Download - Nebraska Methodist College

Document Sample
Download - Nebraska Methodist College Powered By Docstoc
					Systems 
          2010
Portfolio




99
 




Table of Contents 

Organizational Overview ............................................................................................................................................ 1 
Category 1: Helping Students Learn 
                .
    Processes  ............................................................................................................................................................... 11 
    Results .................................................................................................................................................................... 19 
    Improvement ......................................................................................................................................................... 28 
Category 2: Other Distinctive Objectives 
    Processes  ............................................................................................................................................................... 30 
    Results  ................................................................................................................................................................... 33 
    Improvement ......................................................................................................................................................... 36 
Category 3: Understanding Students’ and Other Stakeholders’ Needs  
                .
    Processes  ............................................................................................................................................................... 38 
    Results .................................................................................................................................................................... 42 
    Improvement ......................................................................................................................................................... 45 
Category 4: Valuing People 
                .
    Processes  ............................................................................................................................................................... 46 
    Results .................................................................................................................................................................... 52 
    Improvement ......................................................................................................................................................... 57 
Category 5: Leading and Communicating 
                .
    Processes  ............................................................................................................................................................... 58 
    Results .................................................................................................................................................................... 62 
    Improvement ......................................................................................................................................................... 65 
Category 6: Supporting Institutional Operations 
                .
    Processes  ............................................................................................................................................................... 67 
    Results .................................................................................................................................................................... 70 
    Improvement ......................................................................................................................................................... 74 
Category 7: Measuring Effectiveness 
                .
    Processes  ............................................................................................................................................................... 75 
    Results .................................................................................................................................................................... 80 
    Improvement ......................................................................................................................................................... 81 
Category 8: Planning Continuous Improvement 
                .
    Processes  ............................................................................................................................................................... 83 
    Results .................................................................................................................................................................... 88 
    Improvement ......................................................................................................................................................... 90 
Category 9: Building Collaborative Relationships 
                .
    Processes  ............................................................................................................................................................... 91 
    Results .................................................................................................................................................................... 95 
    Improvement ......................................................................................................................................................... 99 
 
Index to Systems Portfolio 
 
                                                                                           




Table of Contents                                                                                                                                                                  i 

 
 




                                                                        Table of Figures 

Figure 1.1:    Educated Citizen Model  ....................................................................................................................... 12 
Figure 1.2:    Graduation Rates  ................................................................................................................................. 25 
Figure 1.3:    Degrees Awarded .................................................................................................................................. 26 
Figure 1.4:    First Time NCLEX‐RN Pass Rates Comparisons of NMC to NE and U.S  ................................................. 28 
Figure 2.1:    Results of Employee Satisfaction .......................................................................................................... 36 
Figure 3.1:    Stimulating Student Interest  ................................................................................................................ 43 
Figure 4.1:    Overall NMC Satisfaction from the Engagement Survey  ..................................................................... 53 
                                                                                             .
Figure 4.2:    Employee Satisfaction as Measured by NMHS Survey   ........................................................................ 53 
Figure 4.3:    Item Responses by Engaged vs. Disengaged Employees at NMC on the Engagement Survey  ............ 54 
Figure 4.4:    Personal Growth as measured on the NMHS Survey  ........................................................................... 55 
Figure 4.5:    Use of Talent as Measured on the NMHS Survey ................................................................................. 55 
Figure 4.6:    Average salaries of full‐time instructional staff equated to 9‐month contracts, by academic rank  .... 56 
Figure 5.1:    Strategic Plan ........................................................................................................................................ 58 
Figure 5.2:    Engagement Survey (Leadership Confidence) ...................................................................................... 63 
Figure 5.3:    Engagement Survey (Benchmarks) ....................................................................................................... 64 
                                                                                .
Figure 6.1:    Results from 2006 and 2009 Scales on the SSI  ..................................................................................... 71 
Figure 6.2:     SEP Continual Process .......................................................................................................................... 73 
Figure 7.1:    IDEA Evaluation Data and Analysis Process  ......................................................................................... 77 
Figure 8.1:    NMC Strategic Planning Process  .......................................................................................................... 84 
                                                                                             .
Figure 9.1:    Total Enrollment Head Counts from the Past 20 Years  ........................................................................ 96 
Figure 9.2:    Progress on Relevant Learning Objectives  ........................................................................................... 97 
 
                                                                         Table of Tables 
 
Table O.1:     History of Fall Enrollment Head Counts ................................................................................................ 02 
Table O.2:     Key Stakeholders and Their Needs/Expectations ............................................................................ 04‐05 
Table 1.1:     Course Delivery Systems ....................................................................................................................... 16 
                                                                                .
Table 1.2:     Measures of Student Learning and Development  ................................................................................ 19 
Table 1.3:     Data Collected on Student Learning and Schedule of Undergraduate Analysis  ................................... 20 
                                                                          .
Table 1.4:     Measurement of Student Learning – Writing   ...................................................................................... 21 
Table 1.5:     Measurement of Student Learning – Speech  ....................................................................................... 22 
Table 1.6:     Mean Comparison of NSSE Scores to Learning  ............................................................................... 22‐23 
Table 1.7:     SSI Measures of Student Learning  ........................................................................................................ 23 
Table 1.8:     Program Graduation Rates  ................................................................................................................... 23 
Table 1.9:     NMC Certification/Licensure Pass Rates  ......................................................................................... 23‐24 
Table 1.10:   IDEA Survey Results  .............................................................................................................................. 24 
Table 1.11:   BSN students, Responses to Program Outcomes One Year After Graduation (Dec. 2008 Cohort)  ..... 24 
Table 1.12:   IDEA Student Ratings on Learning Progress  ......................................................................................... 26 
Table 1.13:   NSSE 2010 Results for Support Processes  ............................................................................................ 27 
                                                                       .
Table 1.14:   Results of Key Learning Support Indicators   ......................................................................................... 27 
Table 1.15:   Graduation Rate Comparisons  ............................................................................................................. 28 
Table 2.1:     NMC Other Distinctive Objectives  ........................................................................................................ 30 
Table 2.2:     Communication of Objective Outcomes to Stakeholders  .................................................................... 31 
Table 2.3:     Service Learning Objectives and Measurements  ................................................................................. 32 
Table 2.4:     Measures Collected and Analyzed for Non‐instructional Objectives  ................................................... 33 
Table 2.5:     Measured Performance Results  ...................................................................................................... 34‐35 
Table 2.6:     Community Service Trips from 2008‐2010  ........................................................................................... 35 
Table of Contents                                                                                                                                                       ii 

 
 




Table 3.1:     Relationship Building with Students  ................................................................................................ 38‐39 
Table 3.2:     Changing Needs of Key Stakeholders ............................................................................................... 39‐40 
Table 3.3:     Building Relationships with Key Stakeholders .................................................................................. 40‐41 
Table 3.4:     Stakeholder Satisfaction Measures ....................................................................................................... 42 
Table 3.5:     Results of Student Satisfaction as Measured by the Noel‐Levitz SSI (2009)  ........................................ 43 
Table 3.6:     Stakeholder Satisfactions Results .......................................................................................................... 44 
Table 3.7:     Recent Improvements  .......................................................................................................................... 45 
Table 4.1:     Systems that Orient Employees to NMC’s History, Mission and Values  .............................................. 47 
Table 4.2:     Systems to Ensure Ethical Practices ...................................................................................................... 48 
Table 4.3:     Aligning trainning with Long Range Plans  ............................................................................................ 48 
Table 4.4:     Resources used to Train and Develop Personnel at NMC … ................................................................. 49 
Table 4.5:     Recognition of NMC Employees  ........................................................................................................... 50 
                                           .
Table 4.6:     Recognition Awards  .............................................................................................................................. 50 
Table 4.7:     Providing and Evaluating Employee Satisfaction, Health and Safety and Well‐Being  .......................... 51                 .
Table 4.8:     Surveys for Measuring Valuing People  ................................................................................................. 52 
Table 4.9:     Other data used as Indicators of Valuing People  ................................................................................. 52 
Table 4.10:   NMC Comparisons to External Data  ..................................................................................................... 56 
Table 4.11:   Systematic and Comprehensive Recent Improvements  ...................................................................... 57 
Table 5.1:     Comparison from 2009 to 2006 (Importance/Satisfaction) .................................................................  64 
Table 5.2:     NMHS Survey Results based on a five year average of employees who agree or strongly agree  ........ 64                                            .
Table 5.3:     Comparisons on the SSI with Private Schools ....................................................................................... 65 
Table 6.1:     Measure of Key Processes in Support Service to Students  .................................................................. 70 
Table 6.2:     Measure of Key Processes of Organizational and Administrative Support Service   ............................. 71             .
Table 6.3:     Examples of Data reported by Departments in their Annual Reports .................................................. 72 
Table 6.4:     Incidents on Campus ............................................................................................................................. 72 
Table 6.5:     NSSE Comparisons with Plains Private, Private Health Focus and National NSSE 2010 Institutions   ... 74                                                .
Table 6.6:     SSI Comparison with Midwestern and National 4‐Year Privates  .......................................................... 74 
                                                       .
Table 7.1:     Key Institutional Indicators   .................................................................................................................. 76 
                                                                         .
Table 7.2:     Determining Comparative Data Needs   ................................................................................................ 78 
Table 7.3:     Source of Department Comparison Data  ............................................................................................. 78 
Table 7.4:     Measures of Effectiveness  .................................................................................................................... 80 
Table 7.5:     Budget to Actual Headcount and Credit Hours for Spring 2010 ........................................................... 81 
Table 8.1:     Strategic Plan Cornerstones .................................................................................................................. 83 
Table 8.2:     Example of 2009‐2010 Action Step, Objective and Goal under the Three NMC Cornerstones  ........... 83 
Table 8.3:     Planning and Decision‐making teams at NMC  ..................................................................................... 85 
Table 8.4:     Budget Items  ........................................................................................................................................ 87 
Table 8.5:     Assessment of Risk at NMC ................................................................................................................... 88 
Table 8.6:     Measures of Effectiveness of Planning Processes  ................................................................................ 88 
                                             .
Table 8.7:     AQIP Action Projects   ............................................................................................................................ 89 
Table 9.1:     Organizations from which NMC Receives Students  ............................................................................. 91 
Table 9.2:     Relationships with Educational Organizations and Employers  ............................................................ 92 
Table 9.3:     Educational Associations, External Agencies, Consortia Partners, Community Groups  
                       Linked to NMC ….. ................................................................................................................................. 93 
Table 9.4:     Measurement of Collaborative Relationships  ...................................................................................... 95 
Table 9.5:     Total Undergraduate Students by Program for Fall 2009 and Fall 2010 ............................................... 96 
Table 9.6:     Customer Satisfaction Survey of Registrar by Graduating Students, Fall 2009  .................................... 98 
Table 9.7:     New Student Orientation Bookstore Evaluation new students, Spring 2009 (n=31)  ........................... 98 
Table 9.8:     Comparison of Mean Scores for the three “Bottom Line” Questions  .................................................. 98 
Table 9.9:     Recent Changes and the Impact of the Change to Category 9  ............................................................. 99 
Table of Contents                                                                                                                                                          iii 

 
 




 
                                                                           Table of Links 
 
Links to the documents below can be accessed via the links in the document or the Nebraska Methodist College 
website. To access these links and additional links via The Nebraska Methodist College Website please follow the 
steps below: 
      • Go to http://www.methodistcollege.edu  
      • Click the About the College tab towards the top of the page on the left 
      • Click on the Institutional Research link on the left side of the webpage 
      • Click the Systems Portfolio link on the left side of the webpage  
Organizational Overview 
    O2.    NMChelp@methodistcollege.edu ................................................................................................................ 03 
    O6.   NMC Organizational Chart  ............................................................................................................................ 06    
    O6.   Well Workplace Award .................................................................................................................................. 06     
    O6.   Campus Map .................................................................................................................................................. 07 
    O7.   Systematic Evaluation Plan ............................................................................................................................ 08 
    O8.   NMC Strategic Plan ........................................................................................................................................ 09 
Category 1: Helping Students Learn  
    1P6.   Fact Sheets  .................................................................................................................................................. 14 
    1P6.   College Catalog ............................................................................................................................................. 14 
                               .
    1P6.   College Website   .......................................................................................................................................... 14 
    1P11. AQIP Project ................................................................................................................................................. 15 
                          .
    1P18. PTA Example   ............................................................................................................................................... 18 
    1R1.   Systemic Evaluation Plans  ........................................................................................................................... 20 
Category 2: Accomplish Other Distinctive Objectives 
                                                                    .
    2R2.  NMC Community Outreach Newsletters   ..................................................................................................... 35 
    2R3.  Culture Audit ................................................................................................................................................. 36 
    2R3.  Engagement Survey ...................................................................................................................................... 36 
    2I1.   Professional Development Department  ....................................................................................................... 36 
    2I1.   President's Council on Wellness (PCOW)  ..................................................................................................... 37 
                                                     .
    2I1.   Center for Health Partnerships   .................................................................................................................... 37 
Category 3: Understanding Students’ and Other Stakeholder’s Needs 
    3P6.  Student Handbook ........................................................................................................................................ 41 
    3P6.  College Catalog  ............................................................................................................................................. 41 
    3P6.  College Website ............................................................................................................................................ 41 
    3R2.  2009 Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI)  ................................................................................. 42 
                                 .
    3R2.  Department SEPs   ......................................................................................................................................... 42 
Category Four:  Valuing People 
  Table 4.5. The Methodist Alumni Connection .......................................................................................................... 50 
                                    .
     4R2.  Engagement Survey  ..................................................................................................................................... 54 
     4R2.  2008 Culture Audit ....................................................................................................................................... 55 
  Table 4.10  Engagement Survey  .............................................................................................................................. 56 
  Table 4.10  Culture Audit Report ............................................................................................................................. 56 
  Table 4.10  Employee Satisfaction  .......................................................................................................................... 56 
Category Five: Leading and Communications  
   5P1.     Organizational Chart.................................................................................................................................... 58 
                                       .
   5P5.     Organizational Chart   .................................................................................................................................. 60 
   5P8.     College Website  .......................................................................................................................................... 61 
   5P10.   Continuity of Operations ............................................................................................................................. 62 
Table of Contents                                                                                                                                                            iv 

 
 




   5R1.     Engagement Survey  .................................................................................................................................... 62 
   5R1.     NMHS Employee Satisfaction Survey  ......................................................................................................... 62 
   5R3.     Engagement Survey  .................................................................................................................................... 64 
Category Six:  Supporting Institutional Operations 
   6P3.     http://www.methodistcollege.edu/currentstudents/index.asp?S=59 ....................................................... 68 
   6P5.     http://www.methodistcollege.edu/currentstudents/index.asp?S=59  ...................................................... 69 
   6R2.     Retention Report  ........................................................................................................................................ 71 
   6R4.    Systematic Evaluation Plan (SEP)  ................................................................................................................ 72 
Category Seven: Measuring Effectiveness 
   Table 7.4  Culture Audit  ......................................................................................................................................... 80 
   Table 7.4  NMHS Survey .......................................................................................................................................... 80 
   Table 7.4  Engagement Survey ................................................................................................................................ 80 
   7R2.    Headcount and Tuition Revenue .................................................................................................................. 80 
Category Eight: Planning Continuous Improvement 
   8P1.    Action Step Template  .................................................................................................................................. 83 
   8P1.    Guidelines  .................................................................................................................................................... 83 
   8P1.    AQIP Action Project Reports ........................................................................................................................ 83 
   8P4.    NMC Strategic Plan  ...................................................................................................................................... 86 
   8P4.    Annual Report  ............................................................................................................................................. 86 
   8P4.    Contribution Review Template  ................................................................................................................... 86 
  Table 8.5 Incident Management Plan  ..................................................................................................................... 88 
  Table 8.5 COP Template  .......................................................................................................................................... 88 
   8P8.    Contribution Review Template  ................................................................................................................... 88 
   8R2.    Completed Action Step with Feedback for 2009‐2010. ............................................................................... 89 
Category Nine: Building Collaborative Relationships 
   Table 9.2 Clinical Affiliations  .................................................................................................................................. 92 
                                                      .
   9P7.   Seven Dimensions of Wellness  ..................................................................................................................... 94 
                                              .
   9P7.   Platinum Well Workplace  ............................................................................................................................. 94   
                         .
   9R2.   Clinical Sites   ................................................................................................................................................. 95 
   9R2.   Systematic Evaluation Plan  .......................................................................................................................... 97 
   9R2.   Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI)  ............................................................................................................. 98 
                                                        .
   9I2.    Center for Health Partnerships   .................................................................................................................... 99 
 
 
 
                                                                                        




Table of Contents                                                                                                                                                            v 

 
 




                                               Table of Terms 
AACN                 American Association of Colleges of Nursing
AAMA                 American Association of Medical Assistants
ACLS                 Advanced Cardiac Life Support
ARC‐ST               Accreditation Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology 
ARDMS                American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography
ARRT                 American Registry of Radiologic Technologists
AHSEC                American Health Sciences Education Consortium
AICUN                Association of Independent Colleges & Universities of Nebraska
ANA                  American Nurses Association
ANGEL                A New Global Environment for Learning
AONE                 American Organization of Nurse Executives 
AOM                  Administrative Office Manager
AOR                  Annual Organization Review
AQIP                 Academic Quality Improvement Program
ARS                  Academic Advisor / Retention Specialist
AST                  Association of Surgical Technologists
ATI                  Assessment Technologies Institute
BLS                  Basic Life Support 
BOD                  Board of Directors 
BSN                  Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing
CAAHEP               Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
CAPTE                Commission of Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education
CBE                  Community‐based Education
CCNE                 Commission Collegiate Nursing Education
CEO                  Chief Executive Officer
CEU                  Continuing Education Credits 
CfHP                 Center for Health Partnerships 
CIC                  Council of Independent Colleges
CLD                  Coordinator of Leadership Development
CMA                  Certified Medical Assistant 
COARC                Committee on Accreditation of Respiratory Care
COP                  Continuity of Operations Plan
CPTED                Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design 
CR                   Contribution Review 
CRT                  Certified Respiratory Therapist
CSE                  Clinical Simulation Exam
CSRD                 Consortium of Student Retention Data Exchange 
CUPA                 College & University Professional Association
DET                  Director of Educational Technology
DIG                  Data Integrity Group 
DIR                  Director of Institutional Research
DON                  Division of Nursing  
DOS                  Dean of Students  
EAP                  Employee Assistance Program
EBP                  Evidence Based Practice
EMS                  Emergency Medical Services
Table of Contents                                                                          vi 

 
 




ET                   Educational Technology
FA                   Financial Aid  
FERPA                Family Education Rights and Privacy Act
FTE                  Full Time Equivalent 
FY                   First Year 
FYE                  First Year Experience 
HLC                  Higher Learning Commission 
HR                   Human Resources 
HSS                  Health System Survey
HU150                Critical Reasoning and Rhetoric
IAMSCU               International Association of Methodist Related Schools, Colleges and Universities 
IDEA                 Individual Development & Educational Assessment
IPEDS                Integrated Post Secondary Education Data System
IR                   Institutional Research
IT                   Information Technology
JCAHO                Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
LASSI                Learning and Study Strategies Inventory
LSI                  Learning Styles Inventory
MBTI                 Meyers Briggs Type Inventory
MCSLHE               Midwest Consortium for Service‐Learning in Higher Education
NMHS VP              Nebraska Methodist Health System Vice President
MSN                  Master’s of Science in Nursing
NCLEX                National Council on Licensing Examinations
NLN                  National League for Nursing
NMC                  Nebraska Methodist College
NMHS                 Nebraska Methodist Health System
NNA                  National Nurses Association
NP                   Nurse Practitioner  
NSSE                 National Survey of Student Engagement
OCICU                Online Consortium of Independent Colleges and Universities 
OHA                  Omaha Housing Authority
PAE                  Program Assessment Exam for Surgical Technology 
PALS                 Pediatric Advanced Life Support
PCOW                 President’s Council on Wellness
PC                   President’s Cabinet 
PD                   Professional Development
PDO                  Program Development Officer
PTA                  Physical Therapist Assistant
QSEN                 Quality Standards for Education of Nurses 
RN                   Registered Nurse  
SAC                  Student Affairs Council
SAC                  Student Advancement Coordinator
SEP                  Systematic Evaluation Plan
SI                   Supplemental Instruction
SOS                  Student Outreach System
SPSS                 Statistical Package for Social Sciences 
SQL                  Structured Query Language

Table of Contents                                                                                         vii 

 
 




SR                   Senior
SSI                  Student Satisfaction Inventory
SWOT                 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats
TBL                  Team Based Learning 
UMC                  United Methodist Church
VP                   Vice President 
VPAA                 Vice President for Academic Affairs
VPSA                 Vice President for Student Affairs
WAC                  Writing Across the Curriculum
WRRT                 Written Registry Exam for Advanced Respiratory Therapists




Table of Contents                                                                viii 

 
 


                                            NMC Systems Portfolio Overview 
 
Nebraska Methodist College of Nursing and Allied Health (NMC or the College) was originally founded as a 
deaconess school in 1891 for the training of nurses. For 94 years, the school remained a diploma‐granting 
institution before transitioning with the approval of the North Central Association to an accredited degree‐granting 
college of nursing and allied health in 1985. NMC has graduated 6,380 health care providers since 1891. 
Throughout NMC’s 115 years, the focus of education has remained on healthcare.  
 
NMC’s mission as a health professions institution is to provide educational experiences for the development of 
individuals in order that they may positively influence the health and well‐being of the community.  
 
The College enjoys a long‐standing reputation for graduating well‐prepared, highly sought‐after healthcare 
professionals and is currently at an all‐time record enrollment of 788 students. NMC is a small, privately‐funded, 
non‐profit institution affiliated as a sub‐corporation of the Nebraska Methodist Health System (NMHS), specifically 
Nebraska Methodist Hospital (NMH). The College is located in a single state‐of‐the‐art campus in Omaha, 
Nebraska.  

The core values of Nebraska Methodist College describe the essence of the institution and the standards to which 
all actions are held. They are: 
• Caring: We are concerned for the well‐being of all people, and demonstrate this concern through 
          kindness, compassion, and service.  
• Excellence: We expect the best from everyone and hold ourselves to the highest ideals of personal, 
          professional, and organizational performance.  
• Holism: We recognize and honor the interrelatedness of all things and all people, and are committed to the 
          development of the whole person.   
• Learning: We embrace the experiential process by which knowledge, insight, understanding, and 
          ultimately wisdom are created for ourselves and those we serve.  
• Respect: We recognize and uphold the dignity and self‐worth of every human being, and promote honest 
          and forthright interpersonal communications and behaviors.  
 
NMC is governed by a 22 member Board of Directors (BOD) which manages the business and selects a Chief 
Executive Officer of the College whose title is President. The President is the representative of and has a 
responsibility to the BOD in the management of the College. The President has general charge of the business 
affairs and property of the College and control of its several officers. In addition, the President has other duties, 
responsibilities, and powers as assigned to the President by the Bylaws or the BOD. 
 
NMC conducted its most recent comprehensive Strategic Planning process in 2010 (See Category 8), and the 
following strategic goals were established to guide and direct the College within its mission and goals: 
1. Smart Growth: NMC will achieve Strategic Growth to ensure long‐term viability. 
2. Brand Management: NMC will be recognized as the first choice in healthcare education in our market. 
3. Financial Independence: NMC will be a financially solvent organization while providing quality healthcare 
education.  
 
1. NMC’s goals for student learning and shaping an academic climate, key credit and noncredit instructional 
programs, and the educational systems, services, and technologies that directly support them.  
NMC aspires to provide each student with holistic life skills for lifelong development to function optimally in 
today’s complex society and healthcare environment. The College will facilitate this ability by providing an 
accepting environment congruent with its core values so that students may become empowered to influence the 
quality of their own lives as well as the future of healthcare and the well‐being of the local and global 
communities.  
 

Overview                                                                                                             1 

 
 


Enrollment Profile: Enrollment in Fall 2010 marks a record head count of 788 total students at NMC. This number 
represents an increase of 116 (17.3%) students from 2009‐2010. In the past 5 years (2005‐2010), NMC has grown 
by 39% (see Table 0.1). Female to male (90% female) distribution has remained unchanged between 2005 and 
2010, with minority students representing 8% of the student population.  

Table O.1 History of Fall Enrollment Head Counts  
                                 NMC Fall Semester Head Count Enrollment by Years
   1988          1989         1990         1991         1992         1993         1994          1995        1996
    238           342          362          456          467          453          378           375         383 
   1997          1998         1999         2000         2001         2002         2003          2004        2005
    416           431          418          386          399          396          422           527         565 
   2006          2007         2008         2009         2010                                       
    587           593          624          672          788 
 
Academic Profile: NMC embraces a deep belief in lifelong learning, and all NMC programs focus on holistic 
healthcare education. For this reason, a continuum of programs is offered to students and healthcare 
professionals, ranging from one‐hour seminars to post‐graduate degrees. NMC provides professional development 
seminars, certificates, associate, baccalaureate, master’s, and post‐master’s opportunities for healthcare 
education. NMC offers healthcare education via a variety of delivery sites and media including classroom, 
synchronous and asynchronous technology, hybrid, and self‐study. The following programs constitute the 
educational focus at NMC:  

•   Nursing: Certified  Nursing Assistant, Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), Accelerated BSN, LPN to BSN, RN to 
    BSN, Master of Science in Nursing with emphasis in nursing education or nursing executive (online), and Post 
    MSN Certificate  
•   Diagnostic Imaging: Associate Degrees and Bachelor Degrees in General Sonography, Cardiovascular 
    Sonography, and Radiologic Technology 
•   Respiratory Care: Associate Degree and Bachelor Degree 
•   Physical Therapist Assistant: Associate Degree and Bachelor Degree 
•   Health Promotion: Master of Science with emphasis on Health Promotion Management (online) 
•   Medical Group Administration: Master of Science (online) 
•   Certified Medical Assistant and Phlebotomy: Certificates 
•   Medical Assistant: Associate Degree completion 
•   Health Studies: Associate and Bachelor Degree completion 
•   Surgical Technology: Associate Degree 
•   Professional Development: Continuing education for healthcare professionals 
 
All academic programs operate on a semester basis, and certificate and accelerated programs operate on 
extended semesters. NMC offers all graduate programs online. Undergraduate courses are offered morning 
through evening, and in synchronous and asynchronous online formats. Professional development, continuing 
education, and community education offerings are available on‐site and online. 
  
The College considers technology as an important educational tool and a variety of technological tools are used for 
classroom and distance education. Most classrooms are equipped with Smartboard technology, wireless overhead 
projection, and networked computers, and each program is equipped with a new, state‐of‐the‐art teaching 
laboratory. Software for teaching is current and highly competitive.  
 
Each student in an undergraduate degree‐granting program is required to complete an e‐portfolio and to 
participate in a capstone course prior to graduation. These programs are committed to facilitating achievement of 
professional outcomes for its graduates, outcomes that result in an Educated Citizen who can serve client and 
community needs to positively influence the health and well‐being of the community.  

Overview                                                                                                          2 

 
 


As indicated in their Strategic Plans or Systematic Evaluation Plans (SEPs), all programs, certificate through 
graduate, have at their center the purpose of developing competent, engaged professionals and citizens (See 
Categories 1 and 6).  
 
The Educated Citizen Core Curriculum was inaugurated in fall 2006 for all undergraduate students who 
matriculated at that time. The pattern of knowledge and skills reflected in the Core Curriculum outcomes is 
derived directly from the College’s mission and values. While the mission of the College is unified by a focus on 
healthcare fields, its central purpose is education. The three chosen objectives for the Educated Citizen Core 
Curriculum reflect key components in the overall mission: Reflective Individual, Effective Communicator, and 
Change Agent. In course work, these objectives are combined in varied ways to lead to different habits of inquiry. 
Some “reflection” is directly applied to course concepts, while other reflection is more personal (on such matters 
as ethics and academic or professional integrity). Coursework was designed to meet these outcomes as adjusted 
for associate and baccalaureate levels. As part of this new Core Curriculum, NMC implemented an electronic 
vehicle for capturing and measuring outcome data for common student learning objectives: the ANGEL e‐portfolio 
which must be presented as part of a student’s capstone course during the last semester of coursework. 

NMC’s graduate students prepare capstone projects as a part of their graduation requirements. The Master of 
Science in Health Promotion and Master of Science in Nursing capstone projects are required for graduation, while 
undergraduate research projects are influenced by community needs. Faculty research is highlighted in a day‐long 
symposium as a joint venture with Nebraska Methodist Health System to demonstrate outcomes in evidence‐
based practice.  

2. The key organizational services other than instructional programs NMC provides for students and other external 
stakeholders and the programs we operate to achieve them.  
The College provides essential support programs and services to all students:  registration, library resources, 
counseling, academic advising, computer services, financial aid, career services, and bookstore. In addition, Josie’s 
Village, which opened in 2007, is a co‐educational apartment style housing facility with capacity for 100 
students. All units contain private bedrooms, are fully furnished and each of the buildings includes laundry 
facilities, wireless internet, and secured access. 
  
Enrolled students are assigned an individual IQWeb account by which they register for courses and make changes 
to their data. All students have a College e‐mail account and can access ANGEL, NMC’s online learning platform. In 
addition, there is a central support desk, NMChelp@methodistcollege.edu, which supports classroom and online 
programs and courses with technology, troubleshooting, and other online services. Email support and support for 
various software utilized by the College is provided by NMHS computer support staff. The NMC student computer 
lab houses 22 computers and the entire campus is equipped with wireless internet access. The Library is proud of 
an expanding roster of healthcare databases, periodicals, and books, including licensed electronic resources which 
are accessible by students and faculty from off‐campus computers by standard network authentication through 
the EzProxy link located on the Library’s webpage.  

Academic advising is a vital service provided to enrolled students by advisors who provide learners with 
information and advice on career opportunities within their major area and course selection. These individuals 
help students progress toward degree completion. They provide general information about College policies, 
processes, and systems. Campus security is provided by a security officer presence on campus 24/7 and video 
surveillance of the interior and exterior of campus. A Safety Committee under the direction of the Vice President 
for Student Affairs (VPSA) is responsible for the integral support processes that contribute to the physical safety 
and security of faculty, staff, and administration (see Category 6). 
     
Student Services provides students with a variety of supportive services: Disability services, including 
accommodations, personal advising, assistive devices, tutoring in general and professional areas; early alerts; 
support for learners on academic probation; study skills support and supplemental instruction. These services are 

Overview                                                                                                            3 

 
 


all provided without charge. First Year Experience courses and a student health clinic are also available to students 
(see Category 7). 
 
 All key academic, administrative, and enrollment processes are tied to the essential needs of students and other 
stakeholders, including faculty, who depend on administrative and learner services to support their work. In 
addition to the academic processes described in Category 1, the College meets stakeholders’ needs through 
systematic implementation of core operating processes, including key administrative and enrollment services: 
Business services, administrative services, enrollment services, learning services, human resource services, 
technology services and support, and academic support services.    

3. The short‐ and long‐term requirements and expectations of the current student and other key stakeholder 
groups NMC serves. Who are the primary competitors in serving these groups?  
NMC strives to understand and then meet or exceed the needs and expectations of its stakeholders. Table 0.2 lists 
key stakeholders’ needs and expectations.  
 
Table O.2 Key Stakeholders and their Needs/Expectations 
Key                 Key Stakeholder Needs/Expectation                             Outcomes 
Stakeholder 
Potential          •    Quality educational programs                                        Student Satisfaction Scores rate 
Students           •    Timely and accurate information                                     NMC above 4‐year private 
                   •    Affordable program cost                                             colleges in these areas on the SSI 
                   •    Availability of financial aid                                       and NSSE 
                   •    Prompt and courteous responses 
                   •    To contact via the method of their choice‐‐either in person, on 
                        the telephone, through the mail, or electronically 
                   •    Informative website 
Students           •    Quality and relevance education                                     The average undergraduate loans 
                   •    Safe environment                                                    owed at graduation are $25,042, 
                   •    Effective advisement                                                with 50% of graduates having jobs 
                   •    Technology access and help                                          before they graduate, and 98% 
                   •    Polices that make sense are known                                   having jobs 6 months after 
                   •    Awarded the aid for which they qualify in a timely manner           graduation.  
                   •    To develop personally through a community based curriculum 
                        focused on the educated citizen 
                   •     Volunteer opportunities and social interactions with peers, 
                        faculty, and staff 
                   •    They are willing to go into debt to attend college, and they 
                        expect to get value for their money 
                   •    To be a successful entry‐level health professionals 
Community          •    Produce educated citizens                                           NMC partners with over 60 
Members            •    Represents and serves the community by contributing to the          community organizations in the 
                        economic vitality by being civically engaged                        Omaha metro and the region: 
                                                                                            students recorded 1,274 co‐
                                                                                            curricular hours and 20 co‐
                                                                                            curricular service opportunities in 
                                                                                            2009‐2010 
The Board of       •    Expects NMC to operate within the parameters of our mission         NMC has been accredited by the 
Trustees                and in accordance with system policies and procedures along         HLC since 1989, when it became a 
                        with state and federal laws and regulations, with a focus on the    degree granting institution. In 
                        NMC strategic directions.                                           addition, each program has 
                                                                                            programmatic accreditation by 
                                                                                            their governing bodies.  
Alumni             •    expect to maintain a relationship with NMC & other alumni           Five and six year graduation rates 
                   •    Opportunities to contribute to NMC growth                           are 1st in the state (IPEDS 2008 

Overview                                                                                                                       4 

 
 


                     •   Positive institutional image                               data). Board pass rates are in the 
                                                                                    90th  percentile for most 
                                                                                    programs. 
Employers            •   Educated, quality health care providers                    Four year graduation rates ranks 
                     •   Ethical graduates                                          NMC as 5th in the state of 
                                                                                    Nebraska (2008 IPEDS data).  
Parents              •   Safe campus                                                In 2009‐2010, 83% of our enrolled 
                     •   Student success                                            students received some form of 
                     •   Financial support of students                              institutional grants, 67% received 
                                                                                    federal grants, 17% state grants, 
                                                                                    and 89% loans.  
Governing Boards     •   Accountably                                                All programs meet strict 
and Accreditation    •   Compliance with appropriate guidelines and policies        accreditation requirements to 
Agencies             •   Fiscal responsibility                                      ensure that graduates have the 
                     •   High standard for quality                                  knowledge needed for 
                     •   Student success                                            employment in their profession.  
                                                                                     
Employees            •   Respect                                                    Employees rate NMC in the 99th 
                     •   Safe place to work                                         percentile in overall satisfaction 
                     •   Supportive work environment                                as a place to work (Coffman 
                     •   Adequate compensation                                      Engagement Survey, 2009).  
                     •   Recognition of talents and abilities                        
                     •   Confidence in leadership 
                     •   Know the outcome they are responsible for 
 
At this time, NMC’s major competition is with other educational institutions that offer health professions programs 
in the Omaha area. These programs compete not only for students but also for limited clinical sites. Those 
competitors from the private sector include Clarkson College, College of St. Mary, Creighton University, Midland 
Lutheran College in Fremont (NE), Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln (NE), and other hospital‐based 
programs in the metro area that include Alegent. Public sector competitors include Metropolitan Community 
College, University of Nebraska Medical Center, and Southeast Community College in Lincoln (NE). Online for‐profit 
institutions offering healthcare degrees are also considered competitors for students, services, and products. 
These competitors include the University of Phoenix, Hamilton College, Vatterott College, and Baker University. 
NMC also recognizes companies offering online professional continuing education units as competitors.     
 
4. Key factors that determine how NMC organizes and uses administration, faculty, and staff. 
As of Fall 2009 NMC has 127 employees of which 102 (80%) are full‐time. There are 49 full‐time faculty and 11 
part‐time faculty, 20 administrative appointments, 22 support services, 20 clerical and secretarial, and 5 service 
and maintenance employees. Of the employees, 87% are female and 4% are minorities. NMC employees are not 
involved in collective bargaining.        
 
The classroom student to instructor ratio at NMC is 10 students per faculty member with an average of 15 
students per course. Lab courses average 10 students per faculty member with 12 students per course on average. 
The clinical student to instructor ratio ranges from 1:1 to 1:8, as dictated by best practices, accrediting agencies, 
and clinical sites. NMC is diligent about providing a strong clinical component to each program.      
 
Faculty and staff are highly‐involved in campus leadership, strategic planning, committees, taskforces, and other 
campus‐wide initiatives. All employees complete an annual contribution review with their supervisor that 
documents their personal involvement in College‐wide and department Action Steps, committees, and activities. 
Professional and personal growth goals are set and reviewed each year. This ensures consistency in monitoring the 
degree to which the job responsibilities as determined by the College are effectively carried out. Faculty and staff 
development is provided on the basis of role requirements, departmental needs, and in congruence with the 
strategic priorities. Development is well‐funded through endowed resources obtained and administered by the 
Overview                                                                                                              5 

 
 


Nebraska Methodist Hospital Foundation. Training and career development goals are aligned at the campus, 
division, department, and individual levels (see Category 4). Extensive faculty and staff development is provided in 
areas essential to NMC’s mission, strategic cornerstones of Personnel Development, Quality Education and 
Organizational Effectiveness, and strategic goals such as team based learning projects and institutional program 
development. Faculty and staff have access to tuition reimbursements and development activities. 
 
NMC’s mission and strategic goals drive its organizational structure and define its programs. As shown in NMC’s 
organizational chart, NMC has a unique relationship with the Methodist Health System, which provides accounting, 
human resources, marketing, security, and technology services.  
     • The President/CEO oversees the VPAA, VPSA, Directors of Alumni Relations, Institutional Research and 
          Health Ministry.  
     • The Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA) oversees all academic programs, professional 
          development, as well as registration, educational technology, Center for Health Partnerships, Professional 
          Development, and the Upward Bound Program Grant. Faculty are housed under three areas; the Division 
          of Nursing, Division of Health Professions and General Education. Faculty members are hired into an 
          academic department based on their expertise in the discipline, professional experience, and educational 
          background.  
     • The Vice President of Student Affairs (VPSA) oversees enrollment, student developmental services, library, 
          bookstore, business office, and financial aid.  

Daily supervision and decisions regarding work assignments and related tasks are carried out by College 
administrators and managers. This ensures that the operational needs of the College are addressed with regard to 
meeting the needs of the College’s stakeholders, and fulfilling the mission responsibly and effectively.  
 
The health and well‐being of employees is emphasized in many ways. NMC was one of the first businesses and the 
only college in the country to receive the Platinum Level Well Workplace Award from the Wellness Council of 
America. NMC was recertified at the Platinum Level during the 2009‐2010 year. The President’s Council on 
Wellness (PCOW) reports directly to NMC’s President and is progressive in offering programs on all nine 
dimensions of health (see Category 4). 

5. Strategies that align with leadership, decision‐making, and communication processes with the mission and 
values, policies, and requirements of NMC’s oversight entities, legal, ethical, and social responsibilities. 
The NMC administration, led by President Dennis Joslin, is responsible for the achievement of the College’s 
mission, values, and goals, upholding the institution’s legal, ethical, and social responsibilities; and meeting 
requirements established by the College Board; and managing academic, administrative, development, and 
support services.  

