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					              ACES Program
     Critical Design Review Document
                   for the
    Temperature – Infrared – Camera (TIC)
                Experiment
                      by
 Team               JHK
 Prepared by: Jarrod Marsh            04/06/2003
                Team Spokesperson          Date
              Hallie Baer             04/06/2003
                Team Member                Date
              Koren Smith             04/06/2003
                Team Member                Date
 Submitted:           April 7, 2003
 Reviewed:
 Revised:
 Approved:
                T. Gregory Guzik           Date


                John Wefel                 Date


                Karen Johnson              Date


                Brad Ellison               Date


                Jim Giammanco              Date



Team JHK                        i        CDR v1.0
                    Change Information Page

Title: CDR Document for TIC Experiment
Date: 04/08/2003

                     List of Affected Pages
Page Number    Issue                                  Date
1              Reference Documents                    3/30/03
2              Mission Objectives                     3/30/03
2              Science Goals                          4/01/03
7              Weight Budget                          4/03/03
3              Technical Goals                        4/05/03
4              Payload Design                         4/06/03
4              Principle of Operation                 4/06/03
5              System Design                          4/06/03
5              Electrical Design                      4/06/03
6              Thermal Design                         4/06/03
7              Mechanical Design                      4/06/03
8              Payload Development Plan               4/06/03
8              Payload Construction Plan              4/06/03
9              Hardware Fabrication and Testing       4/06/03
9              Integration Plan                       4/06/03
10             Software Implementation                4/06/03
11             Flight Certification Testing           4/06/03
11             Launch Requirements                    4/06/03
11             Flight Requirements and Operations     4/06/03
12             Data Acquisition and Analysis Plan     4/06/03
14             WBS                                    4/06/03
14             Master Schedule                        4/06/03
19             Master Budget                          4/06/03
19             Expenditure Plan                       4/06/03
19             Rick Management and Contingency        4/06/03




Team JHK                        ii                  CDR v1.0
                           Status of TBDs

  TBD  Section              Description      Date    Date
Number                                      Created Resolved
1              Electronic Schematics        Feb. 25 April 6
2              Power Budget                 Feb. 25 April 7




Team JHK                          iii            CDR v1.0
                                               TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cover ............................................................................................................................................. i
Change of Information Page ........................................................................................................ ii
Status of TBDs ............................................................................................................................ iii
Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................ iv
List of Figures ...............................................................................................................................v
List of Tables .............................................................................................................................. vi

1.0 Document Purpose ..................................................................................................................1
    1.1 Document Scope ...............................................................................................................1
    1.2 Change Control and Update Procedures ...........................................................................1
2.0 Reference Documents .............................................................................................................1
3.0 Mission Objectives..................................................................................................................2
    3.1 Science Goals ....................................................................................................................2
    3.2 Technical Goals ................................................................................................................3
4.0 Payload Design .......................................................................................................................4
    4.1 Principle of Operation .......................................................................................................4
    4.2 System Design ..................................................................................................................5
    4.3 Electrical Design ...............................................................................................................5
    4.4 Thermal Design .................................................................................................................6
    4.5 Mechanical Design............................................................................................................7
5.0 Payload Development Plan .....................................................................................................8
6.0 Payload Construction Plan ......................................................................................................8
    6.1 Hardware Fabrication and Testing ....................................................................................9
    6.2 Integration Plan .................................................................................................................9
    6.3 Software Implementation and Verification .....................................................................10
    6.4 Flight Certification Testing .............................................................................................11
7.0 Mission Operations ...............................................................................................................11
    7.1 Launch Requirements .....................................................................................................11
    7.2 Flight Requirements and Operations ..............................................................................11
    7.3 Data Acquisition and Analysis Plan ...............................................................................12
8.0 Project Management .............................................................................................................12
    8.1 Organization and Responsibilities ..................................................................................12
    8.2 Configuration Management Plan ....................................................................................13
    8.3 Interface Control .............................................................................................................13
9.0 Master Schedule ....................................................................................................................14
    9.1 Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) ................................................................................14
    9.2 Staffing Plan....................................................................................................................15
    9.3 Timeline and Milestones .................................................................................................16
10.0 Master Budget .....................................................................................................................19
    10.1 Expenditure Plan ...........................................................................................................19
    10.2 Material Acquisition Plan .............................................................................................19
11.0 Risk Management and Contingency ...................................................................................20
12.0 Glossary .............................................................................................................................20



Team JHK                                                                  iv                                                CDR v1.0
LIST OF FIGURES
1. Block diagram of payload systems ...........................................................................................5
2. Drawing of electrical design .....................................................................................................6
3. Drawing of mechanical details..................................................................................................7
4. Flow chart of data processing and analysis.............................................................................12
5. Figure on expected science results ............................................................................................3
6. Project organization chart .......................................................................................................13
7. Flight software flow chart .......................................................................................................10
8. Project timeline diagram ....................................................................................................17,18




