.

The low amount of terminal degree programs is related to the lack of a major research-driven
educational institution in the region because earning a Ph.D. degree is training for research.

Lack of Entrepreneurial Culture

Entrepreneurship in niche markets needs to continue to be explored in the seven-county
Northeastern Pennsylvania region. According to “County Business Patterns,” a publication by
the U.S. Census Bureau, 78.2 percent of all firms located within the Northeastern Pennsylvania
region in March 2003 had 1 to 9 employees and this percentage increased to 78.7 percent in
March 2005. These percentages were higher than the state and nation. The state had 72.1 percent
in March 2003 and 72.2 percent in March 2005. The nation had 73.3 percent in March 2003 and
73.7 percent in March 2005. Table 19, below, provides more detailed information.

Table 19. The Number and Percent of Firms with 1-9 Employees for the United States,
Pennsylvania, the Northeastern Pennsylvania Region and Each of the Seven Northeastern
Pennsylvania Counties, March 2003 – March 2005
Area                           Number of           Percent in March           Number of            Percent in March
                                Firms in                2003                   Firms in                 2005
                               March 2003                                     March 2005
United States                  5,320,242                  73.3%               5,530,562                   73.7%
Pennsylvania                    214,861                   72.1%                219,086                    72.2%
 Northeastern                    17,124                   78.2%                 17,655                    78.7%
 Pennsylvania
  Carbon County                      916                  79.2%                    916                    79.2%
  Lackawanna County                 3,827                 71.7%                   3,915                   71.8%
  Luzerne County                    5,502                 72.4%                   5,632                   72.3%
  Monroe County                     2,668                 77.1%                   2,869                   77.5%
  Pike County                        658                  83.0%                    737                    84.2%
  Schuylkill County                 2,314                 74.9%                   2,271                   74.1%
  Wayne County                      1,239                 80.6%                   1,315                   81.6%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, “County Business Patterns – 2003 and 2005;”
<http://censtats.census.gov/cbpnaic/cbpnaic.shtml>

When looking at the percent of firms that have 1 to 4 employees, the region was lower than the
nation but higher than the state during the same period. In March 2003, the region had 53.8
percent as compared to the nation with 54.2 percent and the state with 51.7 percent. In March
2005, the region had 54.4 percent as compared to the state with 52.1 percent and the nation with
54.9 percent. Consequently, the gap widened between the region and the nation by 0.1
percentage points. Table 20, on the next page, provides more detailed information.




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Table 20. The Number and Percent of Firms with 1-4 Employees for the United States,
Pennsylvania, the Northeastern Pennsylvania Region and Each of the Seven Northeastern
Pennsylvania Counties, March 2003 – March 2005
                               Number of           Percent in March           Number of            Percent in March
                                Firms in                2003                   Firms in                 2005
                               March 2003                                     March 2005
United States                  3,930,313                  54.2%               4,119,363                   54.9%
Pennsylvania                    154,213                   51.7%                157,916                    52.1%
 Northeastern                    12,347                   53.8%                 12,871                    54.4%
 Pennsylvania
  Carbon County                      673                  58.2%                    669                    57.9%
  Lackawanna County                 2,716                 50.9%                   2,829                   51.9%
  Luzerne County                    3,951                 52.0%                   4,074                   52.3%
  Monroe County                     1,924                 55.6%                   2,116                   57.1%
  Pike County                        486                  61.3%                    563                    64.3%
  Schuylkill County                 1,659                 53.7%                   1,611                   52.5%
  Wayne County                       938                  61.0%                   1,009                   62.6%
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, “County Business Patterns – 2003 and 2005;”
<http://censtats.census.gov/cbpnaic/cbpnaic.shtml>

Relevant Material from Other Government-Sponsored or Supported Plans

In Pike County’s Comprehensive Plan that is dated November 2006, one of their Priority Action
Items is “to manage growth within the county by supporting development of identified growth
areas with road improvements, sewer planning and water supply planning.” Another Priority
Action Item is “to encourage additional economic development by identifying a multi-faceted
approach to retaining young people within the county after completion of high school.” The final
Priority Action Item is “to enhance infrastructure systems such as public water and sewer
facilities.”

In Schuylkill County’s Comprehensive Plan, which is dated 2006, one of the objectives is “to
have commercial and industrial development in areas where infrastructure improvements can be
phased in with new development.” Another objective is “to have growth areas readily accessible
to current or larger infrastructure systems.”

The Pocono Mountains Workforce Investment Area serves four of the seven counties that the
Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance serves. These counties are Carbon, Monroe, Pike and
Wayne. The Pocono Mountains has been a tourism destination for many years. According to
their three-year strategic plan, people who are between 18 and 34 seem to leave the region for
employment purposes. The destination for many of these people is the metropolitan areas of New
York City and Philadelphia. This is being addressed through the local “Work & Play in
Northeast PA” initiative. On the other hand, their service area includes Pike and Monroe
counties, who lead the state in population percent increase in counties that are at least 10,000
people. Some of these people are transplants from the New York City area who relocate to the
Poconos because of the housing affordability and are either retired or commute back to New


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



York City for employment. The Pocono Mountains Workforce Investment Area has targeted
several of the industry clusters that the state is targeting for development. These clusters, which
include Building and Construction; Advanced Materials and Diversified Manufacturing; Life
Sciences; and Logistics and Transportation will be explained in greater detail in the next section.

Industry Clusters

According to the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry Center for Workforce
Information and Analysis, the state has nine targeted industry clusters. They are: Advanced
Materials and Diversified Manufacturing; Agriculture and Food Production; Building and
Construction; Business and Financial Services; Education; Information and Communication
Services; Life Sciences; Logistics and Transportation; and Lumber, Wood and Paper. Some of
these clusters have experienced an increase in the location quotient in both the seven-county
Northeastern Pennsylvania region and the state. A location quotient is a ratio of ratios that is
used in determining the industries that are exporters, which should be targeted for recruitment,
and the industries that are importers. The numerator of a location quotient is the number of
employees in a particular industry in a county divided by the total number of employees in a
county. The denominator is the number of employees in a particular industry in either the state or
nation divided by the total number of employees in either the state or nation. According to the
Penn State Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension publication, “Using Employment
Data to Better Understand Your Local Economy – Tool 3: Use Location Quotients to Identify
Local Strengths, Opportunities and Industry Clusters,” “if a location quotient is greater than 1.25,
then the industry is exporting goods and services.” On the other hand, “if a location quotient is
less than 0.75, then the industry is importing goods or services.”

Table 21, on the next page, provides the location quotients of the targeted industry clusters. The
identification of the industries in the table is different than what is stated above because it is
based on the “County Business Patterns” publication from the U.S. Census Bureau.




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Table 21. Location Quotients of Targeted Industry Clusters for Pennsylvania and
Northeastern Pennsylvania, 1998 and 2005
Industry                              State        State        Change         Region         Region         Change
                                       LQ           LQ                        LQ 1998        LQ 2005
                                      1998         2005
Manufacturing                         1.07         1.11          +0.04           1.25           1.24          -0.01
Agriculture                           0.30         0.34          +0.04           0.14           0.17          +0.03
Construction                          0.86         0.82          -0.04           0.77           0.72          -0.05
Finance and Insurance                 1.04         1.05          +0.01           0.78           0.82          +0.04
Education                             1.70         1.75          +0.05           1.36           1.29          -0.07
Information                           0.86         0.90          +0.04           0.89           0.83          -0.06
Health Care                           1.19         1.20          +0.01           1.24           1.24           0.00
Transportation and                    0.95         1.07          +0.08           0.88           1.70          +0.82
Warehousing
Lumber, Wood and Paper                 n/a          n/a            --             n/a            n/a             --
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, “County Business Patterns – 1998 and 2005;”
<http://censtats.census.gov/cbpnaic/cbpnaic.shtml>

The above table indicates that in 2005, the location quotients in the seven-county Northeastern
Pennsylvania region were higher than the state in the manufacturing, health care, and
transportation and warehousing industries. In the region, there were very slight decreases in the
manufacturing, construction, education and information industries. The location quotient for
construction in both the state and region decreased slightly between 1998 and 2005.

In Northeastern Pennsylvania, manufacturing, education, health care, and transportation and
warehousing are exporting industries. This means that people are coming to the region to obtain
the goods and services that these industries make available. Unfortunately, education in both the
state and region is an export industry which means that people are coming to both the state and
region to obtain education and then taking that education to another location where it can be
applied.

The location quotient for the transportation and warehousing industry in the region almost
doubled between 1998 and 2005. This occurred as a result of the warehousing firms that have
been established because of the close proximity of the region to both the New York City and
Philadelphia Metropolitan Areas. There is growth in this industry in Lackawanna, Luzerne,
Monroe and Schuylkill counties because of the available sites that are close to Interstates 80, 81
and 380.

The location quotient for lumber, wood and paper was not calculated because of its interaction
with the agriculture, manufacturing and retail trade industries.

The hospitality industry cluster, although it is not a targeted industry cluster for Pennsylvania,
has significance on the Northeastern Pennsylvania economy because of the tourism activity in
the region, especially the Pocono Mountains. As a result of the cluster consisting of the



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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



combination of the accommodation and food services, and the arts, entertainment and recreation
industries, a location quotient was not calculated.




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                                      CHAPTER 3

                                           GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

In the future, the Northeastern Pennsylvania region will continue to be an attractive place to live
with an excellent quality of life, which is supported by a strong and diversified economic base
that brings prosperity to its residents. The Northeastern Pennsylvania region will maintain a
balance between the preservation of its rural environment with open space and an expanded
economic base with industrial, commercial and retail centers for its residents.
The Northeastern Pennsylvania region strives to build comparative advantage in accessibility to
the region and its places of employment, its highly-skilled workforce, and its low cost of living
as compared to the major metropolitan areas of New York City and Philadelphia, each being
within 1.5 to 2.5 hours driving time from Northeastern Pennsylvania. An asset of the region
where comparative advantage can be built is its low taxes and crime rate, along with its good
schools and housing costs that are considerably lower than the New York City and Philadelphia
Metropolitan Areas.

Goal One: Increased Economic Growth and Diversification

Objective - Creation of jobs with family-sustaining wages

Short-Term Strategies - Assist companies wanting to locate in the region
                        Assist companies wanting to expand their capabilities in the region
                        Address the needs of businesses for them to stay in the region
                        Assist entrepreneurs wanting to start businesses in the region
                        Encourage technology-lead business development
                        Assist manufacturers and export businesses
                        Establish a regional Small Business Information Center
                        Support regional partnerships as a strategic approach to economic
                        development
                        Assist and support tourism as a core business sector in the region

Action Plan

The objective of creating jobs with family-sustaining (or self-sufficient wages) and the short-
term strategy of assisting companies wanting to locate in the region is accomplished as a result of
Penn’s Northeast, the regional economic development marketing organization, and its member
organizations working together to provide a seamless marketing of the region’s strengths both
inside and outside the Northeastern Pennsylvania region. According to the Massachusetts
Association for Community Action, self-sufficient or family-sustaining wages are needed in
order to “live free of public and/or private supports.”

Both Penn’s Northeast and the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance should provide support to the
local chambers of commerce, industrial development corporations and other economic
development organizations, which are directly involved in the recruitment of businesses. The


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance will continue to provide assistance to these organizations in
terms of research support, such as Target Industry Analysis, and through its business
development and retention programs. Both employment and business retention must also be
viewed as part of a basic economic development strategy since the majority of new jobs are
created by small businesses. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance Enterprise Development
Program as well as the Team Pennsylvania Regional Business Retention Program and the
Northeastern Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center support employment and business
retention. Attention must be given to support these businesses in adapting new technologies into
their operations. This is a niche role for the Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern
Pennsylvania. Assistance must also focus on finding new markets for their products and services.
In addition, sustained access to affordable capital is a priority objective. Business start-up
assistance is offered through several organizations including the Northeastern Pennsylvania
Alliance, the Small Business Development Centers at Wilkes University and the University of
Scranton, the Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania, Metro Action
and the local Chambers of Commerce. Supporting technology-led economic development in the
region is a function of all organizations previously identified including the Pennsylvania
Technology Assistance Program and Angel Investors.