The President’s Cabinet (PC) is the core of the leadership system, involving leaders from all critical areas of the 
College. These members of the senior leadership team provide the communication conduit to and from their 
respective groups, strong communication linkages, and participatory decision making. This group meets bi‐weekly 
during the academic year and for extended periods of time in the summer session to engage in strategic planning 
(see Category 8). This structure assures strong alignment between NMC’s mission, values, and goals and supports 
the objective of the governance groups, and greatly increases faculty, staff, and student awareness and 
understanding of new changing policies and /or requirements of the College Board, as well as NMC legal, ethical, 
and social responsibilities. The President’s Cabinet provides a direct and timely flow of information from the NMC 
Board, state agencies, campus committees, and community organizations. Members of the PC contribute to and 
review all information, including Annual Reports from all divisions. They are actively involved in meeting NMC’s 
legal, ethical, and social responsibilities through their work on key committees, AQIP Action Projects, strategic 
Action Steps, and other campus initiatives.  
 

Overview                                                                                                            6 

 
 


Each member of the President’s Cabinet, excluding the President and the VPs is responsible for one or two AQIP 
categories, for understanding the nature of the category, and for focusing strategic plans that help the College 
enhance its capacities in that category. Each is cross‐functional so that all categories are represented by faculty 
and staff across the campus. Currently, 99% of the faculty and staff volunteer to be on one of the AQIP categories 
for this submission. The President and Vice Presidents provide oversight for three of the AQIP categories.  
 
Formal and informal systems of communication occur on several levels. Publications are produced by the Office of 
Institutional Research to assure consistency in College data. The College website is a forum for official policies, 
processes, and information, including the College’s mission and values, and documentation related to 
accreditation. Communication of the College’s mission and values as well as activities, projects, and initiatives, 
occurs between the VPs, Deans and Directors, and the President as they engage in conversations and interact with 
the College community, and public through a variety of community venues. Faculty and staff, carry the message of 
the College mission, vision, and purposes to classrooms, advisory committees, professional organizations, and 
through contact with others in the community.  
 
The President presents at the All‐College Forums three times each year to NMC faculty and staff. For example, at 
the Fall Forum, the President reviews the state of the College regarding the new faculty and staff, institutional 
changes, College budget and strategic goals, and new initiatives. The President’s presentation concludes with an 
acknowledgment of successes and the efforts of everyone at the College. The past several years, this presentation 
has included information about NMC’s continued success in recruiting, educating, and providing services to a 
record enrollment for the past nine years.   

6. Strategies that align administrative support goals with NMC’s mission and values and the services, facilities, and 
equipment provided to achieve them. 
Essential units that support the administrative needs of faculty, staff, and administrators at NMC are the 
Operations Team, Business Office, Office of Institutional Research, and Educational Technology. In addition, units 
that are part of the NMHS such as Human Resources, Accounting, and Planning Offices, are integral to college 
operations and are designed to deliver efficient and effective service to enhance individual and institutional 
performance (see Category 6).  
 
Administrative support goals are aligned with NMC’s mission and values through the strategic planning process 
(see Category 8). During this process, NMC established long‐term goals as well as short–term priorities for the 
campus. Departments develop Action Steps that align the College’s strategic goals as well as department‐specific 
goals. The progress on Action Steps is monitored and documented in departmental Annual Reports (see Category 
6). Equipment and technology needs are assessed and built into the College’s annual budget, and surveys such as 
the Cultural Audit and the Employee Engagement Survey are used to monitor how employees view NMC alignment 
with its mission and values (see Category 4).  
 
Facilities and equipment at NMC are state‐of‐the‐art. In January of 2006, NMC moved all operations to a single 
new campus consisting of two buildings connected by breezeways on two floors. The campus occupies 5.6 acres of 
land in central Omaha (NE). The buildings consist of 100,498 square feet, which includes 16,934 square feet of 
office space divided into 75 offices; 11,034 square feet of classroom space divided into 13 fully equipped 
classrooms, and 8,983 square feet of laboratory space comprising 13 fully equipped laboratories, including a 
human cadaver lab.(See campus map). 
 
In Summer 2008, over 5000 square feet of shelled space was remodeled resulting in a new 60‐seat classroom, a 
22‐seat classroom, and a new nursing lab totaling approximately 2500 square feet. In addition the existing 1200 sq. 
ft. nursing lab was remodeled and transformed into a lab for the new Physical Therapist Assistant program. Total 
construction cost for these projects was $525,000, and an additional $225,000 was spent purchasing simulation 
equipment, lab materials, and classroom tables and chairs.  
 

Overview                                                                                                            7 

 
 


In Summer 2007, NMC purchased the Whispering Pines Apartments and Townhouse complex. The Whispering 
Pines complex consists of 67 one and two bedroom apartment units, 66 two bedroom townhouse units and 61 
single‐car garages. The complex is adjacent to the west property line of the campus and added 6.6 acres to the 
NMC footprint. The 67 apartment units are being utilized for student on‐campus housing, while the 66 townhouse 
units are being rented to the community and managed for NMC through a local real estate management company.  
 
Future plans for growth include the purchase of an additional 1 ½ acre of land to the west of the townhomes for a 
Campus‐based child care facility for students’ and faculty/staffs’ children. Architectural plans are being designed 
for the project with an estimated cost of $5‐6 million. In addition, architectural plans have been completed for the 
creation of a Learning Commons that will expand services for students related to academic skill building and 
overall student support. This project involves the remodeling and modification of approximately 13,000 square 
feet on the first and second floors of the Clark Center. Initial cost estimates are approximately $650,000 for this 
project. Final plans are nearly complete for expansion of the simulation lab in the lower level of the Clark Center. 
Approximately 1300 square feet of shelled space will be remodeled to accommodate this expansion with the 
estimated cost of $600,000.  

7. The data and information NMC collects and distributes, and the information resources and technologies 
governing how NMC manages and uses the data.  
Since the last Systems Appraisal four years ago, the concentration for quality improvement has been on 
measurement systems, which was one of the strategic issues identified by the review team. The hiring of a Director 
of Institutional Research who is responsible for data and reports, the development of a Data Integrity Group (DIG) 
to ensure reliable and valid data, and the AQIP Action Project on benchmarking has taken NMC to a new level of 
data collection and distribution. NMC now benchmarks results against its own previous results and peer groups. 
The Office of Institutional Research is responsible for administering and creating surveys designed to provide 
information on student satisfaction, student engagement, employee satisfaction, course evaluations, achievement 
on learning outcomes, stakeholder feedback, and the experiences of enrolling learners. The Director of 
Institutional Research provides regular reports on enrollment, retention, learner demographics, course 
enrollments, graduation, and placement.   

The primary data collection tool used by the College is the PowerCampus software. Access to the system is strictly 
regulated by a security authorization protocol. Users are able to input and access data in accordance with their 
level of security, which is dependent upon their job responsibilities. The Director of Educational Technology has 
identified the need for a more robust system that will integrate all of the College’s data and technology needs by 
2011.  
 
The Office of Institutional Research provides web access to a multitude of reports such as Enrollment and 
Graduation reports. Reports are available for the current and preceding three fiscal years. These reports are an 
invaluable resource for tracking results and comparing results with other colleges. The measures are student 
satisfaction, student engagement, enrollment, faculty/learner ratios, student success, and employee engagement 
and culture. The College also compares results with norm groups on standardized surveys like the Noel‐Levitz 
Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) and National Student Survey on Engagement (NSSE), as well as a consortium 
group founded in 1998 of like healthcare colleges, The American Health Science Education Consortium (AHSEC).  
 
Each academic and student service program at NMC has developed its own Systematic Evaluation Plan, which 
includes direct and indirect indicators of learning and satisfaction. In addition, each program reports its results on 
indirect indicators. These reports include a survey of graduates regarding their learning of the program outcomes 
and core abilities, as well as data on program completion numbers and placement of graduates into related 
employment. And finally, students develop an individual eFolio that documents what they have learned through 
systematic uploading of artifacts created in their professional and general education courses. The artifacts 
document their mastery of program outcomes and core abilities.   


Overview                                                                                                              8 

 
 


8. The key commitments, constraints, challenges, and opportunities with which NMC aligns its short‐ and long‐
term plans and strategies.  
The College continually strives to strengthen its positive reputation as a premier health professions institution in 
Nebraska. Despite a 40% growth in enrollment the last five years, the College is committed to offering and 
promoting a personal, learning‐centered approach to education and its focus on development of students (see 
Category 1) and is committed to providing high quality education to our learners and other stakeholders in all that 
it does. The commitment includes promoting the College’s mission of positively impacting the community, 
graduating educated citizens and working toward building and maintaining a healthy, progressive approach to 
growth.  
 
Key opportunities for NMC include the projected shortage of healthcare professionals and other emerging fields in 
healthcare. In pursuit of this goal, an online institute that meets the needs of providing quality healthcare 
education is being developed and implemented (see Category 1). The development of the Center for Health 
Partnerships is also a key opportunity for NMC.  
 
NMC’s vulnerabilities include financial reliance on NMHS, the expense of private education, and the competitive 
environment which includes the rise of for‐profit institutions. To become more financially independent, NMC 
needs to gain a greater understanding of student and other stakeholder needs. NMC has begun to construct the 
framework to support data‐driven decision‐making for continuous quality improvement. The College must 
continue to align processes and structures with planned improvement.         

To direct the College toward the future, the NMC Strategic Plan, with its aggressive long‐ and short‐term goals of 
the AQIP Strategic Plan was developed by the President’s Cabinet with input from all employees, NMHS advisors, 
and the College Board of Directors (see Category 8). The goals outline what the college will become, the objectives 
spell out where the College will direct its energies and initiative and the Action Steps relate to how those goals will 
be achieved.  
 
9. Key partnerships and collaborations, external and internal, that contributes to NMC’s organization’s 
effectiveness. 
Collaborative relationships are a vital factor for NMC to augment programs, courses, and service and to meet the 
needs of students and stakeholders. NMC’s relationships are purposeful, strategic, align with NMC’s mission and 
are aimed at continuous quality improvement and mutual benefit. The primary stakeholders of NMC include the 
Nebraska Methodist Health System, of which NMC is a subsidiary, and specifically Nebraska Methodist Hospital. 
Collaboration with the Hospital and its Foundation are integral to the viability of NMC and communication 
structures exist at many levels between these three entities. The College makes intentional efforts to provide value 
to these stakeholders to include the provision of continuing professional education to maintain the hospital’s 
Magnet status. Strong collaborative relationships exist between NMC’s Department of Professional Development 
and NMHS with respect to providing professional education, certification, and recertification of healthcare 
employees in Basic Life Support and Advanced Life Support. For instance, NMC certifies and recertifies an average 
of 150 NMHS employees each month in Basic and Advanced Life Support. A Hospital‐College Council provides a 
strong collaborative relationship resulting in improved communication between the two facilities and completion 
of important projects such as employee survey outcomes.  
 
The College Admissions department has built favorable relationships with various entities, such as high schools, 
which aid in effective recruiting. NMC has also developed articulation agreements such as the Bachelor of Science 
in Respiratory Care with University of Nebraska at Kearney.  
 
Another key collaborative relationship for the College is with local United Methodist Congregations and the 
Nebraska Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church (UMC). During Summer 2010, the College renewed 
its affiliation with United Methodist Church through 2020 following an assessment visit by UMC’s Board of Higher 
Education. Two different examples of this collaboration at work are:  

Overview                                                                                                              9 

 
 


    •   Fall 2010, NMC enrolled a student from the Lydia Patterson Institute, a United Methodist school in El 
        Paso, Texas serving students from Mexico, and offered her a full tuition scholarship while the Omaha 
        District congregations raised funds to support her housing, textbook, and living needs. 
    •   NMC also partnered with St. Luke United Methodist Church, a local congregation, to run part of the 
        College’s Upward Bound Program through their teen center, while serving low‐income students attending 
        Burke High School.  
 
The College cannot operate its clinical programs without its relationships with clinical sites which are required 
components of each undergraduate healthcare program and which include hospitals, physician’s offices, 
community sites, colleges, hospices, and nursing homes. Community members form key collaborative relationships 
with NMC, and each academic program is responsible to an advisory committee comprised of both experts in the 
field and those with a vested interest in the program. These advisory committees are essential to each program’s 
meeting the requirements of accrediting agencies. The committees provide expertise from community sectors and 
clinical sites. Relationships with accrediting agencies such as state and national professional bodies are monitored 
for each of the programs and all regulations are observed. NMC collaborates with these accreditation agencies 
very successfully as evidenced by positive site visits and re‐accreditations in every program and the frequency of 
NMC personnel serving as officers or advisers in the organizations.    
 
One integral internal relationship with the College is the support of the Nebraska Methodist Hospital Foundation, 
which contributes to the legacy of the College to ensure future College growth. The Foundation accepts and 
manages all charitable donations to the College and provides funding for the following:  
     • Nebraska Methodist College ‐ The Josie Harper Campus and Josie’s Village 
     • Student support in the form of scholarships, grants, and emergency funds 
     • Teaching support, including distinguished professorships and professional staff development 
     • Library and technology support through learning resources 
     • Graduate education 
     •  Alumni development 
     • The Dr. Jean Schmidt Beyer Alumni Center.




Overview                                                                                                          10 

 
 


Category 1: Helping Students Learn 
 
1P1. How do you determine which common or shared objectives for learning and development you should hold for 
all students pursuing degrees at a particular level? Whom do you involve in setting these objectives? 
The Educated Citizen Core Curriculum was initiated in fall 2006 after faculty representing all Divisions of the 
College became engaged in the process of identifying the shared learning outcomes for all undergraduate 
students, regardless of major. The College mission and the mission of the General Education department served as 
guiding principles in support of a true “core curriculum” as opposed to a set of general distribution requirements. 
Currently, there is a renewed discussion on campus related to the requirements of the core curriculum, especially 
when examining transfer credit.  
 
The Educated Citizen model has three goals: Reflective Individual, Effective Communicator, and Change Agent. 
Below are the learning objectives for each. 
 
Educated Citizen Core Curriculum Outcomes 
 
1. Reflective Individual A reflective individual routinely engages in habits of inquiry that influence ways of thinking 
and actions.  
1. Integrate learning from a variety of disciplines. 
              A.      Routinely engage in habits of inquiry such as logic and critical thinking. 
              B.      Engage one or more humanities disciplines to influence ways of thinking and acting. 
              C.      Engage one or more social science disciplines to influence ways of thinking and acting. 
              D.      Apply the scientific method. 
              E.      Analyze perspectives of holism. 
2. Exhibit personal responsibility. 
         
2. Effective Communicator An effective communicator uses critical thinking to generate, connect, and organize 
ideas in a written, oral and nonverbal manner. 
1. Use appropriate written skills in varied contexts. 
2. Use appropriate oral and nonverbal skills in varied contexts. 
3.     Use Spanish or other international languages in academic and community settings. 
 
3. Change Agent A change agent uses the disciplines of the liberal arts and sciences to analyze historical and 
contemporary situations and systems, to develop cultural competence, and to take appropriate initiative to effect 
change. 
1.   Analyze historical and contemporary situations and systems. 
       A. Access information and resources. 
       B. Critically analyze current events using habits of inquiry unique to sociology, political science, history,  
            religion, and/or economics. 
2.  Develop cultural competence. 
      A. Demonstrate respect for others with alternative points of view. 
      B. Analyze power dynamics from sociological and historical perspectives. 
3.  Take appropriate initiative to effect change. 
      A. Draw individuals and/or organizations together for a common purpose. 
      B. Create a voice for self and others. 
 
The Educated Citizen Core Curriculum is a College‐wide commitment with the primary responsibility for breadth of 
learning falling within General Education; yet significant contributions are made by professional programs and 
Student Affairs (See Figure 1.1). 
 
 

Category 1                                                                                                           11 

 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 1.1 Educated Citizen Model 
 
1P2. How do you determine your specific program learning objectives? Whom do you involve in setting these 
objectives?  
The learning objectives of each program at Nebraska Methodist College are developed to reflect the mission and 
philosophy of both NMC and the individual programs. Drawing input from the program‐specific advisory board or 
committee, the Program Director is responsible for creating program objectives that are based on professional 
standards and guidelines. The program learning objectives are reviewed by the NMC Faculty Senate Curriculum 
Committee. Program learning objectives are focused on preparing students who are competent, caring, safe, and 
effective in their discipline, and who will positively influence the communities in which they work. Learning 
objectives encompass competency, professional ideals, and the expectation that the program will produce 
educated citizens.  
 
Degree‐completion programs offered through the online NMC Institute are overseen by a Program Development 
Officer (PDO). The Institute is intended to be a branch of NMC that is especially responsive to market demands. 
Program learning objectives are developed based on community needs with community partners. The PDO for 
each program is charged with creating a Faculty Advisory Board for each program made up of qualified 
credentialed faculty with academic and/or real world experience.   
 
The membership of the advisory committee for the Nursing Division includes NMC nursing faculty and 
administrators, graduate and undergraduate nursing program representatives, and community members from 
practice sites who are nursing professionals and/or administrators of programs. The members draw from a variety 
of perspectives to bring issues related to practice and student performance/involvement to the forefront and to 
contribute insights about clinical experiences and expectations. This advisory committee does not approve 
curriculum, as nursing curriculum is addressed strictly by state and national accreditation guidelines. However, 
ultimately the faculty who teach the courses build the program with approval of all new courses from Faculty 
Senate. In addition to the formal nursing advisory committee, a Methodist Hospital‐NMC Nursing Leadership Team 
(see category 9) meets regularly to evaluate NMC graduates’ professional performance. 
 




Category 1                                                                                                    12 

 
 


1P3. How do you design new programs and courses that facilitate student learning and are competitive with those 
offered by other organizations?  
NMC is dedicated to the design and implementation of high‐quality educational programs that fulfill needs for 
both students and community members for professional and personal development. As new programs are 
considered, a variety of factors are reviewed: compatibility with mission; market analysis of job growth; accrediting 
requirements; competitive programs already offered in the region; costs associated with faculty, staff, labs, and 
equipment; potential for clinical experience; and interest within the region. Each of these factors must be 
favorable before a new program is taken before the Board of Directors for approval or any financial investment is 
made. One of the primary criteria for developing any new program at the College is compatibility with the mission. 
 
To facilitate student learning, faculty are encouraged to use learning‐centered approaches in the classroom and 
hands‐on clinical experiences to achieve defined outcomes. To be competitive and respond to what students want 
and need (e.g., quality programs for reasonable money and time), NMC offers accelerated programs, and some 
online courses and programs. Ongoing implementation of new technology ensures our competitive edge. 
 
1P4. How do you design responsive academic programming that balances and integrates learning goals, students’ 
career needs, and the realities of the employment market? 
Annual strategic planning on future growth directly considers students’ career needs and the realities of the 
employment market. For example, when a newly opening hospital in the Nebraska Methodist Health System 
(NMHS) announced plans to restrict hiring of nurses to only those with a BSN degree, NMC created an online BSN 
program (RN‐BSN Academy) for RNs in the NMHS who wanted to become more competitive. Following the success 
of that model and the already successful online master’s programs, NMC developed plans for a primarily degree‐
completion institute in spring 2010 to offer responsive online curricula in other healthcare arenas. NMC’s 
extensive engagement in regional healthcare networks allows them to be on the front‐end of regional and national 
employment trends.  This fits NMC’s desire to ‘niche’ programs that are designed for specific medical‐related jobs. 
Regardless, of the delivery model, faculty has control over the curriculum so that the courses maintain quality with 
the learning goals.  

1P5. How do you determine the preparation required of students for the specific curricula, programs, courses, and 
learning they will pursue?  
Associate Deans and program directors design program entrance requirements in consultation with Student Affairs 
and the General Education Department to ensure that newly admitted students are adequately prepared for 
success in the program. Admission Committees establish acceptance requirements that are based on program‐
specific accreditation mandates, on the rigor of the program, and also on an analysis of attrition. The Admissions 
Department collects student data on high school GPA, ACT scores, college GPA, and first time freshman and/or first 
generation status. Trends in attrition are tracked and used to make changes. Aggregate data led to changes in 
admission requirements to ensure student success at NMC. For example, in 2009 aggregated attrition data 
showing increased failure rates in NMC science courses indicated a need for adjustment of admission criteria. High 
School chemistry is now an admission pre‐requisite for nursing students and math/science high school GPA is 
considered. To increase board pass rates, the minimum ACT score for admission was raised in 2009 from a 
composite score of 18 to 20.  

1P6. How do you communicate to current and prospective students the required preparation, learning, and 
developmental objectives for specific programs, courses, and degrees or credentials? How do admissions, student 
support, and registration services aid in this process? 
Admissions, student services, and the registrar use the following methods to communicate requirements to 
prospective students: 
• All freshman and transfer applicants receive an information packet that includes admission criteria guidelines 
• As they answer inquiries, Admission Representatives diligently explain the criteria for admission to each 
    program. Admissions are responsible for informing applicants about the limited enrollment in each program 
    and the selective and competitive nature of admission to NMC. 
Category 1                                                                                                         13 

 
 


•   Each program supplies Fact Sheets that detail the respective curriculum requirements.  
•   During a campus visit, such as Senior Visit Day hosted by Admissions, or during the interview with a program 
    director, the rigor of the program is explained and examples of clinical and professional experiences are 
    shared with all prospective students.  
•   The College catalog is available online.  
•   Program directors provide a program handbook with requirements and professional/technical standards to 
    students as they are accepted and enrolled.  
•   The College website also features a detailed profile of each program, including the admission criteria, 
    curriculum outline, and professional/technical standards. 
•   Student Services assigns each new student an academic advisor who communicates the requirements for 
    specific programs, courses, credentials, and degrees. The advisor revisits these requirements when students 
    are not successful in coursework to ensure student knowledge of the potential impact of course failure on 
    progression. 
•   Students are required to attend College Orientation where they are informed about support services and 
    program‐specific requirements.  

1P7. How do you help students select programs of study that match their needs, interests, and abilities?  
The Admissions Office invites prospective students and families to the campus on several occasions each year. 
During many of these visits, faculty from the respective programs provides demonstrations and activities in 
classrooms and lab facilities. Prospective students gain a deeper understanding of the expectations of the program 
as well as the profession. All applicants, especially those for more selective and competitive programs, are strongly 
encouraged to tour a hospital or complete a job shadowing experience. In the PTA program, job shadowing is a 
requirement for admission.  
 
An Admissions Representative conducts each applicant’s interview and addresses the anticipated questions or 
concerns of the respective Admissions Committee. The interview includes discussion of both program 
requirements and a detailed analysis of the applicant’s previous academic performance. Official high school and 
college transcripts are required of each applicant. Special attention is given to science and math courses to 
establish previous success with demanding, relevant coursework. Applicants are counseled on alternate plans as 
appropriate.  
 
NMC admits students into programs when they are admitted into the College; most programs involve students in a 
clinical experience their first year. This allows students early in the program to evaluate their match with that 
selected program.  
 
Graduate students discuss their pending registration with the program director/coordinator, often by phone as all 
the graduate programs are online programs. Among the topics discussed are each student’s educational 
preparation, fit for the specific graduate program, and life readiness for graduate studies.  
 
NMC sees this question as an opportunity of perhaps doing more in this area.  Reviewing areas of research in 
personality and career choice or vocational testing before implementing any ideas are needed.  
           
1P8. How do you deal with students who are underprepared for the academic programs and courses you offer? 
NMC admission criteria help to ensure that students are prepared for the rigor of the academic programs and 
courses offered. The Admissions Committee for each program reviews applicants for suitability. For example, the 
BSN Program Admissions Committee includes the Program Director and representative faculty, the Admissions 
Representative, and the Advisement and Retention Specialist (ARS). During reviews, the ARS forms plans to 
monitor the future progress of students who need additional academic support. After enrollment, a full‐time 
Academic Skills Specialist is available to work with students in need of support. At registration, undergraduate 
nursing students take a math assessment exam to determine if a remedial course is needed.  
 
Category 1                                                                                                         14 

 
 


As of fall 2010, first time freshmen are encouraged to enroll in the available freshman seminar courses to provide 
them with tools for academic success. In some programs, such as nursing, math testing is used to identify students 
who are not ready for the math requirements for the program. Students who do not reach the benchmark score 
are enrolled in a developmental math course.  
ATI testing in each nursing course is used to assess a student’s mastery of the subject. If students are below the 
benchmark score, they must complete a one credit hour course in the areas of math in which the requirements 
were not met. There is a high correlation between ATI results and board pass rates (See 1R4). 
 
Through Spring 2010, study seminars were provided for science courses and some nursing courses that historically 
have higher than average failure rates. These were designed as interactive one‐hour sessions to help students with 
their understanding of the course material. Students who had lower than a 75% test score average were required 
to attend one session each week until their test average improved.  As of Summer 2010, the College is transitioning 
to supplemental instruction for these same courses. Sessions are taught by students who have been successful in 
the courses; attendance to these sessions is optional. Student tutoring is also available to students at no cost. In 
addition, workshops on test‐taking strategies specific to each program are available (See Category 6). 
 
1P9. How do you detect and address differences in students’ learning styles?  
NMC does not stress teaching for learning styles as the research suggests this may not be effective teaching. 
However, there may be some merit to students understanding their own learning styles. Student Services offers 
tools to assess learning styles (i.e. LASSI, MBTI, and LSI). To address differences in learning styles, workshops are 
offered to students to build on their strengths. In addition, faculty receives training in a variety of instructional 
delivery methods, learning activities, and performance‐based assessments geared toward multiple teaching 
modalities. 
            
1P10. How do you address the special needs of student subgroups (e.g. handicapped students, seniors, 
commuters)?  
Special needs of student subgroups are addressed through Student Services. For example, students who are 
diagnosed with a learning disability are provided accommodations. In addition, online registration, synchronous 
and asynchronous online courses, and an online bookstore seek to meet the needs of a diverse population. (See 
1P‐8 for additional ways that NMC responds to special student needs.) 
            
1P11. How do you define, document, and communicate across your organization your expectations for effective 
teaching and learning?  
• The Faculty Development Committee of Faculty Senate sponsors initiatives to deepen faculty command of 
     best practices. In 2009‐2010, the focus was a Team Based Learning initiative which became an AQIP Project 
     (AQIP Project). Once per year, the adjunct faculty is encouraged to attend an “Adjunct Gathering” to review 
     college wide initiatives and be provided resources for effective teaching and learning. 
• The IDEA Student Evaluation process assists faculty in understanding effective teaching and in appraising 
     teaching methods. It also provides Associate Deans and Program Directors with a detailed assessment of 
     faculty strengths and weaknesses. The IDEA Center gives the faculty resources to improve their teaching based 
     on these assessments.  
• In 2010, the Faculty Development Committee developed a Peer Review form for use across all departments in 
     the 2010‐2011 academic year. The form is intended to be a developmental tool to improve teaching; however, 
     completed forms are a necessary component for advancement in rank at NMC. In addition, in some 
     departments, clinical instructors are evaluated by clinical site staff to confirm and improve effectiveness in 
     practice. 
• Annual Contribution Reviews (see Category 4) are completed for each faculty member. Effective teaching 
     strategies are measured for faculty, both by the supervisor and the faculty member. If faculty are not meeting 
     expectations, their supervisor creates a developmental plan for improvement.  
            


Category 1                                                                                                        15 

 
 


1P12. How do you build an effective and efficient course delivery system that addresses both students’ needs and 
your organization’s requirements?  
The course delivery system varies depending upon the specific needs of the student groups and curriculum of the 
programs (see Table 1.1). Developments in technology have facilitated several course delivery options. The 
Educational Technology Department was established in 2002 to support faculty and students with technology 
needs. NMC acquired the ANGEL online learning management software in 2004 (replacing Blackboard which had 
been the delivery system since the late 1990s), and it is available for all courses, whether held on‐campus or via 
distance education. NMC employs an Instructional Design Specialist; she has developed online and in‐person 
learning modules to help faculty learn new technology. 
          
Table 1.1 Course Delivery Systems 
Student Group                         Course Delivery Systems

Certificate                           Face‐to‐face communication, laboratories, clinical experience 
On‐campus undergraduate               Face‐to‐face communication, laboratories, clinical experience, service‐learning, 
                                      hybrid online/classroom, teleconferencing, portfolios 
Degree completion undergraduate       Online, service‐learning, clinical experience, e‐portfolios 
Graduate                              Online, clinical/practicum 
 
Strategic scheduling is part of effective and efficient course delivery. Class schedules are designed to facilitate 
student progression in all programs and at all levels. Departments regularly adjust course offerings to meet 
student demand. Students in good academic standing are guaranteed enrollment in courses that are required for 
progression. The College monitors student satisfaction, especially in Institute Programs, to make sure the format 
and structure are optimal.  

1P13. How do you ensure that your programs and courses are up‐to‐date and effective?  
NMC has multiple processes for ensuring that programs and courses are up‐to‐date and effective. 
    • Strategic Planning. Through the process of strategic planning, the College strives to keep its programs and 
        courses up‐to‐date and effective (see Category 7). 
    • Certification/licensure/exam results. Program‐specific accreditation agencies review graduate outcomes 
        such as certification/licensure pass rates and graduate/employer surveys. These outcomes are reviewed 
        internally and with external Advisory Committees.  
    • Student Feedback. Students’ input on IDEA Student Evaluations yields important insights about 
        effectiveness of courses and instructors (see 1R1). 
    • Advisory Committees. Every undergraduate health professions program has an Advisory Committee. The 
        membership of the committee is generally directed by the accrediting bodies; the campus‐based 
        undergraduate/certificate program committees have a student representative, alumni representative, 
        clinical site representatives, program faculty, and program director. The Associate Dean assists as an ex‐
        officio member on all committees. Some Advisory Committees are required to have a community member 
        and some are required to have a physician representative. As programs consider professional literature, 
        forecast changes in their professions, review graduate and employer feedback and outcomes data 
        (program attrition/persistence, exam pass rate, employment rates), curricular adjustments are proposed 
        that must be approved by the faculty within the department, the respective advisory committee, and 
        Faculty Senate.  
    • Accrediting Bodies. Updates from accrediting bodies often drive curricular changes.  
              
1P14. How do you change or discontinue programs and courses?  
The process for changing or discontinuing courses starts with feedback from several sources: the Enrollment 
Management Committee, professional certification/licensure bodies, educational outcomes, and program advisory 
committees. Any changes are made with stakeholders’ views considered at each point in the process. 
 

Category 1                                                                                                                16 

 
 


Enrollment Management Committee meets every three weeks to review admissions reports to determine 
marketing focus and program viability. As scopes of practice are adjusted within each healthcare profession, some 
programs become obsolete, or the market becomes heavily saturated. Program directors work with the 
Admissions Department to monitor interest in programs, market demand for graduates, and the actions of peer 
institutions in the region. When the decision is made to discontinue a program, great lengths are taken to ensure 
that each student currently in the program can continue to completion. Detailed degree completion plans are 
drafted so students are aware of remaining required courses before they are phased out. The discontinuation of 
the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Certificate Program is one example. Students were informed of the decision 
in writing, and they met with an Academic Affairs administrator to discuss questions. They were also offered 
access to tutors whenever necessary, even after completion of the program in order to prep for registry exams. All 
EMS students were able to successfully complete their plan of study on time.  
 
Most of NMC’s healthcare programs are accountable to specific professional certification/licensure bodies for 
continuing accreditation. These bodies regularly scrutinize curriculum, certification/licensure pass rates, and 
faculty credentials to ensure currency. NMC programs go beyond these minimum requirements, using educational 
outcomes to continuously build and revise program structure and curriculum. Program Advisory Committees also 
convene to review curriculum, licensure/board pass rates, graduate and employer feedback, and professional 
literature in an effort to adjust the curriculum as needed. As changes are made, revised curricula must be reviewed 
and accepted by the program faculty and the Faculty Senate Curriculum Committee. This process is fully described 
in the Faculty Handbook. An example of a program‐specific change was the transformation of the RN to BSN 
program from an on‐campus program to an online format. The change was formulated in consultation with 
Nebraska Methodist Hospital nursing staff who indicated that an online format would be more conducive to the 
nurses’ demanding schedules.  
 
1P15. How do you determine and address the learning support needs (tutoring, advising, placement, library, 
laboratories, etc.) of your students and faculty in your student learning, development, and assessment processes?  
NMC determines learning support needs through the following processes: 
      • Outcomes, such as graduate/employer surveys, board exam pass rates, course grades, and ATI testing, are 
          reviewed for possible trends showing a need for improvement. 
      • Resource assessment surveys are completed by students, faculty, and Advisory Committee members to 
          assess learning resource adequacy. 
      • Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) survey results are used as a benchmark in Student Services’ 
          Systematic Evaluation Plans (SEPs) for student satisfaction of learning support. 
      • Library and other student service surveys are administered to faculty and students to assess needs.  
      • IDEA evaluations assess learning support and teaching methodologies. 
      • Student progress reports are required early in the semester and at midterm to provide feedback to 
          students and their advisors on the students’ progress; advisors then contact at‐risk students and advise 
          them of Student Services’ support. 
      • In some situations, faculty place students with failing mid‐term grades on an Academic Development Plan 
          or contract. The contract stipulates deficiencies in student performance in the course and the 
          recommended course(s) of action for the student to be successful. 
           
 1P16. How do you align your co‐curricular development goals with your curricular learning objectives?  
 NMC aligns their co‐curricular development goals by SEPs in Student Services that target the Educated Citizen 
 learning objectives. The College’s focus on student development is infused in both curricular and co‐curricular 
 programs. New Student Orientation introduces the Educated Citizen model. This includes a “common text” 
 discussion that reinforces the idea that higher education fosters the individual sharing of ideas from different 
 perspectives. The Coordinator for Leadership Development (Student Affairs) and the Service‐Learning Coordinator 
 (Academic Affairs) collaborate on service projects and the integration of the process of reflection. Throughout their 
 experience at NMC, students have multiple opportunities for service‐learning and community service. Portfolio 
 Seminars that expand student exposure to the Educated Citizen goals and objectives are developed and facilitated 

Category 1                                                                                                         17 

 
 


by both faculty and staff on a wide variety of topics. The Center for Health Partnerships provides instructors mini 
grants for exploring service‐learning opportunities and implementing these into the courses.  
 
1P17. How do you determine that students to whom you award degrees and certificates have met your learning 
and development expectations?  
NMC reviews internal and external indicators of success to determine if students who complete their course of  
study have met expectations. Some of these outcome assessments are as follows. 
Skills Testing. Most programs include summative evaluations of students’ knowledge and skills. Professional 
courses assess students for the clinical skills that are required for employment. Practice tests are administered to 
prepare students for licensure or certification exams.  
Board pass rates are closely monitored for trends that indicate needed changes. In response to a decline in NCLEX‐
RN pass rates in 2003‐2005, the Curriculum and Assessment Teams in the Nursing Division examined course 
content and the results of exit exams. A new curriculum was implemented fully by 2006, and the pass rates 
increased the same year and have continued to increase (see 1R4). Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) testing 
was also implemented in the Nursing curriculum at that time.  
Surveys. Graduates are surveyed to determine employment status, offer feedback on academic preparation, and 
to track students’ pursuit of advancing degrees. In addition, their employers are surveyed or participate in focus 
groups to assess graduate preparedness. Graduate and employer feedback have led to changes in curriculum.                                          

1P18. How do you design your processes for assessing student learning?  
The Director of Institutional Research helps to coordinate institutional assessment and supports program‐specific 
assessment processes. The Program Director and program faculty in conjunction with Advisory Committees are 
responsible for assessment of student learning within individual programs.  
 
Programs. Each program has a SEP that articulates procedures and processes for conducting program‐specific 
assessment. Data on program and student outcomes are gathered from communities of interest (for example, 
students, graduates, employers, licensure boards, faculty, and the program’s Advisory Committee). The 
measureable goals, thresholds, persons responsible, timelines, data collection methods, and sources of 
information used in the data collection are included in the Assessment Process Documentation Grid (PTA 
example). Outcomes of the assessment process are used for continuous improvement of student learning. The 
purpose of the SEP is to use program and student outcomes to evaluate and modify objectives and program 
learning objectives. Program SEPs are on a cycle of continuous improvement, and the Annual Reports generated 
are provided to accrediting agencies and division supervisors. The structure for Annual Reports was revised for 
2007‐2008 in an effort to standardize the content that was included in each program’s report. Annual Reports now 
include: departmental demographics; outcomes; identification of strengths and weaknesses that outcomes have 
revealed; and plans for improvement. 
 
Program Advisory Committees. The purpose of each Program Advisory Committee is to provide a mechanism for 
eliciting feedback and suggestions from program constituents, including clinical managers and active practitioners 
in the field who work with NMC students, a current student representative, and program alumnae. With the goal 
of improving student learning and outcomes, the Advisory Committees use outcome data, as well as direct 
experiences with the program or the students in the program, to make recommendations for curricular 
modifications, clinical policies, or other changes in the program. 
 
Core Curriculum. Processes for assessing core curriculum are determined according to the Educated Citizen Core 
Curriculum Outcomes (see Figure 1.1). The need for a comprehensive assessment process for the Educated Citizen 
Core Curriculum was identified in the 2006 Systems Appraisal. The assessment process was a high priority and was 
designated as an AQIP Action Project as well as an Action Step that arose from the General Education 
Department’s own Strategic Plan. The SEP was developed after most courses in the new Educated Citizen Core 
Curriculum were designed and implemented; the assessment plan was then able to measure directly from these 
courses. All courses in the Educated Citizen Core Curriculum have specific Core outcomes tied to the courses. 

Category 1                                                                                                                  18 

 
 


General Education faculty collaborated to design an efficient and focused SEP that would lead to an ongoing 
dialogue on student learning related to Core outcomes.  

1R1. What measures of your students’ learning and development do you collect and analyze regularly?  
NMC regularly collects and analyzes both formative and summative measures to determine student learning and 
development (See Table 1.2). Formative measures are used to identify struggling students early and throughout 
their time at NMC in order to provide resources for their success. For example, academic advisors use individual 
and cumulative grade point averages, educational goals, life circumstances, financial considerations, and other 
measures to advise individual students. Summative measures are used to assess student learning and 
development to make programmatic and student services changes.  
 