Team JHK                                                           v                                            CDR v1.0
                                                    LIST OF TABLES
1. List of References ....................................................................................................................1
2. Table of science goals ..............................................................................................................3
3. Table of technical goals ............................................................................................................3
4. Goals versus measurement traceability matrix .........................................................................4
5. Weight budget table ..................................................................................................................7
6. Fabrication test list ....................................................................................................................9
7. Flight certification test list ......................................................................................................11
8. Data rates and storage requirements .........................................................................................9
9. Interface List ...........................................................................................................................13
10. Work breakdown structure ....................................................................................................14
11. Project budget .......................................................................................................................19
12. Material Acquisition Plan .....................................................................................................19
13. List of risk items ...................................................................................................................20




Team JHK                                                               vi                                              CDR v1.0
1.0 Document Purpose
This document describes the critical design for the TIC experiment by Team JHK for the ACES
Program. It fulfills part of the ACES Program requirements for the Critical Design Review
(CDR) to be held March XX, 2003.

1.1 Document Scope
This CDR document specifies the scientific purpose and requirements for the TIC experiment
and provides a guideline for the development, operation and cost of this payload under the ACES
Program. The document includes details of the payload design, fabrication, integration, testing,
flight operation, and data analysis. In addition, project management, timelines, work breakdown,
expenditures and risk management is discussed. Finally, the designs and plans presented here
will be finalized at the time when the ACES Program Office approves this Critical Design
Review (CDR).

1.2 Change Control and Update Procedures
Designated representatives shall only make changes to this CDR document after approval from
Team JHK and the ACES Program Office. Document change requests should be sent to Team
members and the ACES Program Office.

2.0 Reference Documents
   1. Online Source: National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), February
       16, 2003, http://www.niwa.co.nz/edu/students/faq/layers
   2. Online Source: Online Journey through Astronomy, February 16, 2003,
       http://csep10/phys/utk/edu/astr161/lect/earth/atmosphere.html
   3. Online Source: NASA Website, February 16, 2003,
       http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/academy/space/atmosphere/html
   4. Online Source: Earth Zone Website: Absorption, Radiation, & Greenhouse, February 23,
       2003, http://207.10.97.102/earthzone/lessons/07meteor/greenhouse.html
   5. Online Source: University of Chicago, February 23, 2003,
       http://geosci.uchicago.edu/~archer/EnvChem/Labs/modtran.lite.html
   6. Online Source: Caltech University, February 23, 2003,
       http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/Outreach/Edu/infrared.html
   7. Online Source: Seiko Instruments, February 23, 2003, http://www.sih.com.hk.html
   8. Catalog Source: Edmund Industrial Optics, Optics and Optical Instruments Catalog,
       2002, p. 191
   9. Online Source: Journal of Chemical Education, March 30, 2003,
       http://chemlearn.chem.indiana.edu/c315/C315pFTIR316.html
   10. Online Source: Tech Expo: Table of Physical Constants and Atmospheric Composition,
       March 25, 2003, http://www.techexpo.com/techdata/physical.html
   11. Online Source: Onset Computer Corporation, HOBO H8 Outdoor/Industrial 4-Channel
       External Logger, March 30, 2003,
       http://www.onsetcomp.com/Products/Product_Pages.html


Team JHK                                       1                              CDR v1.0
   12. Online Source: DealTime, Sipix StyleCam Blink II Digital Cameras, March 30, 2003,
       http://www1.dealtime.com/DealSearch/GDS.cmp.html
   13. Online Source: Atmospheric Chemistry: Global Issues, March 30, 2003,
       http://mason.gmu.edu/~gfoster/Chem_212/lectures/Environmental%20Chemistry.html
   14. Online Source: The Standard Atmosphere, April 1, 2003,
       http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wstdatmo.html

3.0 Mission Objectives
        Our mission objective is to successfully operate an IR sensor attached to a HOBO Logger
in order to study temperature as a function of altitude and IR radiation as a function of altitude
and carbon dioxide density. The data from the sensor will be stored on the HOBO. We will use
software that comes with the HOBO to program the sensors to take measurements and to retrieve
and analyze this data after landing. Our objective also includes successfully operating a digital
camera to obtain visual images of the take-off and flight of the payload. The camera will have a
timing crystal attached to allow the camera to take pictures at specific time intervals and the
pictures will be stored onboard the camera to be retrieved upon landing.