Evaluation Plan

The Action Plan for Goal One would be evaluated by looking for increases in employment in the
various industries of the regional economy along with increases in wages. The U.S. Census
Bureau publication, “County Business Patterns,” would be used in conjunction with wage data
from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Labor and Industry, Center for
Workforce Information and Analysis. Also, increases in the number of business establishments
and technology-related businesses would be an indicator for evaluation.

Goal Two: Improvement of Human Resources and Workforce Development

Objectives - Have more highly skilled persons in the workforce
             Have education and training programs based on opportunities and projected needs
             Work with other economic development agencies to address the problem of young
             people leaving the region for employment after completing their education

Short-Term Strategy - Promote the broadening of formal education opportunities
                      Continued integration of higher education resources with economic
                      development efforts

Action Plan

The objective, “Work with other economic development agencies to address the problem of
young people leaving the region for employment after completing their education,” was
initialized during with the coming together of several organizations to develop a publication,
“Work & Play in Northeast PA,” which was distributed to all of the school districts, colleges and
universities, along with several businesses in the region. An accompanying Web site:
http://www.worknplaynepa.com was also established. Included in this Web site is a link to job


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



searches, the housing market and some of the recreational activity locations within the region.
The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance served as coordinator of the effort after the Schuylkill
Chamber of Commerce, who was instrumental in getting the project to where it is today.
Currently, the Great Valley Technology Alliance is coordinating the program

The two objectives of having education and training programs based on projected needs and
having more highly skilled persons in the workforce would have to be developed with Team
Pennsylvania Career Link, the Workforce Investment Boards, the Northeastern Pennsylvania
Manufacturers and Employers Association and the various economic development organizations
and educational institutions, including industry supported initiatives, within the region. The
short-term strategy of promoting the broadening of formal education opportunities would be
done by the regional colleges and universities. In addition, the Wall Street West – Workforce
Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) initiative will help prepare workers
for high-skill, high-wage career opportunities in the financial services sector as well as
complementary business sectors. A concern with the educational resources in Northeastern
Pennsylvania is the very small amount of terminal degree programs offered. Without additional
terminal degrees, the region will continue to lag behind other areas of the state and some of the
other states, in terms of education attainment level. The higher educational institutions in the
region must continue to cooperate and be involved in supporting economic development
objectives. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Technology Institute, along with the Chambers of
Commerce, Industrial Development Corporations, Workforce Development Boards, Wall Street
West and other economic development entities have to communicate with the regional
institutions of higher education in expressing their projected needs so college students will have
opportunities to stay and work at jobs in the region upon graduation.

Evaluation Plan

Evaluation of this goal would be by looking at possible statistics which would be generated from
surveys at the Alumni Association Offices of the various educational institutions within the
region. These statistics would illustrate the migration trends of the young people who attended
college within the region. Periodic checking of the Web sites of the regional colleges and
universities would be done to see if they expanded their graduate program. A realization is that
the expansion of graduate programs takes a long period of time because of the accreditation
process. The establishment and maintenance of industry partnerships is another means that can
be utilized.

Goal Three: Improvement of the Environment

Objective - Protect and maintain our natural resources

Short-Term Strategies - Promote regionalism and smart growth
                       Manage growth through effective land-use planning
                       Brownfield reclamation for industrial/business use
                       Utilize existing infrastructure to attract economic development
                       Preserve green spaces
                       Promote Energy Demand Reduction and Energy Efficiency


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                             Promote Waste Reduction and Recycling

Action Plan

The main objective of this goal is the protection and maintenance of our natural resources. The
Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance (NEPA) will collaborate and partner with federal, state and
local agencies and environmental nonprofits including the United States Environmental
Protection Agency, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, the Pennsylvania
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, the Pennsylvania Department of
Community and Economic Development, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, the
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT), Penn State Cooperative Extension, the
Small Business Development Center – Environmental Management Assistance Program
(EMAP), the Northeastern Regional Office of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council and local
governments.

NEPA will partner with these entities to provide technical assistance and guidance through a
variety of programs including:

   •   Land Use, Transportation & Economic Development (LUTED)
   •   PennDOT – Planning Partners Network – Rural Planning Organization (RPO)
   •   NEPA Energy Assistance Program
   •   NEPA Cooperative Purchasing Initiative

NEPA will refer business owners and local government officials to the appropriate agencies and
assist them in identifying funding programs to better implement projects and programs in the
region. NEPA will also partner to provide seminars and workshops on energy demand reduction
and utility bill analysis.

Under this goal, there are also five short-term strategies: promoting regionalism, managing
growth through effective land-use planning, Brownfield reclamation for industrial/business use,
utilizing water resources to attract economic development and preserving green spaces.
Brownfield reclamation is implemented by the various industrial development corporations
within the region. Various land trusts and planning commissions along with other organizations
such as Earth Conservancy are involved in environmental-related programs within the region.

NEPA will promote smart growth by effective land-use planning through the NEPA Rural
Planning Organization (RPO) and the Land Use, Transportation & Economic Development
(LUTED) initiative. The desired result would be that each of the seven counties in the
Northeastern Pennsylvania region would have a varied land-use pattern that accommodates the
needs and interests of all residents by supporting a variety of housing, commercial and industrial
development strategies. Growth will be guided into those areas, which will have the
infrastructure to support it without providing an undue burden to taxpayers and local
governments. NEPA will assist each of the seven counties in the Northeastern Pennsylvania
region to preserve and protect its agricultural land, open space, streams, rivers and ground water




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            2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



supply to the extent that it is consistent with the desires of the residents and to the extent that a
secure financial future for all residents can be created.

Evaluation Plan

The evaluation process would involve the monitoring of land use patterns and development
across the region. NEPA will also monitor the use of green space versus brownfield
development. Furthermore, NEPA will monitor the savings associated with energy demand
reduction and utility bill analysis of local governments in the region. Compliance with land use
regulations and practices required by the Pennsylvania Municipalities Planning Code will be
monitored by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development and by
the local governments administering their local land-use and development ordinances.

Goal Four: Improvement in Local Government Operations

Objective - Increased cooperation among governments

Short-Term Strategies - Advocate cooperation among governments
                        Support functional consolidation of services
                        Assist local governments by providing resources and training
                        programs
                        Work closely with the Center for Local Government Services

Action Plan

Local governments in Pennsylvania operate independently at the sub-county level, often have
small staffs and many are not equipped with the necessary staff or resources to address larger
regional issues, which they face daily. Realizing the potential for cooperation, the recent trend
by many localities has been to form a Council of Governments (COG), in which they partner to
address issues such as bulk purchasing of products, addressing new legislative regulations,
planning initiatives etc. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance, through its Community and
Government Services Division, would continue to promote the most appropriate techniques to
assist local governments such as joining a Regional Council of Governments, taking advantage
of circuit rider programs, privatizing and contracting for services, and when appropriate,
facilitate the development of shared municipal services amongst local government service
providers.

In addition, to achieve this goal, our county and municipal governmental leadership must
embrace the benefits, which can be gained through partnering with other municipalities and by
utilizing resources such as the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance and the Pennsylvania
Department of Community and Economic Development Governor’s Center for Local
Government Services. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance and other similar community
service organizations can offer services and expertise in many facets of governmental operations
such as grant application preparation, business attraction, resource identification land-use
planning, planning policy etc., which will help the region’s municipalities to become and stay
competitive. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance, through its Community and Government


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Services Division, would provide educational opportunities to interested local government
officials in regards to shared service delivery and identification of funding resources.

Evaluation Plan

Periodically contacting municipalities to identify their needs and evaluating how they may
consider cooperatively resolving shared problems. Discussions with regional representatives of
the Center for Local Government Services will provide insight about successful initiatives
occurring within the region. Other statistics that will be considered are the employment rate,
business expansion rate and the number of businesses locating to the municipality.

Goal Five: Improvement of Telecommunications

Objectives - Development of new industries using advanced technology communications
             Development of broadband technologies to underserved areas

Short-Term Strategies - Identify feasible telecommunication system improvements
                        Identify possibilities for the installation of broadband, including
                        wireless communications and fiber optics
Action Plan

The objectives of developing new industries, which would use advanced technology in the field
of communications, and developing broadband technologies in underserved areas, along with the
short-term strategies of identifying possibilities for the installation of broadband, including
wireless communications and fiber optics and identifying some feasible telecommunications
system improvements are necessary in bringing the Northeastern Pennsylvania region further
into the 21st century. Broadband is a relatively new concept and it needs to be extensively
marketed. Currently, there are very few telecom service providers in Northeastern Pennsylvania
that offer broadband, and the lack of competition results in a high price for installation and use.
In an economic sense, as more firms enter the broadband market, the price will drop and as a
result, more households and businesses can be connected. Therefore, economic development
organizations and utility providers in Northeastern Pennsylvania need to continue to promote
technology as a basis for enhancing economic competitiveness by businesses and industries
throughout the region.

To address the improvement of telecommunications in Northeastern Pennsylvania, a
comprehensive Broadband Assessment Study was completed under the statewide
eCOMMonwealth broadband initiative. This study was completed to identify the current
broadband availability in the region. It will be used as a decision support tool to inform the
region about current broadband availability and to identify priority areas for broadband
deployment.

The results revealed that the majority of residents and a large number of businesses are still using
dial-up connections to access the Internet. A quarter of the population in the seven-county
Northeastern Pennsylvania region stated that high-speed Internet access such as broadband was
not available in their area. Businesses reported that their “current bandwidth is inadequate” and


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



“high-speed services are not available.” Both residents and businesses stated that “high-speed
services are too expensive” and “they need help getting broadband providers to serve their area.”

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance (NEPA) continues to be actively involved in this area.
Accordingly, NEPA is working with a renowned telecommunications expert to better assess
specific challenges facing “priority areas” as identified in the Broadband Assessment Study and
to address regional opportunities and strategies for broadband deployment.

Evaluation Plan

This goal would be evaluated by looking at the trends of new companies locating to the region to
sites that have broadband. These statistics would be new in nature and will take some time to
acquire.

Goal Six: Improvement of Transportation Systems

Objectives - Improved arterial highway system in urban and rural areas
             Developed linked transportation modes
             Restored passenger rail service
             Improved capacity of the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport and other
             general aviation airports in the region

Short-Term Strategies - Support restoration of passenger rail service
                        Improve quality and capacity of highway system

Action Plan

To have an improved arterial highway system in urban and rural areas, developed linked
transportation modes, restored passenger rail service and improved capacity of the general
aviation airports in the region are the four objectives, which, according to respondents of the
survey, are all high priority. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance (NEPA) serves as the Rural
Planning Organization (RPO) for the five rural counties (Carbon, Monroe, Pike, Schuylkill and
Wayne) located within NEPA’s service region, and is responsible for identifying the
transportation needs and priorities for these areas. Currently, funds are being secured through the
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) and other sources to finance a long-
range inter-modal transportation plan, which will compliment current long-range plans
developed for the Lackawanna/Luzerne Metropolitan Planning Organization (LLMPO) region
and other adjoining MPOs and RPOs. In addition to planning and programming responsibilities
associated with the Rural Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), the Northeastern
Pennsylvania Alliance is involved with many transportation enhancement initiatives including
the Focus I-81 Committee and Safe 80 Committee. These committees were formed to address
congestion and safety concerns along Interstate 81 in the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton corridor, and
Interstate 80 in eastern Monroe County. The committees are comprised of federal and state
legislators, local officials, transportation professionals, area business leaders and concerned
citizens, and are committed to identifying issues and actions which it believes will significantly
improve travel safety and reduce congestion for motorists utilizing the portions of Interstates 80


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



and 81 that are within the region. A major initiative to achieve this goal is to increase the
capacity of the corridors and develop a safer travel environment for all vehicles, which is vital to
the area both regionally and nationally.