Table 1.2 Measures of Student Learning and Development 
Measures                                                  Action                                Schedule of Analysis  
Formative:                                                                                       
Grade Point Average          Registrar assesses GPA for probation and dismissal                 Each term 
Progression Grades           Instructors report grades below “C” to registrar; advisors         4 and 8 weeks into each 
                             then contact the students to provide resources to help             semester 
                             students succeed.                            
ATI Testing                  Nursing Assessment Team evaluates grades below                     Each nursing course  
                             benchmark; students work with ATI coordinator on plan of 
                             study to review content.  
Portfolio Presentation       Students research and present during Capstone course to            Students’ last semester 
                             demonstrate skills and knowledge acquired throughout a 
                             program. Portfolio of Distinction Awards are given at 
                             graduation.  
Summative:  
Retention Reports            Director of Institutional Research (DIR) uses for institutional    Semester 
                             benchmarks, and Associate Deans use data for 
                             Departmental SEP   
Degree Completion            DIR uses for institutional benchmarks, and Associate Deans         Semester 
                             use data for Departmental SEP 
IDEA Course Evaluations      DIR uses data for institutional benchmarks; Associate Deans        Semester 
                             use data for student evaluation of faculty and Departmental 
                             SEP.  
NSSE                         DIR uses for institutional benchmarks and Associate Deans          Every 3 years 
                             use data for Departmental SEP 
SSI                          Director of Institutional Research/ uses for Department SEP        Every 3 years 
                             and institutional benchmarks 
ATI/Comprehensive            Nursing Assessment Team works with programs to address             Each nursing course/science 
Predictor/Trends Report      content area in which students consistently score low.             courses  
Portfolio Presentation       Bachelor’s‐degree Capstone course students research and            Bachelor‐degree students’ 
                             present on a community issue that demonstrates “real               last semester 
                             world” application that encompasses skills and knowledge 
                             acquired throughout a program.  
Graduate Surveys             Program Directors and Advisory Committees review post              Post graduation 
                             graduate surveys for programmatic evaluation. 
Employer Surveys             Program Directors and Advisory Committees review                   Annually 
                             employer survey results.  

 



Category 1                                                                                                                     19 

 
 


Programs also collect measures of student learning as reported on their SEP that are part of their Annual Reports. 
Each program’s SEP (see example: Systematic Evaluation Plans) includes a matrix for data collected and analyzed, 
as illustrated in Table 1.3.  
 
Table 1.3 Data Collected on Student Learning and Schedule of Undergraduate Analysis  
Program                    Samples Collected                                          Schedule of Analysis
General Education Core    Documentation of student mastery of each primary outcome             Random sample annually 
Curriculum                (Reflective Individual, Effective Communicator, Change Agent) 
                          Portfolio presentations                                              Analyzed annually 

Medical Assisting,        Individual Skill competencies required by accrediting body, IDEA     Analyzed on an ongoing 
certificate               evaluations for each class.                                          basis 
                          Externship site evaluations of the students, evaluation of the       After each ten‐week term 
                          externship site by the student, graduate surveys at 6 months and     Analyzed annually  
                          employer surveys at 6 months post graduation 
Nursing, undergraduate    Preceptor evaluation, skills lab capstone clinical; NCLEX pass       Annually 
                          rates; admissions, progression, and graduation rates; complaints 
                          and resolutions; clinical evaluations on a semester basis; 
                          graduate surveys, employer surveys 
Radiologic Technology     Procedures portfolio, clinical check‐offs, evaluation by             Annually 
                          technologists, assignments in positioning/procedures, simulated       
                          ARRT exams 
                          Graduate surveys and employer surveys                                Immediately after 
                                                                                               graduation, one year and 
                                                                                               five years post graduation 
Respiratory Care          Clinical site and instructor evaluations, instructor/course          End of each semester 
                          evaluations 
                          CoARC graduate and employer surveys                                  12 months post graduation 
                          National entry level and advanced practitioner exams (CRT,           Annually 
                          WRRT, and CSE), attrition, job placement 6 months post 
                          graduation; student, faculty, and advisory committee complete 
                          CoARC Program Resource Survey 
Sonography                Clinical portfolio, clinical exam competencies, clinical rotation    Every semester 
                          evaluations, lab portfolio (scanning & protocol assignments). 
                          Final program exam competencies, graduate surveys and                Immediately at graduation; 
                          employer surveys                                                     6‐9 months post graduation 
Surgical Technology       Clinical evaluations by preceptors and faculty, Performance          Concurrent during clinical 
                          Assessment Exams by ARC‐ST, graduate surveys and employer            component, at graduation, 
                          surveys.                                                             and 6‐9 months following 
                                                                                               graduation 
Physical Therapist        Test and course grades; student achievement of course                At the end of each course  
Assistant                 objectives  
                          Lab practical performance and skill checks of competency on          At the end of each lab 
                          clinical skills                                                      course 
                          Clinical Performance Instrument                                      At the end of each clinical 
                                                                                               course 
                          Student achievement of program objectives                            Annually  
                          IDEA Student Evaluation                                              Annually  
                          Exit interview, national physical therapy examination pass rates,    Annually  
                          employer survey, graduate survey 
 
1R2. What are your performance results for your common student learning and development objectives?  
NMC’s College‐wide student learning and development objectives are defined in the Educated Citizen Core 
Curriculum (See 1P1). While the courses offered in the Educated Citizen Core Curriculum serve as the foundation 

Category 1                                                                                                                    20 

 
 


for the three goals, the goals are deepened and applied in the professional courses and in the co‐curricular 
offerings of Student Affairs (see 1R5). With this model, the entire College contributes to the development of 
Educated Citizens.  
Educated Citizen outcomes for the core curriculum are measured and reported in the General Education SEP. 
These include direct measures of student learning in such areas as writing, public speaking, and portfolio outcomes 
and also include indirect measures such as student perceptions and satisfaction as measured by the SSI, NSSE, and 
IDEA.  
 
Writing Outcomes. Instructors of HU150 use the identified Educated Citizen Core Curriculum outcomes and 
identified writing outcomes to score papers on similar assignments. A random sample of these papers are then 
scored by the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) committee in a blind review and assessed as either satisfactory 
or unsatisfactory mastery of the outcomes. If the instructor and first reviewer disagree on three or more 
categories, the paper is submitted for a third review. WAC submits an analysis of student writing to the General 
Education department for discussion and action. Beginning with Fall 2007 courses, the WAC committee assessed a 
random sample of the second Formal Paper submitted for course credit in HU150: Critical Reasoning and Rhetoric 
according to five categories: (a) Controlling Ideas, (b) Development, (c) Style, (d) Form, and (e) Core Curriculum 
goal 1.1.A.: “Routinely engage in habits of inquiry such as logic and critical thinking.” The target is that 85% of the 
sample papers will achieve a score of “Satisfactory,” which is defined as receiving a satisfactory score on at least 
three of the five assessment categories. With the exception of the Fall 2007 semester, the target has been met 
(See Table 1.4) 

Table 1.4 Measurement of Student Learning – Writing  
Semester               Target               Results                    Plan of Action
Fall 2007 (n=20)       85% Satisfactory     75%   Satisfactory         HU150 increased efforts to address 
Spring 2008 (n=11)     85% Satisfactory     91%   Satisfactory
Fall 2008 (n=13)       85% Satisfactory     100% Satisfactory          WAC Committee review definition of “critical 
                                                                       thinking” for more uniform assessments 
Fall 2009 (n=27)             85%  Satisfactory    88% Satisfactory
           
Speaking is being assessed by review of speeches delivered in the students’ first year and at graduation. Instructors 
of HU150 use the identified Educated Citizen Core Curriculum outcomes and identified public speaking outcomes 
to score speeches on similar assignments. A random sample of speeches are then scored by the WAC committee in 
a blind review and assessed as either satisfactory or unsatisfactory mastery of the outcomes. In the case of HU150, 
if the instructor and first reviewer disagree on three or more categories, the speech will be submitted for a third 
review. From 2007 through 2008, the WAC committee assessed a random sample of the final 6‐minute Public 
Speech delivered for course credit in HU150: Critical Reasoning and Rhetoric, according to at least four categories: 
(a) Topic and Ideas, (b) Organization, (c) Delivery, and (d) Core curriculum goal 1.1.A.: “Routinely engage in habits 
of inquiry such as logic and critical thinking.” Core Curriculum goal 1.1.A. dealing with “critical thinking” is assessed 
according to the students’ inclusion of (a) insights beyond the reporting of facts, (b) evidence for the position 
taken, and (c) evaluation of alternative evidence.  
 
The target is for 85% of the sample speeches to achieve a score of “Satisfactory.” In 2007 and 2008, “satisfactory” 
was defined as receiving a satisfactory score on at least 3 of the 5 assessment categories; beginning Fall 2009, 
“satisfactory” defined as receiving a satisfactory score on at least 3 of 4 assessment categories. Speeches assessed 
during all of these semesters have met the target (See Table 1.5) 




Category 1                                                                                                             21 

 
 


 
Table 1.5 Measurement of Student Learning – Speech  
Semester                Target                  Results             Plan of Action
Fall 2007 (n=18)        85% Satisfactory        89% Satisfactory
Spring 2008 (n=12)   85% Satisfactory           93% Satisfactory
Fall 2008 (n=20)        85% Satisfactory        100%                WAC Committee review definition of “critical 
                                                Satisfactory        thinking” for more uniform assessments 
Fall 2009 (n=24)        85% Satisfactory        96% Satisfactory
 
Student Portfolios are used as a measure of end‐of‐degree progress on common learning objectives. They are 
evaluated by the Portfolio Assessment Team. Students that have an outstanding portfolio and also an exemplary 
portfolio presentation are awarded “Portfolio of Distinction” status at graduation.  
 
The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), administered in 2010, depicts indirect measures of student 
learning with respect to learning objectives. Table 1.6 provides sample mean comparisons of NSSE scores to NMC’s 
common learning objectives. NSSE results report scores on a scale from 1 “Very often” to 4 “Never.”   
 
Table 1.6 Mean Comparison of NSSE Scores to Learning  
NMC Common Learning Objectives                   NMC             Plains Private    Private Health    NSSE 2010 
                                                                                   Focus 
Reflective Individual  
Understanding yourself                           FY: 3.01        2.95              2.91              2.84 
                                                 SR: 2.96        2.99              2.98              2.86 
Understanding people of other racial and         FY: 3.05        2.71              2.70              2.70 
ethnic backgrounds                               SR: 2.95        2.75              2.69              2.69 
Developing a personal code of values and         FY: 3.01        2.90              2.90              2.73 
ethics                                           SR: 2.97        2.93              3.00              2.77 
Thinking critically and analytically             FY: 3.67        3.36              3.37              3.25 
                                                 SR: 3.58        3.48              3.53              3.38 
Learning effectively on your own                 FY: 3.27        3.03              3.01              2.95 
                                                 SR: 3.20        3.17              3.11              3.07 
Solving complex real‐world problems              FY: 3.00        2.77              2.78              2.72 
                                                 SR: 2.91        2.89              2.90              2.83 
Making judgments about the value of              FY: 3.34        3.01              3.05              2.94 
information, arguments, or methods, such as      SR: 3.36        3.10              3.15              3.05 
examining how others gathered and 
interpreted data and assessing the soundness 
of their conclusions 
Effective Communicator 
Writing clearly and effectively                  FY: 3.53        3.18              3.19              3.05 
                                                 SR: 3.25        3.28              3.20              3.13 
Speaking clearly and effectively                 FY: 3.55        2.98              2.96              2.89 
                                                 SR: 3.20        3.03              3.10              3.02 
Analyzing the basic elements if an idea,         FY: 3.43        3.21              3.27              3.15 
experience, or theory, such as examining a       SR: 3.41        3.33              3.36              3.29 
particular case or situation in depth and 
considering its components 
Change Agent 
Applying theories or concepts to practical       FY: 3.56        3.16              3.24              3.08 
problems or in new situations                    SR: 3.56        3.33              3.38              3.26 
Working effectively with others                  FY: 3.55        3.15              3.15              3.03 
                                                 SR: 3.30        3.23              3.35              3.19 
Contributing to the welfare of your community    FY: 3.04        2.62              2.85              2.50 
                                                 SR: 3.04        2.60              2.81              2.52 

Category 1                                                                                                        22 

 
 


Academic and  intellectual experiences include    FY: 3.40            2.85                 2.83                2.80 
diverse perspectives in class discussions or      SR: 3.13            3.01                 2.91                2.85 
writing assignments 
Participated in a community‐based  project as     FY: 2.30            1.69                 1.91                1.60 
part of regular course                            SR: 2.90            1.70                 2.11                1.74 
 
The Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) results provide indirect measures of student learning through rating of 
satisfaction. In Spring 2009, NMC added nine questions to the SSI that link to learning objectives. The Likert scale 
ranged from 1 (not satisfied at all) to 7 (very satisfied). Means show that students are satisfied with their progress 
on the learning objectives (See Table 1.7).  
 
Table 1.7 SSI Measures of Student Learning  
Items: At NMC, I’m                                                                                             Mean  Scores 
Learning to apply course material to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions                          6.06 
Acquiring skills in working with others as a member of a team                                                  6.05 
Developing creative capacities (writing, performing in art, music…)                                            5.19 
Gaining a broader understanding and appreciation of intellectual/cultural activity                             5.10 
Developing skill in expressing myself orally or in writing                                                     5.51 
Learning how to find and use resources for answering questions                                                 5.63 
Developing a clearer understanding of and commitment to personal values                                        5.67 
Learning to analyze and critically evaluate ideas, argument, and points of view                                5.95 
Acquiring an interest in learning more by asking my own questions and seeking answers                          5.89 
 
IDEA Student Course Evaluations are used to assess common student learning objectives through the Institutional 
Summary Reports provided by IDEA. In addition, NMC participates in The IDEA Benchmarks for Learning, which 
allows NMC to compare student data with 6‐10 peers (See Category 3). Composite scores reflect strong results on 
progress.  
 
1R3. What are your performance results for specific program learning objectives?  
Program specific learning objectives are defined, monitored, and reported in compliance with their accrediting and 
certifying bodies. These outcomes include graduation rates (see Table 1.8), certification and licensure pass rates 
(see Table 1.9), and survey results. See Table 1.10 for IDEA results and Table 1.11 for an example of graduate 
survey results.   
 
Table 1.8 Program Graduation Rates  
Program                                 Benchmarks            2 year Graduation Rates          4‐Year 
                                                              (Associate Programs) 
Medical Assisting, certificate          70%                   65%                               

Nursing, undergraduate                  90%                                                     91% 
Radiologic Technology                   70%                   60%                               
Respiratory Care                        70%                   80% (3 still progressing)         
Sonography                              70%                   92%                               
Surgical Technology                     70%                   60%                               
Physical Therapist Assistant            70%                   91%                               
          
Table 1.9 NMC Certification/Licensure Pass Rates                  
Program                                 Exam/National Benchmark           NMC 2009 first attempt         NMC 2010 first attempt 
                                                                          pass rate                      pass rate 

Medical Assisting, certificate          AAMA Credentialing/70%            CMA 100% pass                  Not yet available 
Nursing, undergraduate                  NCLEX/ 90%                        RN 78% pass                    94% (May only) 
Radiologic Technology                   ARRT/ 89%                         85%                            100% 
Respiratory Care                        CRT/80%                           91%                            91% (May only) 
Category 1                                                                                                                     23 

 
 


Sonography                              ARDMS/61%                       94%                          Not yet available 
Surgical Technology                     AST/70%                         100%                         Not yet available 
                                        PAE/80%                         80% 
Physical Therapist Assistant            PTA Exam/80%                    Not applicable               Not yet available 
 
Table 1.10 IDEA Survey Results  
Program                                                                          NMC      Peers     Carnegie        National

Developing specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by           80.1     78.2      76.9            77.7 
professional in the field most closely related to this course 
Learning to apply course material to improve thinking, problem solving, and      77.6     77.8      76.1            77.2 
decisions 
Learning fundamental principles, generalizations, or theories                    77.2     77.8      77.1            77.6 
Acquiring an interest in learning more by asking questions and seeking           73.9     71.9      67.2            69.3 
answers 
 Source: 2010 IDEA Benchmarking for Learning Report 
 
Graduate surveys also track students’ perspectives of learning outcomes. For example, graduates of the BSN 
nursing program are asked to complete a survey one year after graduating. In the most recent survey of graduates 
of the December 2008 class, 52% completed the survey by phone and 12% sent in the follow‐up mail survey. Of the 
64% that responded, 100% of the respondents are employed in nursing full time as an RN. The survey asked 
graduates to rate “How Nebraska Methodist College prepared you in the following areas.”  Outcomes that do not 
meet benchmarks are monitored by the Nursing Assessment Team and recommendations are sent to the Nursing 
Curricular Team. The Associate Dean of Nursing is an ex officio member of both teams: this ensures that 
information is not only collected and reported, but also used to make changes in teaching methodology and/or 
curriculum. Table 1.11 lists the students’ responses to the learning outcomes survey.                         

Table 1.11 BSN students, Responses to Program Outcomes One Year After Graduation (Dec. 2008 Cohort)  
Item                                    Strongly    Disagree        Neutral      Agree       Strongly        Agree or Strongly 
                                        disagree                                             Agree           Agree 
Critical thinking                                                   15%          54%         31%             85%  
Organization and prioritization with                8%              8%           62%         23%             85% 
multiple clients 
Teamwork                                                                         46%         54%             100% 
Knowledge base                                      7%                           54%         39%             93% 
Delegation                                                          46%          46%         8%              54% 
Communication                                                       7%           31%         62%             93% 
Demonstration of caring and             8%                                       23%         69%             92% 
compassionate behaviors 
Competence with diverse                                             15%          62%         23%             85% 
populations 
Professionalism                                                                  38%         62%             100% 
Accuracy of self evaluation                                         15%          62%         23%             85% 
Interdisciplinary collaboration                                     39%          38%         23%             61% 
Patient safety                                                                   31%         69%             100% 
Knowledge of health care system         8%                          23%          54%         15%             69% 
Problem solving                                                     15%          54%         31%             85% 
Evaluating research findings            8%                          23%          69%                         69% 
Working with others as a member of                                  7%           31%         62%             93% 
a team 
A foundation for graduate study in      8%          8%                           46%         39%             85% 
nursing 
Red= lower than 85% benchmark  
 

Category 1                                                                                                                     24 

 
 


1R4. What is your evidence that the students completing your programs, degrees, and certificates have acquired 
the knowledge and skills required by your stakeholders (i.e., other educational organizations and employers)? 
NMC has a variety of means directly measuring students’ acquired knowledge and skills that are required by 
stakeholders. Programs include summative evaluations of students’ knowledge and skills that students must 
demonstrate before they graduate. Professional capstone courses assess students for clinical skills required for 
employment. Practice tests are administered to prepare students for licensure or certification exams. For example, 
in the Nursing Division, Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) testing is part of the curriculum. Undergraduate 
nursing students now take a series of ATI exams and must pass each with a score that is 50% or higher than the 
individual program percentile in order to avoid requirements for developmental learning. The departmental SEPs 
outline the evidence collected on students’ acquisition of knowledge, skill base, licensure, and certification exam 
results (See Table 1.9) for the awarding of specific degrees or credentials. The requirements of accrediting bodies 
for each program must be satisfied. In addition, the Core outcomes and the individual NMC program outcomes 
must be satisfied for progression and graduation.  
 
Evidence that NMC students have acquired the knowledge and skills base required by the institution and its 
stakeholders for the awarding of specific degrees or credentials includes indirect measures such as graduation 
rate, degrees awarded, student satisfaction with programs and services (reported in 1R5), and student evaluations. 
 
Graduation Rate: Figure 1.3 provides a summary of NMC’s graduation rates for full‐time, first‐time degree, 
certificate‐seeking undergraduates. Note: The cohort graduation rate as reported by IPEDS is not reflective of 
NMC’s student base, but is one of the standardized sources of comparative data available. 

Figure1.2 Graduation Rates 




                                                       
Source: IPEDS 
 
Degrees Awarded:  The number of degrees awarded has increased 107% since 2002 (see Figure 1.3). 
 




Category 1                                                                                                      25 

 
 


Figure 1.3 Number of Degrees Awarded 




                                                                                               
Source: IPEDS 
 
Evaluations: The quality of faculty‐student instruction is another measure which demonstrates that students have 
acquired necessary knowledge and base skills. Compared with students at like institutions, NMC students are 
reporting similar or slightly higher learning progress. See Table 1.12 for student rating of progress, according to the 
percentage of students that report “Exceptional” or “Substantial” progress on the IDEA faculty/course surveys.  
 
Table 1.12 IDEA Student Ratings on Learning Progress 
Survey Item                                                          NMC      NMC      Peers    Carnegie    National 
                                                                     2008     2009     2009     2009        2009 

Gaining factual knowledge (terminology, classifications, methods,    80.3%    82.9%    78.4%    78.4%       78.7% 
trends) 
Learning to apply course material (to improve thinking, problem      78.9%    79.1%    78.3%    77.2%       78.3% 
solving, and decisions.  
Developing specific skills, competencies, and points of view         82%      84%      79.1%    78.4%       79.9% 
needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this 
course 
Learning how to find and use resources for answering questions       72.9%    72.3%    72.8%    67.2%       69.4% 
or solving problems 
Source: IDEA Benchmarking for Learning Report 2010 
 
Accreditation:  All programs meet strict accreditation requirements to ensure that graduates have the knowledge 
needed for employment in their profession.  
 
1R5. What are your performance results for learning support processes (advising, library and laboratory use, etc.)? 
NMC performance results for support needed for learning are measured in NSSE. First Year (FY) students rate NMC 
higher than senior (SR) students, and higher than comparison institutions, as noted in Table 1.13. NSSE results 
report scores on a scale from 1 “Very often” to 4 “Never.”   
 




Category 1                                                                                                              26 

 
  


 Table 1.13 NSSE 2010 Results for Support Processes  
 Item                                                            NMC               Plains          Private Health    National 
                                                                                   Private         Focus             NSSE2010 
 Providing the support you need to help you succeed              FY 3.46           3.25            3.27              3.10** 
 academically                                                    SR 3.02           3.18            3.13              2.98 
 Helping you cope with your non‐academic responsibilities        FY 2.42           2.40            2.40              2.30 
 (work, family, etc.)                                            SR 2.04           2.17            2.14              2.04 
 Providing the support you need to thrive socially               FY 2.77           2.62            2.55              2.54 
                                                                 SR 2.10           2.31            2.24              2.28 
 How would you evaluate your entire educational                  FY 3.41           3.37            3.32              3.23 
 experience at this institution?                                 SR 3.13           3.38**          3.31              3.24 
 **p<.01 
  
 NMC performance results for key learning support indicators are summarized in Table 1.14.  
  
 Table 1.14 Results of Key Learning Support Indicators 
Process             Goal(s)           Measure (Asterisk *= source)               Result(s) 
Financial Aid (FA)     Ease of applying    Timeliness of response*                               86% satisfied to very satisfied 
                                           Satisfaction with availability*                       92% satisfied to very satisfied 
                       Effectiveness       Helpfulness of explanations*                          90% satisfied to very satisfied 
                                           Expertise demonstrated by staff**                     92% satisfied to very satisfied 
                       Security            FA awards are announced in time to be helpful         5.63 NMC  /5.09 National 4 yr 
                                           in college planning ***                               private 
                                           Default Rate                                          3.6% in 2007; 0% in 2008 
                                           Compliance                                            100% compliance (KMPG,  April 
                                                                                                 2010) 
Enrollment             Responsiveness      Admissions Staff provide personalized attention       5.57 NMC /5.25 National 4yr 
Services                                   prior to enrollment***                                private 
                       Ease of 
                       admission           Accurately portray the campus in their recruiting     5.50 NMC /5.05 National 4yr 
                                           practices ***                                         private 
                                           Experienced a sense of belonging from                 98% replied yes (n=234)  
                                           admissions*   
Academic Advising      Responsiveness      “My academic advisor is knowledgeable about           6.26 NMC/5.55 National 4yr 
                                           requirements in my major”***                          private 
                                                                                                  
                       Accessibility       “My academic advisor is available when I need         6.00NMC/ 5.36 National 4 yr 
                                           help”***                                              private 
                                                                                                  
                       Quality             “Overall how would you evaluate the quality of        FY 3.34 NMC/3.07 NSSE 2010 
                                           academic advising you have received  at your          SR 3.00NMC/ 2.94 NSSE 2010 
                                           institution”**** 
Library                Accessibility       Hours of operation                                    Hours of operations increased due 
                                                                                                 to student input 
                       Quality and         Utilization                                           Circulation usage increased 8% 
                       quantity of                                                               from 51,463 in AY08‐09 to 55,794 
                       materials                                                                 in AY 09‐10 
                                           “Overall satisfaction with the library’s resources     
                       Service oriented    and services in meeting your learning/research        82% responded extremely satisfied 
                                           needs” **                                             or very satisfied 
                                           “Librarian built a friendly and approachable          99% responded excellent or good 
                                           connection with students”** 
 Source: * New Student Orientation Evaluation (1/2010); **Customer Service Survey (1/2010); *** 2009 SSI; 
 ****NSSE 
  
 Category 1                                                                                                                         27 

  
 


1R6. How do your results for the performance of your processes in Helping Students Learn compare with the 
results of other higher education organizations and, where appropriate, with results of organizations outside of 
higher education?  
Graduation rates are a main indicator of how institutions help students learn; NMC is proud to report the highest 
5‐ and 6‐year graduation rates of all private non‐profit colleges and universities in the state of Nebraska for full‐
time, first‐time degree/certification‐seeking students (See Table 1.15). National bachelor’s degree graduation rate 
averaged 59% (Source: American Council on Education’s “College Student Retention: Formula for Student 
Success”) compared to an NMC graduation rate overall from the Fall 2000 cohort in the Fall of 2005 of 77.4%. 
NMC’s graduate programs’ graduation/retention rate was 90%.  
 
Table 1.15 Graduation Rate Comparisons 
                        4 year                           5 Year                         6 Year 

NMC                     50.0  (5th in State)             77.4 (1st in State)            77.4 (1st in State) 
Next Highest            51.6  (4h in State)              73.8 (2nd in State)            77.8 (2nd in State) 
College/University 
Source IPEDS 2007 Data 
 
NMC compares well with other higher education organizations as indicated in 1R3 on NSSE common learning 
objectives and results for support processes, national benchmarks for certifications and licensure pass rates, and 
IDEA survey results. For example NMC NCLEX‐RN board pass rates surpassed Nebraska rates in 2008 and continued 
to increase in 2009 after the implementation of ATI testing to help student review the NCLEX‐RN content.  
 
Figure 1.4 First Time NCLEX‐RN Pass Rates Comparisions of NMC to NE and U.S.  




                                                                                         
 
 
 1I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your 
processes and performance results for Helping Students Learn? 
Recent improvements for “Helping Students Learn” include the following: 
• Student retention has been a primary focus of NMC for many years. Student retention was a previous AQIP 
     Action Project, and is systematically monitored and reviewed for potential improvement. A recent initiative (in 
     summer 2010) to enhance student retention was the addition of Supplemental Instruction for courses with a 
     historically high failure rate.  


Category 1                                                                                                         28 

 
 


•   Beginning in Fall 2010, traditional freshman were encouraged to enroll in a First Year Experience (FYE) course. 
    This class meets weekly to orient students to the college experience and to reinforce the availability of student 
    services.  
•   Beginning in Fall 2010, traditional freshman were encouraged to enroll in a particular section of the “Critical 
    Reasoning and Rhetoric” course to provide an environment conducive to their needs. 
•   Since Fall 2009, course progression reports were added for each undergraduate student after the 4th and the 
    8th week of the semester. These reports give faculty and students early warning of potential course failure, 
    and promote intervention by student services through faculty and academic advisors’ recommendations. 
•   The undergraduate nursing program has instituted ATI testing at each level to assess necessary knowledge 
    crucial for success on nursing board examinations. 
•   Team Based Learning (TBL) was recently initiated by the Faculty Development Committee of Faculty Senate to 
    improve teaching effectiveness in the classroom; enhancing the use of TBL became a 2009‐2010 AQIP Action 
    Project.  
•   Using IDEA resources for improvement in teaching and learning effectiveness and to track common learning 
    outcomes has become more systematized in the past two years.  
•    A new instrument for faculty peer evaluation, which encourages improvement in teaching, was piloted in 
    Spring 2010, and will be used for all faculty in Fall 2010. 
 
Each of the recent improvements is systematic and comprehensive. Each one puts processes in place to ensure 
that data is collected and analyzed when scheduled and is evaluated regularly. For example, one designated faculty 
member in the undergraduate nursing program sets up the ATI testing procedures and evaluates the data, not only 
to help students understand their strengths and weaknesses on topics, but also to improve teaching and 
curriculum when trends show areas of student weakness.  
 
1I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in Helping Students Learn? 
We have a highly engaged workforce as measured by the Engagement Survey (See Category 4). This, along with an 
active Faculty Senate with shared governance, allows NMC’s culture to be one of constant quality improvement in 
the area of student learning. Through the quality improvement process of individual faculty/staff Contribution 
Reviews, departmental Annual Reports, and a strong Strategic Plan with Quality Education as a Cornerstone (See 
Category 7), NMC sets targets for improved outcomes. Dynamic Systematic Evaluation Plans (SEP) by each 
department include annual goals for improvement, thereby ensuring that quality education is always in the 
forefront. 




Category 1                                                                                                        29 

 
 


Category 2:  Accomplish Other Distinctive Objectives 

2P1. How do you design and operate the key non‐instructional processes (e.g., athletics, research, community 
enrichment, etc.) through which you serve significant stakeholder groups?  
Other distinctive objectives at NMC are designed to fit the mission of the College. Each of the following objectives 
is a component of NMC’s Strategic Plan, has action plans, is imbedded into NMC’s core values, and complements 
NMC’s instructional programs. Each objective has been a part of the College for many years and has grown in size, 
depth and structure as the College has grown. For example, when the College opened 115 years ago, it was a 
school of nursing with a handful of students preparing to become “deaconesses” who would minister to the health 
of the community. This community outreach objective has grown into community based education and a Center 
for Health Partnerships. Table 2.1, Lists NMC’s three core distinctive objectives, the programs responsible for 
outcomes and the main stakeholders for whom these objectives serve. The individual departments or divisions 
assume responsibility for promoting these objectives, including responsibility for process and budget management, 
as well as program accountability. 

Table 2.1 NMC Other Distinctive Objectives 
                             Professional Development            Community Outreach             Wellness Culture 
Responsible Program(s)       Professional Development            Community Outreach             President’s Council on 
                             Department                          Advisory Council               Wellness (PCOW) 
                                                                  
                                                                 Center for Health 
                                                                 Partnerships 
                                                                    
                                                                 Coordinator of  Service 
                                                                 learning 
                                                                  
                                                                 AmeriCorps VISTA 
Example Activities           Primary source of continuing             Community‐based               Departmental coffees 
                             education in Nebraska and                Education (CBE)               Wii bowling 
                             Iowa                                     Service learning trips        tournaments 
                                                                      Community‐based               Trek Up the Tower 
                                                                      development                   Corporate Cup 
                                                                      experiences                   participation 
                                                                      Immersion trips               Blood donations  
                                                                      Volunteering                  Holiday weight 
                                                                      opportunities                 incentives 
                                                                      Upward Bound Grant            Various cultural and 
                                                                                                    faith based activities 
Main Stakeholders                 NMC Faculty and Staff               NMC faculty and staff         NMC Faculty and Staff 
                                  Medical professionals               Students                      Students 
                                  and others working in               Community 
                                  health related areas                Low income and first 
                                  Nebraska Methodist                  generation students 
                                  Health System (NMHS) 
                              
 
2P2. How do you determine your organization’s major non‐instructional objectives for your external stakeholders, 
and whom do you involve in setting these objectives?  
NMC’s unique objectives flow directly from the College’s mission, highlighting and emphasizing community, health 
education, and the well‐being of students, faculty, staff, and stakeholders. The objectives driving the College were 
chosen in order to complement and enhance NMC’s primary focus: facilitating students’ learning in a learner‐
centered environment. The strategic planning process used to set the College’s objectives and describing the 
individuals involved in setting these objectives will be described in section 8P1. 
          
Category 2                                                                                                                30 

 
 


2P3. How do you communicate your expectations regarding these objectives?  
The objectives of the College are communicated to stakeholders through the strategic planning process as 
described in section 8P2 and as identified in Table 2.2. 

Table 2.2 Communication of Objective Outcomes to Stakeholders 
Objective        Main Stakeholders                                     Primary Communications 
                 NMC Faculty and Staff                                     Employee Connections intranet site 
 Professional 
Development 




                 Medical professionals and others working in health        Print Media; brochures/posters 
                 related areas                                             E‐mail 
                 Nebraska Methodist Health System (NMHS)                   Annual Report 
                                                                        

                 NMC faculty and staff                                     Syllabus 
Community 
  Outreach 




                 Community                                                 New Student Orientations 
                 Students                                                  E‐mail 
                                                                           Annual Report 
                                                                           Forum 
                                                                           Newsletters 
                 NMC Faculty and Staff                                     Annual Report 
Wellness 
 Culture 




                 Students                                                  E‐mail 
                                                                           NMC Intranet 
                                                                           Forum 

 
2P4. How do you assess and review the appropriateness and value of these objectives, and whom do you involve in 
these reviews?  
Professional Development: The Professional Development Department is required by the Nebraska Nurses 
Association (NNA) to obtain program evaluations from all continuing education participants prior to awarding their 
certificates of completion. The Professional Development staff compiles program evaluation data and the 
summaries are shared with the planning committees in follow‐up meetings. Planning committees consist of 
representatives from program participants, Professional Development staff, and representation from healthcare 
professions at NMC and NMH. This method of evaluation allows Professional Development staff and other 
stakeholders to assess existing programs and review the most appropriate use of department resources, including 
the best value for the populations who are served. Future planning and decisions made by the department are 
based on these assessments and data collected to support the conclusions. 
 
Community Outreach: The College faculty collaborates with staff at community clinical placement sites to evaluate 
NMC students and instructors. This assessment provides a means of identifying and evaluating sites that are used 
for service learning and have been developed by faculty based on both College and course objectives. Many of the 
sites have long been associated with NMC (See Section 9P1). Once the faculty have determined the particular site 
they would like to work with, the Community Based Education Coordinator coordinates the partnership and a 
formal contract that lists the agreed upon number of students and duties and explicit directions for evaluation 
forms and processes are explained.  
 
Service Learning: NMC evaluates the service learning experience using the continuation of community 
partnerships and standardized evaluation. Students evaluate their community/service learning experiences using 
course IDEA forms, required reflections, and summaries of these experiences in their portfolios which are 
presented prior to graduation. Student satisfaction and engagement with service‐learning are measured by the 
Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) and the NSSE respectively. In addition to the use of the previously listed 
standard assessment measures already in place at NMC, the Coordinator of Service Learning engages in an 
integrated assessment of the proposed projects and their role in advancing toward stated objectives. Table 2.3 lists 
each objective and methods of measurement.  
           

Category 2                                                                                                        31 

 
 


    Table 2.3 Service Learning Objectives and Measurements. 
    Objective                          Method of Measure 
    1. Contributing to an increased        The number of Lecture Series attendees and their distribution among MCSLSHE 
        level of commitment,               member institution and community organizations 
        partnerships, support, and 
        communication among 
        MCSLH member institutions.  
    2. Expanding and diversifying the      The number of new service learning courses developed 
        base of faculty involved in        The number of faculty applicants for the Faculty Coordination Sub‐grants 
        service learning                   Use of pre‐ and post‐tests of faculty participating in development 
    3. Providing students with             The number of revised and new service learning courses 
        quality service learning,          The quality or revised and new courses as measured by standard course evaluation 
        emphasizing civic engagement       processes 
                                           The number of new coordinated service projects 
                                           The quality of coordinated service projects as measured by faculty self‐assessment 
    4. Improving relationships with        Assessment tools provided by Community‐Campus Partnerships for Health 
        communities                        Written evaluations by community partners of Lecture Series, North and South 
                                           Omaha Immersions, and coordinated service projects.  
 
Wellness Culture:  The College’s culture of wellness is assessed using the results of a Culture Audit and the 
Engagement Survey administered by the DIR every three years. The results of both these assessments are 
presented to the President’s Cabinet. Based on these results, strategic planning occurs to address areas where 
benchmarks were not met. In addition to reporting the results to the President’s Cabinet, they are reported to the 
Deans or heads of each department or division, all of whom are requested to review the results and develop plans 
– or Action Steps – to address areas where benchmarks were not reached. For example, the Engagement Survey 
showed that faculty and staff want professional growth. During annual reviews, department chairs spoke with 
faculty and staff about listing their personal goals for professional development and how NMC could help make 
those happen. In addition to the two assessments, the wellness culture is assessed by maintaining the Platinum 
Level for Well Workplace. Maintaining Platinum Level requires that strict guidelines on wellness are met by NMC 
and evaluated by the Wellness Council of America.   
 
2P5. How do you determine faculty and staff needs relative to these objectives and operations?  
Professional Development:  determines faculty and staff needs through questionnaires completed at the end of 
the academic year. There is open communication between faculty and the VPAA regarding expression of needs. 
For example, faculty in‐services have been presented on topics identified by faculty and experts on various topics 
in order to facilitate professional development. Examples of these topics include TBL, and classroom management 
techniques. Programs that benefit the College’s agenda are supported by College/Foundation funding and are 
offered free of charge to NMC faculty and staff.  
 
Community Outreach:  has been enhanced through the development of the Community Outreach Advisory 
Council, which consists of three NMC faculty members, one NMC staff member, two students, an AmeriCorps 
VISTA volunteer, and two community agency representatives. The purpose of this council is to guide the College in 
making a conscious effort to enhance partnerships with community agencies, and to focus its efforts to create a 
larger impact within the community. The Council assists in identifying key community partners based upon the 
needs of the community, as well as the resources of the College. In addition to the Council, College faculty work 
with the Coordinator of Service Learning to identify opportunities for service‐learning. The Community Outreach 
Advisory Council assesses faculty, staff, students and other stakeholders’ needs by reviewing the evaluation of 
partnerships and development of new ones as needed.  
 
The wellness culture assessment of faculty and staff needs is discussed in 2P4. Individual health program needs are 
provided in a health screening report each year. Participants of the NMHS health care plans are given the option of 
reducing their heath care premiums significantly if they participate in the screening.  
           
Category 2                                                                                                         32 

 
 


2P6. How do you incorporate information on faculty and staff needs in readjusting these objectives or the 
processes that support them?  
In 2009, the Professional Development Department initiated a needs assessment process to establish the 
programming schedule for the upcoming year. The needs assessment forms were distributed to faculty and staff at 
NMC as well as NMHS. The results of this needs assessment were compared to the strategic initiatives of the 
Health System and College to determine program offerings for 2010. Since that time, this process has been refined 
and the revised assessment will be implemented during the Spring of 2010 to identify professional development 
needs for 2011 program planning. 
 
The Community Outreach Advisory Council meets annually with community partners and College representatives 
to examine the needs of the community and how the College can partner with them as needs are endeavored to 
be met. 
 
The PCOW reviews the various activities/programs supported by the College for participation and interest levels of 
the staff and faculty. Adjustments to the activities/programs are made based on this feedback and data from the 
Culture Audit, Engagement Survey, and the health care screenings.  
 
2R1. What measures of accomplishing your major non‐instructional objectives and activities do you collect and 
analyze regularly?  