3.1 Science Goals
        Our goal is to study the dependence of IR radiation on carbon dioxide density and
altitude. We would also like to study temperature as a function of altitude.
        We are going to measure the relationship between temperature and altitude by taking
measurements of temperature in different layers of the atmosphere. We know from research that
temperature decreases in the first layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere. The troposphere
extends from the ground to about 65,000ft, depending on where you are measuring from on
Earth. The sun’s radiation warms the earth’s surface, which in turn warms the air above the
earth. (Reference 3.) The higher the balloon gets, the colder it will get. The next layer of the
atmosphere that we hope our balloon will reach is the stratosphere. The stratosphere extends
from about 65,000ft to 164,000ft. We hope to reach an altitude between 80,000ft to 100,000ft.
In the layer of the stratosphere, temperature increases because of the presence of ozone. The
ozone molecules absorb radiation from the sun and emit this energy in the form of heat, which
causes the temperature to rise. (Reference 2.) Although it is improbable that our balloon will
reach the layer of the mesosphere, we would expect to see the temperature drop again because of
the absence of oxygen molecules to absorb solar radiation. (Reference 1.)
        We are going to measure IR radiation that is emitted from the ground and IR radiation
emitted from carbon dioxide molecules. From research we know that the IR radiation from the
sun is mostly absorbed by the sun’s atmosphere. (Reference 4) However, the earth absorbs
electromagnetic radiation from the sun and then radiates energy in the form of photons of IR
radiation. (Reference 14) This IR radiation is then absorbed and emitted by molecules in the
atmosphere such as carbon dioxide. (Reference 5) There are other greenhouse gases that absorb
and emit IR radiation; it just depends on the frequency at which the IR is radiating. (Reference
10) We will study the dependence on carbon dioxide molecules only because, of the gases in the
atmosphere that are IR active, carbon dioxide is the most prevalent. (Reference 13) Air density
decreases as altitude increases, so there should less carbon dioxide molecules emitting IR



Team JHK                                        2                               CDR v1.0
radiation as altitude increases. (Reference 14) In general, we expect that the IR radiation that
we detect will decrease as the balloon goes up.

Science Goal
To study IR radiation and temperature as a function of altitude.

                                    Predicted Science Results for Temperature/Altitude


                     30


                     20


                     10


                      0
                           0   10       20               30             40               50     60
   Temperature (C)




                     -10


                     -20                                                                                 Series1


                     -30


                     -40


                     -50


                     -60


                     -70
                                                     Height (km)




3.2 Technical Goals
 .
The primary technical goal is to operate a digital camera in order to have a visual representation
of the take-off and flight of the payload. The camera is lightweight and relatively small with a
mass of 42 grams including the battery and dimensions of 60 X 60 X 170 mm. The camera is
capable of taking 70 pictures at the maximum resolution of 640 X 480 pixels. The focus of the
camera is fixed and the power is supplied by one AAA alkaline battery. The camera comes with
software that we will be program to take pictures at a fixed time interval throughout the flight.
There is a 8MB memory capacity enabling the camera to store the images taken during the flight.
After the flight, the images can be downloaded as a JPG file from the camera to a computer
using a USB cable and the software provided by the manufacturer.
The secondary technical goal for the flight is to keep the components and circuitry inside the box
above –40C, which is the required operating temperature for the camera, IR sensor, and HOBO.



Technical Goals
To successfully operate a digital camera at specific time intervals to take visual images of the take-off,
flight, and curvature of the earth’s surface.
To maintain an optimum operating temperature for the equipment, components, and circuitry within the
payload




Team JHK                                                      3                               CDR v1.0
4.0 Payload Design
The payload will be a 10X10X10 cm box and will consist of two different systems. The HOBO
system will include a temperature probe, an IR sensor, a current to voltage converter, and the
HOBO itself. The HOBO comes with batteries that we will link up to power the IR sensor and
temperature probe. The Op-Amp on the current to voltage converter will be powered by a small
5 V battery. The camera will require triple A batteries which we will replace with lithium
batteries. These systems will be separate. The temperature probe will lead from the HOBO to
the outside of the box. The IR sensor and camera will be facing through a window on the side of
the box. The HOBO and current to voltage converter will be toward the center of the box. The
payload will consist of concentric cubes. The HOBO has an operating temperature range from –
40C to 120C so it will have to be the most insulating of all the components of our payload. We
have insulating material surrounding the HOBO and the box that the HOBO is in. Then we will
have insulating material partially surrounding the IR sensor and camera.


4.1 Principle of Operation
We are going to measure temperatures at various altitudes in the atmosphere. To accomplish this
there will be a temperature probe attached to a HOBO. We will also measure IR radiation in the
atmosphere with a photodiode that is sensitive to radiation in the IR region. The photodiode will
measure intensity by detecting a current from the flux of radiation. This current will be turned
into a voltage through a current to voltage converter. The HOBO will then read this voltage.
Since we wish to study temperature and IR radiation as a function of altitude we will want
altitude and time readings from the GPS data that the ACES Program Office obtains. We can
then compare the time on the HOBO data to determine at what altitudes our data was taken.