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance, through its Community and Government Services
Division, is also involved with PennDOT in a study of regional inter-modal transportation
networks. The highest priority short-term strategy within this goal was supporting the restoration
of passenger rail service into New York City, which is being spearheaded by the Pennsylvania
Northeast Regional Railroad Authority. Passenger rail service could be here by as early as 2010
with stops in Scranton, Mount Pocono, Analomink, East Stroudsburg, Delaware Water Gap, and
two stops in New Jersey including the final destination of Hoboken, with possible expansion of
this rail service to Wilkes-Barre. The rail line would also provide an additional means of
transporting products, which are manufactured in the region, to markets located outside the
region. There are plans to develop an inter-modal site in downtown Scranton to work in
conjunction with the Scranton to New York rail service. According to Senator Arlen Specter, at a
meeting of New Jersey and Pennsylvania elected leaders in Scranton on May 1, 2006, $20
million in federal funding had been appropriated. According to New Jersey Transit, the assumed
operator of the service, in 2004, the total estimated project cost for reintroduction of rail
passenger service is estimated at $350 million.

The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport has a new parking facility and a new terminal
building has been constructed. The airport continues to seek additional airlines to provide both
passenger and cargo service.

Evaluation Plan

This goal would be evaluated by the progress being made to improve the transportation network
in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The improvement of Interstates 80 and 81 to handle increased
traffic capacity, the regional inter-modal transportation network, the restoration of passenger rail
service and the improvements at the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport in terms of
both additional infrastructure and additional carriers will immensely open the region to economic
development. The success of this goal would be measured by reviewing projects presently
identified on the region’s TIPs and looking at the employment and wages by industry from
sources such as “County Business Patterns” and the mean travel time to work, both from the U.S.
Census Bureau.

Goal Seven: Improvement of the Quality of Life

Objective - Enhanced appearance of communities

Short-Term Strategies - Create diverse and vibrant places for cultural and lifestyle attractions
                        and opportunities
                        Assist organizations with the identification of alternatives, strategies
                        and actions for community improvement programs




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Action Plan

The most important objective of this goal was the enhancement of the appearance of
communities. The short-term strategies, ranked in terms of importance, are: the Northeastern
Pennsylvania Alliance’s Community and Government Services Division assisting local
municipalities with the identification of alternatives and working with them in developing
strategies and actions for community development programs, which would create diverse and
vibrant places for cultural and lifestyle attractions and opportunities. Many of the communities in
the region need aesthetic improvements and without these improvements economic development
will not occur. By having energetic downtown communities as a result of appearance
improvements and by having many cultural activities, there would be an increase in the number
of people who would visit the area and during their visit, make purchases which would stimulate
the local economy. Given the importance of tourism on the local economy, the various tourism
promotion agencies in the region perform a vital role in this regard. Some of the facilities for
cultural activities include ethnic restaurants, venues for music, comedy and theatrical
productions, and art galleries and museums. Recreational activities would also create a sense of
energy in downtown communities.

Evaluation Plan

The evaluation for this goal of creating more vibrant communities would be to increase the
number of local governments, downtown development associations and chambers of commerce
who utilize the federal and state funded programs and various resources of the Northeastern
Pennsylvania Alliance in obtaining funding for community development projects. An additional
measure is the number and type of community improvement programs undertaken in the region.

Some Generalizations

Economic developers in the region need to promote and establish Northeastern Pennsylvania as a
leading center for the location of new businesses that have jobs with family sustainable wages.
In the next ten years, the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance will be the primary resource for
data, research assistance and planning, including land and transportation planning, as well as
small project funding. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance will maintain the Regional
Information and Resource Center and their Internet home page to provide up-to-date, key
information, which can help promote sound economic growth throughout Northeastern
Pennsylvania.

In conclusion, the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance desires:

       -   To partner with the various organizations, which are involved with economic
           development, and with educational institutions to reduce the number of people,
           between the ages of 18 and 34, who are leaving the region upon completion of
           their formal education

       -   To stay informed about the constant technological changes, which could be used as a
           business recruitment tool in the region


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



       -   To provide support, through its small business development programs, to economic
           development organizations that recruit new businesses, retain businesses and
           participate in other business development programs

       -   To provide a myriad of services to local governments

Economic development is inherently a collaborative process. In order for Northeastern
Pennsylvania to achieve its economic potential, the region must continue to expand the
cooperative effort between the business sector, regional organizations, educational institutions,
local and county agencies, and local, state and federal governmental agencies.




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                                      CHAPTER 4

                     COMMUNITY AND PRIVATE SECTOR PARTICIPATION

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance (NEPA) acknowledges that a vibrant, engaged
private/public sector partnership is critical to the development and implementation of the
Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS). In the initial planning of the CEDS,
the private and public, as well as the not for profit, sectors were heavily involved in the
identification of regional goals and objectives through a series of meetings as well as surveys.

The composition of the NEPA/CEDS Strategy Committee and the NEPA Board of Directors, as
well as the various NEPA Committees, draws upon the expertise and resources of these
volunteers to add additional capacity to the delivery of regional programs and services.

Historically, NEPA has enjoyed strong participation from the region’s private sector in its
management structure and operations. Private sector representation has come from banks, legal
firms, private industries, business owners, utilities, insurance companies etc. Their perspective
and capacity brings additional value to NEPA and its various programs and services.

The participation and interaction of community and private sector organizations is necessary for
any region to improve its quality of life and advance its economic scorecard. As a regional
organization, NEPA strives to be as inclusive as possible and bring together all resources in
addressing issues of significance. Examples of regional private/public partnerships include:

       I-81 Transportation Advisory Committee
       NEPA – Business Finance Center/Loan Review Committee
       Regional Project Priority Committee
       Tobyhanna Army Depot Blue Ribbon Task Force
       NEPA Executive Committee/Board of Directors
       NEPA Entrepreneurial Network
       Industry Partnership Initiatives

NEPA also strongly acknowledges that the private sector generates jobs and wealth. As a
community economic development organization, NEPA’s role is work in partnership with
various organizations throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania to help establish conditions that
promote economic growth. Investments that have incurred in the region arise out of partnerships.
Time and time again, evidence has been accumulated to demonstrate that economic growth does
not come about as a result of a single instance. It comes about because the private sector decides
that a given region or community contains the appropriate characteristics to support an
investment.

A holistic and integrated approach is required for this region to achieve its economic potential.
This includes many factors including:

   -   Trained and available workforce
   -   Integrated transportation network


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



   -   Infrastructure (highway, water, technology/telecommunications)
   -   Affordable housing
   -   Educational attainment
   -   Recreational/leisure/cultural amenities
   -   Access to capital
   -   Environmental awareness
   -   Entrepreneurial development

These requirements for economic growth are included in the CEDS goals, objectives and
strategies.

Examples of regional private/public sector partnerships are included in this CEDS Annual
Performance Report that have resulted in increased investment and related jobs in the region.
Many of these investments have occurred in EDA funded projects including industrial/business
parks, technology incubators, multi-tenant buildings, downtown revitalization or had its
foundation in technical assistance and planning projects.

Each of these initiatives has a common foundation – community-related organizations planning
and implementing a project in order to attract private sector investment, based upon market-
based opportunities and assets. This approach brings together all available resources to enhance
economic development in Northeastern Pennsylvania.




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          2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                                     CHAPTER 5

                    STRATEGIC PROJECTS, PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES

This chapter provides the Economic Development Administration Vital Projects for Fiscal Year
2007-2008, a listing of Multi-Year Vital Projects and a description of events in terms of
businesses opening, expanding, contracting or closing in the region at the county level.

                               Economic Development Administration
                                        Vital Projects for
                                      Fiscal Year 2007-2008

                   (As Adopted by the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance
                                    Board of Directors)

1.     Humboldt Industrial Park - Northwest

       Project Sponsor – CAN DO, Inc.

       EDA Funds Requested - $1,000,000

       Total Project Cost - $3,950,000

       Project Description

       The proposed development project is to provide necessary on-site infrastructure to 450
       acres of mine-scarred and undeveloped land on a property known as Humboldt Industrial
       Park (HIP) - Northwest. The project will extend water, sanitary sewer and roadway
       infrastructure to the park. The project is being driven by market demand of prospective
       companies requesting large parcels of land.

       HIP - Northwest is unique as 109 acres of the site are currently mine-scarred. The
       Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Abandoned Mine
       Reclamation has contracted to back-fill the on-site pits to make suitable for pad-ready
       sites. This project is being driven by market demand of prospective companies requesting
       large parcels of land. The goal of the development is to provide the optimal development
       and location strategy to attract companies. Currently, the site has no infrastructure. With
       reclamation and design already underway in HIP - Northwest, CAN DO, Inc. contracted
       with the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance to complete an economic impact study to
       estimate the employment, revenue and tax outcomes to the community upon full build-
       out of the park. The report estimates that a total of 769 jobs will be created with $281
       million in business revenue which will contribute to an estimated $26 million in taxes.




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        2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



2.   World Class Synchronous Data Center

     Project Sponsor – Pocono Mountains Industries, Inc. a.k.a. Pocono Mountains
                       Economic Development Corporation (PMEDC)

     EDA Funds Requested - $800,000

     Total Project Cost - $4,720,000

     Project Description

     The intent of this project is to utilize the Wall Street West - Workforce Innovation in
     Regional Economic Development (WIRED) initiative as a competitive enhancement and
     construct a world class 60,000 square feet Synchronous Data Center in East Stroudsburg
     Borough. This building will be built in two (2) phases. Phase I will be 40,000 square feet
     and Phase II will be 20,000 square feet.

     This project will capitalize on Monroe County’s strategic location and ability to
     accommodate new and existing financial services in need of back-up data center services.
     This project will be a cooperative initiative between PMEDC and the East Stroudsburg
     University Center for Research and Economic Development. The project site is well
     within the 125 fiber mile criteria from Manhattan, is served by two (2) electric utilities
     and is also located within the Pocono Mountains Keystone Innovation Zone.

     The Data Center will allow businesses to store data locally in a secure environment and
     can provide critical infrastructure services to existing and new businesses.

     The outcome of this project will support the creation of approximately 125 jobs within 3-
     5 years and support the attraction/retention of 1,800 jobs.

3.   Workforce Development Training Center

     Project Sponsor – Northampton Community College (NCC)

     EDA Funds Requested - $1,200,000

     Total Project Cost - $3,000,000

     Project Description

     Northampton Community College’s Monroe Campus has experienced explosive growth
     in enrollment since it opened in 1988. To that end, NCC has met the challenge of
     purchasing a 71.2 acre piece of land in Tannersville to build a new campus. This will
     house traditional classroom and student services as well as a specialized center for
     workforce development.



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        2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



     The Workforce Development Training Center will initially focus on training the local
     workforce for positions in the financial services, allied health and tourism industries.
     Besides the traditional academic arena, NCC is also a significant training resource for
     area businesses and organizations. Over a four-year period, more than 500 Northeastern
     Pennsylvania employees have been served in technical fields such as computer training,
     AutoCAD, wastewater and water operator certification, construction and advanced
     manufacturing maintenance. In addition, another 100 employees received professional
     development and management training through workshops offered by NCC’s Leadership
     Development Institute.

     By addressing the workforce needs of businesses, the Workforce Development Training
     Center will assist companies looking to locate within the region and to help those already
     in the region to expand their capabilities and encourage them to remain. It is projected
     that 1,000 new, incumbent and displaced workers will be trained over the first five (5)
     year period.