Table 2.4 Measures Collected and Analyzed for Non‐instructional Objectives     
Objective             Measures Collected                                          Analyzed 
                              Number of program offerings                                  Determines growth of PD 
 Professional 
Development 




                              Number of participants                                       Determines if program will be 
                                                                                      offered again 
                              Number of staff hours each program required                  Used to improve productivity 
                                                                                      and efficiencies in the department 
                                                                                   
                              Program evaluations                                          Quality of programs 

                              NSSE (National Survey of Student Engagement)                 Percentage of students that 
Community Outreach 




                                                                                      participate in community‐based 
                                                                                      projects as part of regular courses as  
                                                                                      they matriculate through the 
                                                                                      program, used for comparisons to 
                                                                                      peer colleges 
                               Number of faculty that use service‐learning in              Support for community‐based 
                          the curriculum                                              education 
                               Number of hours that students contribute by         
                          service‐learning activities 
                             Evaluation  and reflections for faculty and staff              Used to make improvements in 
                          immersion trips                                             trips  
                       
                              Well Workplace Platinum Award                                Used to measure wellness 
                                                                                      excellence at NMC 
Wellness 
Culture 




                              Culture Audit                                               Benchmarked for improvement 
                              Engagement Survey                                       areas and comparisons to other 
                                                                                      organizations 
 
 
 
 
 
Category 2                                                                                                                       33 

 
 


2R2. What are your performance results in accomplishing your other distinctive objectives?  

Table 2.5 Measured Performance Results  
Objective                   Measures Collected                                      Results   
                                    Number of program offerings                                2008: 209 program offerings 
Professional Development 




                                                                                               2009: 164 program offerings 
                                    Number of participants                                     2008 :7058 program participants 
                                                                                                    o 2949  BLS/ACLS/PALS 
                                                                                                    participants 
                                                                                               2009 : 6053 program participants 
                                                                                                    o 2946 BLS/ACLS/PALS 
                                                                                                    participants 
                                    Program evaluations: Participants’              Likert scale 1‐5 (strongly disagree to strongly 
                                response to questions pertaining to the             agree)  
                                purpose, objectives, and content of the                        2008‐4.37 satisfaction/ program 
                                program.                                                 offerings 
                                                                                         satisfaction/ BLS/ACLS/PALS training 
                                                                                               2009 –4.78‐satisfaction/ program 
                                                                                         offerings 
                                                                                         4.93 satisfaction/ BLS/ACLS/PALS training 
                                                                                     
                                     Number of courses and faculty that use                    2008‐2009: 12 courses/40 faculty 
Community Outreach 




                                service‐learning in the curriculum                       members 
                                     Number of credit hours that students enroll               2009‐2010: 40 
                                that are service learning 
                                     Number of hours that students contribute                    2008‐2009: 4,989 hours 
                                by service learning activities                                   2009‐2010: 5,025 hours 

                                     Number of students and faculty that                         2008: 
                                participate in service learning trips                                o    Students: 18 
                                     See table 2.6 for breakdown by trip                             o    Faculty: 3 
                                                                                                 2009: 
                                                                                                     o    Students: 27 
                                                                                                     o    Faculty: 6 
                                                                                                 2010: 
                                                                                                     o    Students: 25 
                                                                                                     o    Faculty: 7 
                                   Number of  faculty and staff participating in                 2009 
                                immersion trips                                                      o    30 faculty and staff 

                                      Upward Bound: number of low income                         2009: 
                                first‐generation high school students in program                     o 55 (met grant goal) 
                                                                                                 2010: 
                                                                                                     o 52 to date (met grant goal)  
                                     Number of individuals completing the                        2009‐2010: 
                                Certified Nursing Assistance course from Omaha                       o 25 students 
                                Housing Authority Partnership  
                                     President’ Higher Education Community                    Honor Roll Status in 2009 and 2010 
                                Service Honor Roll                                            2010 Students Beyond Boundaries sub 
                                                                                         grant from Midwest Consortium for Service 
                                                                                         Learning in Higher Education  
                                     NSSE:  Students were asked to rate (on a 4‐              2010: 
                                point Likert scale: 1 =never, 2=sometimes, 3 =                     o Freshman 73% 
                                often, 4=very often) “Participate in community‐                    o Senior: 91% 
                                based project as part of a regular course.”                        % who marked sometimes to very 
                                (every 3‐years)                                                    often 

Category 2                                                                                                                             34 

 
 


Wellness Culture                             Culture Audit conducted every 3‐years                  Fall 2008:  
                                                                                                          o 80% of the items that were 
                                                                                                          scored as excellent 
                                              Engagement Survey: Conducted for the first            100% response rate 
                                                                                                                  th
                                         time in Fall, 2009                                               o 99  percentile in employee 
                                                                                                          satisfaction in working at NMC  
                                             Well Workplace Platinum Award , Given by               2010: 
                                         the Wellness Council of America                                  o Recertified until 2013 
 
In addition to having community‐based education in curriculum and service‐learning, immersion trips are also a 
part of NMC’s institutional objective of community outreach. See link to NMC Community Outreach Newsletters. 
Projects from 2008 to 2010 are outlined in Table 2.6. 

Table 2.6 Community Service Trips from 2008‐2010 
                    Date               Destination                # Faculty/Staff     # Students    Activity  
                    2008                                                                             
                              January  Bay St. Louis, MS                 1                 5        Habitat for Humanity  
                                March  Laredo, TX                        1                 3        Habitat for Humanity 
                             October   Rosebud Indian                    1                10        Service to Piya Mani Otipi and IHS 
                                       Reservation                                                  service unit at Rosebud 
                    2009                                                                             
                              January  Laredo, TX                        2                  12      Habitat for Humanity 
                               March  New York City                      1                  8       Service trip that addressed needs 
                                                                                                    of HIV population 
                            October   Rosebud Indian                     3                  7       Service to White Buffalo Calf 
                                      Reservation                                                   women’s shelter and IHS service 
                                                                                                    unit at Rosebud 

                    2010                                                                             
                            January  Laredo, TX                          2                  3       Habitat for Humanity and 
                                                                                                    shadowed public health nurses 
                             March  New Orleans, LA                      2                  7       Habitat for Humanity and working 
                                                                                                    at an elementary school. 
                            October   Rosebud Indian                     3                  15      Service to White Buffalo Calf 
                                      Reservation                                                   women’s shelter and IHS service 
                                                                                                    unit at Rosebud 
 
2R3. How do your results for the performance of these processes compare with the performance results of other 
higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education?  
When the results of wellness culture and community outreach at NMC are compared with those of other 
organizations, NMC proves to be a leader in these categories. In just one example, NMC is the first college in the 
country to have been granted Well Workplace Platinum Status in 2002, and was one of three organizations in the 
world to earn platinum status. NMC is still the only educational institution to maintain such recognition in the 
worksite wellness community and was recertified in 2010 for 3 years (See WWPS Application). NMC is a leader in 
community outreach and was named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll in 2008 
and 2009. At this time, no national database exists to benchmark continuing education programs. 
 
NMC received high marks on the Culture Audit and Engagement Survey, conducted in 2008. Both of these 
assessments reflect the fact that NMC has a very healthy culture. When compared to comparative institutions, 
NMC ranks higher than most. The latest Culture Audit results (2008) indicated that NMC has a very healthy culture. 
Relative to other institutions we are dong exceptionally well. For example while it is not unusual for companies to 
have a gap score of 3.0 or above, the highest gap sore for NMC was 1.47. When compared to other aggregated 
data from 79 other organizations (both educational and corporate), NMC has lower gap scores on 36 of the 43 
Category 2                                                                                                          35 

 
 


matching items. Lower gaps mean that responses were close on level of agreement on current and desired norms. 
For example, using a 5‐point Likert scale to rate the College, from 1=strongly disagree, to 5=strongly agree, faculty 
and employees of NMC rate questions such as, “It is a norm at NMC to reward and recognize efforts to live a 
holistically healthy lifestyle” on a 5‐point Likert scale from 1‐strongly disagree to 5‐strongly agree to both it is a 
“current norm” and it is a “desired norm.” See Culture Audit for complete results. 
 
An outside organization, the Coffman Organization, was used to measure employee engagement in the Fall of 
2009. The Coffman Organization set benchmarks to strive for the 75th percentile, indicating that organizations 
would be considered “highly functioning” at that level. Results for NMC on the three areas measured were: Overall 
Satisfaction (99th percentile), Leadership Confidence (90th percentile), and Overall Engagement (84th percentile). 
NMC scored well above the 75th percentile benchmark in all three of these categories as well as others. NMC’s 
response rate for this Employee Engagement Survey was 100%, a response rate which has only happened a few 
times in the history of the Coffman Organization. See Engagement Survey for further results.  
 
Figure 2.1 Results of Employee Satisfaction 




                                                                        
 
2R4. How do your performance results of your processes for Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives strengthen 
your overall organization? How do they enhance your relationships with the communities and regions you serve?  
Performance results for each of the other Distinctive Objectives are evaluated regularly to ensure they are meeting 
the needs of the College as well as the community. Each of the distinctive objectives is an integral part of the 
mission of the College and positive results strengthen the identity of NMC. NMC strengthens name recognition as a 
lead in healthcare education by offering free, high quality professional development courses to Health System 
employees, faculty, and staff. Community outreach strengthens NMC’s mission of positively impacting the 
community by reaching out to underserved populations within the community and organizations that serve those 
populations, while at the same time providing students with a community‐based education that will prepare them 
to become change agents in the global community. A strong culture of wellness allows NMC to retain high quality 
employees who serve as positive role models to students.  
 
2I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your 
processes and performance results for Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives? 
All three of the Other Distinctive Objectives have been recently restructured to allow NMC to function more 
effectively and to strengthen NMC’s position in these areas. Examples of this restructuring include but are not 
limited to: 
     • August, 2008: An Associate Dean of Professional Development was hired and since that time, the 
          Professional Development Department (PD) has formulated and implemented new planning strategies 
         designed to maximize efficiency and productivity. PD has implemented standardized processes to provide 
         consistency in the quality of programming. This department regularly conducts a needs assessment to 
         identify the continuing education needs of NMHS. 
Category 2                                                                                                        36 

 
 


    •     In August, 2008, the College’s Wellness Committee was transformed to the President's Council on 
          Wellness (PCOW) in order to demonstrate presidential commitment to wellness at NMC. College‐wide 
          initiatives such as the Well Workplace Platinum Award, Going Green, and Employee Recognition are now 
          under the direction of the PCOW. The 12 member PCOW consists of faculty, staff, and students.  
     • In January, 2008, the Center for Health Partnerships was formed with a mission to decrease healthcare 
          disparity in the community. A director was hired for the center which supports College initiatives such as 
          faculty immersions, service‐learning, the Upward Bound grant, and a partnership with the Omaha Housing 
          Authority. 
Note:  click on each of the titles to get Annual Reports with specific activities and outcomes for the year.  
 
2I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in Accomplishing Other Distinctive Objectives? 
Recent enhancements to Other Distinctive Objectives have been executed successfully, resulting in improvement 
and reinforcement of each. This improvement is an example of the manner in which NMC’s Strategic Plan provides 
the infrastructure to set targets for improved performance and how the culture of a highly engaged workforce 
works together to make changes and enhancements happen in a college‐wide, positive environment. 




Category 2                                                                                                       37 

 
 


Category 3: Understanding Students’ and Other Stakeholder’s Needs 

3P1. How do you identify the changing needs of your student groups? How do you analyze and select a course of 
action regarding these needs?  
The official student organization through which students can voice their needs and concerns is the NMC Student 
Government. Representatives of Student Government are elected by the students each year. These 
representatives communicate student concerns, needs or desires for change to College leaders for consideration; 
problem‐solving involves consideration of student input, and College leaders then identify the most effective 
solution. When possible solutions are identified, they are communicated to the student body by College leaders 
and/or through Student Government. Every student group on campus has an advisor who is a member of the 
faculty or staff at NMC. Student groups are encouraged to utilize their advisors’ guidance to solve problems or 
address student concerns, a process which includes making group needs known to the designated advisors. 
Student groups can also make their needs known to the Coordinator of Leadership Development (CLD) who serves 
as the advisor to Student Government and as a resource for all student groups. The CLD has regular 
communications with the student group advisors. The Dean of Students is also available to student groups in this 
capacity and works with appropriate College personnel to address student needs and issues.  
 
3P2. How do you build and maintain a relationship with your students?  
Relationship‐building with students is an on‐going process that begins with a prospective student’s first contact 
with NMC and continues to graduation day and is guided by the core values of NMC: Caring, Holism, Excellence, 
Respect, and Learning. The NMC community is small enough for faculty and staff to know students by name, and 
the size of the College is conducive to relationship‐building. Faculty and staff members are committed to student 
success. As a result, student‐faculty/staff relationships are developed naturally, nurtured, and maintained.  
 
Table 3.1 Relationship Building and Maintenance with Students 
Point of Contact with Students           Relationship Building  
First Contact                            During a visit to campus, a College fair, or an email inquiry, prospective students are 
                                         encouraged to tour campus and have the opportunity to learn more about the College 
                                         with an Admissions Coordinator. 
Initial inquiry to the College to        Students receive multiple communications from the College. These communications 
Matriculation                            are from various departments throughout the institution and are intended to 
                                         strengthen students’ relationship to the College and their sense of belonging at NMC. 
“Registration Days” held on campus       New students meet with the freshman advisor to register for classes. Attending a 
                                         Registration Day also provides new students with the opportunity to meet other new 
                                         students, as well as current students who serve as NMC Ambassadors.  
Carpe Diem, Latin for “Seize the Day”    This event is an annual, overnight, summer event designed especially for new students 
                                         to provide them a fun‐filled environment conducive to relationship building between 
                                         new and current students. 
New Student Orientation                  Orientation for new students occurs three times during each academic year. During 
                                         this event, students have opportunities to meet other new students, current students, 
                                         faculty, staff, and administration.  
Graduate Level Orientation               Students engage in online Graduate Student Orientation (respective to the program 
                                         they are enrolled in), which orients them to their program, expectations, and services. 
                                         In addition, there is a discussion board component which facilitates communication 
                                         and relationship building.  
First‐Year Experience Program            Program intended to help first time students adjust to college life. 
Division of Health Professions            Academic advising is done by program faculty. The Division maintains an open door 
                                         policy and coordinates informal events to gather students and faculty together in a 
                                         non‐academic setting.  
Nursing Division                         Two “BSNack” forums are held each semester, the purpose of which is to facilitate on‐
                                         going communication among nursing students, faculty, and administrators. In addition, 
                                         a “Communication Tool” is available in the Nursing Student Handbook and online to all 
                                         nursing students, the purpose of which is to identify, address, and respond to student 
                                         concerns, needs, and ideas. 

Category 3                                                                                                                   38 

 
 


Clinical Experiences                   Relationships between faculty and students are strengthened through clinical 
                                       experiences. Within the Division of Nursing, the typical faculty to student ratio is 1 to 8 
                                       per group per clinical site. In the Division of Health Professions, the preceptor to 
                                       student ratio is 1 to 1 per clinical site.   
Student Government                     College leaders are invited to attend Student Government meetings each semester. 
                                       These meetings provide opportunities for leaders to build relationships with Student 
                                       Government while answering questions and addressing student issues and concerns.  
On‐going Advising                      Advisors meet with respective advisees each semester to register for next semester; 
                                       during this time, the advisor has the one‐on‐one time with the student to assess how 
                                       the student is doing and if any additional support is needed.  
 
3P3. How do you analyze the changing needs of your key stakeholder groups and select courses of action regarding 
these needs?  
 
 Table 3.2 Changing Needs of Key Stakeholders 
Key Stakeholders        Analyze Changing Needs                                   Course of Action 
Accrediting Bodies      The needs of accrediting agencies are monitored by       The appropriate Associate Dean for each 
                        the Associate Deans and Program Directors.               department and the Vice President for 
                                                                                 Academic Affairs determine course of action.  
Alumni                  The needs of College alumni are monitored by the         As necessary, the Director of Alumni Relations 
                        members of the Alumni Association and the                will consult with the elected members of the 
                        Director of Alumni Relations.                            Alumni Association Advisory Council members 
                                                                                 to determine an appropriate course of action.  
Board of Directors      These meetings address needs, elicit conversations,  The President of NMC brings College needs to 
                        and provide a forum for decision‐making.                 the attention of the appropriate party, such as 
                                                                                 the Chief Executive Officer of NMHS, the Chief 
                                                                                 Executive Officer of Methodist Hospital, or the 
                                                                                 NMC President’s Cabinet.  
Clinical Sites          The needs of clinical sites are monitored by             Based on the data gathered through these 
                        Program Directors via the clinical director and          mechanisms, the appropriate Associate Dean, 
                        clinical instructors by phone calls initiated at least   Program Director, and faculty determine a 
                        once a semester to clinical affiliates, and surveys are  course of action to respond to clinical site 
                        administered annually. Each program has an               needs. 
                        advisory board that includes representatives from 
                        clinical affiliates.  
Donors and              The Methodist Hospital Foundation maintains              The Methodist Hospital Foundation works 
Benefactors             contact with donors and benefactors to assess their  closely with the College President and Vice 
                        changing and on‐going needs.                             Presidents to address donor needs and 
                                                                                 establish a course of action that honors donor 
                                                                                 requests.  
Community Needs         The NMC Center for Health Partnerships (CfHP)            The CfHP’s Advisory Council includes 
                        serves as a means for the institution to understand      community partners who play a crucial role in 
                        the pulse of the community and its needs. A VISTA        identifying needs and targeting community 
                        member on staff keeps NMC informed of the effects  outreach. A survey of these community 
                        of local poverty and maintains a network of other        partners serves to discern further needs. 
                        VISTA organizations to stay current on related 
                        issues. 
Employers               The changing needs of employers of NMC graduates  Academic departments and programs review 
                        are monitored by faculty who place students in the       employer satisfaction data and, when 
                        community for externships, preceptorships, and           necessary, determine a course of action to 
                        service‐learning. Academic departments gauge             address employer needs. Recruiters from 
                        employer satisfaction through employer surveys           NMHS support student employment on a 
                        distributed after graduation.                            part‐time basis and promote NMHS as the 
                                                                                 “employer of choice” for NMC graduates.   
United Methodist        Both the Bishop and the District Superintendent of       As a part of preparation for the visit by the 
Church                  the United Methodist Church serve on the College’s  University Senate in 2010, a task force 

Category 3                                                                                                                     39 

 
 


                           Board of Directors and keep NMC apprised of UMC        comprised of NMC faculty and staff was 
                           needs.                                                 created to examine the institution’s level of 
                                                                                  church‐relatedness. The group identified ways 
                                                                                  to improve the College’s relationship with the 
                                                                                  United Methodist Church. 
Nebraska Methodist         The President of the College monitors NMHS needs       Regular meetings with the Chief Executive 
Health System (NMHS)       through his position on the Presidents’ Council of     Officer of NMHS are used for communication, 
                           NMHS.                                                  coordination of the Strategic Plan, and 
                                                                                  decision‐making.  
Professional               Professional development needs of College and          Programs are developed to fit the needs 
Development                Health System employees are identified using an        identified. 
                           annual needs assessment distributed to NMHS 
                           employees by NMC’s Professional Development 
                           Department.  
 
 
3P4. How do you build and maintain relationships with your key stakeholders?   
 
Table 3.3 Building Relationships with Key Stakeholders 
Key Stakeholder              Building Relationships 
Accrediting bodies                Compliance with recommendations and regulations 
                                  Site visits 
                                  Maintenance of quality programs   
                                  A number of NMC administrators and faculty serve as accreditation reviewers, site visitors, 
                                  and consultants. 
Alumni                            Alumni Association meetings 
                                  Personal communications from the Director of Alumni Relations 
                                  Electronic communications via the College website, Facebook, and the alumni newsletter, The 
                                  Methodist Alumni Connection 
                                  Alumni events  
Board of Directors                Regular meetings attended by members of the College administration 
                                  Correspondence 
                                  Board member participation in College events and decision‐making  
Clinical Sites                    On‐going relationships with unit directors.  
                                   NMC maintains through site visits, phone calls, emails, surveys, and advisory group meetings. 
Local and National                Partnerships with the community are strengthened through the community‐based nursing 
Communities                       program, service‐learning and community service opportunities, and the Center for Health 
                                  Partnerships.  
                                  Because of these partnerships, students, faculty, and staff have on‐going opportunities to 
                                  identify and meet community needs and, as a result, solid relationships with the community 
                                  are built and maintained.  
                                  Community service outreach extends beyond the city of Omaha and state of Nebraska, as 
                                  service trips are held in various locations throughout the United States at least three times a 
                                  year.   
Donors and Benefactors            Relationships are maintained by members of the Methodist Hospital Foundation, the College 
                                  President, and the Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs and Student Affairs, respectively. 
Employers                         Communication between the College and employers is maintained by providing college 
                                  graduates for employment in the community and responding to employer expectations and 
                                  feedback identified in the employer surveys. 
United Methodist Church           The College President has a relationship with both the Bishop and the District Superintendant 
                                  who serve on the College’s BOD. In addition to meeting on a regular basis, the College 
                                  President submits a report to the Nebraska Annual Conference each year.  
                                  The Director of Spiritual Development and Health Ministry provides resources and outreach 
                                  to local Methodist churches and clergy.  
                                  NMC accepted its first student from the Lydia Patterson Institute.  
NMHS                              Maintained via the College President’s membership on the NMHS Presidents’ Council which 

Category 3                                                                                                                     40 

 
 


                              meets monthly and includes the chief executive officers and vice presidents of NMHS.  
                              The College administration, as well as other College personnel, have established effective 
                              working relationships with numerous departments at the Health System level, including 
                              human resources, legal counsel, research, medical staff, nursing, and oncology.  
                              The Methodist Hospital College Council consists of NMC nursing faculty, College 
                              administrators, and Methodist Hospital staff and administrators who meet to discuss and 
                              address issues related to NMC clinical sites and nursing‐related agendas.  
Professional                  Relationships are built and maintained as customers participate in professional development 
Development Customers         offerings and provide feedback through evaluations of offerings.  
 
3P5. How do you determine if you should target new student and stakeholder groups with your educational 
offerings and services?  
The mission of NMC, a health professions institution, is to provide educational experiences for the development of 
individuals in order that they may positively influence the health and well being of the community. New students 
and stakeholder groups are targeted with information about NMC educational offerings and services if research 
indicates a need and/or interest among such groups (See section 1P4). Before adding a new academic program, 
the College gauges community and market needs and then conducts a financial analysis to ascertain the financial 
viability of the program.  
 
3P6 . How do you collect complaint information from students and other stakeholders? How do you analyze this 
feedback and select courses of action?  How do you communicate these actions to your students and 
stakeholders?  
Student complaints are generally directed to the Dean of Students, who collects, documents, and files such 
information. As a student advocate, the Dean of Students considers all complaints and determines how to address 
those needs. The Resolution Process for Academic and Non‐Academic Concerns is the mechanism available to 
students who choose to pursue particular issues and concerns. The first phase of the resolution process is informal 
and, if after pursuing a student is not satisfied, he/she has the option to pursue a formal judicial hearing. In 
addition to directing complaints to the Dean of Students, students may choose to talk with other College personnel 
with whom they feel comfortable, such as a faculty member, advisor, program director, or associate dean. If 
necessary after this informal meeting, the counsel and/or participation of the Dean of Students may be sought. 
These complaints are documented and filed in the offices of those College personnel involved in the process. The 
resolution process can be found in the Student Handbook, the College Catalog, and on the College Website.  
 
General complaints about the College may be directed to Student Government which will investigate the 
complaint or direct the unsatisfied party to the appropriate individual, such as a member of the College leadership. 
Student complaints are shared with members of College Administration.  
 
Other tools for identifying and reporting student complaints at NMC include the Student Satisfaction Inventory 
(SSI), the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), New Student Orientation Evaluations, customer service 
surveys, and academic department or program exit interviews. The type and severity of student concerns 
determine how they will be addressed and may be directed to: an individual, a department, or a division such as 
Student or Academic Affairs; a standing committee, such as the College Administration Executive Council which is 
comprised of the College President and Vice Presidents;  Academic Council, or President’s Cabinet. After 
addressing a student’s concern or complaint, the student is informed of the outcome or resolution via a telephone 
call, email, in person, or by letter.  
 
Within the Division of Academic Affairs, the IDEA course evaluation forms ask for anonymous feedback on both 
course and course instructor and allow students to voice their concerns in writing. All comments and concerns are 
shared with appropriate academic leaders then distributed to NMC instructors. As described in 3P2, the “BSNack” 
forums and Communication Tools are available to nursing students as mechanisms for voicing concerns or 
complaints. Completed Communication Tools are forwarded to the Student Advancement Coordinator (SAC) in the 


Category 3                                                                                                              41 

 
 


Division of Nursing who analyzes and acts upon them. The SAC communicates with students informing them of 
actions resulting from their complaints. Whenever possible, these communications are made in person. 
Complaints from other stakeholders are given serious consideration and appropriate courses of action are 
identified among the involved personnel.  
 
3R1. How do you determine the satisfaction of your students and other stakeholders?  What measures of student 
and other stakeholder satisfaction do you collect and analyze regularly?  
 
Table 3.4 Stakeholder Satisfaction Measures 
Key Stakeholder            Satisfaction  Measures  
Students                   Student satisfaction is determined through both formal and informal methods. Examples of 
                           informal methods include conversations, meetings, verbal feedback, and other forms of qualitative 
                           data collection. Formal methods include in‐house department/program‐specific surveys and 
                           national surveys. In‐house surveys are administered after events such as New Student Orientation, 
                           leadership lunches, and campus housing programs. Customer service surveys are administered 
                           annually for the bookstore, financial aid office, and business office and reported in SEP’s. The 
                           Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) is a national survey administered every three years at NMC 
                           (see below). 
Accrediting bodies         As a result of the accreditation and/or re‐accreditation processes, accrediting bodies provide 
                           departmental or institutional feedback that indicates satisfaction levels and areas of suggested 
                           change or improvement. 
Alumni                     Satisfaction is measured by participation in and support of various alumni‐sponsored activities. 
                           These include well‐attended Alumni Association meetings, an engaged Advisory Council, and 
                           attendance to social events. The percentage of alumni who donate annually is an indirect measure 
                           of satisfaction. 
Board of Directors         Satisfaction is measured by continued service and engagement to NMC.  
Clinical Sites             The continuation of the clinical site relationship is an indicator of the site’s satisfaction with the 
                           College and its students. Ongoing qualitative and quantitative data is collected by the site 
                           supervisors and program directors so effective changes can be planned and implemented as 
                           needed.  
Local and National         Satisfaction is shared with NMC through formal and informal communications. 
Communities 
Donors and Benefactors     Donor and benefactor satisfaction is determined through interactions between them and the 
                           Methodist Hospital Foundation or members of College Administration. 
Employers                  An employer satisfaction survey is sent out annually by each academic department at NMC. 
United Methodist Church    The level of satisfaction with the College by the United Methodist Church is understood through 
                           on‐going conversations and relationship‐building with local congregations and feedback from the 
                           Bishop and/or the District Superintendant. 
NMHS                       Historically, if a member of NMHS is either satisfied or dissatisfied with NMC, he/she reports that 
                           directly to a manager or to a member of College Administration. The NMHS Satisfaction Survey is 
                           distributed to a random sample of employees three times a year.  
Professional               Program evaluations measure satisfaction.  
Development Customers       
  
3R2. What is your performance results for student satisfaction?  
Results from the 2010 NSSE show that 90% of First Year (FY) students report a favorable image of this institution 
and 76% of seniors would choose this school again if they could start their college career over. The majority of FY 
students (88%) believe that NMC has a substantial commitment to the academic success of its students, and 57% 
of students feel well‐supported by NMC regarding their social needs.  
 
According to the results from the 2009 Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI), students are overall very 
satisfied with NMC performance (See Table 3.5). Students also gave high ratings in customer service surveys and 
are reported in Department SEP’s (See 7R2).  
           

Category 3                                                                                                                     42 

 
 


Table 3.5 Results of Student Satisfaction as Measured by the Noel‐Levitz SSI (2009) 
SSI Scale                                                  NMC        Midwestern 4‐Year  Mean 
                                                                      Private              Difference 
Student Centeredness                                       5.62       5.31                 .31*** 
Campus Life                                                4.78       4.75                 .03 
Instructional Effectiveness                                5.62       5.45                 .17** 
Recruitment and Financial Aid Effectiveness                5.55       5.04                 .51*** 
Campus Services                                            5.67       5.35                 .32*** 
Academic Advising Effectiveness                            5.71       5.26                 .45*** 
Registration Effectiveness                                 5.39       5.03                 .36*** 
Safety and Security                                        5.63       4.98                 .65*** 
Campus Climate                                             5.65       5.32                 .33*** 
** Significant at the .01 level, *** significant at the .001 level.  
 
Results from the IDEA course and teaching evaluations found that student satisfaction is high. For example, Figure 
3.1 shows that, 80.7% of NMC students stated that instructors employed methods of stimulating student interest 
in class “Almost Always” or “Frequently”. This was measured by the following four questions on the IDEA student 
evaluation forms:  
     Demonstrated the importance and significance of the subject matter 
     Stimulated students to intellectual effort beyond that required by most courses 
     Introduced stimulating ideas about the subject 
     Inspired students to set and achieve goals which really challenged them. 
NMC improved each year (except for 2006) and was higher than the national IDEA data set, NMC Carnegie 
classification schools, and Peer (Midwest Health Care Colleges).  
 
Figure 3.1 Stimulating Student Interest 




                                                                                        
 
3R3. What are your performance results for building relationships with your students?  
The quality of students’ relationships with other students, faculty members, and administrative personnel was 
measured with the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Most recently administered in Spring 2010, the 
NSSE is administered every 3 years. The majority of First Year (FY) students (74%) find the administrative personnel 
and offices helpful, considerate, and flexible, and 87% of seniors discuss career plans with faculty at least 
occasionally. Over half of FY students (53%) spend time with faculty members on activities other than coursework 
at least occasionally.  
 
The quality of relationships is also measured with the SSI on campus services, academic advising, and campus 
climate; the satisfaction level is significantly higher compared to other 4‐year private institutions (See table 3.5).  
 
Category 3                                                                                                             43 

 
 


3R4‐ 3R5. What are your performance results for stakeholder satisfaction?  What are your performance results for 
building relationships with your key stakeholders?  
 
Table 3.6 Stakeholder Satisfaction Results 
Key Stakeholder            Performance Results for Satisfaction and Relationships  
Accrediting bodies         Accrediting bodies consistently offer positive feedback through the accreditation and re‐
                           accreditation processes (e.g., site visits to NMC). All academic programs at NMC are accredited. 
Alumni                     The alumni percentage of giving remained fairly steady at 10.69% in 2009 from 10.77% for 2008. 
                           However the giving rate from the 2009 graduates was 51.85%. 
                           In 2008, an average of 15 alumni attended alumni meetings, increasing to an average of 20 in 
                           2009. By way of comparison, attendance 4 to 5 years ago averaged 5‐6. 
Board of Directors         Satisfaction of the Board of Directors is evident as members attend meetings, fulfill terms, and 
                           reapply for terms. The Board has longevity, dedication, and ease of recruitment of new members. 
Clinical Sites             Satisfaction and relationships are consistently good as reported in feedback surveys and renewed 
                           contracts for clinical sites.  
Donors and Benefactors     Donor and benefactor satisfaction with NMC is demonstrated by generous, on‐going gifts to the 
                           College through the Methodist Hospital Foundation (e.g., capital campaign for the new campus 
                           was completely funded before it was opened).  
Employers                  Employer satisfaction meets or exceeds the benchmarks for each academic department. See 1R4 
                           for specific results. Employers continue to recruit NMC students and value the education provided 
                           by the College.  
United Methodist Church    A successful summer site visit concluded with a 10‐year re‐affirmation of affiliation and plans to 
                           increase relationship activities.  
Professional               The continued demand for professional development offerings, as well as the attendance at such 
Development Customers      programs, reflects the satisfaction of professional development customers. These factors are also 
                           positive performance results for relationship‐building between the Professional Development 
                           Department and its customers (See 7R2 for results). 
 
3R6. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Understanding Students’ and Other 
Stakeholders’ Needs compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if 
appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education? 




                                                                                                                    
 
 
 
 
 
 


Category 3                                                                                                                 44 

 
 


3I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your 
processes and performance results for Understanding Students’ and Other Stakeholders’ Needs? 
 
Recent improvements are listed in Table 3.7. 
 
Table 3.7 Recent Improvements  
Stakeholders                  Recent Improvements 
Alumni                        Communications with NMC alumni have been enhanced through the use of technology, such 
                              as e‐mailed notice of events and increase use of website. 
Communities                   As a result of contributions from the Center for Health Partnerships Director and the 
                              Advisement and Outreach Coordinator, the College has integrated effective tools for 
                              identifying and responding to the needs of local, state, and national communities. 
United Methodist Church       Preparation for the 2010 site visit enhanced the College’s understanding of the needs of the 
                              United Methodist Church. For instance, through the preparation process, NMC faculty and 
                              staff assessed the level of church‐relatedness at all levels of the institution. As a result, areas 
                              of strength and areas needing improvement throughout the College were identified. 
Students                      Development of Systematic Evaluation Plans (SEP) within the Division of Student Affairs has 
                              positively impacted departments’ understanding of student needs. Communications between 
                              Student Government and the College Administration are positive, frequent, and have led to 
                              the establishment of a health communication channel. Quality customer service to students is 
                              an on‐going priority. As much as possible, student surveys gauging student satisfaction and 
                              needs were consolidated for efficiency and the best use of students’ time.  
 
3I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in Understanding Students’ and Other Stakeholders’ Needs? 
The supportive culture of NMC fosters continuous quality improvement throughout the institution. Through 
evaluation and assessment in SEP’s, departments and programs gain understanding of performance results and 
identify areas in need of improved results. A comprehensive Strategic Plan permeates the College’s culture, 
impacting daily operations and of the classroom. In Spring 2010, NMC initiated the process of revisiting, reviewing, 
and revising the Strategic Plan, including the composition of a College vision. This internal assessment, as well as 
the examination of external environments (e.g., competitors), will provide valuable data about the needs of 
students and other stakeholders.




Category 3                                                                                                                     45 

 
 


Category Four: Valuing People 
 
 4P1. How do you identify the specific credentials, skills, and values required for faculty, staff, and administrators? 
The specific qualifications for all positions are determined by the supervisors or administrators who design the 
positions based on the standard expectations in specialized healthcare industries and with consideration of 
program or institutional accreditations. The credentials, required or recommended skills, and values of each job 
description are updated as needed to ensure a good fit between the College’s values and mission and the 
candidate’s qualifications. As part of the application, HR uses a screening tool based on the core values to 
determine compatibility of the candidate with these core values. 
 
4P2. How do your hiring processes make certain that the people you employ possess the credentials, skills, and 
values you require?  
The Health System Human Resources (HR) department advertises for and accepts applications for all College 
positions. The HR staff evaluates the credentials and experience of all applicants before contacting applicants to 
gauge the applicant’s potential fit with the institution and to verify appropriateness of an applicant’s qualifications. 
When a job posting closes, HR submits qualified applications to the appropriate department for review by the 
department supervisor, regardless of position. Reviews of the application and subsequent interviews are 
conducted by either committees (for faculty and administrative positions) or by hiring managers (for staff 
positions). Because NMC values learning‐centered teaching, a teaching demonstration by all applicants for all 
faculty positions is a required part of the interview. Adjunct faculty members are interviewed personally by the 
Department or Program Director and must complete the same credentialing and work verification process as full‐
time faculty. For senior leadership positions, open forums are included in the interview process.  
 
4P3. How do you recruit, hire, and retain employees?  
 Recruitment:  At NMC, the methods of recruiting new employees vary according to position. Announcements for 
some positions are often posted in both regional and national publications such as The Chronicle of Higher 
Education. Positions in the Student Affairs department are posted in Career‐link, on specialized websites, job 
listings specific to professional organizations, and by networking within the healthcare community. All positions 
are posted on the Methodist Health System website and current employees are notified by an all‐College e‐mail 
sent out by the appropriate Vice President. NMC also encourages current employees to make referrals.  
Hiring:  The appropriate Vice President for a position oversees the recruiting and hiring of new personnel whereas 
staff supervisors screen applications for new staff members. Collaborative cross‐sectional search teams are formed 
to conduct interviews. Collaboration with HR personnel ensures that all hiring processes follow federal, state, and 
local guidelines. Job descriptions have been developed for each position within the College to identify essential 
skills, knowledge, and responsibilities required to meet operational needs. Personnel reductions resulting from 
retirement, attrition, etc., are reviewed by the Executive Team to determine whether the need merits 
replacement, realignment, or reclassification. 
Retention: The factors most responsible for NMC’s high employee retention rate are the generally competitive 
salaries, generous benefits program, and professional development opportunities. These incentives, combined 
with pleasant working conditions and job stability, contribute to a low turnover rate of 2%. To keep salaries 
competitive, HR recommends market‐based salary ranges which are reviewed annually by HR and Faculty Senate 
to adjust for changing markets. Employee benefits are also reviewed annually to remain competitive. For example, 
when peer comparisons showed that the majority of colleges participated in a Tuition Exchange Program for 
employee dependents, this option was added for dependents of NMC staff and faculty. To help employees with 
the rising cost of health care and provide easier access to health care, the College  student health clinic was 
opened up to include faculty and staff. 
 
 
 
 
 

Category 4                                                                                                            46 

 
 


4P4. How do you orient all employees to your organization’s history, mission, and values?  
From the application and interview process through the annual contribution review meeting between employee 
and supervisor, there are many opportunities to orient employees into the organization and to acquaint them with 
the institution’s history, mission, and core values so that all employees can focus on collaborating to provide high 
quality educational experiences to all students and stakeholders. 
 
Table 4.1 Systems that Orient Employees to NMC’s History, Mission and Values 
Systems 
Employee and faculty handbooks           Updated annually and are provided to all employees, they include an institutional 
                                         overview, mission, vision, core values, and College structure 
Office of Institutional Research         Provides current and historical data on enrollment, student demographics, 
                                         graduation and programs 
All‐College Forum                        Presentations at Forum include the annual Strategic Plan that is guided by the 
                                         mission and values of the College, AQIP process and projects, faculty and staff and 
                                         student activities are reported that reinforce our commitment to our quality 
                                         healthcare education and our mission of community involvement.  
HR Orientation                           Provides information on history, mission and values 
Annual Organizational Review (AOR)       Required of all employees which covers mission, history, values as well as safety 
                                         and policy information 
Operations Team                          New employee orientation. In an attempt to create a comprehensive process for 
                                         the newly hired employee to become familiar with our College and its culture, this 
                                         committee developed and implemented guidelines to welcome a new employee 
                                         to NMC.  
Adjunct Gathering                        Further integrates adjuncts by presentations from IT, and department chairs and 
                                         a chance for adjuncts to connect with full time instructors.   
  
4P5. How do you plan for changes in personnel?  
To ensure a seamless transition of key personnel as well as plan for continuing College operations in the event of a 
disaster or other event that may prevent an employee from performing the duties of his or her position, an AQIP 
project on Continuity of Operations was implemented in 2009. This plan provided for the identification of critical 
institutional operations or functions, including a successor for each function. For example, in the event that a 
faculty member could not teach his or her course, at least one faculty member has been identified to do so, and an 
administrative chain of command is in place to ensure on‐going day‐to‐day operations. 
 