Traceability Matrix
GOAL
To measure temperature and IR radiation as a function of altitude
Measurements to Reach Goal
HOBO
   -Temperature
      -Temperature probe from HOBO
   -IR Radiation
      -Photodiode on side of box, measuring intensity
        -Current to Voltage Converter
Altitude
   GPS tracking system




Team JHK                                            4                          CDR v1.0
4.2 System Design
The major components to our payload are the HOBO system and the camera system. The
HOBO system will consist of a temperature probe, a photodiode to measure IR, and a current to
voltage converter. The camera system will consist of only the camera itself. The temperature
probe will connect directly to the HOBO. The IR sensor will connect to the converter then to the
HOBO. The HOBO system and the camera system are separate and require no interfacing.
Our payload will be connected to the spacecraft by some type of cord, attached to the top or
running through the middle of the box depending on the order that all the payloads are tied to the
balloon.

Block Diagram of Payload Systems
Consist of two systems: HOBO system & Camera System


                HOBO                                   Camera




                       Current to Voltage
 Temperature Probe
                           Converter




                           IR sensor




4.3 Electrical Design

The HOBO system consists of temperature probe, a photodiode to measure IR radiation, a
current to voltage converter, and the HOBO itself. From research we found that the maximum
intensity of IR will encounter is 310 W/m^2 and the minimum is 10-30 W/m^2. The current
through the photodiode would then be between 10 and 200 micro-Amps. The HOBO requires a
voltage between 0.0-2.5 V. To the deliver this voltage to the converter, the current will pass
through a 10K resister and a low power Op Amp (LPV321 with V+ = 5 V and V- = 0 V). With
this resistance the HOBO should see a voltage between 0.1-2.0 V, which is within the range that
it requires.



Team JHK                                        5                               CDR v1.0
Electronic Diagram


                                                




                                                +5 V
       2
                                         -
                                             LPV321                               HOBO

             3                           +

                                                0V



       1




Power Budget Table
HOBO-            1s/10s x 20mA(max current) x 2 sensors = 4mA, 4mA x 6 hours = 24 mA/ hr
     Will require a 5V battery > 25mA/hr
Camera-          1s/180s x 25mA = .138mA, .138mA x 6 hours = .833mA/hr
     Will require a AAA battery > 1mA/hr
Op Amp-         1s/10s x 20mA(max current) = 2mA, 2mA x 6 hours = 12 mA/ hr
     Will require a 5V battery > 13mA/ hr
All of batteries will be lithium batteries ordered from Energizer.

4.4 Thermal Design
Operating temperature ranges
HOBO              -20C to 120C
IR sensor         -40C to 85C
Camera            -40C to 100C
Other electronics Unknown

To ensure that the electronics in our system will stay above their operating range we are going to
use plenty of insulating material, our weight budget allows us to do so. Since the HOBO has the
highest minimum temperature constraint, it and the IV converter will be placed in a box with
insulating material within the 10X10X10 cm outer box. Then the outer box will also have
insulating material surrounding the camera and the IR sensor. There is a window through the
box where heat will be lost to the surrounding air and allowing the camera and IR sensor to cool,
but we plan to wrap what we can in plenty of insulating material without hindering the operation
of the devices.
After testing our payload in various temperature environments we will know if our insulating
material is enough or if we need to add some kind of warming devices to our design.


Team JHK                                               6                        CDR v1.0
4.5 Mechanical Design

The payload will fit inside of a 10cm10cm10cm box that will be suspended from the balloon.
The box will be made out of foam core and will be stuffed with insulating material. The
dimensions of the components are small and will fit in the box along with plenty of insulating
material. We will be under our weight budget. We hope that the insulating material will pad our
components from mechanical stresses. The flight will become more turbulent after the balloon
pops, but by then all of our relevant data will be stored on memory.


Drawing of Mechanical Details




                       IR Sensor




                                                        Current to Voltage
                                                            Converter



                                                                                HOBO

             Camera




                           Temperature Probe
Weight Budget

Item                   Weight

HOBO + Battery             50g
Temperature Probe          10g
IR Sensor                  10g
Camera + Battery           42g
I-V Converter/Amplifier    50g

Total Weight            162g
Leftover weight for box and insulation         838g




Team JHK                                        7                             CDR v1.0
5.0 Payload Development Plan
First, the foamcore box will be designed and the IV converter & amplifier will be constructed.
Then the camera will be programmed to allow images to be taken at an interval of once every
three minutes. Next, the hobo will be programmed to sample at a rate of once every ten seconds.
Finally, the hobo will be connected to directly to the temperature probe and indirectly to the
infrared sensor.