4.   Packerton Business Park

     Project Sponsor – Carbon County Board of Commissioners

     EDA Funds Requested - $1,000,000

     Total Project Cost - $2,510,000

     Project Description

     The Carbon County Board of Commissioners is committed to improving the local
     economy by establishing new opportunities for economic growth through the
     redevelopment of brownfield sites, such as Packerton Yard. The site consists of
     approximately fifty-nine (59) acres that was formerly used as a rail yard. Thirteen (13)
     acres will be retained for open-space and recreational use.

     In order to redevelop the site, grant assistance is necessary for infrastructure including
     roadways, a sanitary sewer collection system, a water distribution system and a public
     gas distribution system.

     Economic diversification is needed in order to attract private investment from industry
     sectors that pay considerably higher wages. It is estimated that 368 new jobs will be
     established at the site with 217 indirect and induced jobs in the local economy. The
     estimated economic activity generated is $64,661,000.

5.   Luzerne County Community College, Health Sciences Building

     Project Sponsor – Luzerne County Community College

     EDA Funds Requested - $950,000


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



       Total Project Cost - $9,500,000

       Project Description

       With increased demand for well-trained health care professionals and limited and aging
       facilities, Luzerne County Community College (LCCC) is proposing the renovation of
       the Kanjorski Center in downtown Nanticoke for use as LCCC’s new Health Sciences
       building. The area has been experiencing substantial economic distress; however, with
       the renovation of this building and the financial impact from the significant number of
       students, faculty and staff attending classes and working in the downtown, the area will
       see rejuvenation.

       LCCC was approached by area hospitals and elected officials to increase the number and
       diversity of healthcare graduates and train them in new technologies. However, regional
       hospital consolidations have already started reducing the number of community training
       sites. LCCC must develop on-site simulation clinical training sites to continue to graduate
       high quality healthcare workers in the near future. By moving all of the health science
       programs into one building, classes can share labs to create synergies to increase the
       number of students served, increase the productivity of the college and save on training
       costs. This renovated building will increase the size of space by over 40 percent and will
       serve about 620 students in the Nursing Surgical Technology, Respiratory Technology,
       Emergency Medical Services, Dental Hygiene and Dental Assistance programs. LCCC
       will also be able to add several new programs including Physical Therapy Technology,
       Occupational Therapy Technology and Pharmacy Technology as well as being a central
       point for Wellness Programs in the community.

                            Multi-Year Listing of Regional Vital Projects

Sterling Business Park

Project Sponsor - Wayne Economic Development Corporation

Total Project Cost - $5,980,000

Project Description

The Sterling Business Park is a planned 252 acre development in Sterling Township off
Interstate 84. Economic Development Administration funds will be utilized for the infrastructure
that will serve this development project. It is the first major business park planned for Wayne
County. This site was chosen due to its accessible location at the intersection of SR 191, 196 and
304 and its very close proximity to an Interstate 84 interchange. Infrastructure includes a water
supply system, wastewater collection and treatment, highway improvements for an accessible
entrance, roads within the business park and storm-water drainage. Targeted business sectors for
the business park include manufacturing, warehousing and professional services. Direct, indirect
and induced jobs totaling 917 are projected to be established and nearly $95 million in increased



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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



economic activity is expected to be generated by Phase I development. Annual wages in targeted
business sectors average in excess of $34,000.

East Stroudsburg University Business Accelerator

Project Sponsor - East Stroudsburg University Center for Research and Economic Development

Total Project Cost - $3,654,500

Project Description

The Economic Development Administration (EDA) investment will be used for the construction
of a 23,000 square foot Computer Security Research Center that will house business accelerator
flex space, research and development facilities, the Center for Research and Economic
Development and anchor tenant flex space, including graduates of the Business Accelerator
Program. To date, the Business Accelerator Program has supported five (5) high-tech start-up
companies that have created over 80 new jobs in Monroe County.

This EDA Investment is expected to generate 200 new jobs with an average salary of $47,857.
The EDA investment will provide an environment conducive to the development of new
technology and technology transfer in fast-growing industry clusters including computer
security, biotechnology and information technology. The project builds on East Stroudsburg
University’s capacity to produce a computer security workforce through its first in the nation
Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Security. Plans include the establishment of a Keystone
Innovation Zone (KIZ).

Duryea Industrial Park

Project Sponsors – Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce / Luzerne County Redevelopment
Authority

Total Project Cost - $2,183,650

Project Description

Project entails the development of an 87 acre site in the Borough of Duryea. Project sponsors
have previously purchased the land. Infrastructure includes water, sanitary sewage collection, a
new highway intersection and an access road. The site is Keystone Opportunity Zone (KOZ)
designated. It is anticipated that the project will establish 400 new jobs in the
technology/manufacturing sector. It will also provide growth for the existing Luzerne County rail
system and its 2,000 rail dependent jobs. Also, this project enhances the existing technology
cluster that is approximate to this site. Total permanent economic activity is estimated at $64
million annually. The proposed investment would also result in the development of a former
strip-mined area. This site, which is an additional local contribution to this project, has a value of
$870,000.



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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Mount Pleasant Corporate Center

Project Sponsor – Scranton Lackawanna Industrial Building Company (SLIBCO)

Total Project Cost - $3,997,590

Project Description

This project entails providing infrastructure (including off-site highway improvements, site
grading and building demolition) for a site located at the gateway of the City of Scranton as an
extension of the Scranton Central Business District. The new use would reclaim 23 acres of
abandoned mine lands, which would provide an outstanding setting that would offer all of the
attributes of suburban development within the city limits. Conceptually, the site is conceived as a
combination of 156,000 square feet of Class “A” office space within a KOZ designated property
and 50,000 square feet of commercial/retail space. Seventeen of the twenty-three acres are KOZ
designated. The proposed subdivision of the parcel aims to maximize the use of land that would
be used for building construction, while addressing anticipated market demand.

SLIBCO has received a $175,000 Business in Our Sites Planning Grant for the master planning
and infrastructure design for this project. The master planning and preliminary engineering are
underway.

The proposed development envisions several compatible business activities including: 18,600
square feet of retail/commercial; a 2,000 square foot branch bank; 16,000 square feet of
professional offices; 156,000 square feet of Class “A” office space in three separate buildings
and a 10,000 square foot community service center.

South Washington Street Economic Development Parkade

Project Sponsor – City of Wilkes-Barre

Total Project Cost - $2,795,000

Project Description

The project involves the construction of 182 parking spaces of a 752-space parking garage that
will be part of the City of Wilkes-Barre’s new Intermodal Transportation Center which will be
located in the first block of South Washington Street. These parking spaces will be utilized, in
part, by the Innovation Center @ Wilkes-Barre. Additional parking demand will be created by
the new $30 million multi-use 14 screen theater/retail/residential/restaurant/entertainment
complex that was built by South Main Street Redevelopment, LLD. The additional parking will
provide a catalyst for private/public development initiatives as part of an ongoing program to
positively change downtown Wilkes-Barre. All in all, this project represents the capstone to the
largest amount of public/private investment, over $50 million, in the Central Business District of
Wilkes-Barre in 30 years including:



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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



   •   Wilkes-Barre Center - $4 million
   •   Innovation Center @ Wilkes-Barre - $6 million
   •   Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry - $8.4 million
   •   South Main Street Development - $30 million
   •   Inter-modal Transportation Center - $7.6 million

This parking facility is also needed to accommodate the 1,000+ new and retained jobs in the City
of Wilkes-Barre. This project is needed to support the renewed economic activity in the
downtown district which has been deteriorating over a considerable amount of time. Adequate
parking is vital to support the needs of existing businesses, fulfill prior commitments to
employers and support the needs expected to be generated by the increased activity in the
immediate project area.

Northeastern Pennsylvania Regional Enterprise Development Program

Project Sponsor – Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance (NEPA)

Total Project Cost - $851,064

Project Description

The objective of this regional Enterprise Development program is to provide value-added
services in support of business development resulting in increased investment and job creation or
retention. Major services that are components of this Enterprise Development program focus on
the following:

   •   Business Finance
   •   Market Development
   •   Community Economic Development Services
   •   Entrepreneurial Development

Projected program impacts include 242 active business clients and 16,000 jobs supported with
revenues of $4,029,699,387.

Junior Achievement (JA) BizTown

Project Sponsor – Junior Achievement of Northeastern Pennsylvania

Total Project Cost - $82,000

Project Description

Junior Achievement’s new experiential learning programs, JA BizTown and JA Finance Park,
help students develop an appreciation of the free enterprise system and the need for personal
budgets. JA BizTown is available to all fifth grade students throughout Junior Achievement’s


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



thirteen (13) county service area. Following a six-week, in-class curriculum taught by teachers,
students will visit JA BizTown to put into practice what they have learned through a hands-on
application of skills in banking, decision making and work ethic as they run the businesses
within a mini city for a day. Students will apply for a variety of jobs in the Center, learn about
start-up and operating costs associated with running a business and apply for a business loan.
The purpose of Junior Achievement is to educate and inspire young people to value free
enterprise, business and economics to improve the quality of their lives. Through participation in
Junior Achievements programs, students will enter adulthood with a deeper knowledge of
business and economics, and an understanding of personal finance and entrepreneurship.

When operating at full capacity, Junior Achievement expects to serve 2,500+ students with the
JA BizTown and JA Finance Park programs. Ten (10) new jobs are projected to be created
through the JA BizTown project.

Physical Therapist Assistant Certification Program

Project Sponsor – Lackawanna College

Total Project Cost - $313,674

Project Description

Lackawanna College proposes to establish a two (2) year Physical Therapist Assistant
Certification Program. Northeastern Pennsylvania has a documented need for health care
providers and health care professionals of diverse specialties. In spring 2007, a survey conducted
by the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce identified thirty-one (31) health care providers
in Northeastern Pennsylvania with a need for at least thirty-six (36) certified physical therapist
assistants throughout the next three (3) years. As no local post-secondary educational institution
offers a physical therapist assistant training program, Lackawanna College’s proposed program
will fill this workforce need.

Certification in the Physical Therapist Assistant Program will require the successful completion
of 70 credits and will result in an Associate Degree in Applied Science. The curriculum will
include a significant amount of clinical work, which will be conducted in collaboration with
local healthcare providers, including Allied Services and other partners. Classroom instruction
will occur on Lackawanna College’s main campus in Scranton. The first 15 member class is
expected to enter the program in fall 2008 and graduate in spring 2010. The average median
salary for physical therapist assistants is $26,000 and is expected to rise. The project anticipates a
job placement rate near 100 percent for the students completing the program.

Nursing Learning Resource Laboratory Equipment Upgrade

Project Sponsor – Misericordia University

Total Project Cost - $80,000



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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Project Description

Misericordia University is a liberal arts based co-educational college with a long-standing
tradition of teaching and research in the health sciences. The Nursing Program is positioning
itself to respond to the critical need for nurses by improving its on-campus nursing learning
resource laboratory and equipping it with leading-edge technology.
Since 2000, enrollment in the traditional day program has more than tripled. However, due to
space and technology restrictions, enrollment in the Nursing Program has been limited. The
project request is to purchase a Lateral Simian, which is a portable and advanced patient
simulator for team training. It has realistic anatomy and clinical functionality. The Lateral
Simian enables the program to provide simulation based on education to challenge and test
students’ clinical and decision making skills during realistic patient care scenarios. The Lateral
Simian can also be used by students in other areas of the Health Sciences programs (i.e., Physical
Therapy, Occupational Therapy, etc.).

The output of this project is that 150 students per semester will receive training on state-of-the-
art equipment. The projected placement of nursing graduates is 98 percent and the average
starting salary is approximately $35,000 to $40,000.