The College closely monitors shifts in enrollment, availability of clinical sites, and new or changing program 
opportunities. To ensure a balanced workload for faculty and to meet the diverse and unique needs of NMC 
students, part‐time employees and adjunct faculty members are hired to meet peak workloads and non‐standard 
work hours, as well as to implement new programs. While plans for changes in personnel vary according to 
department and level, monitoring predicted changes, such as retirements and faculty shortages, is particularly 
important to the Division of Nursing. Because of nationwide shortages, the nursing education master’s program 
and Faculty Student Loan Program, a tuition reimbursement program, are used to recruit and retain nursing 
faculty.  
 
4P6. How do you design your work processes and activities so they contribute both to organizational productivity 
and employee satisfaction? 
One of the cornerstones of NMC’s Strategic Plan is Organizational Effectiveness. Action Steps have focused on the 
“opportunities” identified by the 2006 Systems Feedback Report to improve processes for information 
management and the streamlining of campus operations. For example, Action Steps on systems operations have 
led to automated student letters from the Registrar’s office, including letters regarding an online student 
registration process, and a functional alumni database, all of which led to better productivity and better use of 
employee time.  
 

Category 4                                                                                                               47 

 
 


An Operations Team, comprised of support staff, meets regularly to establish and improve operations processes to 
increase efficiency of operations across the campus. This team has created and implemented standardized 
procedures that have resulted in improved campus‐wide communications. New and improved processes to come 
from this team include procedures for new employee hires, employee travel planning and documentation, internal 
online forms, a master College calendar, and FTE support staff utilization.  
 
Improved and streamlined College processes that enable faculty and staff to perform their functions easily foster 
employee engagement which impacts employee satisfaction, both of which point to employees who work with 
passion and who feel a profound connection to the College. Engaged, satisfied employees contribute positively to 
the formation of new and streamlined policies and procedures meant to improve efficiency and stakeholder 
satisfaction. 
 
4P7. How do you ensure the ethical practices of all of your employees?  
There are several systems in place at NMC to ensure that all College business is conducted with the highest 
standard of integrity and is in compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and accrediting agencies (See Table 
4.2). In addition to policies, NMC promotes a culture of ethical behavior with its mission and values.  
 
Table 4.2 Systems to Ensure Ethical Practices 
Systems                                 Methods 
Human Resource Department                   Ensures  Federal guidelines when hiring new faculty and staff 
The President and the VP’s                  Interpret and apply the policies in Employee/ Faculty handbooks on ethical 
                                            policies 
The Dean of Students                        Resource to students who perceive that they have been treated unfairly within 
                                            or outside the classroom by any faculty or staff 
Faculty Senate Shared Governance            Ensures that College procedures are followed and set with guidance from 
                                            faculty. 
College’s Institutional Review Board        Monitors ethical practice in research 
                                            Publishes guidelines for research on the College website  
                                            Reviews applications for research 
Annual Contribution Reviews                 All employees are evaluated on whether they have successfully met their job 
                                            requirements while respecting the core values of the organization 
Professional Development Programs.          Potential conflict of interest is reported by all parties presenting programs 
 
4P8. How do you determine training needs? How do you align employee training with short‐ and long‐range 
organizational plans, and how does it strengthen your instructional and non‐instructional programs and services? 
The program administrators and staff attempt to match available training opportunities at conferences, faculty in‐
services, and other internal training measures with the particular needs identified by the NMC strategic planning 
process (see 5P2). 
 
Table 4.3 Aligning training with Long Range Plans 
Long Range Plan                                Short term strategies  
Becoming a more learning‐centered college          Focused training in this area has led to many initiatives that foster 
          (1st AQIP project in 2003)               learning‐centered teaching such as teaching portfolios, and team based 
                                                   learning. 
Keeping Curriculum Current                         Faculty have been sent to national and regional programs and conferences 
                                                   for training in evidence‐based practice (EBP), after which action plans 
                                                   were developed to integrate EBP into graduate and undergraduate 
                                                   programs. As a result, NMC faculty and graduates are proficient in EBP. 
Meeting Community Educational  Needs               The College Professional Development (PD) department gauges 
                                                   community and professional needs by completing a needs assessment in 
                                                   the spring of each year.  
Efficient Use of Current Technology                The Educational Technology (ET) department conducts an annual 
                                                   assessment of technology and training needs of the College and develops 
                                                   training plans. 
Category 4                                                                                                                   48 

 
 


 
4P9. How do you train and develop all faculty, staff, and administrators to contribute fully and effectively 
throughout their careers with your organization? How do you re‐enforce this training?  
NMC encourages all employees to develop and enhance their professional skills by offering technical training on 
computer programs and skills, providing a tuition reimbursement program and by establishing internal training and 
development  programs  that  focus  on  core  competencies  that  have  been  established  by  senior  management. 
Training  needs  are  identified  during  the  annual  contribution  reviews  with  supervisors.  The  COP  (Continuity  of 
Operations Plan) from the 2009 AQIP Action Step has ensured that several individuals are trained in key processes 
of the College.  
 
Table 4.4 Resources used to Train and Develop Personnel at NMC.  
Training Resources                         
Professional Development Funds                Each department is allocated funds to meet the needs of employees who 
                                              seek to develop their professional skills by attending or presenting at 
                                              conferences or meetings.  
Instructional Design Specialist               Offers a variety of workshops to all College personnel on computer skills 
                                              from e‐mail to teaching online. Online modules have been developed and 
                                              one‐on‐one training is also available when needed. 
Faculty Development                           Faculty Senate coordinates with faculty on a minimum of two Faculty 
                                              Development days each year. The PD department offers workshops and 
                                              training that provide CEUs required for faculty to satisfy credentialing. The 
                                              registration fee for these programs is waived for any NMC employee.  
Tuition Assistance                            A thriving tuition‐assistance program, funded by the Nebraska Methodist 
                                              Health System and Methodist Hospital Foundation, has enabled many 
                                              faculty as well as non‐faculty to take classes to gain additional educational 
                                              preparation or to obtain credentials for current job responsibilities and 
                                              promotional opportunity. 
Regulatory Training                           Training in safety, and regulatory issues are provided for all new employees 
                                              and as needed for existing employees. Regulations such as FERPA training 
                                              is required of all employees to complete on an annual basis and is included 
                                              in the AOR (Annual Organizational Review). Completion of the AOR is 
                                              mandatory for all College employees and reinforced by Department 
                                              Directors who are given daily completion reports and are held accountable 
                                              for their employees.  
 
4P10. How do you design and use your personnel evaluation system? How do you align this system with your 
objectives for both instructional and non‐instructional programs and services?  
All College employees must complete a Contribution Review (CR) on an annual basis which supports the College’s 
operational objectives, Strategic Plan, mission, and core values. This instrument reflects employees’ direct and 
indirect contributions toward student learning as well as other distinct objectives established through AQIP and 
formulated by strategic priorities in the Strategic Plan. Faculty members are also evaluated using IDEA Student 
Evaluations (described in 1P4). All employees must meet with their direct supervisor for an annual performance 
review that provides the individual with an assessment of past performance, input on areas needing improvement, 
and direction for achieving desired personal and professional objectives during the next year. These goals and 
recommendations are recorded on the CR which is signed by both the employee and supervisor.  
 
4P11. How do you design your employee recognition, reward, compensation, and benefit systems to align with 
your objectives for both instructional and non‐instructional programs and services?  
The College strives to foster a fair and supportive environment for its administrators, faculty, and staff so that they 
carry out their job responsibilities with success and loyalty to the College’s key mission, core values, and 
objectives.  
 


Category 4                                                                                                                     49 

 
 


Compensation and Benefits:  The President of NMC monitors the rates of salaries, wages, and benefits to ensure 
that NMC is competitive with regional averages and with the compensation at similar institutions. These 
comparisons are completed using data available through the College and University Professional Association 
(CUPA), the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), and the Association of Independent Colleges 
and Universities of Nebraska (AICUN), in conjunction with NMHS’ internal human resources data, and data from 
peer institutions. Action steps have been developed to examine departmental comparisons of salaries and 
workload.  
 
Table 4.5 Recognition of NMC Employees  
Recognition 
Publications              The monthly online publication, Heartbeat, features the accomplishments of Health System 
                          employees, including students, faculty, staff, and administrators at Nebraska Methodist College. 
                          The semiannual publication of the NMC Alumni Association, The Methodist Alumni Connection, 
                          publishes stories about the impact that College graduates are making in their communities and 
                          highlights personal and professional accomplishments of NMC graduates. 
                          The “News Spotlight” on the home page of the College website and on NMCnet highlights significant 
                          accomplishments of faculty, staff, as well as students.  
In‐Person                 Faculty and staff achievements are routinely recognized at All‐College Forums, which are held three 
                          times a year.  
By Supervisors            One‐to‐one recognition occurs during each employee’s Annual Contribution Review. 
Public Space              A NMC authors’ area was dedicated in the John Moritz Library in the Fall of 2009.  
                          Faculty, staff, and institutional awards are displayed in public areas throughout the College.  
 
Table 4.6 Recognition Awards 
Recognition Awards 
Years of Service Award              Those who have completed years of service (in multiples of five years) are recognized at 
                                    All‐College Forums. In addition, these employees are allowed to choose an award item and 
                                    attend a dinner which is sponsored by the Health System. 
Jean Beyer Award                    This award is given in memory of a former administrator who touched the lives of many at 
                                    NMC through her ability to relate to others, and who created a sense of purpose and 
                                    belonging for all College personnel. Nominees are recognized as individuals who have 
                                    demonstrated the ability to build relationships with colleagues and students alike through 
                                    NMC’s core values: Caring, Excellence, Holism, Learning, and Respect.  
Collaboration Award                 This award is given to individuals or groups who have exhibited collaboration with others 
                                    to complete projects. 
Ruth Berggren Elliott Master        This award is given to one faculty member each year according to established criteria. 
Teacher Award                       Student nominations, with accompanying support documentation, are solicited and 
                                    processed annually by Student Government which then votes to select one faculty 
                                    recipient.  
Master Teacher of                   This award is a faculty‐developed, peer recognition award that is given to a faculty 
 the Year                           member who has demonstrated excellence in teaching by the current initiative, such as 
                                    team based learning.  
Honorary Alumni                     Alumni status is bestowed by the Alumni Association upon one individual each year who 
                                    has adopted the College as their own through uncommon and outstanding service, 
                                    substantial and continuing commitment, and loyalty.  
Monthly Coffees                     Each department or section within the College can host a monthly coffee. The College 
                                    provides monies for these monthly events, each of which has a unique theme as decided 
                                    upon by the hosting department or section. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Category 4                                                                                                                  50 

 
 


 
4P12. How do you determine key issues related to the motivation of your faculty, staff, and administrators? How 
do you analyze these issues and select courses of action?  
The Culture Audit and the Employee Engagement Survey are the primary sources of data used to determine key 
issues and priorities related to overall motivation of College employees. The results of all audits and surveys are 
discussed during the President’s Cabinet meeting, department meetings, and the All‐College Forums. The 
Institutional Research office conducts further analysis of employee‐identified issues of concern then recommends 
a course of action. Action Steps are subsequently developed across campus groups to address the concerns. 
Annual Contribution Reviews (described in 4P7) are used to monitor individual motivation of all employees who 
are required to set personal and professional goals for each year they are employed at the College. Departmental 
supervisors review the goals with the employees and provide guidance and suggestions.  
 
4P13. How do you provide for and evaluate employee satisfaction, health and safety, and well‐being?  
The College informally monitors and responds to issues in job satisfaction, health and safety, and well‐being 
through ongoing communication and meetings and formally through assessments that provide for comprehensive 
awareness of the needs of its employees.  
 
Table 4.7 Providing and Evaluating Employee Satisfaction, Health and Safety and Well‐Being.  
                     Provided through:                                             Evaluated by:  
Satisfaction             The College’s competitive compensation and benefits,           Turnover rate, Employee 
                         fair and formative employee evaluation, and ongoing            Engagement Survey and Culture 
                         employee training and development                              Audit, and exit interviews   
Health                   NMC was the first institution of higher education and          The President’s Council on 
                         one of the first three companies in the country to             Wellness (PCOW) Committee is 
                         become a Platinum Well Workplace. A comprehensive              charged with overseeing the 
                         renewal application process was recently completed             wellness initiatives at NMC.  
                         and in Fall, 2009, the Platinum Award was retained.            A free full wellness health 
                         The College has an on‐site fitness facility.                   screening is offered to everyone 
                         Student Health Clinic services were expanded in 2009           within the Health System who 
                         to include employees.                                          carries the health plan.  
Financial Health         Financial planning workshops are held twice a year.            Number of employees that attend 
                         Through a connection with the Foundation, the College          the workshops or use the fund 
                         maintains a “crisis fund,” a means through which 
                         students and employees at the College can receive 
                         support when they experience personal financial 
                         hardship.  
Safety                   NMC has a 24‐hour Campus Security Officer, who                The Safety Committee fields safety 
                         monitors security cameras and makes campus rounds             concerns and educates/updates 
                         routinely.                                                    the College on major issues.  
                         An Emergency Procedures Manual was developed               
                         specifically for The Josie Harper Campus.  
                         A text message alert with a back up e‐mail system was 
                         added Spring 2009.  
                         Individuals are trained yearly on safety procedures as 
                         part of the AOR. 
Well‐being               The College facilitates many opportunities for staff,         PCOW Committee is responsible 
                         faculty, administrators, and students to interact in          for planning and monitoring social 
                         planning, working, and social events.                         events and soliciting nominations 
                         Spiritual support and well‐being is enhanced by the           and awarding recognition awards. 
                         activities of student campus groups, such as J.O.L.T.,     
                         and by the leadership of the Director of Spiritual 
                         Development and Campus Ministry. 
 
 
 
Category 4                                                                                                              51 

 
 


 
4R1. What measures of valuing people do you collect and analyze regularly? 
The College systematically and regularly uses a variety of surveys, internal data, and peer benchmark indicators to 
gather information to assess the culture and determine the key factors that affect employee engagement and 
satisfaction.  
 
Table 4.8 Surveys for Measuring Valuing People 
Survey                    Timeline for               Description                                  Comparisons 
                          administration 
Culture Audit                 Every 3 years,              118‐item survey addresses 9                 Past years 
                              beginning in 1994           general areas: self care, healthy            
                                                          fun, full potential, mutual respect,        Some data on specific 
                                                          support, quality, collaboration,            question with 
                                                          self‐awareness, and work climate.           corporations, none with 
                                                                                                      other colleges 
                                                          (adapted from Lifegain Health 
                                                          Culture Audit;  Judd Allen) 
Engagement Survey             Every 2 years               12‐item survey used to measure              1 year of data so far, will 
                              beginning in 2009           employee satisfaction, leadership           be able to compare years 
                                                          confidence, and employee                     
                                                          engagement                                  Comparisons with other 
                                                                                                      health organizations 
                                                          Analyzed by the Coffman 
                                                          Organization. 
Employee Satisfaction         Every 3 months,             12‐item survey on employee                  Past years 
                              random sample of            satisfaction (NMHS)                          
                              employees                                                               Comparison data with 
                              throughout the                                                          other entities within the 
                              health system                                                           NMHS. 
IDEA                          Every course,               Students’ evaluation of courses,            Year to year comparison 
                              beginning in 2003           teachers and learning.                      with like institutions.  
 
Table 4.9 Other data used as Indicators of Valuing People 
                 Indicators                                Collected Annually                       Benchmarked with peers 
Employee Compensation                                   Reported in , IPEDS, CUPA                             Yes 
Faculty Workload                                            Reported in IPEDS                                 Yes 
Employee Turnover                                                HR data                                      No 
Professional Development Dollars                                Internally                                    No 
Tuition Assistance Numbers                                      Internally                                    No 
Tuition Exchange Benefit                                        Internally                                    No 
Contribution Reviews                                            Internally                                    No 
Crime Report                                       Reported to Department of Education                        No 
% of Employee Contributing to  Foundation                         NMHS                                 Yes within NMHS 
 
4R2. What are your performance results in valuing people?  
The College employs a number of measures to illustrate means of valuing people which have been instrumental in 
determining key areas of quality improvement over the past few years. The Strategic Plan requires the College to 
dedicate one AQIP Action Project each year to the quality improvement of Valuing People. To guide the College’s 
efforts to demonstrate valuing people and means of improving this key area, administrators, supervisors, and 
other employees use data from the above measures (See Table 4R1), open conversations, and employee feedback, 
both individual and departmental. Based on the results of these measures, successful AQIP Action Projects such as 
Collaborative Skill Building for College Personnel (2007), Campus‐Wide Green Initiative (2008), and Using an 
Employee Engagement Measure to Foster a Culture of Engagement (2009) were completed.  
 
Category 4                                                                                                                       52 

 
 


Employee Satisfaction:  Employee satisfaction at NMC is evident in the high percentage of participation at College 
events and on committees. For example, when asked  during an All‐College Forum to sign up to help with the 
Systems Portfolio, 100% of employees signed on to help. And when asked to contribute to the NMHS foundation 
fundraising campaign, 100% of College employees contributed which made it possible for NMC to win the “Caring 
Cup” for the fourth straight year. (The Caring Cup is an award given to the largest NMHS affiliate or department 
with the highest percentage of employees contributing to the Foundation.)  
The Employee Engagement Survey:  Administered in Fall 2009, the Engagement Survey reflects employee 
satisfaction regarding the workplace. In response to the statement, “Overall, I am extremely satisfied with this 
organization as a place to work,” NMC employee satisfaction was in the 99th Percentile (mean = 4.35), well above 
the 75th Percentile benchmark (Mean = 3.96) for high functioning institutions (See Figure 4.1).  
 
Figure 4.1 Overall NMC Satisfaction from the Engagement Survey 




                                                                                            
The Nebraska Methodist Health System (NMHS) employee survey measures satisfaction by asking employees to 
respond to statements such as, “I would gladly refer a good friend or family member to this organization for 
employment” and “Overall, I am extremely satisfied with this organization as a place to work.”  The five‐year 
average of results (83% and 86%) indicates that employees consistently rate their job satisfaction at NMC as high 
(See Figure 4.2). 




                                                           
Figure 4.2 Employee Satisfaction as measured by NMHS survey 
 
Category 4                                                                                                       53 

 
 


Employee Engagement:  Because employee engagement is related to employee satisfaction, it is not surprising that 
NMC is rated high in terms of employee engagement. Overall engagement is derived from taking an average of the 
nine engagement items, and overall, NMC employees scored in the 84th percentile (mean = 4.13) compared to the 
national benchmark of 75th percentile (mean=3.95) which is established by the Coffman Organization for highly 
engaged healthcare organizations (see Engagement Survey for items and complete results). Results for other items 
illustrate that NMC is above the 75th percentile benchmark for every item except Growth which was the lowest for 
both highly engaged and disengaged employees (See Figure 4.3, below). Department Heads have been encouraged 
to work with their employees through their Annual Contribution Reviews to identify or define what growth means 
to them and how NMC can help them achieve their goals.  
 
 




                                                                            
 
Figure 4.3 Item Responses by Engaged vs. Disengaged Employees at NMC on the Engagement Survey 
 
Employee engagement is related to personal and professional growth, and although growth was ranked lowest on 
the Engagement Survey (59th percentile) it was still above the benchmark of 50th percentile. High engagement was 
validated by the two questions on the NMHS employee) employee questions: “I have a supervisor who has 
encouraged my growth and development” and “This organization provides me opportunities to learn and grow.” 
The five‐year average of results (87% and 83%) indicates that NMC employees have, seek, and desire a high level of 
growth opportunities at NMC (see Figure 4.4). In addition, NMC employees believe that their talents are being 
recognized at NMC (See Figure 4.5, 86% and Figure 4.3, 93rd percentile).  
 




Category 4                                                                                                      54 

 
 




                                                                    
Figure 4.4 Personal Growth as measured on the NMHS Survey 




                                                                                 
Figure 4.5 Use of Talent as Measured on the NMHS Survey. 
 
Health and Well‐being:  The results of the Culture Audit and minutes of the PCOW Committee meetings are 
routinely and regularly monitored. These results are used to improve the health and well‐being of NMC employees 
and students. The Culture Audit has been conducted since 1994. It was described in detail in the 2007 Systems 
Portfolio, and continues to be a valuable tool. Detailed results of the Culture Audit were reported in the 2008 
Culture Audit. 
  
4R3. What evidence indicates the productivity and effectiveness of your faculty, staff, and administrators in 
helping you achieve your goals?  
Examples of ways in which employees help NMC achieve its goals include:  
    • Action Steps are regularly submitted by faculty, staff, and administrators. (7R2) 
         Most programs are accountable to professional accreditation bodies and not only have all programs 
         consistently maintained accreditation; they often receive strong accolades from reviewers and site 
         visitors. 
         Active and productive shared governance of the Faculty Senate. 
         Highly‐engaged, satisfied employees as measured in the aforementioned surveys. (4R1) 
         Faculty‐led restructuring, assessment, and evaluation of General Education. (1R3) 
         100% Employee participation in the annual Caring Campaign and campus surveys. (4R2) 
         Consistent, steady graduation rates. (1R2) 

Category 4                                                                                                   55 

 
 


          Graduates from programs at all levels regularly pass certification exams at over 90%. (7R2) 
          High ratings on student engagement (NSSE) and student satisfaction (SSI) surveys. (1R2 )  
 
4R4. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Valuing People compare with the performance 
results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education?  
Comparisons of the Culture Audit, Engagement Survey, and the Employee Satisfaction Surveys to national and 
regional data show that overall NMC is doing exceptionally well in its processes for Valuing People.  
 
Table 4.10 NMC Comparisons to External Data 
Surveys                                        Comparisons 
Engagement Survey                                 NMC is above the 75th percentile benchmark for high performing 
                                                  healthcare institutions in 3 areas: satisfaction, Engagement, and 
                                                  Leadership Confidence.  
Culture Audit Report                              The Culture Audit data has lower gap scores in all comparable important 
                                                  and satisfied items when compared to non‐educational institutions 
Employee Satisfaction                             Comparisons with other entities in the NMHS consistently find NMC 
                                                  ratings higher on all items 
*click each survey for full results. 
 
Salary:  National comparisons for faculty salary found NMC slightly below most ranks when compared with 16 
other institutions with the following criteria:  Degree granting, Private/not for profit, 4year+, and healthcare 
professions with student population under 1,000. However, when compared to like institutions in Nebraska, NMC 
salaries were above normal in all ranks except Associate Professor (See Figure 4.1).  
 
Figure 4.6 Average salaries of full‐time instructional staff equated to 9‐month contracts, by academic rank:  




                                                                                                     
Academic year 2007‐08 
 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS): 
Winter 2007‐08, Human Resources component. 
Improvement (I) 




Category 4                                                                                                                                  56 

 
 


 
4I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your 
processes and performance results for Valuing People? 
 
Table 4.11 Systematic and Comprehensive Recent Improvements 
2009‐2010 Improvements                     Systematic                                   Comprehensive  
Adding new Engagement Survey                    Provided external evaluation and           With the use of the Culture Audit, 
                                                consultation that will compliment          the NMHS Satisfaction Survey, 
                                                internal evaluations with every            employee Contribution Reviews, 
                                                other year timeline. This survey           and the new Engagement Survey, 
                                                provides a means of validating             NMC has comprehensive data and 
                                                internal measures as well as               is now able to triangulate results 
                                                obtaining counsel on ways to use           (4R2) to determine the “story” 
                                                the data and benchmarking with             behind the numbers. 
                                                other institutions.                      
Research Recognition                            Data from the employee                     Action Steps were put into place to 
                                                Contribution Reviews includes              support and reward the faculty for 
                                                tracking the number of scholarly           their efforts, including mini‐grants 
                                                journal and/or monograph                   for research, an increase in 
                                                publications.                              available funding for regional and 
                                                Tracking this data revealed                national presentations, and a 
                                                employee accomplishments to                prominent area in the College 
                                                celebrate and presented an                 library dedicated to NMC authors 
                                                opportunity to show support and            and their work.  
                                                recognition for an activity that 
                                                faculty value.  
Tuition Exchange Program (TEP)                  A reminder of this program is sent          NMC now participates in two 
                                                out twice a year.                           separate tuition exchange 
                                                Individuals work with TEP‐liaison at        programs to provide free tuition 
                                                NMC on set process.                         opportunities to dependents and 
                                                                                            spouses to their choice of over 800 
                                                                                            institutions.  
Restructuring of the WELL‐BEING                 The committee meets monthly to              The support of the College 
Committee to the President’s Council on         track data and plan                         President of the Committee has 
Wellness (PCOW).                                programs/recognition of all College         given the Committee the 
                                                personnel.                                  institutional status it needs to 
                                                                                            promote programs and 
                                                                                            improvements. 
 
4I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in Valuing People? 
NMC’s culture of engagement related to the institution’s primary goal of educating healthcare professionals is 
evident when one examines both data and performance results. While it is the culture of engagement that drives 
the institution’s programs, it is the employee‐driven Strategic Plan that provides support for that culture. The 
100% employee participation in an anonymous online Engagement Survey and an overall score of 99th percentile is 
but one illustration of the “people power” of NMC and one example of the power behind NMC’s effective health 
professions education programs. This employee engagement demonstrates why it is essential for NMC to value its 
employees, and while the Executive Team sets goals each year, the individual personal and professional goals of 
NMC employees contributes to that Strategic Plan. The integral addition of a Director of Institutional Research has 
opened new doors for NMC in terms of identifying institutional strengths and weaknesses as well as allowing the 
Executive Team to set realistic goals based on the benchmarks established for similar institutions. This ability, in 
conjunction with on‐going, comprehensive surveying of employees and students, enables NMC to continue valuing 
people who are instrumental to the success within the institution.


Category 4                                                                                                                   57 

 
 


 Category Five: Leading and Communicating  
 
5P1. How are your organization's mission and values defined and reviewed? When and by whom? 
NMC’s mission and values as described in detail in Category 8, were established by a cross‐function committee of 
College personnel and were approved by the Executive Team which includes the President, Vice President for 
Academic Affairs, Vice President for Student Affairs, and the College Board of Directors. The College mission and 
core values are imbedded into the strategic planning process (Category 8) and reviewed annually by The 
President’s Cabinet which is comprised of the President, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Vice President for 
Student Affairs, Associate Deans (Nursing, Allied Health, General Education, and Professional Development), Dean 
of Students and Director of Enrollment Services.  See organizational chart for an illustration of the College 
leadership teams. 
 
5P2. How do your leaders set directions in alignment with your mission, vision, values, and commitment to high 
performance? 
As illustrated in Figure 5.1 the direction for strategic planning is set for the College on an annual basis by the 
Executive Team working collaboratively with the President’s Cabinet and all College faculty and staff participate 
and give voice to the Strategic Plan (see description in Category 8). NMC’s mission and core values provide the 
foundation for the three planning cornerstones: Organizational Effectiveness (process), Quality Education 
(purpose), and Personnel Development (people).  
  
Using these cornerstones as a guide, the vision for the goals and objectives currently needed in each of the areas is 
developed annually and is generated through a series of discussions during meetings of the Executive Team and 
President’s Cabinet. These goals and objectives provide the framework for all strategic planning at NMC. Action 
Steps are submitted from faculty, staff, and departments across campus and lead to completion based on what 
needs to be done, why, how, by whom, when, at what cost, and how success will be measured and reported back 
to the President’s Cabinet. 
 
Figure 5.1 Strategic Plan 
                                                     Strategic Goals/Directions
                                                      Upgrading
                                                      Information
                                                      Management


                                                      Streamlining
                                                      Campus
                                                      Operations


          MISSION STATEMENT                           Promotion of
          Educating healthcare professional who       NMC Identity
          positively influence the health and well
          being of the community

          Our Three Cornerstones                      Advancement of
          Organizational Effectiveness (Process)      Comprehensive
          Quality Education (Purpose)                 community
          Personnel Development (People)
                                                      Connections


                                                      Enhancing
                                                      Student
                                                      Success


                                                      Increasing
                                                      Engagement



                                                      Developing
                                                      Professional                   2009-2010
                                                      Competence
                                                                                     Strategic Plan
                                                                                     (see nmcnet for details)
                                                                                                                    
 
 
Category 5                                                                                                         58 

 
 


 
5P3. How do these directions take into account the needs and expectations of current and potential students and 
key stakeholder groups? 
While planning for the future gives the College direction, NMC’s processes are agile enough to respond to student 
needs in a way that focuses on students and learning. The College utilizes advisory committees, focus groups, 
surveys, and evaluations to gather feedback from students and other key internal and external stakeholders. A 
recent response has been the RN‐BSN Academy partnership with Nebraska Methodist Health System which offers 
registered nurses (RNs) at Methodist Hospital who do not have a baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN) the 
opportunity to obtain a BSN in preparation for elevating industry standards. Methodist Hospital’s Magnet status 
has set higher standards for education and research providing many opportunities to partner with NMC. Another 
example of responding to stakeholders is NMC’s full complement of online programs including degree completion, 
RN‐BSN, and Master’s degree programs that are needed in today’s ever‐changing academic environment and 
healthcare arena. The most recent addition to the online programs is the Master of Science in Nursing‐Nurse 
Executive program which will provide leadership education to enhance the quality of nursing administration. 
Included in the 2009‐2010 Strategic Plan is promotion of the NMC identity by educating internal and external 
stakeholders of its mission and core values. In 2008, the Physical Therapist Assistant Program was developed in 
response to increasing demand for physical therapy service in the community and increase demand for physical 
therapist assistants, in particular, in the Omaha and surrounding markets.   
 
5P4. How do your leaders guide your organization in seeking future opportunities while enhancing a strong focus 
on students and learning? 
While open communication that encourages the sharing of ideas sometimes results in the discovery of new 
opportunities for the College to explore, College administrators intentionally maintain professional and community 
connections to seek opportunities and directions for future growth. Because facilitating students’ learning is a 
 College priority, administrators, in consultation with faculty and staff and by reviewing key data make strategic 
 decisions to promote a continuously successful learning environment. The development of Team Based Learning 
 for undergraduate programs is an example of the College’s commitment to fostering a learner‐centered 
 environment for students.  
  
 The Professional Development department creates a number of lifelong learning educational opportunities for 
 NMC graduates, healthcare professionals in the community, and around the world. Each academic program at the 
 College has an operational Advisory Committee that meets on a regular basis to discuss trends and/or changes in 
 clinical practice and implications to curricula. In addition, many College leaders belong to consortia, or other 
 organizations, and subscribe to electronic listservs where they are able to interact with other educators or 
 administrators from other institutions. These memberships or subscriptions provide opportunities for 
 collaboration that enhance teaching and learning, professional skills, and knowledge. Additional opportunities 
 arise as changes in one program may prompt discussions about changes in other programs. For example, online 
 teaching methods employed in one program provide a model for other programs, and influence the day‐to‐day 
 operations of such areas as the Registrar’s Office, Financial Aid Office, Business Office, and Bookstore. 
  
 Staff and students at the College take initiative in collaborative projects that build and sustain a learner‐centered 
 learning environment. Since 2006, there has been a strong emphasis on enhanced leadership development of 
 student leaders. The Ambassador and Pathfinders groups and immersion service trips have utilized Student 
 Coordinators to assist in the logistical planning and leadership of the group. A first year experience (FYE) program 
 was implemented in fall 2009. This semester‐long program is designed for incoming students who just graduated 
 from high school and assists students in the transition to post‐secondary education. Students learn strategies to 
 help them adjust to College and improve classroom performance.  In August, 2010, the FYE program transitioned 
 to an elective course that freshman register for and student leaders facilitate under the guidance of a student 
 affairs professional. Study seminars were incorporated into the NMC curriculum in Spring 2009, with a goal to 
 improve pass rates in courses that have traditionally been challenging for freshmen and sophomore students. 
  Seminars were offered for selected courses and all students were welcome to attend. Course faculty required  

Category 5                                                                                                          59 

 
 


attendance for any student whose testing average was below 75%. A Supplemental Instruction (SI) program was 
piloted during the Summer 2010 session and began officially in Fall 2010. The SI program replaced the study 
seminars and consists of peer‐facilitated academic support provided outside of class each week. SI is provided as a 
complement to NMC’s historically difficult courses. The student SI Leader attends the actual class and conducts SI 
sessions to supplement the learning that occurred during class time. Students are encouraged to take advantage of 
this group study time that is offered at no cost. Each SI Leader is trained and earns a scholarship for service in this 
program. 
 
Program Directors at the College recognize the importance of monitoring the needs and trends in their respective 
healthcare fields and actively participate in professional organizations and pursue other continuing education. In 
response to sometimes subtle changes in technology and research discoveries, Program Directors adjust curricular 
requirements. In addition, administrators develop components of the Strategic Plan so that the College maintains 
its unique niche in the regional market for healthcare education. Examples include exploration of new program 
development and development of community and Health System partnerships for off‐campus delivery of 
programs. 
 
Other examples that illustrate the manner in which the College seizes opportunities for enhancing the future 
learning environment are the College’s decision to join the Online Consortium of Independent Colleges and 
Universities (OCICU) to share the delivery of online course work. NMC was accepted into the Council of 
Independent Colleges (CIC) and is the only healthcare college with membership in this estimable organization. 
NMC was accepted to the CIC because its Educated Citizen Core Curriculum demonstrates a solid liberal arts and 
sciences foundation.  To prepare for the future, NMC searches for new opportunities in healthcare education by 
closely monitoring trends and professions in healthcare. NMC focuses on community outreach to strengthen ties 
with the Methodist Church on the local, regional, and international levels. In addition, with our partnership with 
Omaha Burke High School, the Upward Bound program provided students with the opportunity for academic 
enrichment and college preparation.  
 
5P5. How do you make decisions in your organization?  How do you use teams, task forces, groups, or committees 
to recommend or make decisions, and to carry them out? 
As the organizational chart reflects, the College is structured to facilitate communication and is inclusive in its 
decision‐making. The Academic Council and Student Affairs Council are comprised of leaders from each of these 
areas. These councils meet regularly and all departmental, committee, and council meetings include updates from 
individual members who participate or play leadership roles in College projects. An Advisory Committee assists 
each professional program in its decision‐making. New initiatives may be delegated to subcommittees or task 
forces, and in turn, their recommendations will be forwarded to the appropriate decision‐making bodies. All 
College constituents affected by the decision are notified of committee, program, and College decisions.  
 
5P6. How do you use data, information, and your own performance results in your decision‐making processes?  
The College is using systematically‐gathered information as well as the results from nationally‐normed studies and 
benchmarking in decision‐making. Since the College adopted an AQIP‐based model, areas of the College 
organization strive to share information and key results in a manner that is more deliberate before decisions are 
made. The Enrollment Management Committee includes members of College administration, the Associate Deans 
of academic programs, the Director of Institutional Research, and the Director of Enrollment Services who review 
data about admissions and enrollment regularly. The Board of Directors reviews and approves the overall budget 
on an annual basis, and budgetary figures are regularly monitored by College administration and leaders of 
departments and divisions. The completion of the IDEA student evaluation occurs in virtually every course section 
throughout the College and contributes to decisions being made by Associate Deans and Program Directors about 
the best means to achieve goals related to helping students learn. All departments complete a Systematic 
Evaluation Plan (SEP) which enables programs to monitor the achievement of specific goals, including those set by 
accrediting bodies, and to set goals for the coming academic year. Each program offered by the Professional 
Development department includes participant evaluations that are used to revise programs.  

Category 5                                                                                                           60 

 
 


 
The creation of the Institutional Research and Communication office in 2008 has been instrumental in assisting the 
College to systematically organize, centralize, and integrate data pertaining to academic and institutional 
effectiveness and excellence. The influence of AQIP and program‐specific accrediting bodies has contributed to 
NMC’s use of external benchmark and comparison information such as IPEDS and NSSE. NMC’s recent acceptance 
to the CIC has also supported NMC’s ability to benchmark to like institutions. 

5P7. How does communication occur between and among the levels and units of your organization? 
The primary and official means of communication at NMC is email. Faculty, staff, students, and administrators, are 
assigned an email account on the Outlook system. All members of the NMC community are encouraged to check 
their email accounts frequently, at least once a day, for not only course‐specific information but also upcoming 
events, unforeseen changes, and deadlines. The primary vehicles for student communication are email and ANGEL 
(course delivery platform). Students are able to check billing information, schedule, and grade information on 
IQWeb and NetPartner is a web‐based application that allows students to access detailed financial aid information.  
 
The President’s Cabinet meetings are an intentional vehicle to improve communication between levels of 
administration. The open door policy of NMC administration furthers communication amongst and between 
Department levels. The Academic Council and Student Affairs Council meetings provide additional opportunities 
for important communication to take place and allows for further dissemination of information to different areas 
of the College. Departmental faculty is encouraged to express concerns and ideas to the Faculty Senate Faculty at‐
large Representative Group. In addition, representatives from Administration are invited to attend Student 
Government meetings. College forums are held three times a year to share and publicize important information to 
all College employees.  
 
College staff and faculty members at all levels are encouraged to share suggestions and insights about problems 
with their supervisors and upper‐level administrators informally and at regularly scheduled meetings. All 
departments and employees are encouraged to submit Action Steps. College committees and departments often 
invite guests from other College areas to offer training, share opportunities for involvement, and clarify policies 
and procedures. Much of the information from these meetings is made available to the wider College community 
using the College intranet. 
 
5P8. How do your leaders communicate a shared mission, vision, and values that deepen and reinforce the 
characteristics of high performance organizations? 
The President’s Cabinet is intentionally structured to provide an avenue for communication to the entire College. 
Department leaders employ handbooks, contracts, and Annual Reports to communicate important expectations to 
 the College community. The College’s mission, vision, and core values are posted in key locations: on the College 
 website (www.methodistcollege.edu), course syllabi for all programs and on public space within the College. NMC 
posts the cornerstones of its Strategic Plan in an easily understood Flash format on the College’s intranet. The 
intranet is also used to submit and track Action Steps, allowing everyone to participate in moving the College 
forward.  
 
NMC’s mission, vision, and core values are integrated within the Strategic Plan and Action Steps which are 
important to the College’s efforts toward continuous quality improvement. Action Steps are projects developed by 
administrators, faculty and staff throughout the College with the goal of improving College offerings, effectiveness, 
and efficiencies. The submission of Action Steps by employees is regularly encouraged and applauded by the 
leaders of NMC. The College’s involvement in AQIP and its focus on continuous quality improvement is reinforced 
three times a year at College Forums, at President’s Cabinet and departmental meetings. 
 
 
 


Category 5                                                                                                        61 

 
 


5P9. How are leadership abilities encouraged, developed and strengthened among your faculty, staff and 
administrators?  How do you communicate and share leadership knowledge, skills, and best practices throughout 
you organization?  
NMC strongly supports faculty, staff, and administrators in taking on leadership roles within the professional 
organizations to which they belong. All College faculty, staff, and administrators have opportunities to attend 
conferences for professional development and $100,000 budgeted for College employees to receive continuing 
education credits (CEU) through workshops hosted by NMC’s Professional Development department. Additional 
money is budgeted by the Nebraska Methodist Hospital Foundation for professional development of faculty and 
staff at NMC. In 2007, $50,082 was dispersed to 46 faculty and staff members of the College. In 2008, $43,681 was 
dispersed to 34 faculty and staff members, and in 2009, $85,140 was dispersed to 46 College faculty and staff 
members. The information that College faculty, staff, and administrators gain by attending these conferences is 
integrated into programs and programming on campus. Each semester, College faculty have the opportunity to 
share the information they learn at these professional meetings during faculty in‐service days. The Student Affairs 
leadership team fosters development by sharing information from recent conferences and engaging in reading 
assignments. Professional development is addressed by each employee as they set goals as part of their annual 
Contribution Review (CR). 