6.0 Payload Construction Plan

 Order Parts
        o IR Sensor – Thor Labs
        o Camera – Amazon
        o Hobo – Onset Computer Corporation
        o OpAmp – Radio Shack
 Programming
        o Interface IR Sensor with IV converter & amplifier
        o Interface Temperature Probe with Hobo
               ▪ Program to sample at a rate of once every ten seconds
        o Interface IV converter & amplifier with Hobo
                Program to sample at a rate of once every ten seconds
        o Camera Control
                Program to take images at a rate of once every three minutes
 Construction
        o Circuitry for the IV converter & amplifier
        o Box
 Testing of the Hobo System
        o Review programming.
        o Test the infrared sensor, i.e. measure the intensity in a completely dark room versus a
           brightly lit room to ensure the sensor is working properly.
        o Test the temperature probe, i.e. measure the temperature at a range of levels on the
           order of –80 to 40 C with a thermometer to check accuracy of the probe.
        o Test the IV converter and amplifier to ensure that the voltage is sufficient for the
           hobo to measure.
        o Test the batteries of the hobo, i.e. allowing the hobo run for 12 hours at the
           established sample rate to ensure that it is working properly and can store the data.
● Testing of the Camera System
       o Review the timing program.
       o Test the camera by allowing it to take images at the established sample rate
       o Test the battery on the camera, by allowing it to take and store images for 12 hours
● Testing of the Payload
       o Drop test, allow the payload to fall 5 feet to ensure that it can handle the impact
       o Place the payload in dry ice for three hours to make sure the equipment will function
       o Kick the payload down several flights of stairs to simulate the landing of the balloon




Team JHK                                        8                               CDR v1.0
6.1 Hardware Fabrication and Testing
First, the IV converter & amplifier will need to be designed and constructed. Next, the
temperature probe will be directly connected to the hobo, while the IR sensor and hobo will be
connected using the IV converter & amplifier. That will complete the fabrication of the hobo
system. The camera will be only need to be programmed to sample at the determined rate,
before the camera system is ready for testing. The whole and individual pieces will each be
tested in detail to make sure it operates properly using the methods stated in the construction plan

Fabrication Test List
 Circuitry
      o Design the IV converter & amplifier
      o Construction the IV converter & amplifier

   Programming
       o Program the specific rate of sample for the camera and the hobo
   Testing
       o Test the hobo system to ensure the batteries do not fail, that the IR and temperature
       sensor works properly, that the rate of sample is accurate, and that the memory is
       sufficient for the flight.
       o Test the camera system to ensure the batteries do not fail, the camera operates at the
       correct rate of sample, and that the memory is sufficient for the flight.
       o Test the system as a whole to ensure it is properly insulated and protected from any
       possible damage or temperature change during the flight.


6.2 Integration Plan
The infrared sensor, IV converter & amplifier, hobo, and temperature probe will be integrated
into one system, which we have called the hobo system. The infrared sensor produces a current
output, so it will be connected to an IV converter & amplifier that can be directly connected to
the hobo. The temperature probe, provided by J. Giammanco, is capable of being directly
connected to the hobo. The hobo has on board memory, which will store the data measured
during the flight. The camera, which has on board storage and its own power supply, we have
called the camera system. The two systems will be stored on a constructed foam core box, which
will be tied to the balloon.

Hobo
 Data Rate – 2 measurements per 10 seconds (the temperature and IR measurement are
    separate)
 Storage– 7943 measurements

Camera
●Data Rate- 1 image every 3 minutes
●Storage- 70 images at 640 X 480 pixels



Team JHK                                         9                               CDR v1.0
6.3 Software Implementation and Verification
The software used in the payload is software designed by the manufactures of the hobo and the
digital camera. The software for the hobo, which is provided by the ACES program office, will
be programmed to sample the IR sensor and temperature probe at a rate of once every ten
seconds and to download the data after flight. The software will be verified during the testing
phase of construction in two ways, one for the IR sensor and one for the temperature probe. The
IR sensor will be tested in a complete dark room and a brightly lit room, to ensure that the
measured results are accurate. The temperature probe will be tested at a range of temperatures,
along with the use of a thermometer to check the accuracy of the measurements. The software
for the digital camera will be used to program the rate the images are taken and will allow the
images to be downloaded after flight. The camera will be tested prior to flight to guarantee that
the timing works properly and the images are able to be downloaded properly after the flight.
Software Flow Chart


         Start                         Start




         HOBO                         Camera




    Program to take a              Program to take
      measurement                   pictures once
      every 10 sec                 every 3 minutes




 Temp               IR                 Store
 Probe            Sensor               Data




         Store
                                       END
         Data




         END




Team JHK                                             10                         CDR v1.0
6.4 Flight Certification Testing
Prior to flight, the two different systems will be tested individually and the payload will be tested
as a whole. The testing for the hobo system will include a review of the programming, a test of
the infrared sensor, a test of the temperature probe, a test of the IV converter & amplifier, and a
test of the batteries of the hobo. The testing of the camera system will include a review of the
timing program, a test of the camera, and a test the battery on the camera. The testing of the
payload will include a drop test, a dry ice test, and an impact test. The most likely problem that
could develop during testing is a problem with the construction of the payload in terms of
insulation or protection. To prevent this from happening the weight budget is well under the
limit, allowing most of the weight to be for the box.