Rural Manufacturer Assistance Program

Project Sponsor – Northeastern Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center, Inc. (NEPIRC)

Total Project Cost - $120,000

Project Description

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center, Inc. is seeking $50,000 of
Appalachian Regional Commission funds to provide technical assistance in the areas of process
improvement, workforce development and business growth services to small to mid-sized
manufacturers located within the rural counties of the Northeast and the Northern Tier regions of
Pennsylvania. These funds will be matched by $70,000 of service recipient and/or NEPIRC
internal funds, resulting in a total project value of $120,000.

The requested funds will avail small and emerging rural manufacturers to technical services in
the fields of Lean Manufacturing, Six Sigma, ISO 9000, TS 16949, ISO 14000, Process
Engineering and Statistical Process Control. Participating companies will receive valuable
workforce training opportunities in areas such as CNC machining, PLC technology, supervisory
and management skill development in industrial mathematics. This grant will also facilitate rural
manufacturer business expansion by making new product development assistance, new market
identification assistance, strategic planning services and other business growth initiatives easier
to access and much more affordable. Firms with fewer than 100 employees and with less than $2
million in gross revenue will be specifically targeted for assistance.

It is estimated that forty-eight (48) businesses would receive assistance through this grant with
ninety-six (96) jobs created/retained and an increase of $4,800,000 in increased revenue.


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Pike County Fire/Emergency Training Facility Apparatus

Project Sponsor – Pike County

Total Project Cost - $800,000

Project Description

The County of Pike and the Pike County Fire Federation proposes to acquire fire/emergency
training apparatus that will be utilized in the proposed Pike County Fire/Emergency Training
Facility. The facility will be located on over eight (8) acres of land owned by the county. The
facility and apparatus will be utilized to train the sixteen (16) volunteer fire departments,
numerous emergency volunteers and local law enforcement personnel that are located throughout
Pike County.

Pike County’s regional fire and emergency first responders are 100 percent volunteer based. The
growth that the county has experienced and the required ongoing training needs produce
enormous strains on the ability of the volunteers to continue their valued service. The proposed
facility and equipment will provide the needed training apparatus that will ultimately enhance the
community’s well-being through better fire and emergency protection and prevention services.
Pike County’s fire and emergency departments currently have approximately 500 volunteers.

Artspace/Scranton Community Housing

Project Sponsor – Scranton Tomorrow

Total Project Cost - $100,000

Project Description

Scranton Tomorrow has negotiated a contract with Artspace Projects, Inc. to develop, market,
own and manage thirty-five (35) units of affordable, low-to-moderate income residential units
for artists. Each unit will include a studio as well as living space.

The project will revitalize Scranton’s community and complement on-going projects. The project
will be based out of a portion of the old Scranton Lace building. It will help to increase
pedestrian traffic in Scranton during both days and evenings and increase the lucrative
cultural/heritage tourist market which will consequently boost spending in the Scranton area.

Requested funds will be utilized for operating expenses associated with this project. As the lead
organization’s project manager, Scranton Tomorrow is responsible for various tasks including
management, fundraising, advertising, media relations, serving as liaison to the Mayor’s and
Governor’s Offices, reporting, scheduling and conducting all API meetings with Stakeholders,
grant development and administration, housing market analysis, Web development, legal and
accounting expenses, management of nonbinding artist interest list and development of an
evaluation model to measure the project’s long-term affect on Scranton.


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                 Economic Development Activities by County

The sources for the information below are indicated in parentheses.

Carbon County

The major planned development project in Carbon County is the Packerton Business Park
located in Lehighton Borough and Mahoning Township. Progress continues to be made on this
proposed development as several structures were demolished (Carbon County Economic
Development Office).

Two new hotels are being proposed for 2008, one in Kidder Township and the other in Jim
Thorpe Borough (Carbon County Economic Development Office).

In Mahoning Township on SR 443, there is proposed a Lowe’s Home Improvement Center, a
new Wal-Mart Super Center and a branch of the Mauch Chunk Bank. There will also be an
expansion at the current location of the Giant Food Store there (Carbon County Economic
Development Office).

All Staffing, Inc., a provider of human resources services, was purchased by a San Diego,
California company, Dalrada Financial, who will be transferring all of their payroll and data
processing to Lansford (Carbon County Economic Development Office).

Hydra-Tech, a company that employs 5 to 10 people, relocated to Carbon County in August
2007 (Carbon County Economic Development Office).

Architectural Polymers, Inc. expanded their facility by 5,000 sq. ft. and increased their
employment from 14 to 22 (Carbon County Economic Development Office).

Prince Agri Products, Inc. closed in mid-August 2006. Eleven people lost their jobs (“Lehighton
Times-News”).

There are planned to be 100 jobs at the Indoor Water Park at Split Rock Resort once it is
completed during the third quarter of 2008 (Carbon County Economic Development Office and
Split Rock Resort).

Lackawanna County

A $15 million emergency services building and 911 communications center has been constructed
in the Valley View Business Park (Scranton Plan News).

St. Peter’s Square is a development in downtown Scranton that is stated for a mix of 100 high-
end condominiums and assorted shops (Scranton Times-Tribune).




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



The Connell Building in downtown Scranton is scheduled to be refurbished into 80 apartments
along with creating office and retail space on the first and second floors (Scranton Times-
Tribune).

The 500 block of Lackawanna Avenue in downtown Scranton is scheduled for construction of a
new building, the reconstruction of several building’s facing and the building of restaurants,
boutiques, loft apartments and offices (Scranton Times-Tribune).

In October 2006, Sears Holdings Corporation announced that 200 jobs will be coming to a leased
1.0 million square foot facility in the Covington Industrial Park (Scranton Times-Tribune and
Penn’s Northeast Synergy).

VersaCold, a warehouse and distribution service that specializes in cold-stored products, opened
its doors on November 1, 2006, adding 250 jobs at the Covington Industrial Park (Scranton
Times-Tribune).

Lackawanna County sold the Montage Ski Area to a firm from Philadelphia, who renamed the
area Sno Mountain. In November 2006, Sno Mountain, LLC, planned on hiring 450 new
employees with possibly 200 of them to be hired as year-round employees (The Citizens’ Voice).

In August 2006, Cigna Health Care hired 155 new, full-time customer service representatives
and claims processors for its office located in Scranton (The Times Leader).

The Commonwealth Medical College, which will be based in Scranton, will enroll
approximately 90 students per year starting in September 2009. Once there are four classes
present, 360 total students are expected. According to a report by Tripp Umbach, there will be
123 faculty slots at the college. The college would stimulate $46 million in spending annually,
which would help create 550 high-paying region jobs by 2015. Ten years later, there would be an
economic impact of $54 million and 900 local jobs (The Citizens’ Voice).

In March 2007, The Shoppes at Montage in Moosic opened with approximately 50 retail shops
and restaurants in a combined 300,000 square foot complex (The Sunday Voice).

In March 2007, McLane Company, Inc., the nation’s leading wholesale distributor of food and
consumer packaged goods, announced that they would be opening a regional distribution center
in the Valley View Business Park in Jessup. The $53 million facility is expected to be 420,000
square feet and in early 2008, 200 people are expected to be employed there. By 2009, there
could be 500 people employed at the facility (Scranton Times-Tribune and Scranton Plan News).

In May 2007, one of the local television stations, WNEP, was sold. Prior to the sale, a few
people were laid off (The Times Leader).

The Mount Pleasant Corporate Center received funding in the amount of $1 million. EDA
provided funding towards this project (Scranton Plan News).




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



As a result of the Wall Street West initiative, Secure Electronic Communication Compliance
Archival System (SECCAS) LLC, a provider of hosted compliance solutions for financial
service companies, announced that they will be opening a secondary data operations center in the
Metro Tech Center in downtown Scranton. The 2,000 square foot facility will initially have
between five and seven jobs (Wall Street West Electronic Newsletter). The facility will house
corporate electronic communications for the company’s litigation readiness unit (Penn’s
Northeast Synergy). EDA provided funding towards this project.

In April 2007, McKinney Products Co., a manufacturer of commercial door hinges, announced
that their manufacturing facility will be closing. On June 15, 182 employees will be terminated
(The Sunday Voice and PA Department of Labor and Industry WARN Notice).

The Jessup Small Business Center will have a new tenant this fall. Northeastern Laminated Glass
Corporation, a manufacturer of laminated safety glass, will be leasing 52,000 square feet in one
of the buildings. There are plans to employ 50 full-time workers and the company is anticipating
a September 2007 opening (Penn’s Northeast Synergy).

Cinram Distribution, LLC, a company in Olyphant that distributes DVDs and CDs, announced
that 28 employees will be losing their jobs on February 27 as a result of its plant closing (PA
Department of Labor and Industry WARN Notice).

Cinram Manufacturing, LLC, a company in Olyphant that manufactures DVDs and CDs,
announced that 328 employees will be laid off on February 27, with the possibility of rehire (PA
Department of Labor and Industry WARN Notice).

Effective January 26, 2007, Robison Anton Textile Company (a.k.a. RA Manufacturing, Inc.)
closed their Twisting and Winding facility in Clarks Summit, eliminating 80 jobs in the process.
The facility was built in 1990 (PA Department of Labor and Industry WARN Notice and
Robison Anton Textile Company Web site).

Geisinger Health System has opened a customer service/financial services center in an existing
building at the Glenmaura Corporate Center. The number of employees at the facility will be
375. Part of the building will house a customer call center for scheduling appointments for
patients and the larger portion of the building will be a financial service center that will handle
billing, collections and insurance claims (Scranton Plan News).

BAX Global, Inc., one of the world’s largest third party logistics companies, will be leasing a
64,750 square foot distribution center in the Jessup Small Business Center. There will be 40
people employed at the site (Scranton Plan News).

Circuit City, an electronics retailer that is based in Richmond, Va., will be relocating two
warehousing and distribution centers to a single facility in the Covington Industrial Park, in
Covington Township. The facility will have 320 employees, some will be new hires and others
will be employees who have relocated from the two distribution centers that will be closed. The
cost of the 1,028,000 square foot leased facility is expected to be approximately $45 million and
is slated for opening in late-2008 (Scranton Times-Tribune).


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Keystone Community Resources, a social service agency that provides services to people with
developmental disabilities, leased a 17,000 square foot portion of a building in the Abington
Executive Park. There were 70 jobs relocated to the new facility (The Greater Scranton Chamber
of Commerce).

Fromm Electric Supply, an electrical material and equipment distributor, purchased a facility in
Scranton to establish an electrical distribution center. This 22,500 square foot facility will
provide 15 new jobs and was financed through the City of Scranton and the Northeastern
Pennsylvania Alliance (Fromm Electric Supply Web site and The Greater Scranton Chamber of
Commerce).

TMR, Inc., a New Jersey market research firm, leased 25,800 square feet of office space within
the Stafford Avenue Business Park. There will be 100 new jobs located within the office space
(The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce).

To establish a machine shop, Hooke Machine Company purchased a facility in Archbald. There
are expected to be 30 new jobs at the facility (The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce).

Luzerne County

Hazleton Area

On August 21, 2006, an 80-room Holiday Inn Express opened at the CAN DO, Inc. Corporate
Center in Drums. Its location has proved helpful for companies within the CAN DO Corporate
Center and travelers on Interstate 80 (CAN DO).

On August 30, 2006, ground was broken for the first speculative building in Humboldt Industrial
Park East. Equilibrium Equities of Conshohocken is the developer of the 240,000 square foot
building (CAN DO).

Coca-Cola North America Co. purchased 163 acres in Humboldt Industrial Park North for a
future non-carbonated beverage facility (CAN DO).

Archer Daniels Midland Company chose a site in Humboldt Industrial Park North for their
newest 500,000 square foot cocoa processing facility which should be operational by mid-2008
(CAN DO).