5P10. How do your leaders and board members ensure that your organization maintains and preserves its mission, 
vision, values, and commitment to high performance during leadership succession?  How do you develop and 
implement your leadership succession plans?  
College leaders and Board members ensure the preservation of the mission, vision, core values, and commitment 
to high performance through the strategic planning process. In 2008, one of NMC’s Action Projects was to develop 
and implement a continuity of operations plan across all divisions and departments at the College. Each 
department began identifying essential functions and started building the Continuity of Operations Plan by naming 
successors for each critical function and identifying mitigation strategies.  
 
5R1. What performance measures of leading and communication do you collect and analyze regularly?  
In 2009, NMC administered the Engagement Survey to all employees to measure components of the leadership 
and communication on campus. NMC contracted with the Coffman Organization to conduct the Engagement 
Survey, and this external evaluation provided benchmarks and consultation. The results were reported overall and 
by department and department leaders received an analysis of the results and a manager guide to facilitate 
discussion within their department. Each department reviewed the results of the survey then developed Action 
Steps and goals as necessary.  
 
Another mechanism of determining the level of employee satisfaction is the NMHS Employee Satisfaction Survey, 
which has been conducted throughout the Nebraska Methodist Health System since 2001. This survey provides 
feedback about leadership and communication at the College as well as providing comparisons with other 
departments within Nebraska Methodist Health System.  
 
Each employee’s annual Contribution Review (CR) includes self‐ratings that address leadership and include 
sections related to student focus, professionalism, service to the College, and interpersonal interaction. College 
employees are asked to establish annual professional and personal goals, which may include components of 
leading and communicating, as well as reflect on goals established the previous year.  
 
A Systematic Evaluation Plan (SEP) enables departments and programs to monitor the achievement of specific 
goals, which may include components of leadership and communication, and to set goals for the coming year. In 
addition to formal quantitative data, employee satisfaction with leadership and communication is also monitored 
qualitatively in employee turner‐over, employee relations issues, department feedback, and employee annual 
reviews.  
 
 
 
Category 5                                                                                                          62 

 
 


5R2. What are your results for leading and communication process and systems?  
Data analysis indicates positive results on several measures collected for this purpose. For example, the 
Engagement Survey administered by the Coffman Organization indicated that employee engagement was at the 
84th percentile, when the 75th percentile is considered the ‘gold standard’ for this instrument. Employee 
engagement is based on a foundation of leading and communicating. For example, variables that indicate highly‐
engaged employees include:  
     • A two‐way relationship with the manager (i.e., good communication) 
     • Clear and desired outcomes of their role 
     • Being called on to use their abilities to the fullest 
     • Seeing their contributions valued and growing and developing to new levels of success. 

 
The level of engaged employees is a direct reflection of good communication and confidence in leadership and for 
                                               th                                           th
NMC, “Leadership Confidence” was in the 90  percentile. Again, the ‘gold standard’ is the 75  percentile. As noted 
in the data below (See Figure 5.2), issues related to leadership confidence tend to be:  
         Visibility 
         Purpose behind decisions 
         Direction aligned with values and mission or communication. 
 
The Coffman Organization stated that “Nebraska Methodist College employees are reporting very high levels of 
commitment and belief in the broader purpose of what they do and the people guiding the future.”  
 
Figure 5.2 Engagement Survey (Leadership Confidence) 




                                                                                                                 
 
 
The Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) has been administered every three years beginning in 2003 and measures 
student satisfaction and what issues are important to them.  NMC students have very high expectations on 
measures of leading and communicating. Overall, 73% of students would enroll here again which is up from 60% in 
2006. College leaders have created a safe learning environment one that cultivates respect and that holds high 
expectations for its employees and students (See Table 5.1).  
 
Category 5                                                                                                      63 

 
 


Table 5.1 Comparison from 2009 to 2006 (Importance/Satisfaction) 
SSI Item                                            NMC 2009         NMC 2006     Mean 
                                                                                  Differences  

Administrators are available to hear students       6.41/5.34        6.03/4.88    0.46*** 
concerns.  
Campus safety                                       6.68/6.25        6.53/5.98    0.27*** 
Academic advising                                   6.73/6.06        6.61/5.37    0.69*** 

***p>.001, Source: SSI 2006 Survey.  
 
5R3. How do your results for the performance of your process of leading and communication compare with the 
performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher 
education?  
Results from the Coffman Organization’s Engagement Survey show that NMC is well above the 75th percentile 
benchmark on the following three dimensions of culture: Overall Satisfaction, 99th percentile; Leadership 
Confidence, 90th percentile; and Overall Engagement, 84th percentile. Results were above the 75% percentile with 
the exception of one (See Figure 5.3). 
          
Figure 5.3 Engagement Survey (Benchmarks) 




                                                                                                              
Compared to NMHS, NMC scored consistently higher on leadership confidence than the five other subsidiaries of 
the NMHS (See Table 5.2).  
 
Table 5.2 NMHS Survey Results based on a five year average of employees who agree or strongly agree* 
                                                                                        
QUESTIONS                                         NMC                                  NMHS 
I know what is expected of me.                    93%                                  90% 
I have a supervisor who listens to me.            87%                                  78% 
I believe my leaders follow the core values of    77%                                  74% 
our organization.  
I have a supervisor who cares about me.           84%                                  77% 

*based on 34% response rate of random group three times a year 


Category 5                                                                                                       64 

 
 


There are certain results from the Culture Audit that are compared nationally. The Culture Audit has been 
conducted at NMC five times in the past 11 years and reflects positively on the culture at NMC (See the discussion 
of Culture Audit results in section 4R4). Comparisons on the SSI were done with Midwestern and National 4‐year 
private schools. All results showed that NMC students are significantly more satisfied in all categories (see Table 
5.3).  

Table 5.3 Comparisons on the SSI with Private Schools   
SSI Item                                                    NMC          NMC          Midwestern    National 2009  
                                                            2009         2006         2009 
Administrators are available to hear students concerns.     6.41/5.34    6.03/4.88    5.69/5.22     6.21/5.12 

Campus safety                                               6.68/6.25    6.53/5.98    6.41/5.67     6.41/5.58 
Academic advising                                           6.73/6.06    6.61/5.37    6.47/5.61     6.48/5.55 

Faculty availability                                        6.67/5.89    6.48/5.35    6.31/5.67     6.37/5.80 

 
5I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your 
processes and performance results for leading and communicating? 
Recent improvements to leading and communicating during the following academic years include: 
         2007‐2008  
              o Construction and implementation of the Intranet (SharePoint) 
              o Creation of the President’s Cabinet 
              o Hiring of the Director of Institutional Research and Communication 
              o Updating the organizational chart 
              o Web‐based student registration 
              o Creation of the continuity of operations plan, including a succession plan 
              o Development and implementation of the crisis management plan 
 
         2008‐2009   
              o Using electronic communication with alumni 
              o Streamline the human resources process for new hires and annual review requirements 
              o Departmental hosting of coffees to encourage fellowship and communication 
              o Implementation of electronic record management for the Student Health Center 
 
         2009‐2010   
              o Establishment of the institutional benchmarking process  by identifying peer institutions 
              o Development of a process to assess stakeholder satisfaction 
              o Construction of an online document repository 
              o Comparison of Culture Audit and Engagement Survey results 
              o Establishment of a process for consistent recognition of employee achievements. 
                    
NMC’s process and performance results are systematic and comprehensive. The Culture Audit and SSI are 
conducted every three years, and the Employee Engagement Survey was initiated in the Fall of 2009 and is 
expected to be administered again in the next two or three years. College Forums, held three times each academic 
year, are structured to foster employee participation in strategic plan initiatives. The results of the surveys are 
discussed in Department Annual Reports and survey results and/or Annual Reports are posted on SharePoint for 
easy access by all employees.  
 
 
 


Category 5                                                                                                            65 

 
 


5I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in Leading and Communicating? 
Each session of College forum is four to six hours to allow adequate time to update employees on progress toward 
achievement of action items related to the Strategic Plan. During forum, there is also time for employees to 
suggest topics for key action plans for the following year and for sharing other information important to all 
employees of the College.  
 
Planning Initiatives 
         AQIP: NMC participates in the Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) of the Higher Learning 
         Commission as part of an evaluation process to reaffirm the College’s accredited status. The program 
         infuses the principles and benefits of continuous improvement into the culture of the College. Through 
         the AQIP process, NMC demonstrates the ways it meets accreditation standards and expectations with 
         on‐going activities as a means of working toward continuous quality improvement. NMC has created its 
         Systems Portfolio and annually generates and completes Action Projects that fit the Strategic Plan. The 
         Systems Portfolio is a document that describes fundamental institutional systems covering the nine AQIP 
         Categories and shows evidence that the institution continues to meet the Higher Learning Commission's 
         Criteria for Accreditation. 
          
         Strategic Planning: The Strategic Plan flows from the College mission and core values and has three 
         strategic cornerstones: Quality Education (Purpose); Personnel Development (People); and Organizational 
         Effectiveness (Process). Each of the cornerstones has a series of goals that reflect how the cornerstone 
         will be satisfied. For each goal, Institutional Objectives are developed and Action Steps define how the 
         goal will be fulfilled. The Action Steps define the scope of the work to be completed along with the 
         timeline and responsible party.   
          
         The NMC Strategic Plan provides the guide and is unique in that the President’s Cabinet determines the 
         final direction, but faculty, staff and departments drive the Strategic Plan. Action Steps are submitted 
         annually by any faculty, staff, administrator or department at NMC with an idea for institutional 
         improvement and these Action Steps are reviewed the President’s Cabinet. Institutional objectives are 
         revised or developed, and Action Steps become the means to meet those objectives. Leaders of the 
         Action Projects report to the President’s Cabinet to keep members informed of progress in each of the 
         institutional objective areas. Once the Strategic Plan is established for the year, three of the submitted 
         Action Steps are chosen by the President’s Cabinet to become AQIP Action Projects. One Action Project is 
         selected for each cornerstone of the Strategic Plan. NMC consistently has Action Projects that receive high 
         praise from the HLC.  
          
         Each department reports on their Action Steps in their Annual Report, completing the feedback loop. 
         Annually, new Action Steps are submitted, and the process repeats itself which encourages transparent 
         and continual communication of processes of improvement (See Category 8). For past academic years, the 
         Strategic Plan documents include information related to progress on identified Action Steps and whether 
         the item had been completed or would continued for the next academic year.  
                    
          Organizational Structure:  The Organizational Structure for the College can be found on the intranet. All 
          communication within the College follows the chain of command set forth in the structure (See Category 
          8). NMC has a relatively flat organizational hierarchy which creates an environment that readily gains 
          employee input and is able to assess and improve processes through the strategic planning process 
          described above. 




Category 5                                                                                                       66 

 
 


Category 6: Supporting Institutional Operations 
  
6P1. How do you identify the support service needs of your students and other key stakeholder groups?  
All support services at NMC have one goal in mind: To enhance and support student learning and development. 
Processes emphasize student and stakeholder education and service. Needs are determined through three primary 
methods: 
     • Top down identification from the annual strategic planning process.  
               o Example: The identification of the need for a comprehensive retention plan was established after 
                    review of the piece‐meal approach currently in place. 
     • Listening to key stakeholders. The mechanisms in place for listening to these stakeholders include 
          departmental surveys, national surveys, and established communication channels such as all‐College 
          forums (three times a year), student government meetings, and program communication forums.  
               o Example: After feedback from employees, the Nurse Practitioner (NP) extended services to 
                    employees, which saves College employees time and money when minor illnesses occur.  
     • Interpretation of Data 
               o Example: The Dove Scholarships were created after data showed the significant financial need 
                    with which students were coming to NMC.  
The key units that support the needs of student and key stakeholders include Financial Aid, Enrollment Services, 
John Moritz Library, Advising, Academic Support, Registrar, Business Office, Housing, Counseling, Student Health, 
Safety, and the Campus Bookstore. Each of these units has their own SEP (see Category 3) in which student 
satisfaction is measured and monitored in several ways; in turn, outcomes from the SEP can lead to the 
identification of service needs. On an individual basis, student support needs are addressed by faculty and staff 
during one‐to‐one interactions.  
          Students meet with their advisor to plan for classes, work on their portfolio, set goals, and discuss how 
          the College support services can be helpful to them. Students may be referred to academic skill building, 
          tutoring, financial aid, and involvement in activities, counseling, or other resources.  
           
          In the classroom, students who struggle are identified by week 4 or 8 with progression grades. Students 
          who require referral are referred as necessary and connected with support services, such as tutoring, 
          counseling, or academic skill building.  
           
          Academic Developmental Plans are designed for students with significant weaknesses, in which support 
          services and behavioral expectations are clearly identified. Support service processes always involve a 
          connection back to the referring faculty member for follow‐up on how the work is going.    
  
          The Student Outreach System (SOS) was developed to support students academically and non‐
          academically. A special email account was developed to enable faculty to report student concerns to the 
          Dean of Students (DOS) and the Advising and Retention Specialist (ARS). The nature of the SOS 
          communication is reviewed by the DOS and ARS who determines the correct department or staff member 
          within the College to involve. The DOS and ARS will convene involved parties and/or communicate with 
          each to:  
               o Obtain a full understanding of the situation  
               o Assess the situation or conduct in terms of threat  
               o Identify an appropriate intervention  
               o Develop a response plan.  
 Based on these results an action step will be implemented.  
  
  
  
  
  

Category 6                                                                                                       67 

 
 


6P2. How do you identify the administrative support service needs of your faculty, staff, and administrators?  
Feedback from the last portfolio review suggested that work was required to ensure consistency across groups on 
protocol to identify administrative support needs. This process resulted in the Operations Committee refining 
processes that increase consistency. For example, all College forms can now be found in one place: The College 
Intranet. Directions for each form are provided, including the procedures for travel, so that the same procedure is 
followed for each employee who travels. The Operations Committee reports directly to the College President. A 
sub‐committee of the Operations Committee has been developed: The New Hire Committee. This sub‐committee 
continues to evolve and works to migrate new hire information to the College website and intranet to provide a 
resource for all new hires. Reorganization of staff duties with cross‐training has allowed “business as usual” to 
continue even when key personnel are absent and has allowed for a standardized process for faculty and staff to 
submit project requests such as typing and copying.    
  
During the May 2010 All‐College Forum, new needs were identified by College employees through cross‐
departmental groups as a precursor to the next strategic planning process. These needs were ranked, researched, 
and evaluated by the President’s Cabinet during the summer strategic planning sessions. The new Strategic Plan 
was developed based on these needs (see Category 8). Faculty, staff, and administration continue to develop 
Action Steps to drive the goals and initiatives of the Strategic Plan. The results of the Action Steps are incorporated 
into departmental Annual Reports and sent to the Director of Institutional Research to be included in the NMC 
Annual Report.  
 
6P3. How do you design, maintain, and communicate the key support processes that contribute to everyone’s 
physical safety and security? 
The Safety Committee, under the direction of the Vice President for Student Affairs (VPSA), is responsible for key 
support processes that contribute to physical safety and security of students, faculty, staff, and administration. 
These processes are maintained, communicated, and updated in several ways:  
          A newly‐developed webpage for students that is specific to College safety and security is available at: 
          http://www.methodistcollege.edu/currentstudents/index.asp?S=59.  
          A text message service has been incorporated for students, faculty, staff, and administration. An e‐mail is 
          sent simultaneously to ensure the message is received by those students, faculty, or staff who does not 
          have text messaging. 
         A dedicated phone number for updates of important College announcements, such as weather‐related 
          cancellations is available and updated with important messages as necessary.  
         An emergency phone tree for employees has been developed and is regularly updated and available on 
          the intranet.  
         The Intranet is home for all departmental Continuity of Operation plans developed to provide direction to 
          key support processes in the event of an emergency. 
         In October, 2008, a Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) was performed by the 
          Omaha Police Department Crime Prevention Unit – Business Watch Squad which consisted of a risk 
          assessment of campus facilities. Their report was submitted to the Safety and Health Committee which 
          made recommendations to the President’s Cabinet; in turn President’s Cabinet reviewed these 
          recommendations and acted accordingly. One significant change that occurred from the CPTED Report 
          was the permanent locking of the north entrance of the Clark Center to ensure that all people entering 
          the building without a College identification card pass by the reception desks. 
         Annual safety inspections of each campus building. 
         Tornado drills conducted during Severe Weather Week. 
         Blue Light Drills conducted during Safety Week. 
         The Safety and Health Committee meets quarterly to develop and review safety‐related materials and 
          activities to assist with safety inspections and to educate faculty, staff, and students about safety‐related 
          issues. 
         24/7 security officer presence on campus and video surveillance and monitoring of the interior and 
          exterior of campus.  

Category 6                                                                                                           68 

 
 


        Mandatory Annual Organizational Reviews (AORs) for all employees include reviews of all safety policies 
        and procedures at NMC.  
 
6P4. How do you manage your key student, administrative and organizational support service processes on a day‐
to‐day basis to ensure that they are addressing the needs you intended them to meet?  
Key support service processes of the College are implemented on a day‐to‐day basis by staff and procedures are 
dedicated to those purposes. For example, for technical service, employees and students e‐mail the NMC Help 
Desk. This e‐mail is delivered to three different people who have special roles, such as ANGEL support, yet are able 
to cover for each other when needed. This e‐mail system allows for tracking of technology issues that may require 
policy changes or prioritizing of needs. Continuity of Operations plans have led to cross‐training and 
documentation of day‐to‐day operations in most departments to better serve learners. The reception desks of 
both main College entrances are always staffed when the respective buildings are open, which allows for rapid 
problem‐solving for students, faculty, and staff. 
 
The appointment of an Administrative Office Manager (AOM) has contributed to the coordination of support 
services. Problems noted with day‐to‐day operations are reported to the AOM. For example, a security officer 
monitors daily parking space utilization and communicates this information to the AOM. When it was noted there 
were parking space issues during the first two weeks of each semester before students start clinicals, a plan was 
implemented to arrange parking for faculty and staff off‐campus to ensure fewer parking problems for students. 
This response was directly related to the goal of making students feel welcomed to NMC.  
 
6P5. How do you document your support processes to encourage knowledge sharing, innovation, and 
empowerment?  
NMC documents its support processes through its policies and procedures which are made available to students 
and employees in print and via a web‐based format. New students are informed at new student orientation about 
policies and procedures. Documents include the College Catalog, program handbooks, and the Policy Manual. 
 (http://www.methodistcollege.edu/currentstudents/catalogs/index.asp).  
 
The President’s Cabinet coordinates development and revision of campus‐wide polices. For example, at the Vice 
President of Academic Affair’s (VPAA) request, the Registrar annually sends out notice of the need for updates on 
the College Catalog. The Registrar facilitates the sharing of updates with appropriate College committees to ensure 
approvals of updates.  
 
Empowerment and innovation are encouraged through Action Steps that can be submitted by all College 
stakeholders (see Category 8). For example, Student Government and faculty submitted an Action Step for “going 
green.” This Action Step became an AQIP Action Project and now a committee of students, faculty, staff, and 
administration oversees the procedures. Several policy changes emerged from this Action Step, including recycling, 
printing, and purchasing. The new Print Solution was implemented Fall 2010. Efforts are made to ensure input 
from stakeholders when developing or changing policy and procedures. For example, when NMC joined the Tuition 
Exchange Program, policies and procedures were developed by volunteers from all levels in the College.  
 
Students and employees are made aware of policy and procedure updates through orientations, e‐mail updates, 
College‐wide forums, and the College Intranet. Processes that have been established or revised are posted on the 
College's web site along with the policies to which they are tied. For meetings where policy changes may happen 
such as President’s Cabinet, Enrollment Management, Retention, Academic Affairs, Faculty Senate, and 
Department Meetings, minutes are recorded using a College‐wide template for consistency. These minutes are 
available for all faculty and staff to read.  
 
In the spirit of continuous improvement, at the conclusion of major events such as new student orientation, the 
staff review what worked well, what did not work well, and what improvements could be made for next time. 
Student surveys and oral feedback also guide the improvement processes.   

Category 6                                                                                                        69 

 
 


 
 
6R1. What measures of student, administrative, and organizational support service processes do you collect and 
analyze regularly? [6P5] 
NMC collects and analyzes several measures of effectiveness and efficiency of student, administrative, and 
organizational support processes (see Table 6.1). These measures include national surveys, customer satisfaction 
surveys, and descriptive statistics for each area, which are subsequently analyzed by each department and 
respective Vice President and reported in department‐specific Annual Reports and College‐wide reports.  
 
Table 6.1 Measure of Key Processes in Support Service to Students 
    Key Process              Support Service                   Measures 
    Enrollment               Admissions/Enrollment             SSI, NMC surveys, factors to enroll, enrollment 
                             Services                          management reports                                                                 
                             Financial Aid                     SSI, # students served, $ disbursed,  annual audit,  loan 
                                                               default rate 
                             Scholarships                      students served, $ disbursed 
                             Freshman Advising                 SSI, NMC surveys 
                             Marketing                         Source reports  
    Retention                Advising/Retention                SSI, NMC survey, Retention %  
                             Multicultural Affairs             NMC surveys 
                             Academic Support Services         SSI 
                             Student Orientation               SSI, NMC Orientation survey 
    Student Development      Leadership Development            NMC surveys; # students benefiting from Leadership 
                                                               budget 
                             Student Organizations             # of students involved, hours of service, learning 
                                                               outcomes 
                             Residence Life                    SSI, NMC surveys, occupancy rate 
                             Service Learning                  NSSE, SSI, NMC surveys, # students  
                             Counseling Services               SSI, NMC survey, #students served, referrals, seminars  
                             Fitness Center                    NMC surveys, # served 
    Educational Support      Library                           SSI, student evaluations, student usage, services and 
                                                               resources provided 
                             Educational Technology            SSI, # of students served, % issues resolved 
                             Bookstore                         SSI, student evaluations, descriptive statistics: # 
                                                               students served, book and non‐book sales 
                             Student Center                    SSI 
                             Housekeeping*                     SSI 
                             Business Office                   SSI, Billing descriptive statistics 
                             Student Health                    SSI, NMC survey, # students, compliance with 
                                                               regulations 
                             Student Records & Registration    NMC surveys, compliance with regulations, SSI 
                             Food service*                     SSI 
         Key:*Outsourced 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Category 6                                                                                                                                           70 

 
 


Table 6.2 Measure of Key Processes of Organizational and Administrative Support Service 
    Key Process                 Support Service                   Measures 
    Administrative Projects     Copying, computing and other      # project requests, satisfaction surveys 
                                projects 
    Alumni                      Alumni Relations                  # attending events, awards given, % of giving 
    Budget management           Finance                           Monthly budget compliance 
    Building Upkeep             Maintenance and custodial         Incident reports, satisfaction survey 
                                services 
    Fundraising                 Methodist Hospital Foundation     Projects funded, growth of endowment 
    Human Resources             Benefits                          CUPA data; IPEDS data 
                                New Hires                         Employee Orientation   
                                Employee Health                   JCAHO Joint Commission; Culture Audit  
                                Employee Assistance Program       EAP utilization; staff development programs 
    Integrated Services         Campus safety/security            Annual Security Report 
                                Facility Planning                 Impact to budget Satisfaction: Adjustment to new campus 
                                Purchasing                        Budget Compliance 
    IT                          Computers for workstations        # leases,  Service log 
                                and labs 
                                Network Applications              NMC surveys 
    Training and staff          Faculty Senate , Professional     # offerings, NMC Surveys 
    development                 Development Offerings, Staff 
                                Training  
 
6R2. What are your performance results for student support service?  
Retention is a key indicator for student support services. The retention rate for Spring 2010 was 95% (see 
Retention Report). For the past several years, attrition rates have been 7‐9%. The drop to 5% attrition in Spring 
2010 is attributed to a College‐wide focus on identifying students early in the semester and guiding them to the 
most appropriate support services (See Category 1).  
 
Between Spring 2006 to Spring 2009, student satisfaction at NMC grew significantly in all areas of student support 
as measured by the SSI (See figure 6.1).  




                                                                     
Figure 6.1 Results from 2006 and 2009 Scales on the SSI.  
 
Results for each support service are documented in their Annual Reports, and examples of reported data are given 
in Table 6.3. Overall, each area has made significant improvements in most areas. Comparisons to similar 4‐year 
private schools show that the College is at or above other similar institutions on most measures of satisfaction and 
success.  
 
 
 
 
Category 6                                                                                                         71 

 
 


Table 6.3 Examples of Data reported by Departments in their Annual Reports 
Area                   Measure                               NMC Result                           Comparison 
Admissions             SSI #7 Admissions staff provide       5.57 satisfaction (new item)         5.25 National 4 year 
                       personalized attention prior to                                            private  
                       enrollment 
                       SSI #33 Admissions counselors         5.50, up .64 from 2006               5.05 National 4‐yr 
                       accurately portray the campus in                                           Private 
                       their recruiting practices 
Financial Aid          Loan Default Rate                     0% in 2008 down from 3.6% in         4% for NE 4‐year 
                                                             2007                                 Private 
                       SSI #9 Financial aid awards are       5.61 in 2009 up from 4.79 in 2006    5.09 National 4‐yr 
                       announced in time to be helpful in                                         Privates 
                       College planning.  
Library                SSI # 9 Library resources and         5.86 in 2009 up from 5.41 in 2006    5.35 National 4‐yr 
                       services are adequate                                                      Privates 
 
6R3. What are your performance results for administrative support service processes?  
Performance results for Capital Campaign fundraising is a key indicator of administrative support service 
processes. The Nebraska Methodist Hospital Foundation generated $17.9 million to build a new campus for 
Nebraska Methodist College. During the 5‐year campaign, 1,405 donors supported the College with financial 
contributions. The success of this capital fundraising project allowed the new campus to open debt‐free. The new 
campus was in operation by January, 2006. In 2008, the College secured an adjacent apartment complex through a 
second capital campaign. This complex has become a student housing facility: Josie’s Village. In Fall 2010, the 
College and Foundation kicked off a $36 million dollar campaign to increase the endowment for student 
scholarships.  
 
As noted in 6P3, NMC is a very safe campus. Table 6.4 illustrates what criminal offenses have been reported to 
campus security authorities or local police agencies by students, employees, and visitors. Only larceny of 
institutional or personal property has been reported over the past three years. See Table 6.4. 
 
Table 6.4 Incidents on Campus 
Offense:                                       2007           2008           2009  
Murder                                         0              0              0 
Manslaughter                                   0              0              0 
Forcible Sex                                   0              0              0 
Aggravated Assault                             0              0              0 
Robbery                                        0              0              0 
Burglary                                       0              0              0 
Motor‐Vehicle Theft                            0              0              0 
Larceny‐ Institutional Property                2              2              4 
Larceny‐ Personal Property                     1              1              0 
Arson                                          0              0              0 
Hate Crimes                                    0              0              0 
Weapon Law Violations                          0              0              0 
Drug Abuse Violations                          0              0              0 
Liquor Law Violation                           0              0              0 
 
6R4. How do your key student, administrative, and organizational support areas use information and results to 
improve their services?  
Information use and improvement of results is a continual process. This process provides data for results and 
discussion opportunities for improvement. The Systematic Evaluation Plan (SEP) is the foundation for the 
departments. The SEP includes: 
     • Mission/Purpose statement 
Category 6                                                                                                                72 

 
 


    •    Descriptive statistics 
    •    Student Satisfaction 
    •    Dimensions of Learning Outcomes and Measurement 
    •    Measurement of Learning Outcomes 
    •    Department Goals 
    •    Action Steps 
 
The results from the Systematic Evaluation Plans (SEPs) are reported in the departmental Annual Reports which 
are evaluated for strategic planning purposes. The Strategic Plan drives the goals and direction for the next 
academic year, and this plan is continuous. Each departmental SEP is evaluated and new departmental goals and 
Action Steps are developed. See Figure 6.2 for chart of continuous process. 




                                                                                                
                Figure 6.2 SEP Continual Process 
 
 
6R5. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Supporting Organizational Operations 
compare with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations 
outside of higher education?  
NMC benchmarks its performance against peer and local institutions in higher education, the private sector, and 
national examples by using national surveys such as the NSSE and SSI. 
 
NSSE results show that NMC is doing statistically better than comparison institutions on “relationships with 
administrative personnel and offices” with first year students. However, senior level students rate the relationships 
Category 6                                                                                                        73 

 
   


  much lower, yet on par with comparative institutions. There was no statistical difference in how NMC students 
  rated “helping you cope with non‐academic responsibilities” and “providing the support you need to thrive 
  socially” between comparison institutions (see Table 6.5).  
   
  Table 6.5 NSSE Comparisons with Plains Private, Private Health Focus and National NSSE 2010 Institutions. 
  Item                                   NMC                        Plains Private      Private Health     NSSE 2010 
                                                                                        Focus 
  Relationships with administrative      FY 6.07                    5.21***             5.08***            4.82*** 
  personnel and offices                  SR 4.78                    5.05                4.68               4.69 
  Helping students cope with non         FY 2.42                    2.40                2.40               2.30 
  academic responsibilities (work,       SR 2.04                    2.17                2.14               2.04 
  family, etc.)  
  Providing the support students         FY 2.77                    2.62                2.55               2.54 
  need to survive socially               SR 2.10                    2.31                2.24               2.28 
  ***significant at the .001 level 
  The SSI results show that NMC is doing statistically better or comparable to like institutions on questions related to 
  support services (See Table 6.6).  
   
  Table 6.6 SSI Comparison with Midwestern and National 4‐Year Privates  
Item                                                               NMC                Midwestern 4‐Year      National 4‐Year 
                                                                                      Privates               Privates 
The campus staff are caring and helpful                            5.83               5.59***                5.59** 
The campus is safe and secure for all students                     6.25               5.67***                5.58*** 
Administrators are available to hear student’s concerns            5.34               5.22                   5.12* 
The amount of student parking space on campus is                     4.66               4.12***              3.83*** 
adequate 
Living conditions in the residence halls are comfortable             4.62               4.76                 4.72 
Computer labs are adequate and accessible                            5.54               5.42                 5.34* 
Student are made to feel welcome here                                5.58               5.56***              5.58*** 
I am able to register for classes I need with few conflicts          5.48               5.12***              5.08*** 
*significant at the .05, ** significant at the .01 level; ***significant at the  .001 level 
    
   6I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your 
  processes and performance results for Supporting Organizational Operations?  
  Since the last AQIP Systems Portfolio, a number of improvements have been implemented. Below are a few key 
  highlights: 
           Each department within Student Affairs has developed a Systematic Evaluation Plan (SEP) that tracks 
           production, student satisfaction, student outcomes, and Actions Steps for quality improvement. The SEP 
           results are reported in departmental Annual Reports, which are compiled by the Director of Institutional 
           Research and distributed College‐wide.  
           The Continuity of Operations Plan, a 2009 AQIP Action Project, has been a vital improvement in NMC 
           becoming systematic and comprehensive in this category. Key personnel have been cross‐trained to 
           ensure “business as usual” when issues arise, and processes and procedures have been made explicit and 
           available on a College‐wide Intranet.  
           An institutional Student Retention Committee, including representatives from academic and student 
           affairs, first convened in Summer 2010. This committee’s focus is on retention‐related issues and 
           strategies to strengthen student retention at NMC. Including key administrative leaders on this committee 
           ensures good communication and allows for quality improvement changes to be made to the 
           organizational operations that support students. The Director of Institutional Research sits on this 
           committee to ensure that appropriate data are tracked, and a comprehensive retention report has been 
           developed to provide an overview of the current situation along with trend data and benchmarks to 
           provide context. Further, a best practice in retention, a “First Year Experience (FYE)” program has been 
           implemented in Fall 2010 to give more support to traditional students. In addition, a Supplemental 
  Category 6                                                                                                         74 

   
 


        Instruction (SI) program, a robust and nationally‐known tutoring program, was piloted in Summer 2010 
        and officially launched in Fall 2010.  
        Admissions has made great strides in being data driven. Data is entered into the student information 
        system regarding how inquiries and applicants learn about the College. Reports are generated and 
        analyzed to drive marketing efforts based upon data of where students are coming from and how they are 
        learning about the College. 
        A new AQIP Action Project on Service Excellence was initiated in Fall 2010 in which service to all 
        stakeholders will be addressed.  
 
6I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in Supporting Organizational Operations? 
The departmental SEP’s provide the infrastructure to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in supporting organizational operations. The SEPs report descriptive statistics, 
student satisfaction, student outcomes, and facilitate identification of areas for improvement. As reported in 
Category 8, Action Steps, Annual Reports, and individual contribution reviews are used to set goals for continuous 
improvement. Moreover, faculty and staff participation in professional associations provides information on best 
practices and emerging trends in this area. 




Category 6                                                                                                        75 

 
 


Category 7:  Measuring Effectiveness  
  
7P1. How do you select, manage, and distribute data and performance information to support your instructional 
and non‐instructional programs and services?  
NMC employs a number of methods to obtain, analyze, manage, and disseminate institutional and departmental 
data in support of instructional and non‐instructional programs and services. Data pertaining to institutional 
performance indicators is collected by the Office of Institutional Research which creates and distributes student 
and graduate surveys then collects and analyzes the results of those surveys. In addition, departments and 
divisions within the College collect and communicate data via departmental committees, such as the Division of 
Nursing’s Assessment Team. Departmental and division Annual Reports and employee annual Contribution 
Reviews also provide data pertaining to instructional and non‐instructional programs and services. 
 
The College’s strategic planning process drives the selection, management, and use of data for instructional and 
non‐instructional programs and services, and each department creates Action Steps to meet College objectives and 
goals. This planning process makes it possible for the Executive Team to identify the data required to accomplish 
College objectives within instructional and non‐instructional programs and services (See Category 8). For example, 
an Action Step was submitted for the Business Office (2009‐2010) under the goal of “Upgrading Information 
Management.” The purpose of this Action Step was to develop a detailed reporting tool for monthly financial data. 
As a result of this Action Step, a series of spreadsheets were developed to report accurate detail to finance and the 
wider NMC community, including spreadsheets that 1) Breakdown of all information generated by PowerCampus 
by semester for the main campus and Professional Development, 2) Bookstore revenue detail including vouchers, 
department transactions, and cash, and 3) Income received and deposited for all departments and the student 
loan program. 
 
As new College initiatives are conceived and developed that might not be part of an existing department action 
plan but require data, such as joining new consortiums or writing and submitting grant proposals, requests are 
made by the designated individual(s) to the Director of Institutional Research (DIR).  
 
A list of shared data reports, such as the yearly Enrollment Report, Graduation Report, and Retention Report, are 
available to all College employees on the Intranet and updated each semester.  
 
There exist certain processes and information that are required by program accreditation bodies that is non‐
negotiable, and using accreditation rubrics, all academic programs have identified student learning objectives and 
accompanying criteria for assessment. These criteria are included in academic program Systematic Evaluation 
Plans (SEPs). Programs report results of programmatic evaluation in their Annual Report (See Category 1), and are, 
along with educational support units, evaluated systematically by students, faculty, and key stakeholders such as 
administrators and advisory boards.  
 
At the institutional level, students are surveyed throughout their tenure at NMC. All freshmen and senior students 
are asked to complete the NSSE, a survey of student engagement, and every three years all students are asked to 
complete the SSI, a survey of student satisfaction. All courses are evaluated each semester for student learning, 
instructor effectiveness, and course delivery using the Individual Development and Educational Assessment (IDEA) 
evaluation form. The IDEA, NSSE and SSI, provide national, peer, and longitudinal data comparisons. Student exit 
surveys, along with one‐ and five‐ year graduate surveys and employer surveys provide data for program 
evaluation and revision (See Category 1). The results of program and institutional level assessments are shared 
with Program Directors via the President’s Cabinet and are available on the Intranet. These results are used to 
 enhance academic programs and support services. In addition to written or electronic reports, performance 
 information such as budget, survey results, and accreditation news, is verbally reported three times a year at the 
 All‐College Forum.  
            


Category 7                                                                                                         75 

 
 


7P2. How do you select, manage, and distribute data and performance information to support your planning and 
improvement efforts?  
At the institutional level, the President’s Cabinet selects key indicators that are aligned with and provide 
assessment of both strategic and annual progress. The performance indicators employed for this assessment 
include comparative data where appropriate, as well as trend data (See Table 7.1). The Executive Team 
continuously reviews and studies the collected data and attends conferences and webinars to identify new sources 
of data and data currency to ensure the College’s performance measurement system is current. For example, the 
Vice President for Student Affairs (VPSA) has joined the Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange (CSRDA) 
to stay abreast of current and innovative student retention practices. Membership in the CSRDA has led to the 
College using new reporting practices to monitor College and program retention rates.  
 
Progress on Action Steps is reported at the President’s Cabinet meeting through the year and at the end of the 
year. Accomplishments are reported in the End‐of‐the‐Year Strategic Planning Report. Data related to Strategic 
Planning are shared in this report as are the results of any improvement efforts. When an Action Step needs to be 
continued into the following academic year, a new Action Step is submitted for inclusion in the next year’s 
Strategic Plan. 
 
Each year, the President’s Cabinet reviews and, as appropriate, revises the performance measurement system and 
indicators as part of its strategic, budget, and academic planning process that includes a thorough review and 
revision of the performance indicators’ alignment with the new focus goals and objectives generated by Action 
Steps.  
 
Table 7.1 Key Institutional Indicators 
Key Institutional Measurers                   Cornerstone, Goals      Comparisons        Data         
1. Enrollments                                       C1; G1              P, N, C         Cat 9        
2. Tuition Rates                                     C1; G3                P,C           Cat 6        
3. Tuition Revenue                                   C1; G3                              Cat 7        
4. Retention Rates                                   C2; G2              P, N, C         Cat 1        
5. Graduation Rates                                  C2; G2              P, N, C         Cat 1        
6. Alumni Satisfaction (1 and 5yr.                 C2; G1, G2                           Cat 3/6       
     graduation survey)                                                                              C=Cornerstone, 
7. Student Engagement(NSSE)                          C2;G2                P, N         Cat 1/2/7     G=Goals, 
8. Student Satisfaction Survey (SSI)                 C2;G2                P, N          Cat 3/6      O=Objectives; 
9. Application/Enrollment Ratio                      C1; G3              P, N, C       Overview      P=Peer, 
10. Employee Engagement                              C3; G1               N, B           Cat 4       N=National, 
11. Employee Culture Audit                           C3; G1                              Cat 4 
                                                                                                     C=Competitor, 
12. Safety                                           C1;G3                              Cat 4/6 
                                                                                                     B=Best Practices 
13. Educated Citizen Assessment (IDEA                C2; G2              P,N, B          Cat 1 
     evaluation)  
                                                                                                      
                                                                                                      
7P3. How do you determine the needs of your departments and units related to the collection, storage, and 
accessibility of data and performance information?  
The data needs for each department and program are determined by their accrediting bodies, annual Action Step 
projects set by the departments as part of the Strategic Plan, and by initiatives that develop during the year, such 
as grant proposals. In 2008, the Director of Institutional Research (DIR) position was created to eliminate 
duplicated data housed in several locations, and to resolve issues related to access to, custodianship of, security 
for data, and validity. All institutional reports (e.g., enrollment, graduation and retention) and survey result 
summaries (e.g., NSSE, SSI) are developed or reviewed by the DIR and stored on the IR section of the Intranet 
where they are accessible by all NMC departments and employees. Sensitive survey data (e.g., salary) is stored on 
a secured computer drive to which individuals with appropriate credentials have access. 
 