 Structural
        o Drop Test
        o Dry Ice Test
        o Impact Test

7.0 Mission Operations
The payload will be launched and tracked from the ground. Upon recovery the hobo’s
nonvolatile EEPROM memory will be downloaded and analyzed to determine if a correlation
exists between the temperature, infrared radiation, or altitude. The images from the digital
camera will be downloaded and examined to see a visual representation of the flight.

7.1 Launch Requirements
At the launch site, the equipment will be tested and prepared for launch. First, the batteries for
the camera and hobo will be turned on. Then all the equipment will be checked to make sure the
measurements are being recorded. Finally, the box will be closed, secured, and attached to the
balloon.

7.2 Flight Requirements and Operations
The main requirement for flight is a clear panel for the camera and infrared sensor to work
effectively based on their set functions, i.e. to take images of the flight and to measure the
infrared light intensity. The temperature and infrared data will be stored on board the hobo,
which will be downloaded using the hobo software provided by ACES. The digital camera will
store the images onboard with its own memory chip, which will be recovered using the
manufactured software that comes with camera. All data will be analyzed after the flight. After
recovery the positioning data from the GPS will be synchronized to the stored data from the IR
sensor, temperature probe, and camera to have a clear chronological set of data. Then the data
will be analyzed and graphed to determine the correlations between the different variables.




Team JHK                                         11                                CDR v1.0
7.3 Data Acquisition and Analysis Plan
Temperature and IR light intensity will be measured approximately every ten seconds during the
flight. The data from the sensors will be stored on board the hobo to be recovered with the
payload. The data from the hobo will be downloaded using the hobo software, which has been
provided by the ACES program office. The camera will be programmed to take images of the
flight once every three minutes. The stored digital pictures will be downloaded using the
manufactured software upon retrieval of the payload.


Flowchart of Data Processing


                       HOBO
                   Store Data from
    Start          Temp Probe &
                                      Download          Read          Analyse           END
                        Diode




                      Camera
    Start           Store Pictures
                                      Download          View             END




8.0 Project Management
There are bi-weekly meetings every Tuesday and Thursday evening to review the progress that
has been made over the week to ensure that each experiment objective is made and the decisions
made are recorded in our group notebook. Also, tasks are delegated to each of the team
members by our team leader on a weekly basis to enable each person to have an equal share in
the work and that at the next meeting the team can review how each person has progressed in
their individual task. The team also communicates with each other through email to ask
questions and share ideas about how to put together our payload. As deadlines approach, the
team has additional meetings and a work session to make sure that each aspect of the project is
done for review. Decisions are made as a team and each member helps to monitor the results of
the other members.

8.1 Organization and Responsibilities

Project Management                      Koren Smith
Schedule Management                     Koren Smith
Parts Management                        Hallie Baer
Construction Design                     Jarrod Marsh
Science Research                        Hallie Baer
Programming                             Jarrod Marsh, Koren Smith
Design                                  Jarrod Marsh, Koren Smith
Construction                            Jarrod Marsh, Hallie Baer, Koren Smith



Team JHK                                         12                              CDR v1.0
Preparation of Flight Instrument             Jarrod Marsh, Hallie Baer, Koren Smith
Data Retrieval                               Jarrod Marsh, Hallie Baer, Koren Smith

Contact Information
Jarrod Marsh: marsh_j@phunds.phys.lsu.edu, (225) 334-3456
Hallie Baer: hbaerb1@lsu.edu, (225) 334-6839
Koren Smith: ksmit39@lsu.edu, (225) 266-1587


Project Organization Chart

                             ACES Program Office




                                   Jarrod Marsh
                                   Team Leader




  Hallie Baer                                                   Koren Smith
 Team Member                                                   Team Member


Refer to WBS for detailed list of assignments.

8.2 Configuration Management Plan
As we progress through our mission, changes will have to be made to adjust to problems that
arise. At this point we will make revisions to the PDR using the Change of Information page.
Our team leader, Jarrod, must approve minor changes to our mission. The ACES Program Office
must approve major changes.

8.3 Interface Control
The sensors will interface to the Hobo logger where the data from the flight will be stored in
nonvolatile EEPROM memory. The temperature probe will interface directly to the hobo. The
infrared sensor is indirectly interfaced to the hobo, through a current to voltage converter. The
camera will not interface with any other equipment because it has a separate power and memory
supply. The hobo logger, infrared sensor, temperature probe, and camera will be secured using
foamcore board in the constructed box, which will be tied to the balloon.