State Route 924 is currently being widened from two to five lanes at the entrance to Humboldt
Industrial Park in order to improve the elevated ingress and egress traffic congestion between
Interstate 81 and the industrial park (CAN DO).

Humboldt East will be the home to Humboldt Station, a 28-acre commercial area that will host a
complex of hotels, restaurants and gas/convenience stores. Ground was broken in May 2007 for
the first project there, a 92-room Residence Inn by Marriott, which is expected to open in April
2008 (CAN DO).



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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Mericle Commercial Real Estate Services completed construction of a 501,600 square foot
facility in Humboldt Industrial Park and is currently constructing a 400,000 square foot facility
in Humboldt Industrial Park Northwest. Both Facilities can accommodate either
warehouse/distribution or manufacturing firms (CAN DO).

Higgins Development Partners completed a 400,260 square foot manufacturing or distribution
facility in Humboldt Industrial Park West during spring 2007 (CAN DO).

In Humboldt Industrial Park North, U.S. Cold Storage has announced that they will build a
frozen food warehouse and distribution facility there. Also, Vita Line, Inc. will locate a pet food
processing plant at a site there that has rail access; and an unnamed firm (Project Pioneer)
purchased 61.33 acres for a distribution center that has begun construction in September 2007
(CAN DO).

On July 27, 2007, Truth Hardware, a facility where hinges, locks and operators of windows and
doors are manufactured, closed its plant in West Hazleton, eliminating 80 jobs (PA Department
of Labor and Industry WARN Notice).

George Weston Bakeries has reopened its former Boboli plant in Humboldt Industrial Park and
will produce Entenmann’s cakes and pastries there (CAN DO).

Wilkes-Barre Area

In July 2006, Sealy announced that they will open a 210,000 square foot mattress manufacturing
facility in the Crestwood Industrial Park. According to The Citizens’ Voice, “the company will
hire more than 100 people over the next three years.” According to The Times Leader, “this is a
$30 million investment and the average annual salary is $33,000.”

In December 2006, PepsiCo announced that a 500,000 square foot distribution center for its
Gatorade and Propel product lines will be constructed in an area that is located adjacent to
PepsiCo’s existing 450,000 square foot manufacturing facility in the Crestwood Industrial Park.
There will be an estimated 110 jobs created and an estimated 200 jobs retained over a three-year
period (Northeastern Pennsylvania Business Journal).

In 2006, American Steel, Inc., a manufacturer of steel carports, opened a new manufacturing
facility in Wilkes-Barre, creating 45 jobs (The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and
Industry).

In 2006, Itoh Denki USA, a manufacturer of motorized conveyor rollers & drums, expanded its
manufacturing and distribution facility in the Hanover Industrial Estates near Wilkes-Barre. This
project created 20 new jobs and retained 15 (The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and
Industry).

In August 2006, Pepperjam, a Wilkes-Barre-based full-service Internet marketing agency, was
named to the 2006 Inc. 500. The Inc. 500, published annually by Inc. Magazine, represents a list
of the fastest growing privately held businesses in the United States. Pepperjam was ranked No.


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



293, with a three-year revenue growth of nearly 500 percent, making them the most successful
full-service Internet marketing firm on the list. Pepperjam, founded in 1999 with 2 employees,
and one of the first tenants in the Innovation Center @ Wilkes-Barre, now employs over 85 in its
Downtown Wilkes-Barre offices (The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry).

In September 2006, Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs hired between 350 and 400 jobs for its new
casino, the first in the state. Mohegan’s 90,000 square foot temporary casino facility in Plains
Township opened in November 2006. The investment in this Phase I project was approximately
$72.6 million (The Times Leader).

During summer 2007, there was a layoff of 51 workers at the former Commonwealth Telephone
Enterprises, Inc. offices in Wilkes-Barre and Dallas. The company is now owned by Citizens
Communications Co. and operates in Pennsylvania as Frontier Communications Solutions (The
Times Leader and PA Department of Labor and Industry WARN Notice).

In April 2007, RCN Corporation, a cable television, high-speed Internet and telephone service
provider that is based in Herndon, Va., announced that 292 employees at its call center in Plains
Township will be losing their jobs, starting in June 2007 (Scranton Times-Tribune and PA
Department of Labor and Industry WARN Notice).

In June 2006, the $32 million Northampton & Main project, anchored by a 14-screen R/C
Theatres multiplex cinema, opened its doors in the heart of Downtown Wilkes-Barre.
Northampton & Main is an urban mixed-use infill development encompassing the 14-screen
multiplex, approximately 30,000 square feet of commercial space, and over 20 residential loft
units in a mix of new construction and historic buildings, along with streetscape and
infrastructure improvements and 85 parking spaces under the theater. The multiplex welcomed
over 540,000 patrons during its first 12 months of operation, and 12 new businesses came
downtown (The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry).

In November 2006, a new 18,000 square foot Barnes and Noble Wilkes/King’s Bookstore
opened in Downtown Wilkes-Barre. This novel partnership resulted from the decision by Wilkes
University and King’s College to combine their separate campus bookstores into a single large
downtown bookstore that would serve as a new anchor downtown retailer. The new Barnes &
Noble occupies the ground floor of a former Woolworth’s five-and-dime that the Chamber had
previously rehabilitated into a technology incubator – the Innovation Center @ Wilkes-Barre
(The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry).

Construction on the redesigned River Common, the historic 25-acre park on the banks of the
Susquehanna River in Downtown Wilkes-Barre, commenced with a groundbreaking in October
2006. This $30 million project, undertaken as part of the recently completed project to raise the
Wyoming Valley levee system by five feet, involves the construction of two 60-foot wide portals
– one at Northampton Street and the second opposite the historic Irem Temple – that will be cut
through the levee. In addition, a 750-seat amphitheater and stage, a 1.2-acre “landing” capable of
hosting up to 5,000 people, and a fishing pier will all be constructed on the riverside of the levee.
The new River Common will feature a 4,000-foot long promenade atop the levee, with benches,
signage, lighting and landscaping; and a new formal garden. In addition, other plans are under


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



way to calm traffic along River Street adjacent to the project (The Greater Wilkes-Barre
Chamber of Business and Industry).

Refurbishing of Downtown Wilkes-Barre’s historic Hotel Sterling continued in 2006 with
selective demolition and environmental cleanup, including the demolition of a 14-story tower
addition. Once the jewel of early 20th century Wilkes-Barre, the Hotel Sterling fell into disrepair
and was condemned in 1998. In 2001, Preservation Pennsylvania included the Sterling on its list
of "at-risk" historically significant sites. The non-profit organization CityVest purchased the
property in 2002, initiating a plan to transform the original 1897 hotel into approximately 40
residential condominiums, together with commercial space on the first two floors. In the coming
months, construction costs and financing will be finalized, and construction contracts will be put
out to bid and awarded (The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry).

During 2006, Wilkes University began planning for a new law school – the first in Northeastern
Pennsylvania. The projected timeline included faculty approvals during 2007, after which time
the University would hire a dean, complete final planning and approvals during 2008, and – if
the University’s Board of Trustees concurs – start operations in September 2009. The school will
have a three-year program, with an anticipated enrollment of 75 students per class (The Greater
Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry).

January 2006 marked the creation of the Northeast PA Logistics & Transportation Industry
Partnership. The Partnership’s goal is to align economic and workforce development programs to
meet the skill needs of logistics and transportation industry companies; the career goals of
workers; and to attract and retain quality employers in this locally important industry cluster. It
conducted a Training Needs Assessment and an Industry Analysis, developed a Career Pathways
Model, and designed an industry-specific Web site. During 2006, the Partnership awarded
$500,000 in training grants to 46 job projects, with over 1,300 workers trained to date (The
Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry).

In July 2006, the Ashley Rail Yards project received a $175,000 Business in Our Sites grant
from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for an environmental study (The Times Leader).

Pittston Area

In July 2006, the Duryea Industrial Park received a $750,000 grant from the Economic
Development Administration and a $200,000 grant from the Appalachian Regional Commission
for use in developing the park (The Times Leader).

Men’s Wearhouse, a retail men’s clothing and tuxedo rental firm, has started operating a dry
cleaning, distribution and tailoring facility at the new CenterPoint Commerce and Trade Park in
Jenkins Township. Employment at the 297,600 square foot facility is 217 jobs (Scranton Times-
Tribune, Penn’s Northeast Synergy and Mericle Commercial Real Estate Services).

Lyon, Conklin and Co., Inc., a wholesale distributor of heating and air conditioning equipment,
has started operations in a 30,000 square foot portion of a 128,000 square foot flex building at
the new CenterPoint Commerce and Trade Park in Jenkins Township. An estimated 10 people


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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



will be employed by the facility (The Sunday Voice and Mericle Commercial Real Estate
Services).

Lowe’s Companies, Inc., a retail chain of home improvement stores, has announced that they
will be occupying an approximately 1.6 million square foot distribution center in the new
CenterPoint Commerce and Trade Park in Jenkins Township (The Times Leader).

FedEx Ground Package Systems has begun operations in an 88,000 square foot distribution
terminal at the new CenterPoint Commerce and Trade Park in Jenkins Township. Over 100 jobs
have been created (The Times Leader and Mericle Commercial Real Estate Services).

George Weston Bakeries has opened a 144,000 square foot distribution center for its
Entenmann’s line of products at the CenterPoint Commerce and Trade Park in Jenkins
Township. There are 50 jobs at the facility (Mericle Commercial Real Estate Services).

CLARCOR Air Filtration Products, a manufacturer and vendor of air filtration products and
systems, is leasing approximately 250,000 square feet of the former Sathers Candy Company
building in Pittston. Once the facility is operating to its maximum potential, the company expects
that 100 people will be employed there (Penn’s Northeast Synergy).

Monroe County

The Penn Regional Business Center, a proposed 280,000 square foot office park, will serve as
one of the facilities for backup information for Wall Street. This is made possible by a fiber line
that will be laid between Wall Street and the site, which is located in eastern Monroe County,
near Interstate 80. Lawrence T. Simon, a private developer, is the developer of the office park.
There are projected to be 1,300 new jobs at the facility. Occupancy is expected to occur during
the second quarter of 2008 (Scranton Times-Tribune and Pocono Mountains Insite – Publication
by the Pocono Mountains Economic Development Corporation).

Wall Street West is an initiative that provides workforce development assistance to firms who
would open offices in the Northeastern Pennsylvania region. These firms would primarily be in
the financial services industry. Firms could locate to Berks, Carbon, Lackawanna, Lehigh,
Luzerne, Monroe, Northampton, Pike and Wayne counties (Scranton Times-Tribune).

In June 2007, an announcement was made that Level 3 Communications was selected to be the
contractor to install a high-speed fiber-optic line connecting eastern Pennsylvania with New
York City’s financial district. The initial terminals in eastern Pennsylvania will be in Easton and
East Stroudsburg. This announcement is as a result of Wall Street West and the Workforce
Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) grant (Scranton Times-Tribune and
Wall Street West Electronic Newsletter).

Pocono Ecoindustrial Park, Inc. will operate a manufacturing facility that processes recyclable
material in a 40,000 square foot building at Pocono Mountains Corporate Center South. There
will be 50 new jobs at the facility and there will also be an incubator for businesses that use



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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



recycled materials in their manufacturing processes (Pocono Mountains Insite – Publication by
the Pocono Mountains Economic Development Corporation).

Weiler Corporation, a leading manufacturer of power brushes for the welding, fabrication and
manufacturing industries, is adding 25,000 square feet of office space and 16,000 square feet to
its distribution center in Cresco (Pocono Mountains Insite – Publication by the Pocono
Mountains Economic Development Corporation).