Category 7                                                                                                         76 

 
 


The Director of Educational Technology (DET) manages and maintains the computer servers that house the NMC 
data as well as the databases and applications that use them. At the beginning of every academic term, enrollment 
data is locked down for reporting purposes then parsed by the DIR and reported to the College Community for 
department use. The DET also makes available real‐time data in the form of secure browser based sequel (SQL) 
reports. These reports can be exported in a variety of formats as well as set up to be sent automatically via email 
on a custom schedule. The DET works with departments to set up customized reports as needed.  
 
7P4. How, at the organizational level, do you analyze data and information regarding overall performance? How 
are these analyses shared throughout the organization? 
 Institutional data are collected regularly and reported by Associate Deans and Program Directors in Annual 
Reports. The DIR assists employees on interpreting College‐wide data used for the Annual Reports. The 
appropriate Vice President reviews data and checks it against key indicators then shares the data with Associate 
Deans and Program Directors who also review the data and check it against key indicators. Each faculty member or 
employee receives a summary of the IDEA evaluation each semester and is expected to check their own key 
indicators then discuss the results with their Associate Dean during the annual Contribution Review. Action Steps 
may be developed when appropriate. The data are also used by committees to assess programs and evaluate 
program effectiveness. In addition, the DIR reviews the data for institutional initiatives, such as the Educated 
Citizen (See Table 7.1). In this case, the General Education Assessment Committee retrieves information from 
reports that is kept in the IR section of the Intranet, primarily data from the SSI, NSSE, and IDEA. Committees 
analyze the data in terms of meeting benchmarks for their SEPs and report the results in an Annual Report. 
 
Overall, data analysis and performance is communicated to the College via the Annual Reports and during regularly 
scheduled meetings with Faculty Senate committees, Academic Council, the President’s Cabinet, and All‐College 
Forums. Annual Reports are submitted to the appropriate VP for review then to the President. Following approval 
by the President, the DIR compiles a summary of the Annual Reports that is sent out to all faculty, staff, and 
administrators and is available at anytime on the IR section of the Intranet. The use of ANGEL, SharePoint, and the 
Outlook institutional email system has made the sharing of information and data secure and convenient. An 
example of sharing data between departments can be seen in the analysis of student outcomes data by the 
Division of Nursing (DON) related to progression testing (ATI [Assessment Technologies Incorporated]). In addition 
to sharing group results within the DON via its Assessment Team, Curriculum Team, and the Course Coordinators 
meeting, the department shares results with the General Education faculty and the Retention and Education 
Specialists in Student Services. This collaboration has led to changes in curriculum as well as interventions with 
 students who score low on the testing.  

Figure 7.1 IDEA Evaluation Data and Analysis Process. 




                                        




Category 7                                                                                                      77 

 
 


7P5. How do you determine the needs and priorities for comparative data and information? What are your criteria 
and methods for selecting sources of comparative data and information within and outside the higher education 
community?  
The College uses comparative data for benchmarking key institutional measures as noted in Table7.1. Peer groups 
for the comparative data are selected depending on the need. For example, the IPEDS Data Feedback Report uses 
comparison data from AHSEC, a consortium of small, private healthcare colleges. When comparison data is needed 
about local competitors or inspirational colleges and universities, the IR department uses the Executive Peer Tool 
in IPEDS to pull a customized Data Feedback Report.  
 
Table 7.2 Determining Comparative Data Needs 
Comparative Data         Needs 
Internal                 Based on the need of the department or programs to answer questions, such as 
                         faculty/student ratios, trend data, enrollment, graduation, retention and transfer.  
Consortium Data          NMC has joined CSRD for benchmark data on retention, CUPA for HR data and CIC for 
                         comparison on private colleges 
National Data Sets       NMC uses multiple surveys in IPEDS to pull comparison data 
Non‐Educational          Employee Engagement Survey and the Culture Audit, both provide comparison data 
                         outside of higher education   
 
Each department within the College has unique needs for information and data that offer comparisons between 
NMC programs and similar programs at other institutions. Each program selects comparative information to 
confirm that its curriculum and programming are competitive with, if not exceeding, the expected national 
standards, and positive comparative results contribute to the continuance of program accreditation. The Allied 
Health and Nursing programs maintain Systemic Evaluation Plans (SEP) which list benchmarks and expectations 
based on standards of their accrediting bodies. There is also an SEP for the General Education department which 
provides criteria for evaluation of the Educated Citizen Core Curriculum outcomes. 
 
Table 7.3 Source of Department Comparison Data 
Department                     Source of Comparison Data 
Undergraduate Nursing              CCNE (Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education) Standards 
                                   AACN (American Association of Colleges of Nursing) BSN Essentials  
                                   ANA (American Nursing Association) standards 
                                   QSEN (Quality Standards for Education of Nurses) competencies. 
                                   Standardized testing scores of students e.g. ATI (Assessment Technology 
                                   Incorporated) 
                                   Graduate data from employee focus groups (stakeholders) that focuses on ability of 
                                   NMC graduates to assume the professional role of a nurse compared to graduates 
                                   from other programs. 
Masters in Nursing                 CCNE (Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education) Standards 
                                   AACN  MSN Essentials 
                                   AONE (American Organization of Nurse Executives) 
                                   Nursing Administration: Scope and Standards of Practice 
                                   The Scope of Practice for Academic Nurse LNN (National League of Nursing) Educators 
                                   according to the NLN  
Respiratory Care                   COARC (Committee on Accreditation of Respiratory Care)  
                                   CAAHEP (Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs) 
Sonography                         Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography who 
                                   oversees the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 
                                   (CAAHEP) 
PTA                                CAPTE (Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education)‐ pre‐
                                   accreditation status  
Radial Technology                  ARRT (American Registry of Radiologist Technologists) 
Surgical Technology                CAAHEP (Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs) 
                                   ARC ST/SA (Accreditation Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology ) 

Category 7                                                                                                                78 

 
 


7P6. How do you ensure department and unit analysis of data and information aligns with your organizational 
goals for instructional and non‐instructional programs and services? How is this analysis shared?  
NMC employs broad, organization‐wide participation in quality improvement. For example, all College employees, 
including administrators, faculty, and staff, were asked to participate in the development of the Systems Portfolio 
and are encouraged to submit Action Steps to be  incorporated into the institution’s Strategic Plan. College‐wide 
participation ensures that all departments are aware of and in sync with institutional goals. Each department and 
unit in the College must demonstrate in their Annual Report the manner in which they have supported the 
College’s mission through involvement in approved Action Steps as part of the College’s Strategic Plan (See 7P4). 
Having an Institutional Research space on the College’s Intranet ensures access to data that is consistent across the 
campus. 
 
Every department within the College has developed a Systematic Evaluation Plan (SEP). Within a SEP are the 
following sections:   

     1. Mission statement 
     2. Descriptive statistics 
     3. Student satisfaction 
     4. Strategic Plan Action Steps 
     5. Dimensions of learning outcomes 
     6. Measurement of learning outcomes   
      
The SEPs allow departments, divisions, and programs to track information and identify problems on a yearly basis. 
In addition, the VPSA holds meetings every 4 to 6 weeks with each of the management teams within Student 
Affairs (i.e., Director of Enrollment Services and Dean of Students) and meet collectively as the NMC Student 
Affairs Council (SAC). The Director of Enrollment Services conducts extensive tracking of admissions‐related 
information, and comparisons of data with the previous year are made and the information is shared and reviewed 
every three weeks by the Enrollment Management Team. The VPAA has bi‐weekly meetings with Associate Deans, 
Program Directors, and the Faculty Senate President to ensure relevant College information affecting faculty and 
academics is shared.  
 
Members of the Executive Team perform reviews of departmental SEPs, Annual Reports, and individual employee 
Contribution Reviews and regular reports and analysis of those reports are made to the President’s Cabinet to 
ensure that existing processes are on target.  
 
7P7. How do you ensure the timeliness, accuracy, reliability, and security of your in‐formation system(s) and 
related processes?  
The DET manages and maintains the computer servers that house NMC data, as well as the databases and 
applications that use them. In order to ensure the accuracy of data, the DET performs a variety of checklist queries 
to identify issues in a timely manner. When errors are identified, the Data Integrity Group (DIG) cleans up the 
records and, if possible, identifies means of preventing future issues. The DET also works with Deans and Directors 
to ensure that efficient processes are in place that result in complete and accurate information. The DET makes 
available real‐time data in the form of secure browser‐based SQL reports which can be exported in a variety of 
formats and sent automatically as email on a custom schedule. DIR works collaboratively with the DET to ensure 
the accuracy and reliability of data used for reporting purposes. 
 
The NMHS Information Technology (IT) department regularly audits College technology needs and monitors 
hardware reliability. IT tracks incidents and makes improvement where required. If College employees experience 
computer issues that affect their ability to perform prescribed work‐related tasks and IT is unable to correct the 
problem, the computer is replaced the same day. Software is monitored for effectiveness and usage. For example, 
a software program (Statistical Package for Social Sciences [SPSS]) was recently evaluated for need at the College 
and the number of licenses was reduced from 25 to 5, saving the College over $7,000. Large technology needs, 
such as program or lab equipment are requested on a yearly basis in submitted budgets that the President 
 Category 7                                                                                                         79 

 
 


combines and approves when composing the College‐wide budget. In addition to the aforementioned tasks, the 
NMHS IT department collaborates with the DET on security issues pertaining to information systems at the College.  
 
 7R1. What measures of the performance and effectiveness of your system for information and knowledge 
management do you collect and analyze regularly?  
The NMHS IT department is responsible for evaluating, maintaining, and improving the College’s information 
infrastructure. All communication to the “help desk” is tracked and monitored for completion. Feedback from the 
College is incorporated into improvement plans.  
 
7R2. What is the evidence that your system for Measuring Effectiveness meets your organization’s needs in 
accomplishing its mission and goals? 
The Culture Audit, the Engagement Survey, and the Health System Survey (HSS) are used to monitor employee 
satisfaction with College systems.  
 
Table 7.4 Measures of Effectiveness 
    Measure                  Item                                               Result 
    Culture Audit            “Within this organization individuals have the     85% of employees “Agree” or “Strongly 
                             power to do their jobs the best way possible.”     Agree” 
    NMHS Survey              “I have materials and equipment I need to do my    5 year average is 97% 
                             job.”   
    Engagement Survey        Satisfaction with NMC as a place to work           99th percentile 
*click on each measure for full results 
 
Evidence that NMC’s processes Measuring Effectiveness works to meet the Institution’s needs is apparent in the 
effectiveness of information gathering and the manner in which the results are used to make changes. Examples of 
this effectiveness include but are not limited to the following: 
          When tracking data on student complaints to IT, it was noted that several complaints pertained to being 
          unable to access EBSCO Host to obtain journal articles for research papers. Ed Tech was asked to create 
          online tutorials for students to utilize in order to learn how to properly utilize library resources, including 
          EBSCO. Links to these tutorials are located on the John Moritz Library page on the College’s website. 
          When departmental assessment teams reviewed employer surveys, they found that over the past few 
          years, the response rate had been consistently low. Alumni data pertaining to where the majority of 
          College graduates are employed were used to identify the top employers. Focus groups were established 
          and data was collected from these groups to ensure that College graduates will have the skills they need 
          when they complete their programs of study. This information was utilized by the departmental 
          curriculum teams for review and use.  
          Data from ATI testing has been used to conduct research that has led to curricular changes in both the 
          Division of Nursing and the General Education Department to improve retention efforts. This research has 
          been presented at national conferences and has earned a top research award at a nursing research day 
          held in collaboration between the College, Health System, Hospital, and Nursing Honor Society. 
 
The use of IDEA, NSSE and SSI data is used to assess the outcome goals of the General Education department’s 
Educated Citizen curriculum and an Action Step expands the outcomes assessment across academic programs and 
co‐curricular activities.  
 
Key performance indicators such as headcount and tuition revenue (See Table 7.1) are monitored by the 
President’s Cabinet to ensure that NMC’s budget is in line with the College’s census and ending semester numbers 
(See Table 7.5). 
 
 
 
 
Category 7                                                                                                               80 

 
 


Table 7.5 Budget to Actual Headcount and Credit Hours for Spring 2010 
                     Budget                             Actual as of 1/26/10                    Ending 3/27/10 
                         Headcount    Credit    Headcount  Credit  Variance from       Headcount  Credit  Variance from 
                                      Hours                  Hours        Budget to                Hours        Budget 
                                                                           Actual 
    Undergraduate           477       5867         501        6276          409         500 (‐1)     6259      392 
     RN‐BSN(all)             42        225          44         232             7          44         232        7 
        ACE                  70       1192          77        1340          148         74   (‐3)    1266      74 
      Graduate              63        378          71          439            61        67   (‐4)    418       40 
        Total               652       7662         693        8287          625         685(‐8)      8175      513 
 
7R3. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Measuring Effectiveness compare with the 
results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside of higher education?  
NMC remains abreast of the manner in which similar organizations manage information. For example: 
           NMC and three peer schools in the area hired a full time IR person for the first time in 2008. The IR 
            directors of the nine area colleges formed the Council Bluff/Omaha Research Network which meets every 
            other month and communicates online to share research and ideas.  
           A Heartland AQIP Consortium group was formed by eight AQIP colleges in the Omaha/Council Buffs area 
            to assist and support one another with Systems Portfolio issues and to share quality improvement ideas.  
            NMC is a leader in use of ATI data to support student retention and for curricular revision as evidenced by 
            being one of the first institutions to use ATI data as a retention tool and has been recognized nationally 
            for the research on ATI testing.  
 
7I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your 
processes and performance results for Measuring Effectiveness? 
NMC has worked diligently to improve its process to identify performance results for measuring effectiveness.  
Examples of improvements since the last SP include: 
           Fall 2008: Development of the Data Integrity Group (DIG) under the direction of the Director of 
           Educational Technology (DET). The formation of this group has resulted in greater accuracy of data and a 
           streamlined process for identification and resolution of problems related to the databases.  
           2009: Creation of a full‐time Director of Institutional Research and Communication position and the hiring 
           of an individual to fill this position. The primary result of the addition of this new person has been the 
           centralization of data and reports.  
      • Spring 2010: Collaboration between the College and consultants from the NMHS to guide strategic 
           planning, including but not limited to the composition of a new vision statement, competitor analysis, and 
           self‐evaluation for new directional strategies, resulting in clarification of top priorities for 2011.  
      • Fall 2010: The updated AQIP Systems Portfolio was made available as an e‐folio. 
 
7I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in Measuring Effectiveness? 
 The strong, positive, and supportive culture at NMC, as measured by the Culture Audit and Employee Engagement 
 Survey, supports the ability of the College to function within a strategic planning model driven by employee‐
 authored Action Steps. There is a universal commitment to having and utilizing the latest technology for 
 instruction and supporting departments. Hiring a DIR and DET, has led to an infrastructure and processes that are 
 reliable and universally accessible for measuring institutional effectiveness. A culture of continuous improvement 
 has enabled NMC to identify opportunities for growth and improvement that support institutional goals. An 
 example of such an opportunity can be seen in the expansion of the College’s online programs and the necessity of 
 technical support twenty‐four hours a day, seven days a week; this need will be addressed as an Action Step during 
 the 2010‐2011 academic year.




Category 7                                                                                                            81 

 
 


Category  8: Planning Continuous Improvement 
 
 8P1. Key Planning Processes  
The key planning processes at NMC are centered on a solid Strategic Plan that flows from the College Mission, 
which guides who we are as an organization and the Core Values, which guides our behavior and actions and 
shapes our culture. In 2008, at the HLC Strategy Forum, the current Strategic Plan was developed by the Strategic 
Planning Committee (See 5P1). Central to the Strategic Plan are the three strategic cornerstones. The cornerstones 
are intended to represent long‐lasting strategic initiatives (5 years or longer) and are central to our organizational 
success.  
Table 8.1 Strategic Plan Cornerstones 
Cornerstone                         Description 
Quality Education (Purpose)         Represents a teaching‐learning environment that actively engages the learner and all 
                                    College personnel in a partnership resulting in quality learning outcomes.  
Personnel Development (People)      The integration of the College values that results in a strong organizational culture 
                                    promoting continuous holistic development  
Organizational Effectiveness        Reflects continuous improvement to the infrastructure or processes throughout the 
(Process)                           College. Such improvement promotes effective and efficient operations, flow of 
                                    information, data management and decision making. 
          
Goals are then developed by the President’s Cabinet with input from NMC stakeholders via Action Steps. In 2010, 
NMC performed a SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, and Threat) analysis to ensure that strategic goals 
were on target. The goals represent the desired state articulated in the “cornerstone description.” The goals are 
intended to be of a longer nature and may have a life span of three to five years.  
 
Objectives are developed to further serve the goals. The objectives represent the priority areas that have been 
identified as a means to satisfy or accomplish the goal. Objectives are intended to be of shorter time frame than 
the goals and may be satisfied within a year or two.  
 
Action Steps define the scope of the work to be completed to achieve the desired outcome and includes data to 
support the proposal, analysis of resources needed, a timeline for completion and the responsible party (Action 
Step Template and Guideline).  

Table 8.2 Example of 2009‐2010 Action Step, Objective and Goal under the Three NMC Cornerstones  
Cornerstone: Organizational Effectiveness 

                                      Action Step: Promote and create awareness of online master’s programs in Health 
                    Objective: 
Goal: Promotion                       Promotion Management and Medical Group Administration. Focus this next 
                    External 
of NMC Identity                       recruitment year on Omaha metro area and regionally in Midwest.  
                    Processes 
                                      Responsibility: Director of Enrollment Management 
Cornerstone: Quality Education 
                   Objective:        Action Step: Implement a process that demonstrates the integration of the 
Goal: Enhancing 
                   Coordination of  educated citizen development goals in BSN course outcomes.  
Student Success 
                   Educated Citizen  Responsibility: Director of Undergraduate Nursing  
Cornerstone: Personnel Development 
                                     Action Step: Research feasibility of adding Women’s Health Services to Student 
Goal: Integration  Objective: 
                                     Health Services 
of “NMC” Way       Wellness/Holism 
                                     Responsibility: NMC Nurse Practitioner  
   
Action Projects: Once the Strategic Plan and all Action Steps have been approved for the forthcoming academic 
year, three of the Action Steps are selected by the President’s Cabinet to become AQIP Action Projects. One Action 
Project is selected from each cornerstone of the Strategic Plan. AQIP Action Project Reports are presented to the 
President’s Cabinet, and directed to the Director of Institutional Research for submission to the HLC. 

Category 8                                                                                                                   83 

 
 


Various plans (academic, recruitment and retention, technology, finance, facilities, marketing, and an incident 
management plan) feed into the Strategic Plan. For example, Continuity of Operations is part of the incident 
management plan developed as an Action Step under the cornerstone of Organizational Effectiveness. It was also 
selected as an AQIP Action Project and highly praised by HLC as best practices.  
 
Communication: Throughout the strategic planning process, the relevant information is communicated to the 
entire College through committee structures, postings on the shared intranet, and presented at All‐College Forums 
three times a year. 
 
Once the strategic goals and objectives are set, NMC follows the following flow chart that describes how ideas 
become actions steps and outcomes. 
  
Figure 8.1 NMC Strategic Planning Process 
                                                     NMC Strategic Planning Process 
         Individual or group idea or recommendation for Action Step 
                   Development of Action Step (Action Step Template) and 
                   Departmental Review of Action Step   
                             Submission to President’s Cabinet by area representative 
                                      Review by President’s Cabinet  
                                           1. Congruence with Mission and Goals 
                                           2. Strategic initiative (rather than operational) 
                                           3. Data‐driven analysis (Data, cost‐benefit,  
                                                  resource allocation) 
                                      If approved by President’s Cabinet*: 
                                           1. Added to Strategic Plan ( review/ revise            AQIP 
                                                   institutional goals and objectives)            Action          HLC
                                           2. Considered for adoption as Annual AQIP              Projects 

                                                   Action Project 
                                           3. Assigned to Executive Team member for  
                                                oversight and management 
                              
                              
                             Action Step progress and final reports submitted to President’s Cabinet (completion, 
                   results, recommendations)**  
                    
                   Action Step final report (Institutional and departmental)                                 
                             attached in Department Annual Report 
          
         Individual involvement in Action Step/ Strategic Plan support 
         reported in Annual Contribution Review 
 
     • Action Steps that are not approved for inclusion in the Institutional Strategic Plan may be returned for 
         consideration as departmental initiatives 
     • At the conclusion of the Strategic Plan development and reporting cycle (described above), the strategic 
         planning process is assessed by the President’s Cabinet  and revised as deemed necessary to improve 
         efficacy.  

 
 
 
 
 
Category 8                                                                                                        84 

 
 


 
 
Institutional committee structures/teams for planning and decision‐making are listed below in Table 8.3. 
 
Table 8.3 Planning and Decision‐making teams at NMC  
Team/Committee         Representation                                           Charge (Purpose Statement) 
Executive Team         •   President (chair)                                    Oversees strategic planning and 
                       •   Vice President for Academic Affairs                  decision‐ making.  
                       •   Vice President for Student Affairs 
President’s Cabinet    •   President (chair)                                    Ensures alignment of Strategic Plan with 
                       •   Vice President for Academic Affairs                  Mission; utilizes data to support 
                       •   Vice President for Student Affairs                   decisions and resource allocation and 
                       •   Associate Dean for the Division of Nursing           oversees implementation. Members 
                       •   Associate Dean for the Division of Health            have ownership of a System Portfolio 
                           Professions                                          Criterion.  
                       •   Associate Dean for the General Education Division 
                       •   Associate Dean for Professional Development 
                       •   Dean of Students 
                       •   Director of Enrollment Services 
                       •   Director of Institutional Research 
Academic Council       •   The Vice President for Academic Affairs (chair)      The Academic Council oversees all 
                       •   The Director of Student Records and Registration     matters pertaining to managerial/ 
                       •   Associate Dean for the Division of Nursing           academic program policy and procedure, 
                       •   Associate Dean for the Division of Health Prof       as well as on student academic support 
                       •   Associate Dean for the General Education Division    and developmental program policy and 
                       •   Faculty Senate President                             procedure.   
Incident               •   Associate Dean for the Division of Health            Monitors risks and develops action plans 
Management                 Professions (chair)                                  to counter potential risks. 
                       •   Appointed Faculty/Staff Members 
Operations Team        •   Operations Manager (chair)                           The Operations Team assess operations 
                       •   Appointed Support Staff                              and develops more efficient strategies. 
Enrollment             •   President                                            Meets every other week, monitors 
Management             •   Vice President for Academic Affairs                  enrollment and develops strategies to 
                       •   Vice President for Student Affairs (chair)           improve low areas and manage strong 
                       •   Associate Dean for the Division of Nursing           programs.  
                       •   Associate Dean for the Division of Health 
                           Professions 
                       •   Director of Enrollment Services 
                       •   Director of Institutional Research 
Retention              •   Vice President for Student Affairs (chair)           A new committee (Fall 2010) will ensure 
                       •   Associate Dean for the Division of Nursing           communication between student and 
                       •   Associate Dean for the Division of Health            academic affairs as they work together 
                           Professions                                          on retention issues. 
                       •   Associate Dean for the General Education Division 
                       •   Director of Institutional Research 
                       •   Academic Advisement/Retention Specialist 
                       •   Faculty Senate – Academic Standards Committee 
                           Rep 
Faculty Senate         •   Elected FS president (chair)                         Specific subcommittees in FS review and 
                       •   Departments are equally represented by elected       report to the FS Leadership Team on 
                           positions for leadership and committee               issues of academic standards, curriculum 
                           appointment.                                         changes, faculty development, faculty 
                                                                                welfare,  advancement in rank, and 
                                                                                faculty grievance.  
 
Category 8                                                                                                                  85 

 
 


8P2. How do you select short‐ and long‐term strategies?   
The Action Steps that have been approved by the President’s Cabinet function as short‐term strategies. The 
Objectives, as supported by the Action Steps, function as the College’s long‐term (3‐5 year) Strategic Plan. The Plan 
allows flexibility to make necessary and timely changes if these objectives are met in a shorter time frame or 
become operational rather than strategic in nature. The current goals were built upon the College‐wide planning 
process (SWOT analysis, discussed in 8P1).  
 
Action Steps are supported by assessment of data points such as national, regional and local trends, enrollment 
management reports, program outcomes, institutional assessments and benchmarking data, feedback from 
constituents, institutional financial reports, and campus feedback.  
 
8P3. How do you develop key action plans to support your organizational strategies?  
Action Step development is an integral part of the planning process. Key action Steps, including AQIP Action 
Projects, are developed by stakeholders from the institutional initiatives listed in the Strategic Plan. As described in 
8P1, the President’s Cabinet reviews each action item for fit with the institutional mission, goals, and objectives, 
with attention paid toward data that support the action item proposal, resource allocation, and financial cost‐
benefit analysis. After reviewing goals and objectives for the next year, the President Cabinet ensures that Action 
Steps are developed if not already submitted to address the goals. A member of the President Cabinet is assigned 
the development and oversight of the goal. The majority of action items are submitted by June for the upcoming 
academic year (August‐July); however, they may be submitted at any time during the year.  
 
8P4. How do you coordinate and align your planning processes, organizational strategies, and action plans across 
your organization’s various levels?  
The coordination and alignment of planning processes at varying institutional levels occurs both from a top‐down 
and bottom‐up perspective. The President’s Cabinet sets goals and objectives with initial feedback from 
stakeholders and all stakeholders have the opportunity to submit Action Steps. For example, the Going Green 
Action Step was a combination of student and faculty input and participation. 
           
The NMC Strategic Plan guides department initiatives. Each department or division that has ownership of an 
approved Action Step formally reports progress in their Annual Report, along with other outcome and benchmark 
data. Furthermore, each staff member must provide evidence of individual support of the Institutional Strategic 
Plan through participation in Action Steps as a part of the annual Contribution Review (Contribution Review 
Template). See 8P1 for more in‐depth description.  
 
8P5. How do you define objectives, select measures, and set performance targets for your organizational strategies 
and action plans?  
• NMC defines objectives, selects its performance measures, and sets performance projections through the 
    development and evaluation of Action Steps. Action Steps contain measures and performance projections that 
    are approved by the submitting departments.  
• Specific enrollment, student services, and financial benchmarks are reported in the annual Systematic 
    Evaluation Plans (SEP’s). The performance measures in the SEP’s and projections result from a variety of inputs 
    including benchmarking, external reviews and accreditation, system requirements, new technologies, faculty 
    and staff, and student/stakeholder requirements. Achievement of the measureable short‐term Action Steps 
    and SEP’s provides visible progress towards the achievement of long‐term goals.  
  
8P6. How do you link strategy selection and action plans, taking into account levels of current resources and future 
needs? 
Each Action Step requires data analysis and resource projections as part of the proposal process (See Action Step 
Template and Guidelines). Review of proposed Action Steps takes into account the fit with Mission and 
overarching strategic initiatives, financial feasibility, and resource allocations. The selection of Action Projects for 


Category 8                                                                                                           86 

 
 


inclusion in the Strategic Plan is completed by August, in advance of the budget requests for the upcoming fiscal 
year. 
• May— Department Annual Reports are submitted (benchmark data reported)   
• May‐President’s Cabinet reviews/updates goal for new year 
• June‐ July—  Call for Action Steps (supported by benchmark and other data) 
• July‐August—Cabinet review of Action Steps as part of the strategic planning  process including identification 
     of AQIP Action Projects  
• August—The Strategic Plan update and AQIP Action Projects are presented at College Forum (September) 
• September‐November— Annual fiscal planning and institutional capital, operational, and human resources 
     budgeting process for upcoming fiscal year (January‐ December).  
 
The institutional budgeting process resides within the President’s Cabinet and threads through department/area 
representatives to all departments and programs. It includes both an operational budget that addresses the 
financial needs for the next fiscal year as well as long‐term financial planning for the next three‐to‐five years. Prior 
to the start of the fiscal year, the budget is submitted and approved by each entity listed below: 
• President and CEO of NMC 
• Nebraska Methodist College Board of Directors 
• Methodist Hospital Board of Directors 
• Methodist Health System Board of Directors.   
 
Throughout the year, all departments prioritize resource allocations to maintain operations within the approved 
budgetary guidelines. Managers have unrestricted access to their monthly, live cost center financial reports to 
track income and expenses for their respective areas. 
 
Table 8.4 Budget Items  
Budget Items               Responsibility                         Based on:  
Revenue Projections        Associate Deans/Department             Tuition and fee‐based revenue projections  
                           Heads  in conjunction with  VPs        Annual projections from the College revenue sources; 
                                                                  Bookstore, Josie’s Village (i.e., on‐campus housing), 
                                                                  Townhomes, and Student Health 
Capital Budget Requests    Associate Deans/Department             Identifying immediate capital needs  
                           Heads  in conjunction with VPs         Projected future needs 
Annual Expense and         Associate Deans/Department             Historical data 
Labor Projections          Heads  in conjunction with VPs         New initiatives  
 
8P7. How do you assess and address risk in your planning processes? 
The College conducted an institutional SWOT Analysis in the Spring and Summer 2010. Critical issues were solicited 
from all employees through division and department meetings and anonymously through electronic submission, 
and finally in the Summer All‐College Forum. The President’s Cabinet then reviewed and identified the top 12 
issues that were deemed most critical to long‐term College viability. Each Cabinet member was tasked with 
conducting a thorough investigation of the real and potential impact of the issue to the College’s ability to 
continue to carry out its mission and report back the full Cabinet. The result was the identification of the need for a 
new College Vision Statement and the identification of three overarching strategic goals. Actions Steps were then 
established for each of the goals to become the 2010‐2011 Strategic Plan. A new vision statement will be created 
by an adhoc committee of board members, faculty, staff, and students.  
 
In addition to the process described, there are several organizational structures in place to address the multi‐
faceted process of institutional risk assessment. Examples of institutional risk assessment and planning are listed in 
Table 8.5.  
 
 
Category 8                                                                                                                 87 

 
 


Table 8.5 Assessment of Risk at NMC  
    Responsibility                    Action 
    The Incident Management           Identifies and establishes a plan to address potential threats to NMC’s continued ability to 
    Team                              serve as a community leader in healthcare education. The plan is updated annually or as 
                                      needed. Current threats are organized into four categories: campus safety, public health, 
                                      death in the NMC community, and public scandal (Incident Management Plan).  
    Enrollment Management             Recruitment, admission, and matriculation data are presented and matched against 
    Team                              program enrollment goals and are analyzed to identify enrollment trends. 
    Continuity of Operations and      Each College Department and Academic Program has a Continuity of Operations Plan for 
    Succession Planning               implementation in the event of disruption of College, department, or program operations 
                                      (COP Template). Succession Planning for Executive Leadership has begun and will be 
                                      completed by Summer 2011. 
 
 8P8. How do you ensure that you will develop and nurture faculty, staff, and administrator capabilities to address 
changing requirements demanded by your organizational strategies and action plans?  
    • All employees are assigned to an AQIP team  
    • The strategic planning process relies on the active participation of College employees (through 
         department and division meetings, committees, and teams) 
    • All employees are encouraged and supported in submitting an Action Step to address an identified need 
         or improvement 
    • Three All‐College Forums are held each year and serve as mechanisms for communication, education, and 
         engagement of employees in areas related to organizational effectiveness and strategic planning 
    • Each employee completes an annual Contribution Review, which identifies and measures individual 
         performance and contribution to the institutional Strategic Plan (generally identified as active 
         participation in an institutional or department Action Step) 
    • NMC provides and reinforces training and development of faculty, staff, and administrators so that they 
         can maximize their contributions to the institution as well as their professional disciplines (see 4P8). 
 
 8R1. What measures of the effectiveness of your planning processes and systems do you collect and analyze 
regularly?  
 NMC collects and analyzes the following institutional, program/department and individual measures of continuous 
improvement systems on a regular basis:  
 
Table 8.6 Measures of Effectiveness of Planning Processes 
    Measures                                        Analyzed by 
    Institutional Assessments:                       
    AQIP Action Projects                            Reviewed by President’s Cabinet for submission to HLC. Feedback from HLC 
                                                    incorporated into the following year’s AQIP projects.  
    Action Step Completion                          Review by Executive Team  and Presidents Cabinet for progress on goals and 
                                                    objectives 
    Enrollment Management Monthly Reports           Enrollment Management Committee  
    Enrollment/Graduation/Retention                 Director of Institutional Research, reviewed by President’s Cabinet 
    Surveys: Employee Engagement/Culture            Director of Institutional Research, reviewed by President’s Cabinet 
    Audit/SSI/NSSE 
    Budget                                          Executive Team, Associate Deans, Department Heads   
    Program/Department                               
    Systematic Evaluation Plans (SEP)               Associate Deans, VPAA, VPSS, Department Heads 
    IDEA (student learning outcomes)                Director of Institutional Research  
    Academic Program Assessments                    Associate Deans  
    Individual                                       
    Annual Contribution Reviews                     Immediate Supervisors  
    IDEA (faculty teaching effectiveness)           Faculty/Associate Deans/VPAA 

Category 8                                                                                                                        88 

 
 


 
8R2. What are your performance results for accomplishing your organizational strategies and action plans?  
NMC completed 90% of its proposed Action Steps in 2009‐2010; the remaining Action Steps were discontinued or 
rolled over to 2010‐2011. See example of completed Action Step with results and feedback for 2009‐2010. 
NMCs performance results for AQIP Action Projects are listed below. As described in 8P1, three Action Projects are 
chosen from all Action Steps submitted each year, one from each cornerstone in the Strategic Plan.  
 
Table 8.7 AQIP Action Projects  
AQIP Project                       Description                                                                     Started      Retired 
Collaborative skill‐building of    Collaborative skill‐building through a formal program.  Increase the use of     Fall 2006    Fall 2008  
College personnel                  collaboration  between College personnel and students and increase 
                                   personnel engagement through relationship building 
Comprehensive assessment           Development of a systematic evaluation plan for Educated Citizen Core           Fall 2007    Fall 2008  
plan for the Core Curriculum       Curriculum outcomes  
Assessment, intervention,          Nursing student mentor program for first year, first –generation nursing        Fall 2007    Fall 2008  
and retention project              students and assessment of high‐risk students 
Develop & implement an on‐         Reduce the carbon footprint of the NMC campus and develop a program of          9/15/2008    6/01/2009 
going campus‐wide green            sustainability 
initiative 
Continuity of operations           Develop and implement  continuity of operation plans across all divisions       9/03/2008  8/15/2009 
planning and implementation        and departments at NMC    
Nebraska Methodist Upward          Increase the rate that participants complete secondary education and            12/01/07     Completion 
Bound                              enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education                          date 
                                                                                                                                11/30/2011 
Establishing institutional         Identify benchmarks and related performance metrics for internal                9/8/2009     9/1/2010 
benchmarks and related             measures and external reporting  
performance metrics for NMC 
College‐wide Team Based            Train a team of faculty members in the effective development and use of         8/19/2009  9/1/2010 
Learning initiative:  Enhancing    team based learning in the courses they teach 
Student Learning 
Using an employee                  Employees to participate in an employee Engagement Survey with 95%              9/9/2009     9/1/2010 
engagement measure to              participation. Each department manger uses the results to initiate 
foster a culture of                conversation and help select issues that the department feels are 
engagement                         important to pursue.  
 
 
8R3. What are your projections or targets for performance of your strategies and action plans over the next 1‐3 
years?  
Performance targets for three to five years are the goals that were developed from the 2010 Summer Strategic 
Planning Sessions.  
     • Smart Growth:  NMC will achieve Strategic Growth to ensure long term viability. 
     • Brand Management:  NMC will be recognized as the first choice in healthcare education in our market. 
     • Financial Independence:  NMC will be a financially solvent organization while providing quality healthcare 
          education. 
 
8R4. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Planning Continuous Improvement compare 
with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside 
of higher education?  
As referenced throughout the Systems Portfolio, NMC uses several measures to assess how it is doing in meeting 
its performance targets relative to other institutions. These measures are benchmarked with peers, National data 
sets, best practices, and competitors. Comparative data from one or more of these groups are provided for nearly 
all of the performance indicators. Overall, NMC performance is equal to or better than the benchmarks groups or 
national sources.  
 
 

Category 8                                                                                                                                    89 

 
 


8R5. What is the evidence that your system for Planning Continuous Improvement is effective? How do you 
measure and evaluate your planning processes and activities? 
The Strategic Plan was totally reconstructed in 2008 at the HLC Strategy Forum. It has continued to be improved 
and modifications have been made based on feedback from participants, networking with other institutions, and 
the increasing ability of the College to engage in more comprehensive planning efforts. For example, the strategic 
planning sessions (Summer 2010) led by the NMHS VP of Planning. The sessions where guided by feedback from an 
All‐College Forum, where faculty and staff participated in roundtable discussions and voted on priority initiatives. 
Evidence of effectiveness is in high employee involvement in the planning process. Over 98% of employees signed 
up to be on AQIP teams for the Systems Portfolio development. Each team is lead by a member of the President’s 
Cabinet and is ultimately responsible for the content of a category. After the submission, the teams will meet each 
year to update the content of the category. This ensures campus‐wide participation in AQIP and feedback from all 
levels.  
 
The success of the planning process is measured through the completion of priority initiatives identified as Action 
Steps. Process is evaluated by the President’s Cabinet and modifications are made during the strategic planning for 
the next year.  
 
 8I1. What recent improvements have you made in this category? How systematic and comprehensive are your 
processes and performance results for Planning Continuous Improvement? 
Recent improvements in this category all led to more systematic and comprehensive processes; these include: 
• SWOT analysis to evaluate risks and opportunity when developing 2010‐2011 goals 
•  Retention Committee established to facilitate communication between student affairs and academic affairs as 
     they collaborate on improving student retention with new initiatives such as Supplemental Instruction (SI) 
• Campus‐wide AQIP teams for writing and monitoring System Portfolio Categories 
• Continuity of Operations plan, this AQIP project has led to College‐wide crisis communication and 
     management planning and cross‐training where necessary 
 
8I2. How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in Planning Continuous Improvement? 
With the development of department‐wide Systematic Evaluation Plans (SEP) and individual Contribution Reviews, 
the culture has become focused on outcomes that are data driven and enhance goals outlined in the Strategic 
Plan. The planning process has become more systematic and comprehensive as noted by improvement is 8P1 due 
to the infrastructure of the President’s Cabinet and other decision making teams listed in Table 8.3.