Interface List
 IR Sensor – IV Converter & Amplifier ▬ the infrared sensor will interface to a current to
    voltage converter and amplifier (section 4.3), which we will be building to change the output



Team JHK                                           13                                 CDR v1.0
    of the sensor to enable the sensor to be connected to the hobo which has a memory chip to
    store data.
 IV Converter & Amplifier – Hobo▬ the converter and amplifier will interface to the hobo
    providing it with the data from the IR sensor, so that it can be stored.
 Temperature Probe – Hobo▬ the temperature probe, supplied by J. Giammanco, connects
    directly to the hobo, which can store the data the temperature probe measures during the
    flight.
 IR Sensor, Temperature Probe, Hobo, Camera – Constructed Foamcore Box▬ the equipment
    will be interfaced to the foamcore box, which will protect and insulate the equipment from
    any possible damage or temperature change.
 Constructed Foamcore Box – Balloon ▬ the box will be tied to the box, so that the payload is
    capable of taking the required measurements for analysis.

9.0 Master Schedule & Timeline
Task Name                                  Duration           Start                   Finish

CDR Due                                     37 days          March 1                  April 7
Construction of Box                         7 days           April 8                  April 15
Receive Digital Camera                      8 days           April 8                  April 16
Receive Sensor and Hobo                     10 days          April 8                  April 20
Interface Sensor and Hobo                   5 days           April 20                 April 25
Program Camera                              7 days           April 20                 April 25
Testing                                     5 days           April 25                 April 30
FRR                                         5 days           April 25                 May 1
Preparation of Flight Instrument            9 days           May 2                    May 11
Operations                                  5 days           May 19                   May 24


9.1 Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)

                                 Element Description
     1                           Management
            1.1                  Project Management                                              KS
            1.2                  Schedule Management                                             KS
            1.3                  Parts Management                                                HB
                  1.3.1            Price supplies                                                HB
                  1.3.2            Total Cost                                                    HB
                  1.3.3            Shipping Dates                                                HB
            1.4                  Construction Design                                             JM
                  1.4.1            Weight Management                                             HB
                  1.5.1            Interface IR sensor to Converter, Amplifier, then HOBO        JM
            1.6                  Assignment of Tasks                                             KS
            1.7                  Deadlines                                                       KS
            1.9                  Preparation of Documentation                                    KS



Team JHK                                      14                                CDR v1.0
     2                             Science
           2.1                     Science Research                                               HB
                 2.1.1               Research Temperature Sensor                                  HB
                 2.1.2               Research Infrared Sensor                                     HB
                 2.1.3               Research Camera                                              HB
     3                             HOBO System
           3.1                     Design
                 3.1.1               Electrical                                                   JM, KS, HB
                         3.1.1.1        Build Current to Voltage Converter                        JM, KS
                         3.1.1.2        Build Amplifier                                           JM, KS
                         3.1.1.3        Link devices                                              JM, KS, HB
                         3.1.1.4        Set up temperature probe                                  JM
                 3.1.2               Mechanical                                                   KS, HB
                                        Situate system to fit in box                              KS, HB
                 3.1.3               Thermal                                                      JM, KS, HB
                         3.1.3.1        Research Thermal Conditions                               HB
                                        Meet requirements for operating temperature of HOBO and
                         3.1.3.2   IR sensor                                                      JM, KS, HB

           3.2                     Power System
                 3.2.1               Link Battery from HOBO to IR sensor                          JM, HB
           3.3                     Software
                                     Program to set data acquisition rate, download data, and
                                   analyze data                                                   JM
     4                             Camera System
           4.1                     Software
                 4.1.1               Program to set rate at which camera takes pictures           HB
                 4.1.2               Program to download pictures after flight                    HB
           4.2                     Power
                                     Replace battery with lithium battery                         HB
     5                             Testing
           5.1                     Calibration of Sensors                                         JM, HB, KS
                 5.1.1               Test and calibrate temperature sensor
                 5.1.2               Test and calibrate IR sensor
           5.2                     Structural and Thermal testing of Box
     6                             Flight Preparation
           6.1                     Preparation of Flight Instrument                               JM, HB, KS
                 6.1.1                Space Requirements                                          JM, HB, KS
                 6.1.2                Construction of Box                                         JM, HB, KS
     7                             Data Retrieval
           7.1                     Download Data from HOBO                                        JM, HB, KS
           7.2                     Download pictures from camera                                  JM, HB, KS



9.2 Staffing Plan
Our team consists of three people: Jarrod Marsh, Hallie Baer, and Koren Smith. We have evenly
distributed the tasks as shown in the WBS.