The opening of the Johnson & Johnson Sales and Logistics Co., LLC facility, as the first tenant
in the Arcadia North Business Park in Coolbaugh Township, will bring approximately 700
warehousing jobs once the 1.38 million square foot warehousing and distribution facility is
completed sometime in fall 2007. The workers will process Johnson & Johnson’s consumer and
personal care products (The Sunday Voice and Penn’s Northeast Synergy).

Mount Airy Resort and Casino announced in February that there are over 1,000 jobs available at
their facility in Paradise Township. In the first phase, there will be a 200-room luxury hotel with
2,500 slot machines, four restaurants, two live entertainment lounges, an 18-hole golf course and
retail shopping. In 2008, the facility will be expanded by an additional 200 hotel rooms, 500
additional slot machines and additional retail. The maximum number of employees is expected to
be over 1,400 (The Sunday Voice). The facility is scheduled to be opened in October (Pocono
Record).

Pike County

Clarion Safety System, formerly known as Hazard Communication Systems, a safety label
producer for companies worldwide, opened a new production facility behind its headquarters in
Milford. Clarion employs 46 people and plans to have 92 employees within the next three years
(Penn’s Northeast Synergy).

Altec Lansing, a manufacturer of high quality consumer and professional speaker systems, added
an 80,000 square foot warehouse to its existing 70,000 square foot facility in Milford. The new
warehouse will serve as storage and distribution for the company's broad variety of speaker
systems and audio products. There are 133 employed at its Milford-based global headquarters
(Pike County Industrial & Commercial Development Authority).

Pike County Industrial & Commercial Development Authority closed a $3 million tax free loan
with Camp Speers Eljabar YMCA in July 2007. This loan converted a construction loan for a
new dining hall which will allow the YMCA to conduct programming year round in its
Dingmans Ferry location (Pike County Industrial & Commercial Development Authority).

A marketing plan for the Pike County Business Park, which is located in Blooming Grove
Township, was completed in December 2006. It, along with the Sterling Business Park in Wayne
County, is listed in a marketing publication about business parks located along Interstate 84, one
of the gateways to New England (Pike County Industrial & Commercial Development
Authority).



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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



Loral Skynet is undergoing a merger with Telesat Canada and as a result is closing its Pike
County satellite earth station. All 45 employees will be furloughed by July 1, 2008. Also closing
was Smith Barney, closing its Pike County branch office in 2007 (Pike County Industrial &
Commercial Development Authority).

Schuylkill County

Ground was broken for a new Sara Lee Food & Beverage Distribution Center in the Highridge
Business Park in Cass Township. The 182,000 square foot facility will employ 120 people when
it is fully operational. The project is scheduled for completion in October 2007 (Schuylkill Jobs
& Growth – Schuylkill Economic Development Corporation Newsletter).

JELD-WEN, Inc., a manufacturer of doors and windows, will open a 250,000 square foot facility
in the Highridge Business Park. Interior and exterior doors and pre-hung door assemblies will be
manufactured there. Within 36 months of completion, there will be at least 300 employees at the
facility (Schuylkill Jobs & Growth – Schuylkill Economic Development Corporation
Newsletter).

By the end of 2007, Highwood-USA, a manufacturer of synthetic wood products, plans on
expanding the size of their plant by 38,000 square feet in the Tidewood East Industrial Park and
create approximately 25 additional jobs. The company was hoping to attract at least ten new
employees during a job fair that was held on October 5, 2006 (Schuylkill Jobs & Growth –
Schuylkill Economic Development Corporation Newsletter).

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. completed a 900,000 square foot distribution center at Highridge North.
Approximately 700 people are employed at the facility, where dry goods and perishables are
cold-stored (Schuylkill Jobs & Growth – Schuylkill Economic Development Corporation
Newsletter).

Solar Innovations, Inc., a solar enclosures manufacturer, is planning a relocation of their
operation to an $8.6 million, 200,000 square foot manufacturing facility in the Pine Grove
Industrial Park from Myerstown, Lebanon County. The company is relocating because they have
outgrown their existing facility. The company will increase their production capacity and create
new jobs in addition to their existing 88 jobs. Spring 2008 is the anticipated completion date
(Schuylkill Jobs & Growth – Schuylkill Economic Development Corporation Newsletter and The
Republican & Herald).

Green Renewable Energy Ethanol and Nutrition Holding, LLC (GREEN) will be constructing a
$300 million ethanol plant on 300 acres in Tremont. The first phase, which is the terminal, will
be used for shipping mid-western ethanol to various locations in the northeastern United States.
The first shipment could arrive by early- to mid-2008. The second phase, which is the ethanol
production facility, is slated to be operational in late 2008 or early 2009. This facility is expected
to produce 100 million gallons of ethanol annually. Once the facility is operational,
approximately 200 people will be employed there (Lancaster Farming Web site).




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



A coal gasification plant that will convert coal waste to diesel fuel is slated for construction in
Gilberton. According to officials at Waste Management & Processors, Inc. (WMPI), they are
hoping to open the facility in the not too distant future. The facility is expected to create 1,000
construction jobs and 600 permanent jobs (Ultra Clean Fuels Web site and The Republican &
Herald).

West Side Building Products, Inc. has announced that they will have constructed six buildings
which total 57,600 square feet in the Auburn Business Park on 10.7 acres. A sales growth
projection of 50 percent will become possible as a result of this relocation and employment at the
facility is expected to increase from 15 to 27. Ground was broken in mid-April 2007 and
completion is expected to be by early-September 2007 (Schuylkill Economic Development
Corporation and Schuylkill County Economic Development Office).

Wayne County

Following PA Department of Environmental Protection’s approval of the sewage planning
module in April, the Wayne Economic Development Corporation (WEDCO) submitted an
application for the design of the wastewater treatment plant at the Sterling Business Park.
WEDCO has also applied for effluent level and construction permits for the wastewater
treatment plant. Additionally, WEDCO is working on the park’s water system. Hydrologists
completed 8-hour and 24-hour pump tests on a test well previously drilled by WEDCO and
performed water quality tests. WEDCO has also submitted extensive engineering work in
support of their application to PennDOT for a Highway Occupancy Permit, and is developing the
technology plan for the park with regional electric and telecom providers (Wayne Economic
Development Corporation).

The Stourbridge Rail Line, which is used for both the transporting of goods from Honesdale to
Lackawaxen and as a tourist attraction, was severely damaged during the April 2005 and June
2006 flood events. Wayne Industrial Development Authority (WIDA), which owns a damaged
rail trestle near Hawley, received an $880,000 Infrastructure Development Program grant from
the PA Department of Community and Economic Development for repair of the trestle. WIDA
has also received approval for funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency; this
funding will supplement the Commonwealth’s grant and enable the trestle to be fully restored.
Wash-outs along the rail line have also been repaired. Operation of the rail line is vital to the
Ideal Steel Supply project, which is expected to create 65 jobs at a KOEZ site located in White
Mills, Pennsylvania (Wayne Economic Development Corporation).

Ideal Steel Supply Corp. from New York City is moving forward with their plans to develop a
steel distribution facility at Palmyra Business Park in White Mills. Representatives from the
company have met with township officials and engineering work has begun at the site (Wayne
Economic Development Corporation).




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           2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                                  CHAPTER 6

 COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY PLAN OF ACTION

The following plan of action will help implement the goals and objectives of the CEDS:

   •   Promotes Economic Development and Opportunity

       •   Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance (NEPA) Business Finance Center

                o Provides affordable capital for business development and expansion
                  opportunities that attract investment resulting in employment
                  creation/retention or self-employment.

       •   Market Development Programs

       •   Government Procurement Assistance

                o Enhance the competitiveness of businesses in securing government contracts
                  or sub-contracts through comprehensive outreach and technical assistance
                  services.

       •   Export Marketing Assistance

               o Provide comprehensive outreach, technical and marketing assistance to
                 businesses in order for them to expand their existing international markets
                 and/or enter into new international markets.

       •   Information Services

               o Provide demographic and statistical data to policy and decision makers, which
                 is essential for significant investment in redevelopment and development
                 projects.

       •   Project Development

               o Provide assistance to various community economic development
                 organizations in applying for financial assistance for projects that will attract
                 investment and consequently result in new jobs in area communities.

       •   Strategic Partnering

               o NEPA is an engaged partner in various initiatives that promote economic
                 growth in the region. Examples includes Penn’s Northeast, Wall Street West



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        2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                 (Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development - WIRED), and
                 the Tobyhanna Army Depot Blue Ribbon Task Force.

    •   Entrepreneurial Network

            o This activity supports entrepreneurs and small businesses through service-
              provider networks delivered through PA BizHelp, a 24/7 interactive Web site
              of virtual offices that matches seasoned professionals with clients to deliver
              various services.

•   Fosters Effective Transportation Access

    •   Rural Transportation Planning

            o Assesses the transportation needs of five (5) rural counties within the NEPA
              service area. Through the Transportation Improvement Program, projects are
              identified and advanced for funding to provide for the restoration and
              development of an inter-modal transportation infrastructure, which supports
              economic development by creating a safe and more efficient travel
              environment for the movement of people and goods.

    •   Focus I-81 Committee

            o The Focus 81 Committee was convened in order to address overall safety and
              congestion issues along Interstate 81. The Focus 81 committee addresses
              short-, mid- and long-term initiatives to improve safety and reduce congestion
              along Interstate 81in a targeted corridor stretching from Nanticoke in Luzerne
              County to Waverly in Lackawanna County. The Focus 81 Committee
              identifies and promotes actions for the improvement of this corridor,
              considered essential to sustaining the flow of both regional and interstate
              commerce, population movement and the overall economic vitality of the
              region.

    •   Coordinate with Metropolitan Planning Organizations

            o NEPA, as the Rural Planning Organization (RPO), has struck Memorandum
              of Understanding Agreements with the adjoining Lackawanna/Luzerne
              Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and the Lehigh Valley MPO to
              better coordinate transportation planning and programming responsibilities
              and promote regionally significant highway, aviation and rail projects.

•   Enhances and Protects the Environment

    •   Seminars & Workshops




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       2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



           o NEPA routinely conducts seminars / workshops on various topics relating to
             the environment including EPA/DEP Regulatory Compliance, PEMA/FEMA
             grant programs etc.

       •   Partnerships with Environmental Related Organizations

           o NEPA co-sponsors the Environmental Partnerships Award Program with the
             Pennsylvania Environmental Council-Northeast Chapter.

       •   Project Development

           o NEPA, at times, is involved in land reuse or redevelopment projects (i.e.
             brownfields; grayfields) that promote community economic development
             benefits in terms of new investment and resulting jobs. In these activities,
             NEPA typically provides project development assistance in researching and
             preparing proposals for state/federal assistance.

•   Maximizes Effective Development and Use of the Workforce Consistent with Any
    Applicable Local Workforce Development Strategy

           o The NEPA Workforce Development Program is intended to meet the needs of
             regional employers and enhance competitive position in an ever changing
             economy by utilizing workforce capacity as a regional asset to attract high-
             skill, high-wage businesses to locate, expand or start operations in the region.
             Appropriate workforce skills have been identified by numerous employers as
             a regional priority.

           o Increasingly sustainable economic development relies heavily on the quality
             of the regional workforce. The plan of action includes:

                     Provide project management service for various industry partnerships
                     Promote the integration of regional workforce development activities with
                     Workforce Investment Boards; PA Career Link Centers and
                     local/county/regional economic development organizations, as
                     appropriate.
                     Integrate various initiatives that align training and education programs
                     with aggregate industry needs.

•   Promotes the Use of Technology in Economic Development, Including Access to
    High-Speed Telecommunications

       •   Broadband Outreach and Aggregation Fund (BOAF)

           o Through the BOAF program, NEPA will conduct outreach programs
             regarding the benefits, use and procurement of broadband services, as well as



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        2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                 aggregating customer demand in communities, with little or no broadband
                 service. NEPA will also provide assistance to communities without broadband
                 to help them receive this service. Further, NEPA will convene a regional
                 telecommunications committee to assist in the education and identification of
                 broadband initiatives and promote broadband connectivity throughout the
                 region.