Category 8                                                                                                        90 

 
 



AQIP Category Nine — Building Collaborative Relationships 
 
9P1. How do we create, prioritize, and build relationships with the educational organizations and other 
organizations from which we receive our students?  
The Office of Admissions strives to make data‐driven decisions in student admissions, to create, prioritize and build 
relationships with educational and other organizations or institutions from which NMC receives students. The 
Enrollment Management Committee comprised of members of the Executive Team, Admissions staff, academic 
Deans, and the Director of Institutional Research (DIR), meets regularly to ensure attainment of enrollment targets 
and to provide strategic planning for institutional growth. Institutional priorities drive the manner in which NMC 
builds relationships with other institutions and organizations. For example, the addition of Josie’s Village, the 
student housing facilities, made it a priority to recruit students from outside the Omaha metropolitan area and in 
pursuit of this goal, the Admissions department expanded recruitment efforts to include Central Nebraska, 
including the Kearney and Grand Island areas, to nurture growth in the population of students who will live on 
campus. In addition, NMC’s Center for Health Partnerships has created relationships with the Omaha Housing 
Authority and Burke High School to increase access to post‐secondary education for populations that are under‐
represented in healthcare and to increase student diversity at NMC. Table 9.1 lists the organizations from which 
students are recruited. 
 
Table 9.1 Organizations from which NMC Receives Students 
    Organizations                                            Implementation  and Strategies 
                                                                            
High Schools         Data is reviewed each semester to identify the high schools from which NMC students come. This data guides 
                     where high school visits are scheduled. Approximately 44 schools, mostly in the Omaha area, are visited each 
                     year. 
                     Target schools are selected for more in‐depth approach. Students are invited to campus for a tour of College 
                     facilities and for information sessions about College academic programs.”(e.g. Grand Island). NMC faculty are 
                     invited to present information to students at target schools about health careers and NMC.  
Colleges and         Articulation agreements define course transfer credit information. A majority of NMC student population is 
Universities         comprised of transfer students. Every effort is made to facilitate the transfer process. 
Community            According to research on high school drop outs, students the make decision about going to college in 4th grade. 
Groups               Early partnership with Omaha Public School such as hosting a 4th grade career day at NMC help to inform and 
                     hopefully inspire student to think about higher education. To address the growing need for diversity in healthcare 
                     providers. NMC partners with organizations such as Boy Scouts of America, Mid‐America Council, and Omaha 
                     Housing Authority to provide awareness of health careers. For example, NMC hosts an Explorers Program through 
                     the Learning for Life Program at NMC and has a federally‐funded Upward Bound program. 
Regional Health      Through the use of clinical sites, NMC employees’ advisory board and committee involvement  in regional health 
System               systems and community agencies, NMC gains name recognition that impacts student recruitment. 
Professional         Application source data and internal meetings between the Director of Graduate Nursing Program and Program 
Organizations        Development Officers (RN‐to‐BSN and Allied Health online programs) are used to target outreach for NMC online 
                     programs. 
 
9P2. How do we create, prioritize, and build relationships with the educational organizations and employers that 
depend on the supply of our students and graduates that meet those organizations’ requirements?  
NMC employs a systematic process for creating, prioritizing, and building relationships with prospective employers 
of College graduates. Employer needs and satisfaction with NMC graduates are assessed on a regular basis (See 
Category 1) and employer requirements are considered when programs engage in curriculum evaluation and 
revision, including employer feedback and the counsel of advisory committees. Each academic program seats an 
advisory committee that is comprised of experts in the field who have a vested interest in the program. These 
advisory committees meet annually and their composition follows accrediting agency guidelines for the specific 
healthcare discipline. Table 9.2 lists the organizations that depend on NMC for students or provide counsel to 
ensure that NMC students meet the needs of future employers.  

Category 9                                                                                                                            91 

 
 


 Table 9.2 Relationships with Educational Organizations and Employers 
         Organizations                          Relationship Building                                  Outcomes 

      Advisory Committees       Member of clinical sites and employing agencies            Employer needs are monitored. 
                                are recruited for the Advisory Committees. 
    Methodist Health System     The Division of Nursing works collaboratively with  Programs are developed to meet 
                                the NMH‐NMC Hospital‐College Nursing Council to     practice needs, such as the RN‐to‐
                                                                                    BSN Academy. Alignment of 
                                identify needs unique to the hospital, the College’s 
                                primary clinical site.                              education and practice is ensured. 
    Regional Health Systems     Health system employees and external healthcare     Professional Development 
                                organizations are surveyed regularly to solicit     programs are offered to meet the 
                                information pertaining to continuing education      needs of a variety of health care 
                                needs.                                              professionals. 
          Clinical Sites        Relationships are built by ensuring high quality    Clinical sites are able to get to know 
                                                                                    NMC students before considering 
                                students and supervision (See: Clinical Affiliations).  
                                                                                    hiring them 
    Community Organizations     Through service learning courses and student group  The Center for Health Partnerships 
                                outreach, NMC students deliver essential services   prioritizes new outreach efforts 
                                to community organizations.                         with key partners where outreach is 
                                                                                    likely to make the greatest impact. 
 
9P3. How do we create, prioritize, and build relationships with the organizations that provide services to our 
students?  
NMC employees provide the majority of student services, including, academic support, housing, and health. The 
Vice President of Student Affairs (VPSA) works with vendors to meet College stakeholder needs that align with 
institutional priorities in instances when it is more effective to outsource these services. Processes are in place to 
obtain input from students, through student focus groups and Student Government, and other stakeholders to 
prioritize services. Healthcare referrals and food services are examples of the collaborative relationships that have 
been developed to meet student needs.  
 
9P4. How do we create, prioritize, and build relationships with the organizations that supply materials and services 
to our organization?  
As an entity within the Nebraska Methodist Health System, the College collaborates to share services. For example, 
during a period in which construction at the primary clinical site limited the space available for student parking, the 
Security Division at NMH hired a shuttle company to transport students and faculty to and from the hospital. The 
Security Division also coordinates basic security for the College using parking area safety lighting security cameras 
and a 24/7 security presence on the campus. In addition, all supply materials are ordered from Shared Services, an 
NMHS subsidiary. Routine audits of purchasing, contracts, and relationships with supplier organizations are 
conducted by the Health System. 
 
9P5. How do we create, prioritize, and build relationships with the education associations, external agencies, 
consortia partners, and the general community with whom we interact?   
NMC endeavors to build collaborative partnerships with key partners that fit the mission and goals of the College 
and NMC employees are active, visible members of educational and community service organizations. NMC 
employees are engaged in support of the College and Omaha community and are involved in many initiatives 
which have resulted in the College being named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Roll for 
the years 2007‐2009. Table 9.3 lists the relationships that are integral to NMC success. 
           




Category 9                                                                                                                  92 

 
 


Table 9.3 Educational Associations, External Agencies, Consortia Partners and Community Groups linked to NMC 
                        Organizations                                                       Relationships  

                                                               Faculty and administrators serve as reviewers or site visitors for the 
                                                               HLC as well as other professional accrediting bodies in Nursing and 
                     Accrediting Bodies                        Allied Health. Employees are encouraged to serve and report service as 
                                                               part of their annual Contribution Reviews and for advancement in 
                                                               rank. 

                                                               NMC encourages active participation in professional organizations and 
                                                               supports faculty, staff, and administrators who hold offices or present 
                 Professional Organizations                    at conferences in those organizations. Employees are encouraged to 
                                                               serve and report service as part of their annual Contribution Reviews 
                                                               and for advancement in rank. 


           Council of Independent Colleges (CIC);              NMC provides data to CIC for their benchmarking and other reports. 
                                                               Faculty and administrators offer input on department‐specific list 
    First special interest college to be accepted into CIC.    serves. Campus leaders attend seminars and workshops to learn best 
                      Member July 2009.                        practices for the improvement of educational programs, administrative 
                                                               and financial performance, and institutional visibility. 

                                                               NMC provides data to this group of healthcare educational institutions 
     American Health Sciences Education Consortium             for collaborative data‐sharing in the areas of finance, operations, and 
                        (AHSEC)                                student outcomes to facilitate quality improvement throughout the 
                                                               campus. 

                                                               NMC provides detailed retention and graduation data to CSRDE. 
     Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange            Administration and faculty attend the annual convention and 
                        (CSRDE)                                participate in webinars and continuing education opportunities 
                                                               provided the CSRDE. NMC has identified student retention as an 
                    NMC joined Fall 2009                       initiative in the Strategic Plan. The annual retention study performed 
                                                               by the CSRDE will provide comparative benchmarking data. 

                      Tuition Exchange 
                                                               NMC joined a non‐profit association of public and private colleges and 
                                                               universities to provide free tuition to qualified dependents. 
                        Member 2008 

                                                               NMC’s relationship with IAMSCU leads to strong efforts to cultivate 
                                                               spirituality on campus, as well as an international focus; students, 
      International Association of Methodist‐Related 
                                                               faculty, and staff have attended international conferences in Australia, 
       Schools, Colleges, and Universities (IAMSCU) 
                                                               Northern Ireland, the UK, and Argentina. The College Spiritual Director 
                                                               participates in class and clinical experiences connecting learning 
                   Reaffirmed Spring 2010 
                                                               opportunities for NMC students and integrating spirituality into course 
                                                               work. 

                                                               The NMC service‐learning partnership with the College of Saint Mary is 
                                                               facilitated through the Consortium, which provides opportunities for 
    Midwest Consortium for Service‐learning in Higher 
                                                               collaboration with multiple member colleges and universities in 
                      Education 
                                                               Nebraska and South Dakota. Grants received from this organization 
                                                               fund faculty development in community‐engaged learning strategies. 

                                                               NMC students provide services to many community groups on their 
                                                               first orientation day, service learning trips, community based 
                     Community Groups                          curriculum initiatives, and through campus student groups. Many 
                                                               students report their work with community groups as an important 
                                                               part of their education.  

 
 
Category 9                                                                                                                               93 

 
 


9P6. How do you ensure the varying needs of those involved in your partnership relationships are being met?   
The needs of organizations or institutions with which NMC maintains professional relationships are constantly 
changing but are closely monitored through advisory board meetings (described in 9P2) and annual surveys 
administered by academic programs. Regularly scheduled meetings with stakeholders such as the monthly 
Hospital‐College Council meetings, provide routine contact with key partners in a reciprocal relationship that 
contributes to NMC’s awareness of changing needs. Departmental surveys provide additional feedback.  
The College’s academic programs consistently meet the accreditation criteria of its accrediting organizations as 
evidenced by continued accreditation of the academic programs. NMC proactively and regularly participates in the 
collection, processing, and analysis of data to make curricular changes to meet the criteria of these bodies. All 
NMC academic programs write self‐studies and participate in site visits by their accrediting bodies and submit 
Annual Reports to those bodies. For example, programs in the Division of Nursing and Allied Health submit Annual 
Reports to accrediting and regulatory bodies that include curriculum updates, faculty data, retention rates, 
licensure pass rates, and clinical site evaluations that document attainment of accrediting criteria.  
 
At the institutional level, the Center for Health Partnerships (CfHP) maintains relationships with key community 
partners such as the Omaha Housing Authority (OHA), and helps NMC have a greater impact in community 
outreach efforts. In this work, the Center is guided by the Community Outreach Advisory Council which is 
comprised of College faculty, staff, and students as well as community partners. In order to meet the evolving 
needs of NMC’s community partners, the CfHP works with the AIM Institute to assess the current partnership with 
the OHA for its effectiveness in meeting program outcomes. In Spring 2010, the CfHP piloted a method of 
community partner assessment to evaluate service‐learning and community outreach efforts. The CfHP is currently 
seeking additional grant funding to further its goals and to fund collaborative efforts with community partners.  
 
NMC has used the AQIP process to guide institutional improvement and has received positive feedback from the 
HLC on AQIP Action Projects. The College seeks to be actively involved with AQIP through participation in the HLC 
annual meeting, AQIP Colloquium, AQIP workshops, and frequent idea‐sharing opportunities.  
           
9P7. How do you create and build relationships between and among departments and units within your 
organization? How do you assure integration and communication across these relationships?  
 NMC’s emphasis on the strength of its internal culture is apparent in the opening phrase of its Vision Statement: 
 “Through the strength of our culture at NMC, we will…” NMC believes that full human potential is encouraged by a 
 culture that is connected, a culture of respect and caring that values individual growth and development (See 
 Category 4). Relationships within NMC are built by involvement of all departments and levels in activities and 
 decision‐making. For example, when all College employees signed up to be part of a team that addressed a specific 
 Systems Portfolio category, they provided initial input, evaluation, and will provide on‐going monitoring of the 
 category for Systems Portfolio updates. Each employee is essentially an “expert” in one SP category. The 
 President’s Council on Wellness (PCOW) ensures that employees are connected by providing activities that focus 
 on the “Seven Dimensions of Wellness” and that NMC is a Platinum Well Workplace. Results from the Engagement 
Survey, found that NMC has a highly engaged workforce which contributes to the College’s success in integration 
of departments and communication (See Category 4).  
 
NMC maintains an inclusive leadership system (See Category 7) that encourages creating and building 
relationships. The President’s Cabinet is the primary unit for relationship‐building, assuring integration and 
communication across departments, and decision‐making on campus. The President’s Cabinet is complemented by 
a host of other councils and committees within the College (See Category 7 and 5) that foster communication and 
relationships. These decision‐making bodies meet regularly to review and set policy (See priority initiatives below), 
problem solve, share information, and facilitate processes within and across divisions and departments.  
 
Priority Initiatives: Initiatives that are identified in the Strategic Plan involve Action Steps that promote 
collaboration across departments for implementation. An example of this improved process is the recent 
implementation of online student registration at NMC, a process that is a collaborative effort between Educational 

Category 9                                                                                                        94 

 
 


Technology division leadership (Deans and Directors), program advisors, and the office of the Registrar. All Action 
Steps are approached with the collaborative goal to ensure that departments or employees with expertise might 
be affected by the action are represented.  
 
To ensure College‐wide communication two avenues are utilized: 
All‐College Forum: The President of the College addresses the entire College community three times a year in an 
All‐College Forum, which all employees, faculty, and staff must attend. Forum is an opportunity for open 
communication, collaboration, and collective problem‐solving. The President presents strategic planning, Action 
Steps, discusses preparation for accreditation visits, and recognizes individual and group achievements. This All‐
College Forum embodies the spirit of positive, proactive, and collaborative culture that exists throughout the 
College.  
 
NMCnet: The College’s internal Intranet is used to facilitate collaborative work on documents, to share 
information, and to provide access to the Strategic Plan, Action Steps, annual Contribution Reviews, survey results, 
and all data reports.  
 
9R1. What measures of building collaborative relationships, external and internal, do you collect and analyze 
regularly?  
NMC collects and analyzes data on building relationships as noted in Table 9.4. 
Table 9.4 Measurement of Collaborative Relationships 
    Priority Relationships                 Measurement 

    External:                               
          High Schools/other Colleges      Enrollment Reports 
                Advisory Committees        Semiannual meetings, continuous curriculum development 
                  Local Employers          Advisory committees, surveys, and placement rates 
                       Donors              Funds provided, testimonials 
                    Clinical Sites         Surveys, testimonials; ongoing partnerships 
                 Accrediting Bodies        Accreditation status, site visits, feedback 
                    Community              Cooperative projects, perception of satisfaction 
                 Methodist Church          Conferences, course content, commitment to spirituality and values 
    Internal:                               
                     Employees             Surveys, turnover, annual reviews, participation in College events, Action 
                                           Steps, committees, 100% participation in the Caring Campaign  
                    Students               Enrollment, surveys, retention rates, class/instructor evaluations, 
                                           participation at College events 
                     Alumni                Donations, activities attended, College involvement  
 
9R2. What are your performance results in building your key collaborative relationships, external and internal?  
NMC’s strong relationships with high schools, colleges, and health organizations are evident in campus enrollment 
trends. Fall enrollment continues to increase each year and was up 116 students (17.3%) from Fall 2009 to Fall 
2010. NMC Visit Days showed a 31% increase in attendance from the same time period.  
 
NMC regularly meets enrollment targets in all programs and has increased credit hour production, especially in key 
areas such as the Accelerated Nursing Program. Enrollment growth would not be possible without strong 
relationships and retention of excellent clinical site partnerships (see Clinical Sites).  
 




Category 9                                                                                                               95 

 
 


Figure 9.1 Total Enrollment Head Counts from the Past 20 Years 
 




                                                                                                    
 
 
Table 9.5 Shows the growth in programs from 2009‐2010.  


Table 9.5 Total Undergraduate Students by Program for Fall 2009 and Fall 2010 
    Program                   Number of              Program                 Number of Students 
                              Students Enrolled                              Enrolled 
                                2009        2010                               2009       2010 
    Nursing (Traditional)        339       403       Radiologic Technology      25         28 
    Accelerated Nursing          38         38       Diagnostic                 19         16 
                                                     Sonography 
    RNBSN/RNACAD                 44          52      Cardio Vascular            13         16 
                                                     Sonography 
    LPNBSN                        4          2       Surgical Technology        28          26 
    BSHS                         15          11      Respiratory Care           19          25 
    HCAACO                                   8       Physical Therapist         24          29 
                                                     Assistant 
                                                     ASHSMA                                 2 
                      BA         440        514      AS                        128         142 
 


                                                         
 
 
 
Category 9                                                                                             96 

 
 


The IDEA evaluations are used in classes to measure student perception of learning and instruction. Figure 9.3 
shows that NMC student rate “Progress on relevant objectives” higher than National, Carnegie, and peer 
institutions.  
 
Figure 9.2 Progress on Relevant Learning Objectives 
 




                                                                                                            
                                *Data from IDEA Benchmarking for Learning Report,6/18/2010 
                                                                                        
NMC’s results on building internal relationships across departments and effectiveness of internal communication 
are presented in Category 4 and Category 5.  
 
NMC assesses the effectiveness of all areas of the College that provide services to students. Each student service 
area, from the bookstore to the counseling department, has developed a Systematic Evaluation Plan (SEP) with 
which to monitor student satisfaction with services. Satisfaction is measured with internal surveys implemented at 
student orientation and graduation (examples given in 9.6‐9.9) and the external SSI. Each service area reports 
results in their Annual Report and develops and submits Action Steps to address scores under established or 
recommended benchmarks.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Category 9                                                                                                        97 

 
 


Table 9.6 Customer Satisfaction Survey of Registrar by Graduating Students, Fall 2009 

                                                     Very                    Somewhat      Somewhat                     Very 
                                                                Satisfied                               Unsatisfied 
                                                   satisfied                  satisfied    unsatisfied               unsatisfied 
     1. How satisfied are you with 
     policies and procedures of the                    8            20           5             1             0                0 
     Registrar’s office? 
     2. How satisfied are you with the 
     timeliness of responses you received              8            19           6             1             0                0 
     from the Registrar’s office? 
     3. How satisfied are you with 
     availability of the Registrar’s office            9            19           6             0             0                0 
     staff? 
     4. How satisfied are you with the 
     friendliness of the Registrar’s office           11            17           5             0             1                0 
     staff?  
     5. How would you rate your 
     overall level of satisfaction for the 
                                                       8            19           7             0             0                0 
     customer service you received from 
     the Registrar’s office? 
 

Table 9.7 New Student Orientation Bookstore Evaluation new students, Spring 2009 (n=31) 
    Bookstore’s hours of operation: 39% very satisfied; 48% satisfied; 3% somewhat satisfied  
    Selection of non‐textbook merchandise: 35% very satisfied; 52% satisfied; 3% somewhat satisfied 
    Helpfulness of bookstore employees: 42% very satisfied; 48% satisfied 
    Prices of textbooks sold in bookstore: 19% very satisfied; 32% satisfied; 29% somewhat satisfied  
Qualitative data   “Comments about overall experience with NMC bookstore”: 
    Label the books that belong to each class  
    Very friendly 
    Very helpful with books and uniforms needed for my academic program 
 
NMC assesses student, employee, and employer’s satisfaction and engagement on a regular basis. Results from the 
Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) indicated that student satisfaction increased in ALL categories from 2006 to 
2009, and comparisons to Midwest and National data were also favorable (See Table 9.8). 

Table 9.8 Comparison of Mean Scores for the three “Bottom Line” Questions 
                                                            NMC                NMC           Midwestern           National 
                           Item 
                                                            2009               2006             2009               2009 
    So far, how has your college experience 
                                                            4.67               4.46*                4.62            4.63 
    met your expectations? 
    Rate your overall satisfaction with your 
                                                            5.29               5.01*                5.34            5.27 
    experience here thus far. 
    All in all, if you had it to do over again, 
                                                            5.27               4.89*                5.36            5.40 
    would you enroll here again? 
*Significant at the .05 level 
 
NMC’s relationships with its employees are benchmarked externally on a National Engagement Survey with other 
health organizations and with the Nebraska Methodist Health System. Results indicated that NMC is far above the 
national and NMHS benchmarks (See 8R2 for results).  
 



Category 9                                                                                                                         98 

 
 


9R3. How do your results for the performance of your processes for Building Collaborative Relationships compare 
with the performance results of other higher education organizations and, if appropriate, of organizations outside 
of higher education?   
The results in 9R2 give the comparative results for the national surveys. The results are favorable and are used for 
benchmarking with peer and inspirational groups.  
 
9I1. Recent improvements made in this category.  
Since the last AQIP System Portfolio review, there have been many improvements in building collaborative 
relationships; Table 9.9 lists a few of the most significant. 
 
Table 9.9 Recent Changes and the Impact of the Change to Category 9 
                          Change                                                         Impact 
Developed a new organizational infrastructure was              Systematizes methods to review and use performance 
developed with the creation of the President’s Cabinet  results related to building collaborative relationships. 
to replace the Leadership Team.  
Hired an Institutional Research Director                       Centralizes the analysis, reporting and benchmarking of
                                                               data. 
Created The Center for Health Partnerships (CfHP):             Strengthens community connections. 
Implemented The President’s Council on Wellness                Fosters employee connectedness and supports their
                                                               accomplishments. 
 
9I2.How do your culture and infrastructure help you to select specific processes to improve and to set targets for 
improved performance results in Building Collaborative Relationships? 
NMC’s strong culture of engagement has been instrumental in embracing the AQIP process of continuous 
improvement. The development of a strong Strategic Plan and a new organizational infrastructure provided the 
ability to be able to select specific processes to set targets to improve performance in building collaborative 
relationships. Using current survey results, trend data, comparative data, and key performance indicators related 
to building collaborative relationships, any areas that indicate a need for improvement are targeted for Action 
Steps. The President’s Cabinet sets the targets (objectives), and individuals, departments and groups submit Action 
Steps to meet those objectives. For example, when the need for more targeted academic and co‐curricular 
community outreach was identified the Center for Health Partnerships was established (described in 9P2).   




Category 9                                                                                                         99 

 
 


                                         Index to the location of evidence 
                                           relating to the Commission’s 
                                             Criteria for Accreditation 
                                      found in Nebraska Methodist College’s 
                                                 Systems Portfolio 
                                                            
Criterion One – Mission and Integrity. The organization operates with integrity to ensure the fulfillment of its 
mission through structures and processes that involve the board, administration, faculty, staff, and students. 

Core Component 1a. The organization’s mission documents are clear and articulate publicly the organization’s 
commitments. 
 
    • The NMC Mission is clear, widely communicated and provides direction for Academic programming. [1P1] 
         [1P2] [1P3] [4P1] [4P4] 
    • The College mission and purposes are routinely shared with all prospective students throughout the 
         recruitment and admission process. [3P5] 
    • NMC has designed leadership and communication systems to fulfill the mission and to satisfy 
         requirements of oversight entities. [2P1] [2P2] [2R4] [4P8] [5P1] [5P2] [5P8] 
    • The College’s mission, vision and core values provide direction for the Institution and individual 
         employees toward positive contributions. [4P4] [4P10] [4P11] [5P2]  
 
Core Component 1b. In its mission documents, the organization recognizes the diversity of its learners, other 
constituencies, and the greater society it serves. 
 
    • Community Outreach programming and community‐based education are direct extensions of the College 
         mission. [2P1] [2P4] [2R1] 
    • Holism as a core value reflects the social, physical, intellectual, spiritual, and emotional dimensions of all 
         individuals, as well as the world view that all are connected. [0] [1P1] [4P11] 
    • NMC places a high value and high expectations on ethics, social responsibility, community service, and 
         involvement. [0][01][05] [1P16] [2R2] [3P3] 
    • Having partnerships throughout the community that will increase diversity remains a high priority at 
         NMC. [09][9P1]  
          
Core Component 1c. Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization. 
 
    • The College’s Strategic Plan was developed with the mission and core values as the guide. [0][3I2] [4P4] 
    • All employees at NMC are involved in the development and maintaining of the Strategic Plan and 
         understand the relationship to the mission. [0][08][4P10] [4R2] [4I12] [8P4]   
    • Mechanisms are in place throughout the College to maintain performance with key indicators such as 
         admission rates, retention rates, and graduation rates. [03][07][1R3] [5P6] [6R1] [6R2] [6I1] [7P2] 
          
Core component 1d. The organization’s governance and administrative structures promote effective leadership 
and support collaborative process that enables the organization to fulfill its mission. 
 
    • The Board of Directors has articulated expectations for excellence, expertise, financial operations, and 
         quality of graduates. [0][08][1P3] [5P6] 
    • Leadership and communication systems are structured in such a way that communication occurs regularly 
         and freely among all employees. [04][05][3P3] [3P4] [3P6]   
    • Numerous College shareholders are involved in the development and updating of the College Strategic 
         Plan that flows directly from the mission. [09] [6P1] [6P5] [7P1] [8P1] 
          
Index to the Criteria for Accreditation                                                                             1 

 
 


Core component 1e. The organization upholds and protects its integrity. 
 
    • Workshops and in‐services for faculty are offered. [04][5P9] [9P6] 
    • An AQIP Action Project focused on student academic integrity.[05][07] [1P18] [5I2] [8P1] 
    • A dynamic Strategic Plan, open communications and shared leadership roles guide leadership activities 
        that set directions to align directly with mission and values. [05] [8P1] [8P7] [8R2] 
    • Faculty, staff, and administrators work together in a variety of capacities and hold one another 
        accountable for designated responsibilities and ethical behavior. [1I1] [3P1] [7P1] [7P4]  
    • All department and College personnel have established mechanisms and processes to ensure the 
        protection of confidential information and materials. [O7] 
         

Criterion Two – Preparing for the Future. The organization’s allocation of resources and its processes for evaluation 
and planning demonstrate its capacity to fulfill the mission, improve the quality of its education, and respond to 
future challenges and opportunities. 
Core Component 2a. The organization realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic 
trends. 
     •  NMC is dedicated to the design and implementation of high‐quality educational programs that both serve 
          the diverse community and the student in terms of professional and personal development. [1P3] 
     • NMC programs go beyond minimal requirements, using educational outcomes to continually build and 
          revise program structures and curricula. [1P6] [1P14] 
     • Curricula at NMC have a strong community‐based educational focus that creates partnerships which allow 
          students to witness and engage in reciprocal, collaborative relationships, mutual learning, and social 
          change. [O9] [9P3] 
     • The College places high value and high expectations on ethics, equity, social responsibilities, community 
          service, and involvement. [O1] [2P1] [2P4] [2R1] 
     • The Center for Health Partnerships was created to increase and strengthen the community‐based efforts 
          in service‐learning initiatives. [1P1] [5P4] [9P5] 
 
Core component 2b. The organization’s resource base supports its educational programs and its plans for 
maintaining and strengthening their quality in the future. 
 
     • NMC intends to provide faculty and students with a productive learning environment; thus, significant 
          expenditures are made for current software, hardware, laboratory equipment, and other educational 
          technology. [01][01] [1P3] [1P12] [4P8] [7P7] [9P7] 
     • Open communication and interfacing with the community and healthcare systems allow for a fluid 
          exchange of thoughts and desires among constituents resulting in stronger programs. [05][3P5] [8P1] 
          [9P7] 
     • The College has created a structure that facilitates rapid change in response to collective feedback 
          received. [07][08] [1P13] [1P14] [1P15] [1P17] [4R1] [2P6] 
     • NMC has intentional professional and community connections designed to promote opportunities for 
          future growth. [09] [3P2] [3P4] [4P5] [5P2] [5P4] 
 
Core component 2c. The organization’s ongoing evaluation and assessment processes provide reliable evidence of 
institutional effectiveness that clearly informs strategies for continuous improvement. 
 
     • NMC has established an outcomes‐based portfolio process that promotes student ownership for learning 
          and value for the formative nature of education.[0][07] [6P1] 
     • NMC collects national measures on student learning for comparison purposes. [1R2] [1R5] [1R6] 


Index to the Criteria for Accreditation                                                                             2 

 
 


    •      The changing needs of students in the co‐curricular arena are monitored by the Student Government, the 
           official vehicle for the students to voice their needs and concerns. [3P1] [3P2] [3P6] [4P11] 
      • Institutional data is collected by means of cyclical assessment tools as well as by composite data from 
           Annual Reports. [5P8] [6P2] [6I1] 
            
Core component 2d. All levels of planning align with the organization’s mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to 
fulfill that mission. 
 
      • All programs are built upon NMC’s mission to positively influence the health and well‐being of the 
           community. [1P16] [2R1] [2R2] [2R3] 
      • NMC’s distinctive objectives flow directly from the mission, specifically the emphasis on community, 
           health education, and well‐being. [1P1] [1P2] [1P3] 
      • When training needs are identified at NMC, either through data, results, or informal measure, leaders 
           explore opportunities to satisfy the expressed need. [4P8] [4P9] [4P13] 
      • Processes are in place to enable participants at NMC to set directions that align directly with overall 
           College values, mission, and vision and to enact positive changes. [4R4] [4I1] [4I2] 
            

Criterion Three – Student Learning and Effective Teaching. The organization provides evidence of student learning 
and teaching effectiveness that demonstrates it is fulfilling its educational mission. 
Core component 3a. The organization’s goals for student learning outcomes are clearly stated for each educational 
program and make effective assessment possible. 

    •   The Core Curriculum, “the Educated Citizen,” was derived directly from the College mission and clearly 
        delineates expected outcomes for student learning. [01][1P1] [1P2] [5P4] 
    • The College’s Strategic Plan, individual departments’ strategic plans, and program SEP’s set the course for 
        improvements and for specific improvement priorities. [05][01][1P18] [1I2] [2P4] 
    • NMC utilizes a formal strategic planning process to align its short‐term and long‐term goals and strategies 
        with the mission and core values. [06][8P1] 
         
Core component 3b. The organization values and supports effective teaching. 

    •    NMC has committed to enhance its focus on “Learning‐Centered” instruction with AQIP Action Projects 
         such as Team Based Learning. [08][1P3] [1I1][4P2] 
    •    The College has engaged in in‐services, resource sharing initiatives, and training and development toward 
         its goal of “helping students learn.”  [1R6] [1I1] [1I2] 
    •    Nationally normed assessment tools are utilized regularly to monitor student achievement as well as 
         satisfaction. [07] [1P9] [1R1] [1I1] [7R2] 
    •    All new faculty members are assigned a faculty mentor and complete a general orientation. [4P4] [6P5] 
    •    All faculty are evaluated by the IDEA student survey, self assessment, syllabi review, or all new programs 
         by the Faculty Senate Curriculum Committee and department dean evaluations. The College recognized 
         effective teaching the annual presentation of teaching excellence awards by peers and students. 
         [1P11][4P11]  
 

Core component 3c. The organization creates effective learning environments. 

    •    The Advisement and Retention Specialist works one‐on‐one with students who need assistance with study 
         skills or other academic enhancement strategies. [02] [1P8] 
    •    The physical resources of the campus were designed to provide an optimal physical learning environment 
         and improvements continue to be made. [06] [07][4P8] [7P7] [9P7] 
Index to the Criteria for Accreditation                                                                            3 

 
 


    •    NMC employs a variety of strategies to monitor student satisfaction with the NMC learning experience 
         with both the curricular and co‐curricular programming. [07][1P16] [1P18] [7R2]  
 

Core component 3d. The organization’s learning resources support student learning and effective teaching. 

    •    Areas needing potential improvement are identified through departmental or national surveys and 
         established communication channels. [8R1] [8R2] [9P6] [9R2] 
    •    Feedback is routinely sought from all stakeholders to enhance the quality and support of learning 
         resources and reported in department SEP’s. [07][08][1P14] [2P3] [2P4] 
    •    Executive Council assumes responsibility for securing all necessary physical, human, and financial 
         resources at NMC. [0][04][3P6] [5P6] 
          

Criterion Four: Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge, The organization promotes a life of learning 
for its faculty, administration, staff, and students by fostering and supporting inquiry, creativity, practice, and 
social responsibility in ways consistent with its mission. 
Core Component 4a. The organization demonstrates, through the actions of its board, administrators, students, 
faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning. 

    •    Results from annual stakeholder surveys indicate that NMC is meeting its goals, following its mission, and 
         furthering its mission. [07][08][3P6] [3R1] 
    •    The Board approved Strategic Plan provides clarity and direction for the growth and development of 
         institutional objectives. [04][3I2] [4P4] [4P10] 
    •    The three distinct objectives – Professional development programming, community outreach, and 
         workplace wellness all support student learning. [01][2P1] [2P4] 
    •    NMC reinforces training through regular venues for those who have received training and development to 
         share this training with others. [4P8] [4P9] 
    •    Administrative support for the needs of faculty, staff, and stakeholders are identified and satisfied in a 
         variety of ways. [6P2] 
 

Core Component 4b. The organization demonstrates that acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills and the 
exercise of intellectual inquiry are integral to its educational programs.  

    •    The Educated Citizen outcomes are infused in general education courses and ends with a capstone project 
         that encourages students to reflect on how they will use their knowledge and experiences built at NMC to 
         address an issue of their choice. [1P1] 
    •    The faculty practice is congruent with principles of academic freedom and a faculty committee is charged 
         with exploring questions of academic freedom, free speech, and review/formulation of policies. [1P18] 
         [5P7] 
    •    The College has a focus on student development that is infused in both curricular and co‐curricular 
         programs. [03] [1P16] 
    •    Advisory Committees exist to infuse additional ideas for programmatic planning and development. [09] 
         [5P3] [9P2] 
 

Core Component 4c. The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in 
a global, diverse, and technological society. 

    •    Faculty at NMC integrate cultural experiences in the classroom and require students to participate in 
         cultural immersions, service learning, and community events. [2P4] [9P2] [9P5]  
Index to the Criteria for Accreditation                                                                                4 

 
 


    •    NMC has added a full‐time VISTA Volunteer in the fall of 2006, who was recruited to bridge service‐
         learning and community service activities. [2P5] [3P3] 
    •    Communications at NMC has improved through the use of an all‐College email system and the online 
         learning platform for students and other stakeholders. [02] [3P4] [3P6] [5P7] [7P4] 
    •    Technology applications for learning as well as utilization of data for institutional effectiveness are critical 
         elements of the Strategic Plan. [7P7] [7I2] 
 

Core component 4d. The organization provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, 
discover, and apply knowledge responsibly. 

    •    Academic programs receive favorable evaluations from employers of NMC graduates. [03] [1P17] [1P18] 
         [3P3] [3R1] 
    •    NMC has formal and informal processes in place to identify training needs. [4P8] [4P9] 
    •    Staff, faculty, and students have initiated several collaborative projects to help build and sustain a 
         learning environment. [5P4] 
    •    NMC has established multiple measures of effectiveness for individual programs for purposes of 
         promoting improvement and maintaining professional accreditation. [05][1P14] [1R4] [3P4] 

Criterion Five: Engagement and Service. As called for by its mission, the organization identifies its constituencies 
and serves them in ways both value. 
Core Component 5a. The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve 
their needs and expectations. 

    •    All programs include summative evaluations of students’ knowledge and skills. [07] [1P17] [1R3] 
    •    The Core Curriculum has undergone a thorough process of redesign to address the “Educated Citizen” 
         core competencies. [01] [5P4] [7P5] [8R2]  
    •    NMC uses national standardized measures to assess performance and progress relative to other like 
         institutions (SSI, NSSE, Culture Audit, and Engagement Survey).[07] [1P18] [1R2] [1R5] 
    •    NMC has established open communication and interfaces with the community and numerous 
         stakeholders and has created mean to satisfy identified needs. [05][09] [2P5] [5P4] [9P6] 
    •    NMC strives to be proactive in anticipating future needs and desires of College constituents. [8P6] 
    •    NMC has many key internal and external collaborative relationships that are intricate partners in the 
         areas of education, operations, and community. [09][9P3] [9R1] [9R2] [9I1]   
 

Core Component 5b. The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified 
constituencies and communities. 

    •    Advisory Committees at NMC reflect collaborative relationships that actively support changes in 
         institutional direction. [5P3] [9P2]  
    •    NMC has instituted a cycle for reviewing, assessing, retooling, and renewing the Strategic Plan that 
         includes more systematic broad involvement of stakeholders. [1P18] [6R4] [8P1] 
    •    NMC has established key measures of effectiveness that focus on the accomplishments of students, 
         programs, faculty, and administrators. [4P11] [9I1] 
    •    A formal and flexible strategic planning process is in place to involve key stakeholders related to NMC 
         strategic initiatives. [09] [2P6] [8P6] 
          

Core Component 5c. The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it 
for service. 

Index to the Criteria for Accreditation                                                                                  5 

 
 


    •    NMC has established numerous methods to assess the quality of its services to various stakeholders. 
         [09][03][1R4] [1R5] [2R1] 
    •    Mechanisms exist to College to analyze data related to changing needs of constituents. [04] [5P5] [8P2] 
    •    When training needs are identified, either through data, results, or through more informal observations, 
         leaders explore training opportunities and select appropriate training tools as necessary. [04][4P8] [4P9] 
    •    The College is agile in its ability to make structural changes to address problems that surface in meeting 
         needs of constituents. [08] [5P4] [8P2] 
    •    NMC currently supports over 100 clinical partnerships that facilitate student learning and through whom 
         students experience economic, cultural, and racial diversity. [09] [9P1] 
          

Core Component 5d. Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides. 

    •    The successful completion of a $20 million capital campaign to build the new campus, and the new kick 
         off of the $36 million campaign to increase student scholarships reflects the value of the College from a 
         donor perspective. [6R1] [6R3] 
    •    NMC has established numerous support services to support students, faculty, staff, and other 
         stakeholders in the achievement of institutional goals.[02][6P1][6R1][6R2]  
    •    The employees at NMC believe the culture is positive and rewarding as evidenced by favorable Culture 
         Audit and Engagement Survey results. [02][03] [2R2][2R3][7I2] 
    •    Results of the Culture Audit reveal areas that may need to be addressed for improved job satisfaction, 
         health, safety, and well‐being. [2P4] 
    •    National survey data results reveal NMC student satisfaction is high and student requirements are being 
         adequately met. [03][3R2] [5R2] 
     
          




Index to the Criteria for Accreditation                                                                               6 

 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:15
posted:8/21/2011
language:English
pages:114