Team JHK                                         15                                CDR v1.0
9.3 Timeline and Milestones

Weekly Tasks                  Duration    Start      Finish      Pre.
Work on PDR                    2 days    Mon 2/24/03 Tue 2/25/03
Work on PDR Presentation       3 days    Tue 2/25/03 Thu 2/27/03
PDR Presentation               0 days    Thu 2/27/03 Thu 2/27/03 2
Begin Construction Design     22 days    Mon 3/3/03 Tue 3/25/03
Work on CDR                   11 days    Wed 3/26/03 Mon 4/7/03
CDR Due                        0 days    Tue 4/08/03 Tue 4/08/03
Construct Box                  8 days    Tue 4/8/03 Wed 5/15/03
Work on Interface              5 days    Sun 4/20/03 Fri 4/25/03
Program Camera                 7days     Sun 4/20/03 Fri 4/25/03
Testing/ Begin Calibration     5 days    Fri 4/25/03 Wed 4/30/03
Work on FRR                    6 days    Fri 4/25/03 Thu 5/1/03
FRR Due                        0 days    Thu 5/1/03 Thu 5/1/03
Preparation for flight         5 days    Fri 5/2/03  Sun 5/11/03
Final Exams                    5 days    Mon 5/12/03 Fri 5/16/03
Operations                     5 days    Mon 5/19/03 Sat 5/24/03




Team JHK                         16                       CDR v1.0
Team JHK   17   CDR v1.0
Team JHK   18   CDR v1.0
10.0 Master Budget
The total budget is $500, but there is a reserve contingency fund of approximately $50. The total
expected cost of our payload is currently $380, which means the expenditure required for our
payload is $70 under budget. The budget has also factored in the cost of shipping and tax for
each item. There are 3 items to be purchased it total: a digital camera, hobo, and infrared sensor.
Each of these items will take only a short amount of time to be delivered once ordered, on the
order of one to two weeks.


10.1 Expenditure Plan

There are 4 items to be purchased: infrared sensor, digital camera, an OpAmp, and a hobo. The
infrared sensor will be used to measure the infrared light in the atmosphere during the flight.
The cost for the sensor including the shipping will be 200 dollars. The digital camera will be
used to provide a visual representation of the flight of the payload. It will cost approximately
forty dollars. The OpAmp will be used in to build the IV converter & amplifier; it is needed to
amplify the voltage. It will cost around twenty dollars. The hobo will be used to measure the
temperature the payload encounters and will store the data using nonvolatile EEPROM memory
taken during the flight. The hobo will cost approximately one hundred and twenty dollars


Project Budget

Items to be Purchased                      Estimated Cost
Infrared Sensor                                 $200
Digital Camera                                   $40
HOBO                                            $120
Batteries                                        $20
OpAmp                                            $20

Total Estimated Cost                           $400



10.2 Material Acquisition Plan
             Item               Supplier        Quantities Order Date Need Date Long Lead Item

Infrared sensor         Thor Labs                     1         4/10/03     4/24/03       No
Hobo                    Onset Computer Corp.          1         4/10/03     4/24/03       No

Digital camera          Amazon.com                    1        4/10/03     4/24/03        No
 OpAmp                   Radio Shack                  1        4/10/03     4/24/03        No
 Batteries               Energizer                    5        4/10/03     4/24/03        No




Team JHK                                        19                               CDR v1.0
11.0 Risk Management and Contingency
There are several risks associated with a project of this kind. There is the risk of being over our
budget in weight and cost. To minimize this risk the planned weights and expenditures are less
than 90% of our allowed budget. Other risks include programmatic problems: an error in
programming or data not stored correctly. In order to reduce this risk we will work together
when programming and will simulate all aspects of the flight to test for any possible errors. Also,
every connection and interface will be rechecked to make sure everything is working properly. It
is expected that any problems will present themselves during the testing and calibration of the
sensor. It is a possibility that the sensor will fail during flight due to our heating system failing or
the flight being disturbed by turbulence in the air which could damage the equipment. These
risks will be minimized in two ways, the construction of the box and flight simulation. The box
will be made from foamcore board to insulate and protect the equipment from the changes in the
atmospheric temperature and turbulence in the air. The flight simulation will include a thorough
test of all equipment to test for possible damage, power loss, or failure to measure/record data
that could be incurred during the flight.


    Risks
   1 Power Loss
   2 Sensor Failure
      Heater Failure
      Air Turbulence
   3 Programming Error
      Data not Stored
      Sensors Malfunction
   4 Exceeding Weight Budget
   5 Exceeding Cost Budget

12.0 Glossary
ACES        Aerospace Catalyst Experiences for Students
CDR         Critical Design Review
FRR         Flight Readiness Review
PDR         Preliminary Design Review
TBD         To be determined
TBS         To be supplied
WBS         Work breakdown structure
TIC         Temperature, Infrared light, Camera
JHK         Jarrod, Hallie, Koren
IR          Infrared
JM          Jarrod Marsh
KS          Koren Smith
HB          Hallie Baer




Team JHK                                          20                                 CDR v1.0

				
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