•   Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) Northeast
    Partnership

            o NEPA is a partner in a major initiative aimed toward deployment of a high
              capacity telecommunications infrastructure, combined with a strategic
              investment in human capital, designed to better position Northeastern
              Pennsylvania’s companies, schools and workers to compete in the global
              economy. This initiative centers around the developing the region as Wall
              Street West, which is conducive for financial service firms to establish reliable
              back-up operations for the rapid recovery of commerce and financial reporting
              activities in the wake of a catastrophe, making the region an epicenter for
              financial service secondary and back office operations. This project involves
              the interaction of various strategic partners with expertise in economic
              development, technology investment, workforce investment and education,
              research and private sector engagement.

•   eCOMMonwealth II

            o eCOMMonwealth is a broadband project created to identify communities in
              Pennsylvania that lack modern, affordable broadband services and place those
              underserved communities in a position where one or more broadband service
              providers could affordably offer service to that community. Through the
              eCOMMonwealth II program, NEPA will be working to address regional
              broadband opportunities and strategies for broadband deployment, which may
              include the utilization of eCOMMonwealth II funding to underwrite
              deployment costs of telecommunications infrastructure projects.

•   Balances Resources through Sound Management of Physical Development

    •   Land Use; Transportation and Economic Development

            o NEPA, in conjunction with each of the counties within its service area, is
              involved in a regional effort to identify and prioritize strategies to improve the
              integration of transportation, land-use and economic development. This
              initiative will help to effectively promote, develop and implement
              comprehensive sustainable small growth initiatives that reduce the need for
              capacity building and preserve needed green/open space. An outcome to this
              endeavor may be to more cohesively initiate changes to land-use policies,



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       2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                laws and other state codes that will establish a framework for a more regional
                approach to sustainable economic growth.

•   Obtains and Utilizes Adequate Funds and Other Resources

           o NEPA continuously strives to obtain funding for various economic
             development initiatives in the region, which will attract investments and new
             jobs. Sources of these funds for major projects in the region include the
             Appalachian Regional Commission, the Pennsylvania Department of
             Community and Economic Development (PA-DCED), various
             Commonwealth of Pennsylvania agencies, banks, equity funds, and federal
             agencies including United States Department of Agriculture Rural
             Development, the United States Department of Housing & Urban
             Development and the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and
             county and county-based community economic development organizations.

•   Cooperates and Integrates with Pennsylvania’s Economic Development Priorities

           o As a Local Development District of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and
             the Appalachian Regional Commission, NEPA maintains a close working
             relationship with the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic
             Development’s Appalachian Development Center. Each year, the Appalachian
             Development Center prepares its Annual Strategy Statement for the
             Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC). Accordingly, NEPA works on
             various projects that demonstrate a close relationship in implementing these
             strategies. Also, the various NEPA programs and services are highly
             influenced by the Commonwealth’s Economic Development Priorities. These
             programs help result in new investment and related employment based upon
             established conditions that promote high-skill, high-wage employment on
             market-based opportunities. Examples include the NEPA Enterprise
             Development Program with a focus on providing direct assistance to
             entrepreneurs and small businesses with programming efforts directed toward
             Finance, Government Contracting, International Trade and Entrepreneurial
             initiatives.

                In addition, NEPA programming also includes strategic integration with
                Pennsylvania’s telecommunications, transportation and workforce
                development policies.

                Lastly, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania actively promotes the
                establishment of partnerships to effectively produce positive economic
                changes. NEPA strives to accomplish this strategy through various alliances
                with the region’s private, public and not for profit sectors.




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                                                 CHAPTER 7

                                    PERFORMANCE MEASURES

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance (NEPA) will use the following performance measures
to help evaluate their organization’s successful development and implementation of the
Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS).

   1. Number of types of projects implemented within the region that are included in the
      CEDS.

   2. Number of jobs created/retained by the private sector and/or CEDS project proponents
      and beneficiaries.

   3. Amount of investment and/or level of economic activity attracted to the seven-county
      Northeastern Pennsylvania region by CEDS project proponents and beneficiaries.

   4. Wage levels paid by CEDS project beneficiaries.

   5. Number and types of other investments undertaken.

   6. Number and type of CEDS related Community Economic Development initiatives.

   In addition to the fore-referenced economic scorecard; additional performance measures to
   be used by NEPA include:

   -   Number of participants in the development of the CEDS

   -   Number of counties actively participating in NEPA’s programs and services

   -   Development of a multi-year project investment listing

   -   Participation in regional initiatives and partnerships focused on implementing the CEDS
       Goals and Objectives




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   2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania




                                         APPENDIX A

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA
  ALLIANCE AND MEMBERS OF THE CEDS STRATEGY COMMITTEE




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               2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



                                                     APPENDIX A

       THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA
        ALLIANCE AND MEMBERS OF THE CEDS STRATEGY COMMITTEE

During Fiscal Year 2006 - 2007, the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance was guided by a forty-
six (46) member Board of Directors, of which forty (40) members had voting capabilities.
Members of the Board of Directors represent industries, labor, governments, general businesses,
professionals and citizens in each of the seven counties that the Northeastern Pennsylvania
Alliance serves. The varied services available from the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance are
performed by a twenty-seven (27) member professional and administrative staff.

The officers and other board members of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance are from both
the private and public sectors. This is exemplified by the following list.

Table A-1. The Board of Directors of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance as of July 1,
2007.
                            COUNTY     OFFICER    VOTING     MINORITY FEMALE        PUBLIC
                           OR OTHER               MEMBER                           OFFICIAL
            NAME          AFFILIATION (1=YES)     (1=YES)     (1=YES)    (1=YES)    (1=YES)                  REPRESENTING
  1 Artuso, Toni          Carbon                      1                     1          1      Carbon County Bureau of Economic
                                                                                              Development
  2 Costello, Stanley, Jr. Carbon          1          1                                1      All Staffing, Inc
  3 O’Gurek, William      Carbon                      1                                1      Carbon County Board of Commissioners
  4 Richards Jr., Ralph   Carbon                      1                                1      St. Luke’s Miners Memorial Hospital
  5 Sebelin, Joseph       Carbon                      1                                1      Pocono Counties Workforce Investment Area
  6 Boam, Gary            Lackawanna                  1                                       Diversified Information Technologies
  7 Condron, Philip       Lackawanna                  1                                       Condron & Company
  8 McNulty, John         Lackawanna                  1                                1      PA Department of Labor & Industry
  9 Munchak, A.J.         Lackawanna                  1                                1      Lackawanna County Board of Commissioners
 10 Preate, Ernest, Jr.   Lackawanna       1          1                                       The Law Office of Ernest D. Preate, Jr.
 11 Riggi, Vincent        Lackawanna                  1                                       V.S. Riggi, AIA Architects
 12 Barrouk, Stephen      Luzerne          1          1                                       Mericle Commercial Real Estate Services
 13 Maher, Paul           Luzerne                     1                                1      Office of Congressman Paul E. Kanjorski
 14 Pacyna, Michael       Luzerne                     1                                       PNC Bank
 15 Palermo, Donna        Luzerne                     1                     1                 Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce
 16 Skrepenak, Gregory Luzerne                        1                                1      Luzerne County Board of Commissioners
 17 Vonderheid, Todd      Luzerne                     1                                       The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business
                                                                                              and Industry
 18 Asure, Donna          Monroe                      1                     1          1      Monroe County Board of Commissioners
 19 Canevari, Paul        Monroe                      1                                1      Monroe County Industrial Development
                                                                                              Authority
 20 Casella, John         Monroe                      1                                1      Monroe County Career Link
 21 Connell, Matthew      Monroe           1          1                                1      Northampton Community College
 22 Phillips, Robert      Monroe                      1                                       Pocono Mountains Chamber of Commerce
 23 Forbes, Harry         Pike             1          1                                1      Pike County Board of Commissioners
 24 Gruzesky, Amy         Pike                        1                     1                 Pike County Chamber of Commerce and Pike
                                                                                              County Industrial & Commercial Development
                                                                                              Authority



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                2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania



 25 Karpiak, P.J.           Pike                       1                                       Alice’s Wonderland
 26 Kerstetter, William     Pike                       1                                       Wayne Bank
 27 Wulfhorst, Peter        Pike                       1                                       Penn State Cooperative Extension
 28 Gursky, Micah           Schuylkill                 1                                1      Office of State Representative David G. Argall
 29 Holman, Champ           Schuylkill                 1                                       Office of State Senator James J. Rhoades
 30 Quandel, Noble, Jr.     Schuylkill                 1                                       The Quandel Group, Inc.
 31 Schlitzer, Joseph       Schuylkill      1          1                                       KNBT Higgins Insurance
 32 Staudenmeier, Frank Schuylkill                     1                                1      Schuylkill County Board of Commissioners
 33 Coar, Edward            Wayne                      1                                1      Wayne County Planning Commission
 34 DeYoung, Annetta        Wayne           1          1                     1                 Wayne County Chamber of Commerce
 35 Herzog, Tony            Wayne                      1                                1      Wayne County Board of Commissioners
 36 Redington, Frank        Wayne                      1                                       The Dime Bank
 37 Wood, Mary Beth         Wayne                      1                                1      Wayne County Industrial Development
                                                                                               Authority
 38 Cervenak, Anna          At-Large                   1                     1                 Verizon
 39 Donlin, David           At-Large                   1                                1      Luzerne/Schuylkill Workforce Investment Board
 40 Fahmy, Mahmoud          At-Large                   1           1                    1      Luzerne County Community College
 41 Barber, Charles         Ex Officio                                                         The Luzerne Foundation
 42 Box, Jeffrey            Ex Officio                                                         Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance
 43 O’Donnell, W.           Ex Officio                                                         CAN DO, Inc.
    Kevin
 44 Brandwene, Phyllis      Emeritus                                                           Brandwene Marketing
 45 Gooch, J. Glenn         Emeritus                                                           Private Citizen
 46 Heaney, Thomas          Emeritus                                                           Integrated Capital Services
      TOTALS BASED                          7         40           1         6          21
       ON VOTING
        MEMBERS
       % OF TOTAL                                                2.5%      15.0%      52.5%


The table below lists the members of the CEDS Strategy Committee.

Table A-2. The Members of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance Board of Directors
Who are on the CEDS Strategy Committee
                              COUNTY     OFFICER   VOTING     MINORITY FEMALE        PUBLIC
                             OR OTHER              MEMBER                           OFFICIAL
           NAME             AFFILIATION (1=YES)    (1=YES)     (1=YES)    (1=YES)    (1=YES)                     REPRESENTING
 1 Costello, Stanley, Jr.   Carbon          1          1                                1      All Staffing, Inc
 2 Preate, Ernest, Jr.      Lackawanna      1          1                                       The Law Office of Ernest D. Preate, Jr.
 3 Barrouk, Stephen         Luzerne         1          1                                       Mericle Commercial Real Estate Services
 4 Connell, Matthew         Monroe          1          1                                1      Northampton Community College
 5 Forbes, Harry            Pike            1          1                                1      Pike County Board of Commissioners
 6 Schlitzer, Joseph        Schuylkill      1          1                                       KNBT Higgins Insurance
 7 DeYoung, Annetta         Wayne           1          1                     1                 Wayne County Chamber of Commerce


   TOTALS BASED ON                          7          7           0         1          3
   VOTING MEMBERS
     % OF TOTAL                                                  0.0%      14.3%      42.9%




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      2006 – 2007 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Annual Performance Report for Northeastern Pennsylvania




                                            APPENDIX B

RESOLUTIONS FROM COUNTY BOARDS OF COMMISSIONERS IN THE REGION




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